Re: Emotions & KM #emotions


Patrick Lambe
 

Lovely, Rob, thank you.

I wouldn't argue for substituting “affect” for “emotion” - in fact, when a field is ripe for discovery and exploration, it’s generally a good idea I think to expand the vocabulary until perceptions settle, and the more ambiguity in the language the better, strangely enough… It forces us to explain and think. So the more language we have, the more expressive we can be, and the more interesting distinctions we can make… ultimately. That’s why I think Matt’s endeavour is quixotic, provocative and worth bouncing around in. 

As for competing affects, well I think we all experience competing bundles of affect/emotion at any given moment. Am I going to laugh or cry? Bristle or brush it off?

P

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com


On 15 Oct 2020, at 10:40 PM, Robert L. Bogue <rbogue@...> wrote:

Trying to catch up on the whole thread at one time…
 
First, my review of How Emotions are Made is at https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2018/10/29/book-review-how-emotions-are-made-the-secret-life-of-the-brain/  You’ll likely note that I’ mot entirely positive about it because I think Barrett interprets things in ways that are contrary to the data at times.  However, I have that same problem with other folks too.  Most notably Charles Duhig (See https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2018/08/06/book-review-the-power-of-habit-why-we-do-what-we-do-in-life-and-business/)  In my opinion Emotion and Adaptation (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2019/04/01/book-review-emotion-and-adaptation/) is a much better book about the relationship between reason and emotion – but it’s a bit more obscure.
 
As for motivators, certainly the carrot and the stick is overdone.  You can see that in Deci’s work on intrinsic motivation (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2020/05/04/book-review-why-we-do-what-we-do/ ) and Pink’s interpretation of it in Drive (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2011/07/11/book-review-drive/) More than that Reiss’ work gives us reason to believe that there are 16 basic motivators for people (See https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2013/03/29/book-review-who-am-i/)  Of course, there’s also Fredrick Hertzberg work from 1968 that explains how motivators work (Hygiene vs. Motivators and the importance of Achievement, Recognition, etc.)
 
I also would say that fear is a powerful and often hidden motivator.  Here I’d look at Amy Edmonson’s work in The Fearless Organization (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2019/06/24/book-review-the-fearless-organization-creating-psychological-safety-in-the-workplace-for-learning-innovation-and-growth/)
 
Patrick, with all that said, I’d argue that the etymology of the word emotion is about movement.  While our current thinking is that emotion means inaction the roots of the word are about creating motion.  I personally like affect but do find it less universally understood.  It gets even more difficult to address conceptualize if you think about negative and positive affect occurring simultaneously.  See this figure from Emotion and Adaptation (referenced earlier) as it refers to Watson and Tellegen’s two-factor structure of affect.
 
<image002.png>
 
Matt, I think that there’s been a division for a long time between reason and emotion – one that started with Descartes (See https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2020/06/22/book-review-descartes-error-emotion-reason-and-the-human-brain/) but I think the intersection is around how we motivate change in people to be more open (and trusting) of sharing what they know in organizations.  (See also https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2019/07/03/trust-vulnerability-intimacy-revisited/ for more about the role of trust.)
 
Rob
 
-------------------
Robert L. Bogue
O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog
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From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Patrick Lambe via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2020 4:32 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Emotions & KM
 
Thanks Nimmy. I was thinking some more about the “mobility” that emotions give us, and went back to a term that is often used in the learning domain instead of emotion, and that’s “affect” - Matt is not enthusiastic about the term because he thinks it too technical to be widely understood, but I like it because it implies a disposition toward action that I think is important, and this is not always very clear when we use the language of emotion. We often talk about emotion as something separate from action but which conditions it - like reasoning. We can stew in our emotions and not do anything. “Affect” on the other hand, pretty much demands a course of action.
 
And if Matt can have “valence”, surely I’m allowed “affect”?
 
P
 
Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:                                                    +65 98528511

web:                                                       www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:                                             www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:           www.aithinsoftware.com

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On 15 Oct 2020, at 4:17 PM, Nirmala Palaniappan <Nirmala.pal@...> wrote:
 
That’s a very useful example, Patrick.
Shifting the emotional frame can shift the interpretive frame and help us reconsider the emotion or even dissolve it. Been there! 
Someone who can quell the fear (or gradients of the emotion ;-)) in the atmosphere (oh, that rhymes!) is an invaluable asset to have in collective discussions.  
 
On Thu, 15 Oct 2020 at 1:24 PM, Patrick Lambe <plambe@...> wrote:
Conjoining the protean nature of emotions with classification schemes is an interesting twist.
 
It implies that shifting the emotional frame can very quickly shift the interpretive frame and that feels absolutely right. I have been in conflict situations where somebody stepped in with humour and grace and calmed everybody down, and it helped us all to see new ways of acting that had appeared closed off while in anger.
 
P
 
Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com

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On 15 Oct 2020, at 3:40 PM, Matt Moore <matt@...> wrote:
 
Patrick,
 
"I suppose what I’m saying is that emotions are tangled up with all sorts of other aspects of our personalities and so while this is a fascinating discussion to start, it may not be very simple to bring to a swift close."
 
Absolutely. The book "How Emotions Are Made" (thank you, Stephen) goes into the protean nature of emotion (how they shift based on culture or context) in a lot of detail.
 
And the problem with classification schemes is that they are often good places to start but poor places to end. They can help you make sense of an environment that appears chaotic but in doing so they close off other possibilities and subtleties.
 
Regards,
 
Matt
 
On Thu, Oct 15, 2020 at 5:48 PM Patrick Lambe <plambe@...> wrote:
Hi Matt
 
When I was reading your list of motivators I wondered to what extent a sense of ethics or how we frame and feel about virtues/vices (I’m not entirely sure they are the same things but they seem connected) come into play in evoking emotional responses. 
 
For example, pride is (in my case) a frequent precursor of annoyance. It also helps to diminish the influence of fear. Ethical frames can also condition what patterns of behaviour count as desirable/undesirable. 
 
Playfulness is a good one and has indeed been harnessed in the service of KM (e.g. in gamification), although I fear it is sometimes trivialised as an entertainment layer on top of “serious" tasks. I am absolutely sure you’re familiar with the work of Huizinga. There are strong hints of annoyance in the interactions that Diane Vaughan records in the Challenger launch decision, particularly in relation to the way that the engineer Roger Boisjoly issued his warnings… he had a reputation for being “difficult”.
 
I suppose what I’m saying is that emotions are tangled up with all sorts of other aspects of our personalities and so while this is a fascinating discussion to start, it may not be very simple to bring to a swift close.
 
P
 
Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com

<SK18th_Anniv2020_emailfooter (2).jpg>
 
On 15 Oct 2020, at 2:17 PM, Matt Moore <matt@...> wrote:
 
Hi Nimmy,

I am going to agree and disagree.

I absolutely agree that fear and desire are powerful motivators and
that they play roles in knowledge sharing (there's actually a fair bit
of academic writing on this that I really should read properly over
the weekend).

Where I would disagree is that human beings only act from fear or
desire. That sounds like we need to reduce the world to carrots and
sticks. When I look at my own behaviour, I can be motivated by a
frisson of playfulness, a slick of disgust, a pinprick of annoyance, a
hurricane of rage, a pool of boredom, a shock of surprise.

How do we as knowledge managers harness the full range of emotions in
the people that we work with? Or is it all just carrots and sticks?

Regards,

Matt

On Thu, Oct 15, 2020 at 2:43 AM Nirmala Palaniappan
<Nirmala.pal@...> wrote:


Matt,

Glad to be catching up with this discussion.
- I did a session on the Psychology of Knowledge Sharing for the KM Society of Singapore last month and what I covered may be of interest to you and relevant to the topic of discussion
- I began with the assumption that human beings act out of either desire or fear, almost always. I then went on to map these two emotions to three key behaviours - These could be action based on values, action based on convenience or profit-motive and action based on ego/pride
- Values may arise from passion or fear (conditioning). A profit-motive is likely to be driven by desire and ego stems from fear (of losing something or being hurt in some way)
- People who share knowledge or hoard knowledge are likely to be driven by one or more of these three factors (imo)

Hope this helps!
Regards
Nimmy

On Sat, 26 Sep 2020 at 5:04 AM, Matt Moore <matt@...> wrote:


Hi,

So as you will have seen from Stan's email, I will be doing a session
on emotions and KM in later October.

I have started work on the presentation but I'd be interested to hear
thoughts from the community on this topic.

- How do KM and emotion inter-relate?
- What role do emotions (of ourselves, of others) play in the work that we do?
- How are different emotions bound up with knowledge and how do the
impact knowledge creation, knowledge dissemination, and knowledge use?

BTW emotions are a big part of being human but a literature search
reveals only about 10-20 articles on emotion and KM over the last 20
years.

Regards,
--
Matt Moore
M. +61 (0) 423 784 504
matt@...




--
"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous




-- 
Matt Moore
M. +61 (0) 423 784 504
matt@...




 
 
 

 
-- 
Matt Moore
M. +61 (0) 423 784 504
matt@...
 
 
 
-- 
"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous
 


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