Date   

KM Asia 2009 - Snowden, Harvard Business School, US Secret Service #conferences

soscall <soesterreich@...>
 

www.kmasia.com


September 11 in Chicago: Midwest Knowledge Management Community Symposium #conferences

Stan Garfield
 

http://sites.google.com/site/midwestkmcommunity/

Date: September 11, 2009

Time:  8:00AM - 5:00PM

$15.00 cash at the door if you submit survey
Otherwise $20.00 cash at the door


Link to Survey 

Location: GSA Conference Center
Ralph H. Metcalfe Federal Building
77 W. Jackson, (3rd floor)
Chicago, IL  60604


We encourage you to continue to send in Insights.  The new Insights will be added to the publication of the book. 
We would like to see 22 additional Insights to bring the total to 50 for the first publication.


Midwest KM Symposium:
Calling all KM professionals interested in learning more about business applications of knowledge management! The Midwest KM and KM Chicago communities are joining forces to host a very special event on September 11, 2009. This event holds a new twist - it will enable all who would like to participate to write one or more "insights" that will then be published into a book. You are encouraged to be creative for your ideas. The topics can be about any knowledge topic you are passionate about. They don't have to be in the primary field of knowledge management. Your "insights" should help general business practitioners from all walks of life better understand how business issues can be addressed by knowledge management processes and solutions.


September 2009 Nancy Settle-Murphy - Planning and Running Successful Virtual Meetings #monthly-call #remote-work

nsettlemurphy <nancy@...>
 

Hello everyone,

For the September SIKM Leaders Community conference call (Planning and Running Successful Virtual Meetings), we will be following a format that reflects virtual meeting "best practices." So instead of showing slides, I have set up a virtual conference area using FacilitatePro for our session, to be used both before the September 15 webinar and during that actual conference call.

Starting right now, I'd like to invite you to our online conference area to introduce yourself and to answer a few simple questions, which will help me modify our session to best meet the needs of those who plan to attend. You will also find a tips guide to download and review. Please participate no later than Friday, Sept. 11.

 

http://fac.facilitate.com

User ID: sikm

Password: 915

Your name: (Please be sure to enter your name so we will know who's "talking")

 

We will use this same virtual conference room and logon information for our conference call on September 15, when our phone conference line will be the same we always use: USA and Canada: Toll-Free 888-998-2663 or Toll +1 517-466-2222, Participant Passcode: 406165. For other countries, see http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/files/Conference%20Call%20Dialin%20Numbers.doc

 

Any questions, please contact me at nancy@... or via phone at 978.263.2545 (Boston, Mass. area).

 

Looking forward to meeting you soon!

 

Regards,

Nancy


Re: Estimated Timing/Cost for SharePoint implementation for medium-sized non-profit #SharePoint

Michael Dieterle
 

Megan,

I have planned and implemented a SharePoint Portal and Collaboration solution for my organization. While you most likely won't get any cost estimates due to the number of factors involved, here are some general thoughts.

- With a fairly out-of-the-box implementation, you should plan with 6 months. It is obvious that any outside expert help you can get will speed up any part of your project.

- You should always plan for additional costs like third-party web parts or tools that compensate for certain shortcomings of the platform.

- We are moving what we can to the cloud, but SharePoint is not inexpensive if you need your own instance that you can customize. Attractive SaaS pricing only applies to shared instances where you're locked in to a narrow set of standard features.

- Last, but certainly not least. You need to answer the question of purpose and intended usage scenarios first. SharePoint is above all a platform. You can do pretty much anything. Someone who knows it well will be able to tell you how much effort it takes to get to where you want to go.

Feel free to take a more detailed discussion offline.

Best Regards,
Michael Dieterle


Re: Estimated Timing/Cost for SharePoint implementation for medium-sized non-profit #SharePoint

Jeevan Kamble
 

Hi,
 
You could look at the another option if possible on Confluence Wiki tool which is free for Non-Profit Organizations.
 
For more details:
 
Also, recently we have finished the evaluation on MOSS 2007, Do let me know if you have any speacific queries.
 
Thanks & regards
Jeevan


--- On Fri, 8/28/09, meganreads wrote:

From: meganreads
Subject: [sikmleaders] Estimated Timing/Cost for Sharepoint implementation for medium-sized non-profit
To: sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com
Date: Friday, August 28, 2009, 10:49 AM

 
I am looking for advice on rough ballpark estimates I should use as a placeholder as part of a goal setting and budgeting exercise I need to do as part of establishing a new KM function at my organization.

Specifically, I am looking for suggestions for:

*time to implement Sharepoint for a medium (100 employee) non-profit

*cost for Sharepoint launch (both software and programming)

*cost for ongoing annual Sharepoint support (enhancements, upgrades, etc)

I know the figures can be wildly varying depending on factors such as in-house IT expertise vs contracting out and what KM the organization already has in place, but still hope to get some sense of how long and how much it cost other folks, so as to have some basis to start from.

I expect I'll likely end up with a menu of option - for $1 you can get A in three years, for $10 you can get A in 6 months, for $100 you can get A, B and C in one year. Any suggestions based on your experience would be helpful. Thanks.




Love Cricket? Check out live scores, photos, video highlights and more. Click here.


Re: Estimated Timing/Cost for SharePoint implementation for medium-sized non-profit #SharePoint

Michael Fulton <cincibuckeyenut@...>
 

I don't have details on the items you have requested, but the one thing I would say is to focus on using SharePoint Online rather than an in-house SharePoint.  Much faster and cheaper, probably ideal for a non-profit. 
http://www.microsoft.com/online/sharepoint-online.mspx

The other thing I would do is consider if a broader Web 2.0 platform like Telligent Enterprise would better meet your needs.  http://telligent.com/products/telligent-enterprise/

We use Telligent Enterprise and my personal preference is that over SharePoint.  If we didn't already have SharePoint install base, it is where I would start. 

Mike


--- On Fri, 8/28/09, meganreads wrote:

From: meganreads
Subject: [sikmleaders] Estimated Timing/Cost for Sharepoint implementation for medium-sized non-profit
To: sikmleaders@...
Date: Friday, August 28, 2009, 10:49 AM

 

I am looking for advice on rough ballpark estimates I should use as a placeholder as part of a goal setting and budgeting exercise I need to do as part of establishing a new KM function at my organization.

Specifically, I am looking for suggestions for:

*time to implement Sharepoint for a medium (100 employee) non-profit

*cost for Sharepoint launch (both software and programming)

*cost for ongoing annual Sharepoint support (enhancements, upgrades, etc)

I know the figures can be wildly varying depending on factors such as in-house IT expertise vs contracting out and what KM the organization already has in place, but still hope to get some sense of how long and how much it cost other folks, so as to have some basis to start from.

I expect I'll likely end up with a menu of option - for $1 you can get A in three years, for $10 you can get A in 6 months, for $100 you can get A, B and C in one year. Any suggestions based on your experience would be helpful. Thanks.



Estimated Timing/Cost for SharePoint implementation for medium-sized non-profit #SharePoint

Megan Fox
 

I am looking for advice on rough ballpark estimates I should use as a placeholder as part of a goal setting and budgeting exercise I need to do as part of establishing a new KM function at my organization.

Specifically, I am looking for suggestions for:

*time to implement Sharepoint for a medium (100 employee) non-profit

*cost for Sharepoint launch (both software and programming)

*cost for ongoing annual Sharepoint support (enhancements, upgrades, etc)

I know the figures can be wildly varying depending on factors such as in-house IT expertise vs contracting out and what KM the organization already has in place, but still hope to get some sense of how long and how much it cost other folks, so as to have some basis to start from.

I expect I'll likely end up with a menu of option - for $1 you can get A in three years, for $10 you can get A in 6 months, for $100 you can get A, B and C in one year. Any suggestions based on your experience would be helpful. Thanks.


Re: August 2009 SIKM Call: Andrew Gent - Sustainable KM #monthly-call

Stan Garfield
 
Edited

Here are two comments I received on Andrew's presentation.

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Kate Pugh, AlignConsulting
Date: Wed, Aug 19, 2009 at 9:29 AM

I attended yesterday and as always loved hearing Andrew's rational, yet deep, reflections on the sociology of KM.  I am very much in favor of sustainable KM, and I wrote a piece with a friend on personal KM, which I think is part of the picture. https://www.khouricc.com/blog/bid/20094/Your-Job-is-Knowledge
 
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Lee Romero, Deloitte
Sent: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 4:41 PM
 
I attended today's SIKM call and I thought it was excellent.  Good topic and an area that I can imagine is "uncomfortable" for a lot of folks to consider ("What, I should be working myself out of a job or something?") but I think that Andrew's slides and presentation and Linda Hummel's questions generated some good discussion. 


Re: What are the Top 3 Knowledge Management Services? #knowledge-services

Arthur Shelley
 

Valdis et al.,
I completely agree, conversations that matter are the beginning of
most great thinks. I would argue that behind every successful leader
there is continuous flow of open conversations.
In my time at Cadbury I would (only semijokingly) reply to "What do
you do?" with one of two comments:
1. I manipulate people's minds or
2. I'm the corporate dating service
The base level of how we (KM'ers) create value is to get people
together and engage them in open conversation in an environment where
they feel safe. From there good things start to flow.

Arthur
Www.organizationalzoo.com

On 28/08/2009, at 12:25, Valdis Krebs <valdis@orgnet.com> wrote:

Glad to see your #1 item Arthur. Without conversations that matter,
etc., the rest of knowledge work doesn't happen not matter how much we
"capture" and "transfer" and "store". Without #1, your #2 and #3
don't happen.

Valdis Krebs
http://orgnet.com


On Aug 27, 2009, at 9:43 PM, Arthur Shelley wrote:



My top three "services" of knowledge management takes a slightly
different perspective.
1. Stimulating "Conversations that Matter" (as opposed to general
conversations or those without intent- which is different to "with
purpose"). It is fine to have conversations without intent and these
assist our social frabric and relationships. Conversations that
matter have a purpose and a desired outcome (in general), but the
specific outcome and may not be known in advance since the nature of
the ideal conversation is emergent rather than predetermined (to
enable the incorporation of unpredicted opportunities).

2. Build effective decision making capabilities through generation
of experiential learning opportunities - predominately projects
because this is how we change the world through the injection of new
(applied) knowledge (and hopefully decommission some old knowledge
at the same time. Projects are the ultimate knowledge transfer
vehicles and a very much overlooked capability development
opportunity for individuals, teams and the organisation as a whole
(when strategically managed).

3. Enhance the performance of the organisation in tangible and
intangible ways whilst shifting focus on the future. Knowledge
workers influence best when they can engage participation and get
people to understand the link between what people know and do with
desired future outcomes. Sometimes this can be measured, but many
times it can't be objectively assessed or directly attributed from a
"cause and effect" perspective. When we embed the principles of
knowledge management (loosely i mean generating of benefit from the
knowledge assets we have access to (directly and through our
networks) we are doing our best work. This is because we effectively
get everyone to "do KM" without them realizing it. In effect we
invisibly, but effectively, enhance the value created by all those
around us.

Arthur
Www.organizationalzoo.com

On 28/08/2009, at 10:03, Mark May <mdmay@stanfordalumni.org> wrote:


What are the top 3 services offered by the KM Group in your
organization?

We don't really have a KM group in the IBM Integrated Technology
Services business unit where I work.

But we do have KM-related areas of emphasis in ITS:

• Repository of reusable IC for our standard services offerings
(sales and technical content)
• Methods and tools to support pre-sales and delivery
• Centers of excellence to provide hands-on SMEs and to build
and
transfer skills and knowledge
• Global communities of practice

Best regards,
Mark May
Program Manager
IBM Global Technology Services



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: What are the Top 3 Knowledge Management Services? #knowledge-services

Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

Glad to see your #1 item Arthur. Without conversations that matter,
etc., the rest of knowledge work doesn't happen not matter how much we
"capture" and "transfer" and "store". Without #1, your #2 and #3
don't happen.

Valdis Krebs
http://orgnet.com

On Aug 27, 2009, at 9:43 PM, Arthur Shelley wrote:



My top three "services" of knowledge management takes a slightly
different perspective.
1. Stimulating "Conversations that Matter" (as opposed to general
conversations or those without intent- which is different to "with
purpose"). It is fine to have conversations without intent and these
assist our social frabric and relationships. Conversations that
matter have a purpose and a desired outcome (in general), but the
specific outcome and may not be known in advance since the nature of
the ideal conversation is emergent rather than predetermined (to
enable the incorporation of unpredicted opportunities).

2. Build effective decision making capabilities through generation
of experiential learning opportunities - predominately projects
because this is how we change the world through the injection of new
(applied) knowledge (and hopefully decommission some old knowledge
at the same time. Projects are the ultimate knowledge transfer
vehicles and a very much overlooked capability development
opportunity for individuals, teams and the organisation as a whole
(when strategically managed).

3. Enhance the performance of the organisation in tangible and
intangible ways whilst shifting focus on the future. Knowledge
workers influence best when they can engage participation and get
people to understand the link between what people know and do with
desired future outcomes. Sometimes this can be measured, but many
times it can't be objectively assessed or directly attributed from a
"cause and effect" perspective. When we embed the principles of
knowledge management (loosely i mean generating of benefit from the
knowledge assets we have access to (directly and through our
networks) we are doing our best work. This is because we effectively
get everyone to "do KM" without them realizing it. In effect we
invisibly, but effectively, enhance the value created by all those
around us.

Arthur
Www.organizationalzoo.com

On 28/08/2009, at 10:03, Mark May <mdmay@stanfordalumni.org> wrote:


What are the top 3 services offered by the KM Group in your
organization?

We don't really have a KM group in the IBM Integrated Technology
Services business unit where I work.

But we do have KM-related areas of emphasis in ITS:

• Repository of reusable IC for our standard services offerings
(sales and technical content)
• Methods and tools to support pre-sales and delivery
• Centers of excellence to provide hands-on SMEs and to build and
transfer skills and knowledge
• Global communities of practice

Best regards,
Mark May
Program Manager
IBM Global Technology Services


Re: What are the Top 3 Knowledge Management Services? #knowledge-services

Arthur Shelley
 

My top three "services" of knowledge management takes a slightly different perspective. 
1. Stimulating "Conversations that Matter" (as opposed to general conversations or those without intent- which is different to "with purpose"). It is fine to have conversations without intent and these assist our social frabric and relationships. Conversations that matter have a purpose and a desired outcome (in general), but the specific outcome and may not be known in advance since the nature of the ideal conversation is emergent rather than predetermined (to enable the incorporation of unpredicted opportunities).

2. Build effective decision making capabilities through generation of experiential learning opportunities - predominately projects because this is how we change the world through the injection of new (applied) knowledge (and hopefully decommission some old knowledge at the same time. Projects are the ultimate knowledge transfer vehicles and a very much overlooked capability development opportunity for individuals, teams and the organisation as a whole (when strategically managed).

3. Enhance the performance of the organisation in tangible and intangible ways whilst shifting focus on the future. Knowledge workers influence best when they can engage participation and get people to understand the link between what people know and do with desired future outcomes. Sometimes this can be measured, but many times it can't be objectively assessed or directly attributed from a "cause and effect" perspective. When we embed the principles of knowledge management (loosely i mean generating of benefit from the knowledge assets we have access to (directly and through our networks) we are doing our best work. This is because we effectively get everyone to "do KM" without them realizing it. In effect we invisibly, but effectively, enhance the value created by all those around us. 

Arthur

On 28/08/2009, at 10:03, Mark May <mdmay@...> wrote:

 


What are the top 3 services offered by the KM Group in your organization?

We don't really have a KM group in the IBM Integrated Technology Services business unit where I work.

But we do have KM-related areas of emphasis in ITS:

  • Repository of reusable IC for our standard services offerings (sales and technical content)
  • Methods and tools to support pre-sales and delivery
  • Centers of excellence to provide hands-on SMEs and to build and transfer skills and knowledge
  • Global communities of practice

Best regards,
Mark May
Program Manager
IBM Global Technology Services


Re: What are the Top 3 Knowledge Management Services? #knowledge-services

Mark May
 


What are the top 3 services offered by the KM Group in your organization?

We don't really have a KM group in the IBM Integrated Technology Services business unit where I work.

But we do have KM-related areas of emphasis in ITS:
  • Repository of reusable IC for our standard services offerings (sales and technical content)
  • Methods and tools to support pre-sales and delivery
  • Centers of excellence to provide hands-on SMEs and to build and transfer skills and knowledge
  • Global communities of practice

Best regards,
Mark May
Program Manager
IBM Global Technology Services


Re: Knowledge Maps #mapping

Lee, Jim <jlee@...>
 

Maria,

 

Thanks for your interest and question. It may be easier to think in terms of the action that we’re completing when referring to the table as a map. That is, by using that format, we’re “mapping” the knowledge—in terms of its use, its source, and its value. We create many of these in collaboration with our clients through workshop-type sessions of subject matter experts and process owners. For that reason, using the row/column metaphor for a map offers several practical advantages, including:

 

1.       Spreadsheet applications are ubiquitous—everyone has one on their computer, so there’s no learning curve with respect to the format.

2.       Completing the map in real-time with the input of the SMEs in the room means that the linear nature (going across the columns for each step of the process) makes it easy for people to follow the thinking and consequently, easier to facilitate. [Think in terms of a concept map and the variability in final appearance as a comparison.]

3.       A spreadsheet application also provide hotlink capability. That is, say you have a column, “Where is the knowledge located?”. You could simply insert the URL or hotlink directly into the cell for both ease of access as well as for version control.

4.       Perhaps the most important benefit of the format is that knowledge maps must be periodically updated! Any knowledge map created and simply left static will soon lose its own value as the first time something changes and everyone knows that the map is not updated, rendering it less than 100% reliable, the map will soon fall into disuse. Using a spreadsheet format removes one of the barriers to upkeep as again, anyone should have enough familiarity with the application to update.

 

I hope this answers your question.

 

 

Jim Lee, PMP

APQC

123 North Post Oak Lane

Houston, TX 77024

O: +1.713.893.7790   C: +1.216.338.3548

http://www.apqc.org

email: jlee@...

Yahoo, AOL, Skype IM: jimpmp2000

Windows Live Messenger: jimleesr@...

text messaging: 2163383548@...

 

 


Survey on the Future of Taxonomy Work #survey #taxonomy

Patrick Lambe
 

Hi folks - apologies for cross posting

This invitation is for those of you who are involved in taxonomy related work. 

I am conducting a survey on the present and future of taxonomy work and the needs of taxonomy professionals. I'll be reporting the results at Taxonomy Bootcamp in San Jose this coming November, and participants in the survey will also get a report of the results (which will include additional research beyond the survey).

For those of you who believe that taxonomies still have a future, this might make interesting reading, and for those of you who believe a la Theresa Regli that "taxonomies are dead", we'd like to hear from you on why!

You can take the survey at http://tinyurl.com/taxonomywork

Many thanks in advance!

Best wishes

Patrick

Patrick Lambe


Have you seen our KM Method Cards or
Organisation Culture Cards?  




Re: Knowledge Maps #mapping

maria_de_cali <mtrujillo@...>
 


--- In sikmleaders@..., "Lee, Jim" wrote:
>
> A few years ago, I tried to sort out the various mapping tools that we
> use for this exact reason-to understand what to use when. Attached is a
> presentation on the topic. I hope you find it helpful.

Jim, very helpful ... your description of knowledge maps made me revise my own definition. What you have there looks more like a table than a map, why would you call them maps then?

Maria F. Trujillo, PhD
Knowledge Management Senior Associate
CAMRIS International


Opportunity: KM Consultant for Wiki Implementation in Charlotte, NC #jobs

Stan Garfield
 

Knowledge Management (Wiki Implementation)

Our client in the Charlotte area is searching for a Knowledge Management Consultant that will lead the design and roll out of a Wiki information system.

To qualify for this role, this individual will need to have extensive experience in web design, knowledge base management, usability, Confluence Enterprise Wiki, content authoring and search engine implementations.

Candidates must have also have hands on design experience in an enterprise web environment (Wiki Confluence, SharePoint and HTML).

This is a long term contract with a cutting edge company based in the Charlotte, NC area.
Send an updated resume to clint.hawkins@...


Re: Knowledge Maps #mapping

tom short <tman9999@...>
 
Edited

Matt - a few years back a colleague and I were working with a large industrial client on developing a knowledge strategy. During this work we "invented" an approach we called 'knowledge process mapping.'

Purpose: identify an appropriate focus for KM by isolating a work process and process step within it that would benefit the most from the application of KM principles.

Technique: knowledge process mapping (described in Lesson 1, attached book chapter)
TomShort-BookChapter-KM+Lessons+Learned.pdf

Outputs
: see (described in Lesson 1, attached book chapter)

What was done with the outputs: the K process mapping activity pointed us to the area within the client's work processes that had the greatest potential to benefit from application of KM. This formed the basis for creating a business architecture map and implementation plans, which included establishing the new role of knowledge broker and building a tool kit for that role to enable expertise tracking/location as well as content retrieval.

Impact: Client quote one year after implementation began: "I laminated the architecture map we created and I carry it around with me daily. This will keep us busy for the next two to three years."  (diagram shown in Lesson 2, attached book chapter).

Keep us posted on your work on this - would be interested in seeing any final collection/summary.

Thanks.

-Tom Short
Tom Short Consulting
San Francisco, CA
415-912-0927


--- In sikmleaders@..., Matt Moore wrote:

>
> The key things I am after are:
> - What the purpose behind the exercise was.
> - What techniques were used.
> - What the outputs looked like (obviously there may be confidentiality issues here).
> - What was then done with the outputs & what impact they had.
>


Free KM online event tonight at 6:30pm EST #webinar

Robert Swanwick
 

The KM Institute is sponsoring a simulcast of its in-person KM Buzz session tonight at 6:30pm EST.
Read about the "KM Buzz" meeting format here: http://bit.ly/13NqxU 
 
Use http://twebevent.com/KMIevent to join the simulcast tonight. No registration or passcode required. You will need a Twitter account to participate in the online chat, but not to watch the live video.
 
Topics are
  • "Knowledge Mapping for Success" with Jane Maliszewski, ISKA, LLC
  • "World Bank Group SmartLessons: Using Storytelling to Share Knowledge" with Andres Baquero Franco, IFC
  • "TBD" with "TBD" (last minute replacement required due to illness)
Hope to see you on the chat,
Swan


Re: Knowledge Maps #mapping

Patrick Lambe
 

Hi Matt

Just to recast your enquiry: maps of any kind are shaped by their purposes - to aid navigation, exploitation, demarcation and identity, power claims, memory, sensemaking, to name but a few. An inventory of purposes (if you manage to compile one) should help to clarify a typology of forms, and they should help identify useful processes and tools (to modify slightly the sequence of your question elements). In knowledge mapping I think we tend to get hung up on either on the form we are familiar with first, or on the process we use to develop a map, and think too little about the originating need or purpose. So as always you have engineered a fascinating quest!

In my experience maps of knowledge (whether intra-organisation, community-based or societal) tend to serve the following functions:

Locate knowledge resources and "owners"
Show relationships between any combination of knowledge resources, people, locations, activities/processes
Track flows of information and knowledge
Identify gaps (can exploit map forms produced for other purposes)
Track development of knowledge, trends in knowledge landscapes
Aid navigation of knowledge resources (eg taxonomies and site structures)
Find rationalisation/"tidying up"/efficiency opportunities
Assess value of resources (this could just as well be an inventory, but a map could help illustrate the multiplication potential from combining resources)
Improve the exploitation of knowledge resources

In terms of your example request, I have some short video clips explaining how we use knowledge maps as part of a knowledge audit activity at
http://www.greenchameleon.com/gc/blog_detail/conducting_a_knowledge_audit/

P

Patrick Lambe

weblog: www.greenchameleon.com
website: www.straitsknowledge.com
book: www.organisingknowledge.com


Have you seen our KM Method Cards or
Organisation Culture Cards?

http://www.straitsknowledge.com/store/

On Aug 24, 2009, at 12:44 PM, Matt Moore wrote:

Hello,

I am interested in knowledge mapping exercises that organisations have engaged in (& apologies to Stan for cross-posting, there is a reason tho).

The key things I am after are:
- What the purpose behind the exercise was.
- What techniques were used.
- What the outputs looked like (obviously there may be confidentiality issues here).
- What was then done with the outputs & what impact they had.

I'm currently doing some work with a client who have different groups all producing things they call "knowledge maps". Each group are doing this for different reasons & using techniques - and hence getting different outputs.

While I encourage then to focus on the "why", it's tweaked my curiosity & I'd like to see other examples of these things.

I may produce a "knowledge map gallery/atlas" if I get sufficient responses (& obviously confidential responses won't go in that).

Cheers,

Matt





_______________________________________________
Actkm mailing list
Actkm@actkm.org
http://actkm.org/mailman/listinfo/actkm_actkm.org


Re: Knowledge Maps #mapping

Matt Moore <laalgadger@...>
 

Jim,

Many thanks! This is an excellent introductory presentation to the topic.

Cheers,

Matt


--- On Tue, 8/25/09, Lee, Jim wrote:

From: Lee, Jim
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: [Actkm] Knowledge Maps [1 Attachment]
To: sikmleaders@...
Date: Tuesday, August 25, 2009, 4:11 PM

 

A few years ago, I tried to sort out the various mapping tools that we use for this exact reason—to understand what to use when. Attached is a presentation on the topic. I hope you find it helpful.

 

 

Jim Lee, PMP

APQC

123 North Post Oak Lane

Houston, TX 77024

O: +1.713.893.7790   C: +1.216.338.3548

email: jlee@...

Yahoo, AOL, Skype IM: jimpmp2000

Windows Live Messenger: jimleesr@sbcglobal. net

text messaging: 2163383548@messagin g.sprintpcs. com

 

 


8121 - 8140 of 9717