Date   

A rare video clip, of GE leader Dr. Sukh Grewal, discussing GE SupportCentral #video

cjam_roxxx <cjam_roxxx@...>
 

Hello all,

Dr. Sukh Grewal - the leader of the GE SupportCentral collaboration &#92;
knowledge platform - made a rare public appearance last week, at the
Office 2.0 conference in San Francisco. You can see him here, 45
minute clip, discussing SupportCentral:

http://www.office20.com/docs/DOC-1101

CJ @ GE


Re: Identifying Subject Matter Experts - any structured methodology/guideline #expertise-location

Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

Yes Peter, excellent application.

We do a lot of work like this for Pharmaceuticals and other knowledge/ expert type businesses. See example of Key Opinion Leader diagram @ http://www.orgnet.com/KOL.html

Companies [pharma & others] also use social/organizational network analysis to look at internal experts/mavens/leaders
http://www.orgnet.com/experts.html

Valdis
http://www.orgnet.com
http://www.thenetworkthinker.com

On Sep 8, 2008, at 1:23 PM, Peter Dorfman wrote:

If "thought leaders" intrigue you, do some networking in the Pharmaceutical
industry. Drug companies maintain a function called Medical Affairs that is
largely devoted to networking among "Key Opinion Leaders" -- thought leader
physicians who are influential in the treatment of specific diseases, who can
often make or break a drug brand in the marketplace. They have this down to a
science; there is a whole class of software applications specifically designed to
manage KOL networks. How they do this translates nicely to address the needs of
organizations in lots of other industries that have to manage influence networks.

Peter Dorfman
KnowledgeFarm
http://pdorfman.wordpress.com

On Mon Sep 8 13:17 , 'Albert Simard' <simarda@...> sent:












Srinivas -

Speaking of thought leaders, you have just expanded my horizons of the
possible dimensions of a directory of expertise. it's not just
multi-attribute, but multi-purpose as well.

Hummm...something to ponder.

Al Simard



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Identifying Subject Matter Experts - any structured methodology/guideline #expertise-location

Albert Simard <simarda@...>
 

Srinivas -
 
Speaking of thought leaders, you have just expanded my horizons of the possible dimensions of a directory of expertise.  it's not just multi-attribute, but multi-purpose as well.
 
Hummm...something to ponder.
 
Al Simard


Re: Identifying Subject Matter Experts - any structured methodology/guideline #expertise-location

steven.wieneke@...
 


Srinivas,

We use a structured methodology (executive vetting process) to identify SME by CoP.

Steven Wieneke
Technical Fellow
Global Technical Memory
Closed-Loop Learning Process
Global Product Engineering
General Motors Corporation




sjagannath@...
Sent by: sikmleaders@...

09/08/2008 08:40 AM

Please respond to
sikmleaders@...

To
sikmleaders@...
cc
Subject
[sikmleaders] Identifying Subject Matter Experts - any structured methodology/guideline






All,


Probably one of the crude/easiest ways to identify SME’s in an organization would be through (a top-down approach) nominating associates who have accumulated knowledge in specific area.
Just a devil’s advocate thought, could this be the right approach? Views could be biased based on experience, communication skills or other qualities.


Hence, would want to learn from this group if anybody followed a structured methodology/broad guideline to identify subject matter experts. Please do share…


Thanks & Regards

Srinivas Prasad



Re: Identifying Subject Matter Experts - any structured methodology/guideline #expertise-location

Peter Dorfman <pdorfman@...>
 

If "thought leaders" intrigue you, do some networking in the Pharmaceutical
industry. Drug companies maintain a function called Medical Affairs that is
largely devoted to networking among "Key Opinion Leaders" -- thought leader
physicians who are influential in the treatment of specific diseases, who can
often make or break a drug brand in the marketplace. They have this down to a
science; there is a whole class of software applications specifically designed to
manage KOL networks. How they do this translates nicely to address the needs of
organizations in lots of other industries that have to manage influence networks.

Peter Dorfman
KnowledgeFarm
http://pdorfman.wordpress.com

On Mon Sep 8 13:17 , 'Albert Simard' <simarda@...> sent:












Srinivas -

Speaking of thought leaders, you have just expanded my horizons of the
possible dimensions of a directory of expertise. it's not just
multi-attribute, but multi-purpose as well.

Hummm...something to ponder.

Al Simard


Identifying Subject Matter Experts - any structured methodology/guideline #expertise-location

Mark D Neff <mneff@...>
 


Srinivas,

Here is the crux of the question. What do you define as a SME? (academic, experience, recognized thought leader, the one everyone else goes to for advice, the greatest communicator, the best teacher, the most productive, the most published, the most patents, all of the above?) What do you want these SMEs to do? What is the purpose of identifying them? Do you want to point to them in proposals as leads in particular subject areas? Do you want them to form the basis for establishing a mentoring program? Are you trying to identify a starting point for collecting their knowledge? Are you trying to give them recognition? Are you testing your senior management to see who they go to for particular expertise so that their social network becomes more visible? Do you see them as a possible way to influence senior management? Are you afraid that unless senior management recognizes their expertise in a particular area, then they are not really SMEs? All of these questions and more will actually influence your methodology for identifying SMEs. It also depends on what areas you are trying to id expertise in because depending on the level of expertise and topic, senior management may be the worst place to start. Just some thoughts for you to consider.

Mark
706.447.8522




sjagannath@...
Sent by: sikmleaders@...

09/08/2008 08:40 AM

Please respond to
sikmleaders@...

To
sikmleaders@...
cc
Subject
[sikmleaders] Identifying Subject Matter Experts - any structured methodology/guideline






All,


Probably one of the crude/easiest ways to identify SME’s in an organization would be through (a top-down approach) nominating associates who have accumulated knowledge in specific area.
Just a devil’s advocate thought, could this be the right approach? Views could be biased based on experience, communication skills or other qualities.


Hence, would want to learn from this group if anybody followed a structured methodology/broad guideline to identify subject matter experts. Please do share…


Thanks & Regards

Srinivas Prasad



Identifying Subject Matter Experts - any structured methodology/guideline #expertise-location

sjagannath@...
 


All,

Probably one of the crude/easiest ways to identify SME’s in an organization would be through (a top-down approach) nominating associates who have accumulated knowledge in specific area.
Just a devil’s advocate thought, could this be the right approach? Views could be biased based on experience, communication skills or other qualities.

Hence, would want to learn from this group if anybody followed a structured methodology/broad guideline to identify subject matter experts. Please do share…

Thanks & Regards
Srinivas Prasad


Re: Departing Knowledge #knowledge-retention

Arthur Shelley
 

Paulette,

 

This is very interesting and I am sure accelerates the development of your new people.  Does your program extend to have mentoring right across the career path or just with the new joiners.  What about experienced middle managers who join from other organisations? Do you match them up with experienced (slightly older?) Boeing personnel to accelerate their understanding of your orgnisation as well.

 

Is the purpose of the mentoring to be one way transfer of knowledge or both?  Organisations often underestimate the value being brought in by the new generation, especially in the area of networking capabilities and social capital development that the younger recruits can teach the organisations how to improve in.

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley
Author: The Organizational Zoo A Survival Guide to Workplace Behavior
www.organizationalzoo.com
Ph +61 413 047 408


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of DeGard, Paulette H
Sent: Saturday, 6 September 2008 1:54 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Departing Knowledge

 

Hi Jerry,

Here at Boeing in my group we have created an entire toolkit for
Knowledge Transfer between the generations. The toolkit includes an
electronic survey to determine how to match people up for mentoring
purposes, a matrix that is used to match people based on their survey
answers, an analysis of usage for the different tools such as wikis,
blogs, and other electronic means of communicating, a training for
managers on the differences between the generations, and a process for
helping managers support their employees by creating business goals that
address knowledge transfer between the generations. This toolkit is
being integrated into our larger knowledge management toolkit for
capturing, retaining and retrieving knowledge and information in the
engineering environment.

One of the things we have learned is that matching senior people with
new hires really doesn't work all that well. The gap between mentor and
mentee should be closer to 5 years because the language between the
generations is often mismatched and additionally, a new hire to Boeing
would have had a totally different experience in hiring into Boeing than
someone who hired in 20+ years ago. Our matrix is being used to help
with these particular issues.

We are still early in the deployment of the Knowledge Transfer toolkit,
but so far it appears to be helping. The Knowledge Management System has
been hugely successful and is being deployed across all parts of Boeing
as well as our Research Center in Sheffield, England.

I look forward to seeing the article in Inside Knowledge on these
generational issues.

Regards,

Paulette

Dr. Paulette DeGard
Knowledge Strategist
Lead, Process and Efficiency Team
Flight Deck
425-717-9238 (voice)
360-550-4099 (telecommute number on Fridays)

-----Original Message-----
From: Jerry Ash [mailto:jash@...]
Sent: Thursday, September 04, 2008 6:08 PM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [sikmleaders] Departing Knowledge

Hi all.

I met Bob Wendover of the Center for Generational Studies at the APQC
KM meeting in Chicago recently and was very interested in his thoughts
on the communication breakdown between older and younger generational
cultures at the point of departing/arriving knowledge.

I have commissioned him to write a special feature for Inside Knowledge
magazine on "Sharing Departing Knowledge in Ways that will Appeal to
the Emerging Generations." Clearly, the incoming/outgoing communication
and cultural gaps are a major problem. How do you get the revolving
generations to respect one another and share/accept knowledge transfer?

Bob has just now asked me if I am aware of any organizations that are
actively practicing the following (or other) methods that he might be
able to access to ask about their methods, challenges and successes:

1. An exploration of how the characteristics of the knowledge being
transferred impacts the delivery methods and reception of younger
workers. These include the type of knowledge, the relevance of the
knowledge, the passion for the topic, the communication style of the
present knowledge holder, and so on.

2. An exploration of platforms and methods for transferring the
knowledge in an appealing way to young workers including wikis,
podcasts, self-directed training sessions, games, and so on.

If you would like to discuss it here, that would be great. If not, and
some of you have some thoughts, please contact me back channel:
jash@...

Thanks.

Jerry Ash

--
Jerry Ash
* Managing Editor, Inside Knowledge magazine
* Author, 'New Generation Knowledge Management' series
* Founder, Association of Knowledgework (AOK)
* KM Coach

Email: jash@...
Phone: 813.634.4397
URLs: www.IKmagazine.com | www.kwork.org

------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: MOOC on Knowledge, Learning and Connectivity #learning

Matt Moore <laalgadger@...>
 

Dave,

I have also signed up for this. Not so up for the knotty debates on epistemology but I like that:
- The course is free if you don't want to claim credit towards a degree for it.
- They really are using a mix of tools & techniques to deliver all this (video, audio, wikis, blogs, etc) - i.e. they are walking the talk.

Matt


Re: MOOC on Knowledge, Learning and Connectivity #learning

Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

Very interesting Dave.

From my work with social/organizational/knowledge networks I have
come to the conclusion of "What you know depends on Who you know" [and
vice versa] -- this course aligns well with that thinking. I will
"sit in" on the course... thanks!

Valdis Krebs
http://www.orgnet.com
http://www.thenetworkthinker/com

On Sep 6, 2008, at 4:02 PM, Dave Pollard wrote:

I've enrolled in the Massive Open Online Course on Connectivism.
It's a credit course offered through the University of Manitoba by
two old hands at KM/OL, George Siemens and Stephen Downes, but it
has 1200 enrolees from around the world working simultaneously in 5
languages. At its heart, it's all about knowledge, knowledge
transfer and learning, but, carrying my "content to context and
collection to connection" argument one step further, basically
argues that the 'capturing' and 'acquisition' and 'transfer' of
knowledge are meaningless concepts. If you're interested in joining,
signup and full details are here, it's fully online, free, starts
Monday and runs for 3 months.

What Connectivism Is: (article by Stephen Downes):
• At its heart, connectivism is the thesis that knowledge is
distributed across a network of connections, and therefore that
learning consists of the ability to construct and traverse those
networks.
• It shares with some other theories a core proposition, that
knowledge is not acquired, as though it were a thing. Hence people
see a relation between connectivism and constructivism or active
learning (to name a couple).
• Where connectivism differs from those theories, I would argue, is
that connectivism denies that knowledge is propositional. That is to
say, these other theories are 'cognitivist', in the sense that they
depict knowledge and learning as being grounded in language and logic.
• Connectivism is, by contrast, 'connectionist'. Knowledge is, on
this theory, literally the set of connections formed by actions and
experience. It may consist in part of linguistic structures, but it
is not essentially based in linguistic structures, and the
properties and constraints of linguistic structures are not the
properties and constraints of connectivism.
• In connectivism, a phrase like 'constructing meaning' makes no
sense. Connections form naturally, through a process of association,
and are not 'constructed' through some sort of intentional action.
And 'meaning' is a property of language and logic, connoting
referential and representational properties of physical symbol
systems. Such systems are epiphenomena of (some) networks, and not
descriptive of or essential to these networks.
• Hence, in connectivism, there is no real concept of transferring
knowledge, making knowledge, or building knowledge. Rather, the
activities we undertake when we conduct practices in order to learn
are more like growing or developing ourselves and our society in
certain (connected) ways.
• This implies a pedagogy that (a) seeks to describe 'successful'
networks (as identified by their properties, which I have characterized as diversity, autonomy, openness, and connectivity)
and (b) seeks to describe the practices that lead to such networks,
both in the individual and in society (which I have characterized as
modeling and demonstration (on the part of a teacher) and practice
and reflection (on the part of a learner)).


MOOC on Knowledge, Learning and Connectivity #learning

Dave Pollard <dave.pollard@...>
 

I've enrolled in the Massive Open Online Course on Connectivism. It's a credit course offered through the University of Manitoba by two old hands at KM/OL, George Siemens and Stephen Downes, but it has 1200 enrolees from around the world working simultaneously in 5 languages. At its heart, it's all about knowledge, knowledge transfer and learning, but, carrying my "content to context and collection to connection" argument one step further, basically argues that the 'capturing' and 'acquisition' and 'transfer' of knowledge are meaningless concepts. If you're interested in joining, signup and full details are here, it's fully online, free, starts Monday and runs for 3 months.

What Connectivism Is: (article by Stephen Downes):
  • At its heart, connectivism is the thesis that knowledge is distributed across a network of connections, and therefore that learning consists of the ability to construct and traverse those networks.
  • It shares with some other theories a core proposition, that knowledge is not acquired, as though it were a thing. Hence people see a relation between connectivism and constructivism or active learning (to name a couple).
  • Where connectivism differs from those theories, I would argue, is that connectivism denies that knowledge is propositional. That is to say, these other theories are 'cognitivist', in the sense that they depict knowledge and learning as being grounded in language and logic.
  • Connectivism is, by contrast, 'connectionist'. Knowledge is, on this theory, literally the set of connections formed by actions and experience. It may consist in part of linguistic structures, but it is not essentially based in linguistic structures, and the properties and constraints of linguistic structures are not the properties and constraints of connectivism.
  • In connectivism, a phrase like 'constructing meaning' makes no sense. Connections form naturally, through a process of association, and are not 'constructed' through some sort of intentional action. And 'meaning' is a property of language and logic, connoting referential and representational properties of physical symbol systems. Such systems are epiphenomena of (some) networks, and not descriptive of or essential to these networks.
  • Hence, in connectivism, there is no real concept of transferring knowledge, making knowledge, or building knowledge. Rather, the activities we undertake when we conduct practices in order to learn are more like growing or developing ourselves and our society in certain (connected) ways.
  • This implies a pedagogy that (a) seeks to describe 'successful' networks (as identified by their properties, which I have characterized as diversity, autonomy, openness, and connectivity) and (b) seeks to describe the practices that lead to such networks, both in the individual and in society (which I have characterized as modeling and demonstration (on the part of a teacher) and practice and reflection (on the part of a learner)).


Open Position #jobs

giovanni.piazza@...
 


Dear Friends,

I am looking for a Search Expert (Search as in Search Engine, not Executive Recruitment.....).

I do not need a techie, but a strong Program Manager, with a high degree of expertise in Search Engines and in all the business and Information Management functions that are necessary to get a SE to perform at its best in the enterprise environment.

Cleveland or Boston are preferred locations, but - as they say - in the presence of the right candidate i can be flexible.

A detailed job description is below, as well as my contact information.

Feel free to circulate, and thanks a million for any lead (sorry, no finder fee, but the next time we get together, drinks are on me....)

G.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Search Engine Program Manager



Summary:  The Search Engine Program Manager is responsible for all business aspects of the Ernst & Young Intranet Search Engine, including evaluating search engine effectiveness and user search experience, identifying means to improve search engine effectiveness, and implementing ongoing improvement plans, with the goal of optimizing users' search experience.  Search is embedded in a variety of tools and applications, as well as in Ernst & Young's internal home page.  The SEPM will work closely with other members of the knowledge team, including the User Experience Program and Taxonomy Program; Global Information Technology, including the search engine technical team; and business stakeholders, to articulate requirements, prioritize releases, and manage user and stakeholder expectations.



Essential functions:
·        Develops an ongoing program of search engine improvement:
·        Works with other knowledge team members and information technology to define requirements for search engine releases
·        Defines processes and standards for incorporating new content into the search engine
·        Defines, implements, maintains and improves search engine features such as Best Bets, synonyms, advanced query guidance, thesaurus, etc.
·        Implements ongoing relevancy testing and improvement program
·        Works with information technology team to continuously improve search engine performance
·        Works with knowledge team members globally to test and improve search engine effectiveness in a variety of languages and content types
·        Collaborates with User Experience Program on periodic usability evaluations of the search engine
·        Reviews user feedback, stakeholder input, log file analysis, and other inputs to formulate plans for continuous search engine improvement
·        Identifies metrics for ongoing measurement and evaluation of search engine effectiveness


Knowledge and skill requirements:
·        excellent written and verbal communications skills
·        strong presentation skills
·        strong analytical skills
·        the ability to complete multiple projects and meet deadlines in a fast-paced environment
·        the ability to interface with all levels of management and organize/manage virtual work teams
·        an understanding of teaming with culturally diverse business groups and the ability to influence diverse technical teams
·        proficiency in MS Office; Lotus Notes preferred
·        project management skills




Education:  
·        Master's degree preferred (for example, business, library science, or computer science).


Experience:  
·        5-10 years experience in knowledge management or information management, with significant experience in search engine product management
·        Experience working with Autonomy's IDOL search engine highly desired
·        Project management experience
·        Experience working in professional services industry desirable


Other:
·        This position may require some travel.


Ernst & Young ®
Ernst & Young LLP
Giovanni Piazza

'
+1 (216) 583 1123 | È+1 (216) 577 4024
Assistant: Sandra M. Kisilewicz
| +1 (216) 583 1808


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Re: Departing Knowledge #knowledge-retention

DeGard, Paulette H <Paulette.H.Degard@...>
 

Hi Jerry,

Here at Boeing in my group we have created an entire toolkit for
Knowledge Transfer between the generations. The toolkit includes an
electronic survey to determine how to match people up for mentoring
purposes, a matrix that is used to match people based on their survey
answers, an analysis of usage for the different tools such as wikis,
blogs, and other electronic means of communicating, a training for
managers on the differences between the generations, and a process for
helping managers support their employees by creating business goals that
address knowledge transfer between the generations. This toolkit is
being integrated into our larger knowledge management toolkit for
capturing, retaining and retrieving knowledge and information in the
engineering environment.

One of the things we have learned is that matching senior people with
new hires really doesn't work all that well. The gap between mentor and
mentee should be closer to 5 years because the language between the
generations is often mismatched and additionally, a new hire to Boeing
would have had a totally different experience in hiring into Boeing than
someone who hired in 20+ years ago. Our matrix is being used to help
with these particular issues.

We are still early in the deployment of the Knowledge Transfer toolkit,
but so far it appears to be helping. The Knowledge Management System has
been hugely successful and is being deployed across all parts of Boeing
as well as our Research Center in Sheffield, England.

I look forward to seeing the article in Inside Knowledge on these
generational issues.

Regards,

Paulette

Dr. Paulette DeGard
Knowledge Strategist
Lead, Process and Efficiency Team
Flight Deck
425-717-9238 (voice)
360-550-4099 (telecommute number on Fridays)

-----Original Message-----
From: Jerry Ash [mailto:jash@...]
Sent: Thursday, September 04, 2008 6:08 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Departing Knowledge

Hi all.

I met Bob Wendover of the Center for Generational Studies at the APQC
KM meeting in Chicago recently and was very interested in his thoughts
on the communication breakdown between older and younger generational
cultures at the point of departing/arriving knowledge.

I have commissioned him to write a special feature for Inside Knowledge
magazine on "Sharing Departing Knowledge in Ways that will Appeal to
the Emerging Generations." Clearly, the incoming/outgoing communication
and cultural gaps are a major problem. How do you get the revolving
generations to respect one another and share/accept knowledge transfer?

Bob has just now asked me if I am aware of any organizations that are
actively practicing the following (or other) methods that he might be
able to access to ask about their methods, challenges and successes:

1. An exploration of how the characteristics of the knowledge being
transferred impacts the delivery methods and reception of younger
workers. These include the type of knowledge, the relevance of the
knowledge, the passion for the topic, the communication style of the
present knowledge holder, and so on.

2. An exploration of platforms and methods for transferring the
knowledge in an appealing way to young workers including wikis,
podcasts, self-directed training sessions, games, and so on.

If you would like to discuss it here, that would be great. If not, and
some of you have some thoughts, please contact me back channel:
jash@...

Thanks.

Jerry Ash

--
Jerry Ash
* Managing Editor, Inside Knowledge magazine
* Author, 'New Generation Knowledge Management' series
* Founder, Association of Knowledgework (AOK)
* KM Coach

Email: jash@...
Phone: 813.634.4397
URLs: www.IKmagazine.com | www.kwork.org

------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Departing Knowledge #knowledge-retention

Arthur Shelley
 

Jerry,

I would be happy to talk in detail about some for the initiatives we were
putting in place before I left Cadbury Schweppes. I have remained in touch
with them on a regular basis and whilst they have slowed a little because of
the restructures going on, they are still active.

Before going public with the details on these I would like to verify with CS
it is OK to share more widely - not my program to give away any more:)
However, if Bob wants to make contact with me directly I can discuss some of
the things we were doing whilst I gat the approval for my former leaders.
Best regards
Arthur


Regards

Arthur Shelley
Author: The Organizational Zoo A Survival Guide to Workplace Behavior
www.organizationalzoo.com
Ph +61 413 047 408

-----Original Message-----
From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On
Behalf Of Jerry Ash
Sent: Friday, 5 September 2008 11:08 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Departing Knowledge

Hi all.

I met Bob Wendover of the Center for Generational Studies at the APQC
KM meeting in Chicago recently and was very interested in his thoughts
on the communication breakdown between older and younger generational
cultures at the point of departing/arriving knowledge.

I have commissioned him to write a special feature for Inside Knowledge
magazine on "Sharing Departing Knowledge in Ways that will Appeal to
the Emerging Generations." Clearly, the incoming/outgoing communication
and cultural gaps are a major problem. How do you get the revolving
generations to respect one another and share/accept knowledge transfer?

Bob has just now asked me if I am aware of any organizations that are
actively practicing the following (or other) methods that he might be
able to access to ask about their methods, challenges and successes:

1. An exploration of how the characteristics of the knowledge being
transferred impacts the delivery methods and reception of younger
workers. These include the type of knowledge, the relevance of the
knowledge, the passion for the topic, the communication style of the
present knowledge holder, and so on.

2. An exploration of platforms and methods for transferring the
knowledge in an appealing way to young workers including wikis,
podcasts, self-directed training sessions, games, and so on.

If you would like to discuss it here, that would be great. If not, and
some of you have some thoughts, please contact me back channel:
jash@...

Thanks.

Jerry Ash

--
Jerry Ash
* Managing Editor, Inside Knowledge magazine
* Author, 'New Generation Knowledge Management' series
* Founder, Association of Knowledgework (AOK)
* KM Coach

Email: jash@...
Phone: 813.634.4397
URLs: www.IKmagazine.com | www.kwork.org

------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links





--
No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG.
Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 270.6.16/1653 - Release Date: 5/09/2008
6:57 AM


Departing Knowledge #knowledge-retention

Jerry Ash <jash@...>
 

Hi all.

I met Bob Wendover of the Center for Generational Studies at the APQC
KM meeting in Chicago recently and was very interested in his thoughts
on the communication breakdown between older and younger generational
cultures at the point of departing/arriving knowledge.

I have commissioned him to write a special feature for Inside Knowledge
magazine on “Sharing Departing Knowledge in Ways that will Appeal to
the Emerging Generations.” Clearly, the incoming/outgoing communication
and cultural gaps are a major problem. How do you get the revolving
generations to respect one another and share/accept knowledge transfer?

Bob has just now asked me if I am aware of any organizations that are
actively practicing the following (or other) methods that he might be
able to access to ask about their methods, challenges and successes:

1. An exploration of how the characteristics of the knowledge being
transferred impacts the delivery methods and reception of younger
workers. These include the type of knowledge, the relevance of the
knowledge, the passion for the topic, the communication style of the
present knowledge holder, and so on.

2. An exploration of platforms and methods for transferring the
knowledge in an appealing way to young workers including wikis,
podcasts, self-directed training sessions, games, and so on.

If you would like to discuss it here, that would be great. If not, and
some of you have some thoughts, please contact me back channel:
jash@...

Thanks.

Jerry Ash

--
Jerry Ash
* Managing Editor, Inside Knowledge magazine
* Author, 'New Generation Knowledge Management' series
* Founder, Association of Knowledgework (AOK)
* KM Coach

Email: jash@...
Phone: 813.634.4397
URLs: www.IKmagazine.com | www.kwork.org


Following the Recipe -- with Disastrous Results #knowledge-capture

Bruce Karney <bkarney@...>
 
Edited

When I was a KMer, I often used the analogy of recipes to try to
explain how knowledge could be captured and shared.

Here's a vivid example of the dangers blindly following a recipe.
(The recipe called for 20 whole nutmegs instead of 2 pinches of
ground nutmeg.)

See https://www.thelocal.se/20080829/14000/

The comments about the error are quite interesting.

If you use this example in a teaching context, here are two questions
you may want to ask.

1) How would you have reacted if your spouse gave you this recipe and
asked you to make it for them for their birthday? How would your
answer differ if she/he gave you the recipe and 20 fresh nutmegs at
the same time?

2) If your boss invited you to his/her home for dinner for the first
time and served this horribly overspiced cake, would you have eaten
your entire portion? How about if your mom served it?

These questions get at the topics of 1) what kind of idiot would make
this cake? and 2) what kind of idiot would eat it?

The answer is, naturally, "Idiots just like you and me!" but the
discussion should be fun.

Cheers,
Bruce Karney
SolarCity (formerly of HP's KM Organization)
bkarney@...


Bangkok, London, Paris, Tokyo and... Bognor Regis #personal

Matt Moore <laalgadger@...>
 

Hi,

Following on from the US/Canada excursion earlier this year, I will be in Bangkok (subject to civil unrest & flight cancellations), London, Paris, various parts of Japan and, yes, Bognor Regis over the course of the next few weeks.

Bangkok - 12-14 Sept
London - 15/22/23/24 Sept
Paris - 16-19 Sept
Japan - 24-30 Sept

Let me know if anyone fancies a coffee and a rant.

Matt


Graduate schools for KM? #learning

alicemacgillivray <alice@...>
 

Several years ago, Michael Sutton compiled a report of about 30 pages
about graduate programs in KM. I know it is out of date, but he may be
willing to share it; I know you are both on LinkedIn.

I am in the final stages of a PhD program at Fielding Graduate
University in a concentration they call "Information Society and
Knowledge Organizations." There is enough flexibility to make that any
variation on KM that would interest a scholar practitioner. Alex
Bennet and Juanita Brown are two of the graduates.

--- In sikmleaders@..., "Stan Garfield" <stangarfield@...>
wrote:


Patti,

See The Knowledge Management Education Wiki at
http://knowledge-management-education.wikispaces.com/
<http://knowledge-management-education.wikispaces.com/> and in our
Member list
<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/files/Community%20of%20Consul\;
ting%20%20SI%20KM%20Leaders%20%20-%20Member%20List.doc> in the Files
folder under Universities. We also have some members who are currently
pursuing their degrees, and I invite them to reply with details.

Regards,
Stan


--- In sikmleaders@..., "Patti Anklam" <patti@> wrote:

I'd appreciate any information, suggestions, recommendations for
universities (US and other) that offer PhDs in knowledge management.


Re: August 2008 SIKM Call: Marc Solomon of PRTM - Content Supply? Meet Knowledge Demand! The Case for Knowledge Planners #monthly-call

Marc Solomon <spinvillage@...>
 

SIKMers,

As follow-up to last week's "densely delivered" one-way discussion on
Knowledge Planning I've blogged some of the presentation notes for
the purpose of sparking the responses that had no chance to air on
our call last week. The first two posts can be found at:

http://attspin.blogspot.com/2008/08/case-for-knowledge-planners-sikm-
forum.html
http://attspin.blogspot.com/2008/08/case-for-knowledge-planners-part-
2.html

For the purposes of continuity and mapping can attendees post any
questions or comments to this thread instead of the blog?

Thanks for your participation,

Marc Solomon
spinvillage@...
http://attspin.blogspot.com
617.549.9022

--- In sikmleaders@..., "Stan Garfield"
<stangarfield@...> wrote:


TO: SIKM Leaders Community

Today we held our 37th monthly call, this one with Marc Solomon of
PRTM
on "Content Supply? Meet Knowledge Demand! The Case for Knowledge
Planners."

Marc's presentation is available at
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/files/Content%20Supply%
20and%2&#92;
0Knowledge20Demand.pdf
<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/files/Content%20Supply%
20and%&#92;
20Knowledge20Demand.pdf> . The call was recorded and can be
listened
to at http://www.divshare.com/download/5207514-648
<http://www.divshare.com/download/5207514-648> .

Thanks to Marc for presenting. Here is a comment from a
participant:

* "I'm right in the middle of a 'what's the use of that?'
discussion
regarding some KM initiatives in their early, vulnerable stages, so
this
call, as always, was encouraging."

You can continue the discussion in the Yahoo! Group by replying to
this
thread.

If you are willing to give a presentation on a future call, please
send
a note to stangarfield@...
<http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/post?
postID=lM8V8gFhJnuT&#92;
NLh1T61getRn5c6Wctt0yw_F3xNrAut8CjdhB8HRCM9EyH7nB0FLs6DlwMfHgSo7XD4sOy
c>
with the topic and the desired month.

Future Calls

* September 16, 2008: Hubert Saint-Onge - "Collaboration and
the New
Enterprise"
* October 21, 2008: Richard McDermott - "Developing, Deepening
and
Retaining Expertise"
* November 18, 2008: John Hovell of ManTech - "KM at ManTech
International"
* December 16, 2008 Raj Datta of MindTree - "Building a
knowledge
ecosystem"
* January 20, 2009 Bernadette Boas - "Day in the Life of
Business
Workflow"
* February 17, 2009 Arthur Shelley - "Impacts of behavior on
project
outcomes (with an emphasis on knowledge transfer)"
* March 17, 2009 Al Simard - "Knowledge services framework
developed
by Natural Resources Canada"

Regards,
Stan

Community Information

* Yahoo! Groups team space
<http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/>
* Files (including all presentations)
<http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/files/>
* Minutes from Previous Calls
<http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/database?
method=reportRo&#92;
ws&tbl=1&sortBy=1&sortDir=up>
* Member list
<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/files/Community%20of%
20Consul&#92;
ting%20%20SI%20KM%20Leaders%20%20-%20Member%20List.doc>

How to change your email address:

When joining this community, you may have thought that you needed
to use
a Yahoo! email address. In fact, you can use any email address you
like.
If you used an email address which you don't regularly check, and
would
like to change to a better one, follow these instructions.

* Go to http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/join
<http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/join>
* Under Email Address:
* Choose the email address that you would like group messages
sent
to (you can add an email address if the one you want is not listed).
* Click on a valid email address.
* Click on the blue "Save Changes" button at the bottom.


Re: Graduate schools for KM? #learning

Arthur Shelley
 

Patti,

 

We include KM as one of the 12 courses in our MBA program at RMIT University (Melbourne Australia).  RMIT also facilitates PhD and Doctorate programs in Project management and several of the candidates have had a strong Knowledge management emphasis in them.

 

Andre Saito is probably your best contact.  He was completing a PhD at the Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology on post graduate KM courses, 4 of them PhD and 40 masters level courses.  He summarised postgraduate courses and classified the courses into themes of Strategy, Information, Human and Computing.  I have not been on contact for about 18 months, but his email at the time was

asaito@...

 

Another interesting experiment about to start is an on-line collaborative “KM course” facilitated by George Siemens at the University of Manitoba. See:  http://ltc.umanitoba.ca/connectivism/

 

Sounds like you are doing some interesting research, is it part of a larger program or just personal interests? 

Regards

Arthur Shelley
Author: The Organizational Zoo A Survival Guide to Workplace Behavior
www.organizationalzoo.com
Ph +61 413 047 408


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Patti Anklam
Sent: Saturday, 23 August 2008 11:41 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Graduate schools for KM?

 

Hi,

 

I’d appreciate any information, suggestions, recommendations for universities (US and other) that offer PhDs in knowledge management.

 

Thanks,

 

/patti

 

 

Patti Anklam
Leveraging Context, Knowledge, and Networks

http://www.pattianklam.com
(978)456-4175

Net Work: A Practical Guide to Creating and Sustaining Networks at Work and in the World is now available at Amazon.com and other online booksellers.

 

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