Re: Emotions & KM #emotions


Robert L. Bogue
 

Re: LaLoux's work - It goes too far. In some of the follow up research I did, I think while reading Red Goldfish (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2017/06/05/book-review-red-goldfish-motivating-sales-loyalty-shared-passion-purpose/) I realized that most of the lack of hierarchy wasn't real. It's sort of like Joy, Inc. (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2015/11/23/book-review-joy-inc/) he spun a good tale -- but knowing software development like I do I know that the approach doesn't work well. I do think that we're evolving to having less fundamental concerns. I don't know that I'd agree either if higher = better, rather than just different.

Re: Fear - Absolutely, fear based motivation still exists. However, I do believe it's edging down particularly as we maintain low-levels of unemployment and it becomes easier for people to find alternative work that is reasonable.

Rob

-------------------
Robert L. Bogue
O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog
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-----Original Message-----
From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Matt Moore via groups.io
Sent: Friday, October 16, 2020 7:56 PM
To: main@sikm.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Emotions & KM

Robert,

"In my review of The Fearless Organization, I basically mentioned that fear is an inherent part of being human. It’s not possible for an organization to remove all fear from the equation – nor is it their role. It is, however, in their best interests to find a place where fear is minimized and productivity is maximized."

I agree that fear is an inherent part of being human and I agree that the book does not say fear can be completely removed. However it does call itself "The Fearless Organisation" and it doesn't have a lot to say about the broader contexts that shape human behaviour beyond group dynamics. It's not a bad book - but like most leadership books, it is at best half true. As for productivity being maximised when fear is minimised, I would like to believe that it is true but I have seen enough instances of managers using fear to get results and to be rewarded for it that leave me cynical.

I have very mixed feelings about LaLoux's work. I actually read RO a while ago - and I was a bit underwhelmed. I like the idea of non-hierarchical organisations (in much the same way that I like the idea of fearless organisations) - but I don't necessarily buy his arguments that this change is inevitable. Plus the Spiral Dynamics type stuff that underpins it reminds me a lot of the Whig Theory of History or 18/19th Century German Romanticism mixed with some New Age Esalen malarky. While I believe that our societies and economies change, I do not believe that we are evolving to some higher plane.

"So, I think organizations are changing to use less fear based motivations"

I think the trend for the last 50 years has been that it is increasingly unacceptable amongst the enlightened managerial classes to say that using fear is acceptable. The distaste for naked tyranny doesn't mean that we won't split the jobs where fear is unacceptable from those where it is. Facebook and Google outsource their content moderation. Apple outsource their manufacturing. The freedom accorded to a manager of a dev team in Amazon Web Services manager vs an Amazon warehouse worker are very different. And we should remember that the second biggest economy in the world has a very different set of values to the US and Europe.

Regards,

Matt

On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 11:11 PM Robert L. Bogue <rbogue@thorprojects.com> wrote:

Matt –

In my review of The Fearless Organization (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2019/06/24/book-review-the-fearless-organization-creating-psychological-safety-in-the-workplace-for-learning-innovation-and-growth/, for those not tracking the other thread), I basically mentioned that fear is an inherent part of being human. It’s not possible for an organization to remove all fear from the equation – nor is it their role. It is, however, in their best interests to find a place where fear is minimized and productivity is maximized.

With regard to organizational structure and the systemic use of fear,
Fredrick LaLoux’s work in Reinventing Organizations
(https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2017/06/19/book-review-reinvent
ing-organizations-guide-creating-organizations-inspired-next-stage-hum
an-consciousness/) is good at showing this as an evolution.
Observationally and through my other research, I’d support that we’re
evolving our management style and that while fear was often used as a
mechanism for motivation, it’s a bit unstable and because we’re
recognizing that more-and-more it seems to be falling out of favor.
Reinforcing this point is the work of Chuck Underwood in America’s
Generations
(https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2016/09/19/book-review-americas
-generations-in-the-workplace-marketplace-and-living-room/). While
Chuck and I have vastly different styles, his observation of
generations across time is intriguing. (As he points out generations
are largely based on the country that people live so the applicability
across the globe may be limited – but understanding the shift across
generations is interesting to me.)

So, I think organizations are changing to use less fear based motivations – and that’s a good thing.

As for fear of reprimands, I think this where we look at how to help/support people into being more wholly human filled with self-efficacy and resilience. When we do this they have a greater capacity for courage. (Courage is not the absence of fear but moving forward in it’s presence.) This greater capacity for courage decreases the need for the organization to be focused on reducing fear.

All this being said, the transition isn’t done. Terri (my wife and
partner) and I wrote Extinguish Burnout: A Practical Guide to
Prevention and Recovery for The Society for Human Resource Management
(SHRM) last year. As we’ve tried to engage others to partner with on
the materials we’ve run into two key problems. First, the
organizations we’re working with are selling that there’s something
broken in the organization that they know how to fix. Second, that
burnout is exclusively associated with work. Despite the WHO’s
inclusion of burnout as an ICD-10 code which lists it as an
occupational phenomenon, it’s not. This is evident even in
Frudenberger’s early work on the topic. The problem is a political
one between the WHO and the APA and is negatively influenced by
Maslach. (I’ll stop there.)

We believe we’re largely unsuccessful in getting employee engagement-type companies to leverage our materials because we don’t blame the company and we’re concerned about helping the person learn about their own self efficacy. For what it’s worth all the materials – including the course – are free until at least December 20th as our gift to the world.

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