Date   

Re: Knowledge Workers? #workplace

Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Nice one, Fred. One comment that stood out for me was:

"We should aggressively create opportunities for people within our organization to work together with leading edge talent outside our organization so that both sides can develop their talent even more rapidly. In driving scalable learning, we must expand our horizons far beyond the boundaries of our own firm."



From: Fred
To: sikmleaders@...
Sent: Wed, April 7, 2010 5:24:28 AM
Subject: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Workers?

 

John Seely Brown is one of the authors of a very interesting piece at this link:

http://www.bloomber g.com/apps/ harvardbusiness? sid=H12a9b09b214 df3fdba284650b69 531c4

It calls into question the validity and utility of identifying people as knowledge workers.

Fred Nickols
fred@nickols. us



Re: Request for strategy assistance #strategy

Stan Garfield
 

The slides that I recently presented to KM Chicago may be helpful. They are taken from my book.

 

 


Re: Knowledge Workers? #workplace

Murray Jennex
 

John has attended many of our KM sessions at HICSS and I've had the pleasure of conversing.  Our group at HICSS tends to agree with John only in a reverse way, we just consider everyone a knowledge worker to some degree.  A few months ago I mentioned my knowledge loss risk process and the funny thing when we piloted it was that the long term executive secretary scored very high on the potential to be a loss of knowledge should she leave, it kind of surprised the clients...murray
 
 

In a message dated 4/6/2010 12:34:43 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, fred@... writes:
John Seely Brown is one of the authors of a very interesting piece at this link:

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/harvardbusiness?sid=H12a9b09b214df3fdba284650b69531c4

It calls into question the validity and utility of identifying people as knowledge workers.

Fred Nickols
fred@...
 


Knowledge Workers? #workplace

Fred Nickols
 
Edited

John Seely Brown is one of the authors of a very interesting piece at this link:

http://web.archive.org/web/20100510193057/https://www.bloomberg.com/apps/harvardbusiness?sid=H12a9b09b214df3fdba284650b69531c4
or
https://hbr.org/2010/04/are-all-employees-knowledge-wo.html

It calls into question the validity and utility of identifying people as knowledge workers.

Fred Nickols
fred@nickols.us


Re: Request for strategy assistance #strategy

Fred Nickols
 

Jason:

I think you've gotten some good responses re "KM Strategy" so I'll go up a click to strategy itself. Strategy, along with tactics, is a means to an end; it speaks to how a particular goal or objective will be attained. So you have to be clear about the ends in order to formulate a strategy. From your inquiry, it seems you have been tasked to develop a knowledge management system (KMS). The first order of business for you is to pin down just what that means. Moreover, a KMS, like strategy, is a means to an end so you need also to pin down the ends this KMS will lead to. Some obvious questions follow:

Just what is meant by a KMS in this context?
How would things be different if a KMS were in place?
What business results is the KMS expected to produce or enhance?
Do you build it and roll it out all at once or in stages?
However you've defined KMS, how will people have to adjust and adapt to it? Who is likely to support or oppose it? Whose support do you need?

I could go on and on; so could others on this list and so could you. Therein lies my point: You need a long list of questions like these and others related to them in order to get clear about just what it is you're going to put in place and call a KMS and what kinds of changes are involved in doing that. Your "strategy" will emerge from that kind of thinking and analysis.

Finally, keep in mind the link between strategy and execution.

If you've got the right strategy but don't execute well, you will have muffed it.

If you've got the wrong strategy and you do execute it well, you run the risk of shooting yourself in the foot.

If you've got the wrong strategy and don't execute well, your effort is doomed from the beginning.

Only if you've got the right strategy and execute it well do you have a chance of succeeding.

The right strategy will emerge from some solid strategic thinking rooted in questions like those above and others you can add to the list. Good execution? Well, I'll assume you and your folks can do that.

Good luck,

Fred Nickols
Managing Partner
Distance Consulting LLC
fred@nickols.us
www.skullworks.com

"Assistance at a Distance"

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, jason.swan@... wrote:

Hi all,



I recently found your group and have been appreciating the depth of the
discussion that has been going on here for the last week, or so.
However, at this point, I'm in need of some "nuts-and-bolts" type of
information.



I work for a company that is part of L-3 Communications. We supply
training and engineering support services to the US military. I've been
give the responsibility for directing our company's knowledge management
initiative, including the development of a knowledge management system.
Our company is more than 25 years old, we have more than 500 employees
and more than 30 locations around the world. Like many companies, we
haven't yet crossed the bridge to becoming a learning organization, and
we struggle with knowledge attrition and wasted effort.



Since being tasked with developing a KMS, I have assembled a team and we
have recognized that we need to approach KM as a human system, rather
than a technology system. We have support from our executive management
to initiate behavior changes as well as technological changes at a
corporate level. However, no one in our company has experience with
developing or deploying a KMS. We have made excellent progress by
researching and reading, and I've made some valuable connections with
other L-3 Communications personnel, but I am still unable to get on top
of the strategy. I feel like I need a defined strategy before I can
make more progress in our effort.



I have no idea what the strategy should look like or what a good "model"
strategy would contain. Can anyone share examples of strategies that
might provide me with some direction? We have long-range goals, and we
are stirring around some ideas for short-range goals. And our business
has some important strategies for acquiring and maintaining business.
How do those things relate to a specific KM strategy? What are the
components of a KM strategy? How does the KM strategy inform subsequent
steps of design and implementation? Once we have a strategy, I feel
like I can draft out a roadmap to get us to implementation.



Thanks in advance!



Regards,



Jason Swan

Lead Instructional Systems Designer

-----------------------------------------





1228 E. Main St.

Havelock, NC 28532

Phone: (252) 444-0927

Fax: (252) 444-3129


Re: Request for strategy assistance #strategy

Allan Crawford
 

Jason,
 
Another book that you might want to look at is Learning to Fly by Collison and Parcell.  It provides not only a good overall KM model, but also provides an excellent "how to section" on a wide variety of KM techniques and processes. 



From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of crosspe2@...
Sent: Tuesday, April 06, 2010 8:55 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Request for strategy assistance

 

Hello Jason,
I might suggest the easiest place to start would be by getting a copy of the book, "The Complete Idiot's Guide to Knowledge Management". It has a section on KM strategy, but in actuality the structure of the whole book (as seen through the Table of Contents, for example) is itself a great starting point for defining a structure for a holistic organizational strategy for KM. (and not just for Idiots. :)
Pete Crossley

Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


From: jason.swan@l-3com.com
Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2010 10:55:41 -0400
To: yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [sikmleaders] Request for strategy assistance

 

Hi all,

I recently found your group and have been appreciating the depth of the discussion that has been going on here for the last week, or so.  However, at this point, I’m in need of some “nuts-and-bolts” type of information.

I work for a company that is part of L-3 Communications.  We supply training and engineering support services to the US military.  I’ve been give the responsibility for directing our company’s knowledge management initiative, including the development of a knowledge management system.  Our company is more than 25 years old, we have more than 500 employees and more than 30 locations around the world.  Like many companies, we haven’t yet crossed the bridge to becoming a learning organization, and we struggle with knowledge attrition and wasted effort.

Since being tasked with developing a KMS, I have assembled a team and we have recognized that we need to approach KM as a human system, rather than a technology system.  We have support from our executive management to initiate behavior changes as well as technological changes at a corporate level.  However, no one in our company has experience with developing or deploying a KMS.  We have made excellent progress by researching and reading, and I’ve made some valuable connections with other L-3 Communications personnel, but I am still unable to get on top of the strategy.  I feel like I need a defined strategy before I can make more progress in our effort.

I have no idea what the strategy should look like or what a good “model” strategy would contain.  Can anyone share examples of strategies that might provide me with some direction?  We have long-range goals, and we are stirring around some ideas for short-range goals.  And our business has some important strategies for acquiring and maintaining business.  How do those things relate to a specific KM strategy?  What are the components of a KM strategy?  How does the KM strategy inform subsequent steps of design and implementation?  Once we have a strategy, I feel like I can draft out a roadmap to get us to implementation. 

Thanks in advance!

Regards,

Jason Swan

Lead Instructional Systems Designer

-----------------------------------------

1228 E. Main St.

Havelock, NC 28532

Phone: (252) 444-0927

Fax: (252) 444-3129


Re: Request for strategy assistance #strategy

Douglas Weidner
 

Jason,

 

Quite a challenge, but good to see you have a clear vision of your needs, rather than approaching KM in an ad hoc fashion.

 

I encourage you to look into the KM Institute’s training and certification offerings.

 

We dominate KM training for your customer, the US military, including most all the CoComs and special ops.

One of our strengths is a proven KM methodology to “Create a Learning Organization”, first funded by the US military, but quite suitable for a smaller organization, whether gov or commercial.

 

An essential ingredient is change management, the requisite ‘behavioral changes’ you mentioned.

 

If you would like to know more, please contact me directly.

 

Douglas Weidner, eCKM Mentor

Chairman, International Knowledge Management Institute

Best in KM Training & Certification

Home of the KM Body of Knowledge (KMBOK)

www.kminstitute.org

703-757-1395

 

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of jason.swan@...
Sent: Tuesday, April 06, 2010 10:56 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Request for strategy assistance

 

 

Hi all,

 

I recently found your group and have been appreciating the depth of the discussion that has been going on here for the last week, or so.  However, at this point, I’m in need of some “nuts-and-bolts” type of information.

 

I work for a company that is part of L-3 Communications.  We supply training and engineering support services to the US military.  I’ve been give the responsibility for directing our company’s knowledge management initiative, including the development of a knowledge management system.  Our company is more than 25 years old, we have more than 500 employees and more than 30 locations around the world.  Like many companies, we haven’t yet crossed the bridge to becoming a learning organization, and we struggle with knowledge attrition and wasted effort.

 

Since being tasked with developing a KMS, I have assembled a team and we have recognized that we need to approach KM as a human system, rather than a technology system.  We have support from our executive management to initiate behavior changes as well as technological changes at a corporate level.  However, no one in our company has experience with developing or deploying a KMS.  We have made excellent progress by researching and reading, and I’ve made some valuable connections with other L-3 Communications personnel, but I am still unable to get on top of the strategy.  I feel like I need a defined strategy before I can make more progress in our effort.

 

I have no idea what the strategy should look like or what a good “model” strategy would contain.  Can anyone share examples of strategies that might provide me with some direction?  We have long-range goals, and we are stirring around some ideas for short-range goals.  And our business has some important strategies for acquiring and maintaining business.  How do those things relate to a specific KM strategy?  What are the components of a KM strategy?  How does the KM strategy inform subsequent steps of design and implementation?  Once we have a strategy, I feel like I can draft out a roadmap to get us to implementation. 

 

Thanks in advance!

 

Regards,

 

Jason Swan

Lead Instructional Systems Designer

-----------------------------------------

 

1228 E. Main St.

Havelock, NC 28532

Phone: (252) 444-0927

Fax: (252) 444-3129

 

 


Re: Request for strategy assistance #strategy

Pete Crossley
 

Hello Jason,
I might suggest the easiest place to start would be by getting a copy of the book, "The Complete Idiot's Guide to Knowledge Management". It has a section on KM strategy, but in actuality the structure of the whole book (as seen through the Table of Contents, for example) is itself a great starting point for defining a structure for a holistic organizational strategy for KM. (and not just for Idiots. :)
Pete Crossley

Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


From: jason.swan@...
Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2010 10:55:41 -0400
To: <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: [sikmleaders] Request for strategy assistance

 

Hi all,

 

I recently found your group and have been appreciating the depth of the discussion that has been going on here for the last week, or so.  However, at this point, I’m in need of some “nuts-and-bolts” type of information.

 

I work for a company that is part of L-3 Communications.  We supply training and engineering support services to the US military.  I’ve been give the responsibility for directing our company’s knowledge management initiative, including the development of a knowledge management system.  Our company is more than 25 years old, we have more than 500 employees and more than 30 locations around the world.  Like many companies, we haven’t yet crossed the bridge to becoming a learning organization, and we struggle with knowledge attrition and wasted effort.

 

Since being tasked with developing a KMS, I have assembled a team and we have recognized that we need to approach KM as a human system, rather than a technology system.  We have support from our executive management to initiate behavior changes as well as technological changes at a corporate level.  However, no one in our company has experience with developing or deploying a KMS.  We have made excellent progress by researching and reading, and I’ve made some valuable connections with other L-3 Communications personnel, but I am still unable to get on top of the strategy.  I feel like I need a defined strategy before I can make more progress in our effort.

 

I have no idea what the strategy should look like or what a good “model” strategy would contain.  Can anyone share examples of strategies that might provide me with some direction?  We have long-range goals, and we are stirring around some ideas for short-range goals.  And our business has some important strategies for acquiring and maintaining business.  How do those things relate to a specific KM strategy?  What are the components of a KM strategy?  How does the KM strategy inform subsequent steps of design and implementation?  Once we have a strategy, I feel like I can draft out a roadmap to get us to implementation. 

 

Thanks in advance!

 

Regards,

 

Jason Swan

Lead Instructional Systems Designer

-----------------------------------------

 

1228 E. Main St.

Havelock, NC 28532

Phone: (252) 444-0927

Fax: (252) 444-3129

 

 


Re: Request for strategy assistance #strategy

Joel Muzard <joel.muzard@...>
 

Hi Jason,



I like your message.

I invite you to attend our April Webinar on April 13.
We will first share tools for Collaboration in a socio-technical approach

Then we will have a Knowledge-Lab.  We will be discussing the theme «Implementation of a Knowledge Circulation Plan: Advantages and Difficulties to KM 2.0» You can see a Knowledge-Lab as an Open Space on the Web, where all  the participants garden knowledge. What emerges is the result of the participants collaboration. It is an Open Conversation. And at the same time Knowledge emerges from the interactive participation. 

We start a round table using Key-Words that matter from your point of view. Then the discussion unfold. We work developing trust introducing ourselves and the locations we are located.

The way we work allows parallels contribution of participants on the Co-construction WhiteBoard, and that at the beginning can be annoying, but fun when you see that it is very stimulating.

Vera wrote a report on last event, sharing her experience, it is posted on here: http://www.a-i-a.com/k-net/K-Lab%20Reports.html 

For more info, see :: http://www.a-i-a.com/k-net

See you soon


Joel
--------------------
Dr Joel Muzard
skype


Le 10-04-06 à 10:55, jason.swan@... a écrit :


Hi all,

 

I recently found your group and have been appreciating the depth of the discussion that has been going on here for the last week, or so.  However, at this point, I’m in need of some “nuts-and-bolts” type of information.

 

I work for a company that is part of L-3 Communications.  We supply training and engineering support services to the US military.  I’ve been give the responsibility for directing our company’s knowledge management initiative, including the development of a knowledge management system.  Our company is more than 25 years old, we have more than 500 employees and more than 30 locations around the world.  Like many companies, we haven’t yet crossed the bridge to becoming a learning organization, and we struggle with knowledge attrition and wasted effort.

 

Since being tasked with developing a KMS, I have assembled a team and we have recognized that we need to approach KM as a human system, rather than a technology system.  We have support from our executive management to initiate behavior changes as well as technological changes at a corporate level.  However, no one in our company has experience with developing or deploying a KMS.  We have made excellent progress by researching and reading, and I’ve made some valuable connections with other L-3 Communications personnel, but I am still unable to get on top of the strategy.  I feel like I need a defined strategy before I can make more progress in our effort.

 

I have no idea what the strategy should look like or what a good “model” strategy would contain.  Can anyone share examples of strategies that might provide me with some direction?  We have long-range goals, and we are stirring around some ideas for short-range goals.  And our business has some important strategies for acquiring and maintaining business.  How do those things relate to a specific KM strategy?  What are the components of a KM strategy?  How does the KM strategy inform subsequent steps of design and implementation?  Once we have a strategy, I feel like I can draft out a roadmap to get us to implementation. 

 

Thanks in advance!

 

Regards,

 

Jason Swan

Lead Instructional Systems Designer

-----------------------------------------

 

1228 E. Main St.

Havelock, NC 28532

Phone: (252) 444-0927

Fax: (252) 444-3129

 

 




Request for strategy assistance #strategy

jason.swan@...
 

Hi all,

 

I recently found your group and have been appreciating the depth of the discussion that has been going on here for the last week, or so.  However, at this point, I’m in need of some “nuts-and-bolts” type of information.

 

I work for a company that is part of L-3 Communications.  We supply training and engineering support services to the US military.  I’ve been give the responsibility for directing our company’s knowledge management initiative, including the development of a knowledge management system.  Our company is more than 25 years old, we have more than 500 employees and more than 30 locations around the world.  Like many companies, we haven’t yet crossed the bridge to becoming a learning organization, and we struggle with knowledge attrition and wasted effort.

 

Since being tasked with developing a KMS, I have assembled a team and we have recognized that we need to approach KM as a human system, rather than a technology system.  We have support from our executive management to initiate behavior changes as well as technological changes at a corporate level.  However, no one in our company has experience with developing or deploying a KMS.  We have made excellent progress by researching and reading, and I’ve made some valuable connections with other L-3 Communications personnel, but I am still unable to get on top of the strategy.  I feel like I need a defined strategy before I can make more progress in our effort.

 

I have no idea what the strategy should look like or what a good “model” strategy would contain.  Can anyone share examples of strategies that might provide me with some direction?  We have long-range goals, and we are stirring around some ideas for short-range goals.  And our business has some important strategies for acquiring and maintaining business.  How do those things relate to a specific KM strategy?  What are the components of a KM strategy?  How does the KM strategy inform subsequent steps of design and implementation?  Once we have a strategy, I feel like I can draft out a roadmap to get us to implementation. 

 

Thanks in advance!

 

Regards,

 

Jason Swan

Lead Instructional Systems Designer

-----------------------------------------

 

1228 E. Main St.

Havelock, NC 28532

Phone: (252) 444-0927

Fax: (252) 444-3129

 

 


(Event) The Role of Taxonomy in Enterprise Architecture - April 7 Taxonomy Community of Practice webinar #taxonomy #webinar

Rebecca Allen <rebecca@...>
 

Invitation
Please join us for our monthly Taxonomy Community of Practice webinar, presented by Earley & Associates. This month's topic is The Role of Taxonomy in Enterprise Architecture.

Date: Wednesday, April 7, 2010
Time: 1:00 - 2:00 Eastern Time
Cost: $50

To register, visit: http://www.earley.com/webinars/business-processes/role-taxonomy-enterprise-architecture

This session features Leslie Owens of Forrester Research and Nina Patel of Earley & Associates. If you missed Taxonomy Boot Camp 2009, here is a chance to hear Leslie reprise her popular keynote session.

Description
Organizations today struggle with unifying their enterprise information systems with business processes so that classifications can evolve to meet changing needs, yet remain in context of one another.

In most cases, enterprise taxonomy initiatives derive from pain points in search and retrieval, but taxonomy has a much larger role to play in a variety of processes, such as business intelligence, customer relationship management, and master data management.

Our speakers will discuss emerging trends in the role of taxonomy in the enterprise, and how information professionals can better leverage the taxonomy message to steer EA strategy to achieving business objectives.

Next Technology Showcase:
Optimizing Search with FAST, May 18
Free registration at http://www.earley.com/webinars/technology-showcase/fast

Thank you,

Rebecca Allen
Taxonomy Consultant
_____________________________
EARLEY & ASSOCIATES
Cell: 425-299-5400
Email: rebecca@earley.com
Web: www.earley.com


Request for Case Studies: Social Media for Business Performance #call-for #case-studies #social-media

Stan Garfield
 

From: Megan Miller, Deloitte Center for the Edge

Social Media for Business Performance – Participation in Case Studies

Deloitte's Center for the Edge is currently researching the use of social media within the enterprise, and resulting business performance improvement.  We have developed specific hypotheses about the use of social media tools within the enterprise, and are looking to conduct primary research with companies using social media tools to measure the specific business impact that has resulted.
 
To move our research forward, we are looking to develop several case studies, based on original research, where social media driven performance improvements are measured. We are looking to connect with companies that have rolled out social media initiatives, and get their first hand perspective on its impact to business metrics. In cases where that level of impact has not been measured, we would be interested in collaborating with the company to quantify impact where possible.
 
Our goals are to use this research to prove out our hypotheses and to deepen our knowledge and understanding of ways enterprises are leveraging social media. The cases we develop will be integrated in our research findings, and may also be published as part of a research paper. We would want to work hand-in-hand with the business partner to ensure the research is beneficial to their organization, and so that they are comfortable with our findings before going to print.
 
For anyone interested in participating or getting additional information on the project, please reach out to Megan Miller at memiller@...
 
 
Additional information on Deloitte's Center for the Edge and this research initiative:
 
The Center for the Edge

The Center for the Edge conducts original research and develops substantive points of view for new corporate growth. The Silicon Valley-based Center helps senior executives make sense of and profit from emerging opportunities on the edge of business and technology.
 
The Center conducts its research at three primary levels:
- Describing the shifting context for value creation
- Defining long-term opportunities for creating and capturing value
- Recommending the actions companies must take today to seize tomorrow's opportunities
 
The Center for the Edge is Co-Chaired by John Hagel III and John Seely Brown, with Lang Davidson as Executive Director. John Hagel III is the author of Net Worth, Out of the Box, and The Only Sustainable Edge. John Seely Brown, or JSB, is the former chief scientist for the Xerox Corporation. Lang Davidson is the former editor of The McKinsey Quarterly.
 
Social Media for Business Performance

Social Media for Business Performance is one of two research initiatives currently underway at The Center for the Edge. This workstream focuses on how social media used within the enterprise can drive measurable business performance, and explores the following three working hypotheses:
 
1.     While traditional enterprise tools help with standard processes and structured workflows, social media tools are uniquely capable of supporting the informal activities that drive day-to-day problem solving
 
2.     The success of enterprise social media depends on positioning the tools to alleviate significant pain points and thereby improve operating metrics
 
3.     Organizations that leverage social media tools for day-to-day problem solving will experience longer-term benefits including increased learning and innovation 


Re: Peer Assists? #peer-assist

Tom Eucker <tom@...>
 

Proverbs 29:18  


On 4/1/10 7:21 AM, "mark.tilbury@..." <mark.tilbury@...> wrote:


 
 
   

Not really on the subject but at this time of year would just like to point out that the bible mentions that knowledge comes through fear. I wonder, in today's corporate life we can translate that to mean where we have weak leadership knowledge will not flourish!

--- On Fri, 26/3/10, Allan Crawford <allancrawford@...> wrote:

From: Allan Crawford <allancrawford@...>
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Re: Peer Assists?
To: sikmleaders@...
Cc: "'Allan Crawford'" <allancrawford@...>
Date: Friday, 26 March, 2010, 17:24

  Mark,

I've been involved in using Peer Assists in both the oil and gas business and aerospace. And you are absolutely right...they are very effective.  

We have used them for a wide variety of projects and as well as at a variety of stages within projects.  We have used them in projects ranging from development of billion dollar oil and gas fields to preparing for meetings with congressional committees.  We have used them at the launch of projects as well as at key stages within projects.  Regardless of what we used them for...or the timing...the teams inevitably got a tremendous amount out of them.  They are relatively low cost (usually just the time of the people involved and perhaps some travel) - and target the issues the team is most concerned with.  

We have found that key to success is:
  1. Understand the key issues that the team wants to discuss -- what are the things that keep them up at night...or where they say...wow..if I could only answer this question.  Then develop a meeting agenda that allows the team to addresses those issues.  
  2. Select peers that have real world experience that is relevant to the issues.  This doesn't mean that they need to have done exactly the same thing...but that what they have done is applicable to the problems at hand.
  3. For example in one case we were preparing a design for a subsea oil well that would be drilled from a floating platform.  To complete the well (which involves putting a bunch of tools on the bottom of the drill pipe to clean out the well, perforate casing da...da...da) there is a lot of heavy (i.e., tons) of equipment hung on the end of the drill pipe (which in itself weighs tons).  The peer assist was about the methods that were going to be used to complete the well, but we also brought in a marine engineer that was working on design of the floating platform.  During the meeting, after hearing what was being proposed, the marine engineer did a quick calculation and said....hummm. ...if that is what you are going to do....it will sink the platform we are currently proposing.  The result was the marine engineers went back and redesigned the platform...prior to having done extensive design...and long before we had spent major sums of money on construction or procurement of the "wrong vessel."  Another common situation was to bring in the ultimate users of a product and get their input during the design phase.  The conversation was typically something like...this is what we are proposing because... And the response would be...well for the most part that sounds good....but if....you would do this, make this minor change, put this over here instead of here....it would be easier to use, or easier to maintain...or safer.  
  4. Have the team present enough context for the peers to understand the issues.  This can be done in part by sending out material prior to the meeting...but we have found that if the team does a short presentation outlining the key issues during the meeting this helps set both the tone for the meeting...and helps make sure everyone understands the issues to be addressed.
  5. Don't try to do to much in one peer assist.   Unless you are dealing with a relatively small project or one with narrow scope, break it into pieces where the peers can focus on a select few issues.

I'd be happy to share more of what we have learned  - don't hesitate to give me a call...or send an e-mail.

I'd also recommend the book Learning to Fly.  It has the best description of how to run an effective peer assist that I have seen.

Regards,

Allan Crawford
310-994-1619
www.acrawfordphoto. com <http://www.acrawfordphoto.com/>  
 
 


From: sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:sikmleaders @yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Mark
Sent: Friday, March 26, 2010 7:35 AM
To: sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Peer Assists?

  Thanks Mark, your idea sounds interesting. . to clarify, I am looking to understand more regarding organizations utilizing the knowledge sharing technique of a peer assist in their day to day prject delivery processes (embedded in workflow and standards of executing projects). How something like this has been presented to leadership as a method for "getting better at what you do" by adding in the peer assist step prior to projects, engagememnts, etc.. do you think this knowledge sharing approach is more fitted to communities or within more organizational focused team structures? I like to think both but I am very interested in organizational (team) knowledge sharing aspects. e.g. if a national organization wanted to learn from its international peers on project approaches and best practices what would be the best approach for setting the stage for this that is a business oriented focused approach that they will "grasp on" to? I would be interested in different view points on this. Thanks..

--- In sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com <http://uk.mc863.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=sikmleaders%40yahoogroups.com> , mark.tilbury@ ... wrote:
>
> Not sure if this answers the question but we use 'virtual' scouts within one of our Yammer community groups and physical scouts - thererole is to stage manage discussion and act as connectors for meetings withn their groups. Happy to expand further if interested. Also find out more at
> Â
> http://digitaldivid e.posterous. com/the-knowledg e-scouts <http://digitaldivide.posterous.com/the-knowledge-scouts>
>
> --- On Fri, 26/3/10, Mark wrote:
>
>
> From: Mark
> Subject: [sikmleaders] Peer Assists?
> To: sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com <http://uk.mc863.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=sikmleaders%40yahoogroups.com>
> Date: Friday, 26 March, 2010, 13:58
>
>
> Â  
>
>
>
>
> Peer Assists?? A Peer Assist can be organized in a workshop or meeting
> form to gain knowledge and insight from people in other teams before
> embarking on a project or activity where they have experience. Is there
> anyone effectively utilizing this KM concept of the "peer assists" in
> their organization as a process for preparation prior to projects or
> activities? Seems to me this is a bit more focused than a roundtable and
> the results are very beneficial to the "receiver" and the peers alike. I
> would like to understand more about your approach and organizational
> adoption from those who have effectively done this. Peer assist on peer
> assists??
>

 
   



Re: Peer Assists? #peer-assist

Mark Tilbury
 

Not really on the subject but at this time of year would just like to point out that the bible mentions that knowledge comes through fear. I wonder, in today's corporate life we can translate that to mean where we have weak leadership knowledge will not flourish!


--- On Fri, 26/3/10, Allan Crawford wrote:

From: Allan Crawford
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Re: Peer Assists?
To: sikmleaders@...
Cc: "'Allan Crawford'"
Date: Friday, 26 March, 2010, 17:24

 
Mark,
 
I've been involved in using Peer Assists in both the oil and gas business and aerospace. And you are absolutely right...they are very effective. 
 
We have used them for a wide variety of projects and as well as at a variety of stages within projects.  We have used them in projects ranging from development of billion dollar oil and gas fields to preparing for meetings with congressional committees.  We have used them at the launch of projects as well as at key stages within projects.  Regardless of what we used them for...or the timing...the teams inevitably got a tremendous amount out of them.  They are relatively low cost (usually just the time of the people involved and perhaps some travel) - and target the issues the team is most concerned with. 
 
We have found that key to success is:
  1. Understand the key issues that the team wants to discuss -- what are the things that keep them up at night...or where they say...wow..if I could only answer this question.  Then develop a meeting agenda that allows the team to addresses those issues. 
  2. Select peers that have real world experience that is relevant to the issues.  This doesn't mean that they need to have done exactly the same thing...but that what they have done is applicable to the problems at hand.

    For example in one case we were preparing a design for a subsea oil well that would be drilled from a floating platform.  To complete the well (which involves putting a bunch of tools on the bottom of the drill pipe to clean out the well, perforate casing da...da...da) there is a lot of heavy (i.e., tons) of equipment hung on the end of the drill pipe (which in itself weighs tons).  The peer assist was about the methods that were going to be used to complete the well, but we also brought in a marine engineer that was working on design of the floating platform.  During the meeting, after hearing what was being proposed, the marine engineer did a quick calculation and said....hummm. ...if that is what you are going to do....it will sink the platform we are currently proposing.  The result was the marine engineers went back and redesigned the platform...prior to having done extensive design...and long before we had spent major sums of money on construction or procurement of the "wrong vessel."  Another common situation was to bring in the ultimate users of a product and get their input during the design phase.  The conversation was typically something like...this is what we are proposing because... And the response would be...well for the most part that sounds good....but if....you would do this, make this minor change, put this over here instead of here....it would be easier to use, or easier to maintain...or safer. 
  3. Have the team present enough context for the peers to understand the issues.  This can be done in part by sending out material prior to the meeting...but we have found that if the team does a short presentation outlining the key issues during the meeting this helps set both the tone for the meeting...and helps make sure everyone understands the issues to be addressed.
  4. Don't try to do to much in one peer assist.   Unless you are dealing with a relatively small project or one with narrow scope, break it into pieces where the peers can focus on a select few issues. 
 
I'd be happy to share more of what we have learned  - don't hesitate to give me a call...or send an e-mail.
 
I'd also recommend the book Learning to Fly.  It has the best description of how to run an effective peer assist that I have seen.
 
Regards,
 

Allan Crawford

310-994-1619

www.acrawfordphoto. com

 

 


From: sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:sikmleaders @yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Mark
Sent: Friday, March 26, 2010 7:35 AM
To: sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Peer Assists?

 
Thanks Mark, your idea sounds interesting. . to clarify, I am looking to understand more regarding organizations utilizing the knowledge sharing technique of a peer assist in their day to day prject delivery processes (embedded in workflow and standards of executing projects). How something like this has been presented to leadership as a method for "getting better at what you do" by adding in the peer assist step prior to projects, engagememnts, etc.. do you think this knowledge sharing approach is more fitted to communities or within more organizational focused team structures? I like to think both but I am very interested in organizational (team) knowledge sharing aspects. e.g. if a national organization wanted to learn from its international peers on project approaches and best practices what would be the best approach for setting the stage for this that is a business oriented focused approach that they will "grasp on" to? I would be interested in different view points on this. Thanks..

--- In sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com, mark.tilbury@ ... wrote:
>
> Not sure if this answers the question but we use 'virtual' scouts within one of our Yammer community groups and physical scouts - thererole is to stage manage discussion and act as connectors for meetings withn their groups. Happy to expand further if interested. Also find out more at
>  
> http://digitaldivid e.posterous. com/the-knowledg e-scouts
>
> --- On Fri, 26/3/10, Mark <mpreissler@ ...> wrote:
>
>
> From: Mark
> Subject: [sikmleaders] Peer Assists?
> To: sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com
> Date: Friday, 26 March, 2010, 13:58
>
>
>  
>
>
>
>
> Peer Assists?? A Peer Assist can be organized in a workshop or meeting
> form to gain knowledge and insight from people in other teams before
> embarking on a project or activity where they have experience. Is there
> anyone effectively utilizing this KM concept of the "peer assists" in
> their organization as a process for preparation prior to projects or
> activities? Seems to me this is a bit more focused than a roundtable and
> the results are very beneficial to the "receiver" and the peers alike. I
> would like to understand more about your approach and organizational
> adoption from those who have effectively done this. Peer assist on peer
> assists??
>


Re: Peer Assists? #peer-assist

Dave Cerrone
 

In the context of Marketing projects in our business, we have identified SME's (subject matter experts) who get notified when a new Marketing project is initiated that relates to their areas of expertise. This does not drive a strict process for peer review, however it enables the SME's to review the (required) project scoping document, and provide input and coaching on project approach and process, as needed. This also enables the SME's to help connect the dots with similar past projects, to leverage best practices and learning's, and avoid duplication of efforts.

Obviously this only works if/when people initiate their new projects into the tracking system...so it requires that we work with leadership to weave some level of review of project activity into their operational processes/meetings. I think that as project leaders start to feel the benefits of entering in their projects, they may start to do it because "they want to" vs "they have to".

Outside of the project tracking system, we also meet monthly with all the SME's to review the projects and discuss learning's.

The SME's also maintain documented guides on the project components relating to their areas, that the project leaders can leverage. The next level that we'll be moving toward is having the SME's provide project process and project quality "scores" to completed projects...not for the purpose of surfacing this as a negative, but more to help identify the strengths and development areas for the teams, relative to Marketing Excellence...which after all is what our goal is.

- Dave

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, "StanGarfield" <stangarfield@...> wrote:


Thanks to Mark P. for posting this question and to Mark T. and Allan for
responding. I would like to ask the other community members who have
used peer assists if they would also reply with a few words about how
they have used them and the results they experienced. Thanks a lot.

I am looking to understand more regarding organizations utilizing the
knowledge sharing
technique of a peer assist in their day to day project delivery
processes
(embedded in workflow and standards of executing projects). How
something
like this has been presented to leadership as a method for "getting
better
at what you do" by adding in the peer assist step prior to projects,
engagements, etc. Do you think this knowledge sharing approach is more
fitted to communities or within more organizational focused team
structures?

I like to think both but I am very interested in organizational (team)
knowledge sharing aspects. e.g., if a national organization wanted to
learn
from its international peers on project approaches and best practices,
what
would be the best approach for setting the stage for this, that is a
business
oriented focused approach, that they will "grasp on" to? I would be
interested in different view points on this.


Re: Peer Assists? #peer-assist

 

I use peer assist regularly… While CKO at Acquisition Solutions from 2005-2009 we used peer assists to bring our engagement teams together to share practices and solve challenges before they engaged with or delivered services to our clients.  At ASI, it was all about reducing risk in performance and increasing the probability of success.

 

For other clients, I use peer assists to transfer knowledge between teams transferring project responsibility before the new team executes its project management plan..just a few examples..all are facilitated conversations.

 

Best

 

Bill

 

Bill Kaplan CPCM | Great Falls, Virginia 22066 | 571.934.7408 | 703.401.4198 (direct) | Linked In: www.linkedin.com/in/ckobillkaplan

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Learn more about that value we provide at www.workingknowledge-csp.com

 

 

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From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of StanGarfield
Sent: Wednesday, March 31, 2010 12:11
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Peer Assists?

 

 


Thanks to Mark P. for posting this question and to Mark T. and Allan for
responding. I would like to ask the other community members who have
used peer assists if they would also reply with a few words about how
they have used them and the results they experienced. Thanks a lot.

> I am looking to understand more regarding organizations utilizing the
knowledge sharing
> technique of a peer assist in their day to day project delivery
processes
> (embedded in workflow and standards of executing projects). How
something
> like this has been presented to leadership as a method for "getting
better
> at what you do" by adding in the peer assist step prior to projects,
> engagements, etc. Do you think this knowledge sharing approach is more
> fitted to communities or within more organizational focused team
structures?

> I like to think both but I am very interested in organizational (team)
> knowledge sharing aspects. e.g., if a national organization wanted to
learn
> from its international peers on project approaches and best practices,
what
> would be the best approach for setting the stage for this, that is a
business
> oriented focused approach, that they will "grasp on" to? I would be
> interested in different view points on this.


Re: Peer Assists? #peer-assist

Stan Garfield
 

Thanks to Mark P. for posting this question and to Mark T. and Allan for
responding. I would like to ask the other community members who have
used peer assists if they would also reply with a few words about how
they have used them and the results they experienced. Thanks a lot.

I am looking to understand more regarding organizations utilizing the
knowledge sharing
technique of a peer assist in their day to day project delivery
processes
(embedded in workflow and standards of executing projects). How
something
like this has been presented to leadership as a method for "getting
better
at what you do" by adding in the peer assist step prior to projects,
engagements, etc. Do you think this knowledge sharing approach is more
fitted to communities or within more organizational focused team
structures?

I like to think both but I am very interested in organizational (team)
knowledge sharing aspects. e.g., if a national organization wanted to
learn
from its international peers on project approaches and best practices,
what
would be the best approach for setting the stage for this, that is a
business
oriented focused approach, that they will "grasp on" to? I would be
interested in different view points on this.


Verbal wiki conversation #wikis #conversation

Arthur Shelley
 

About a month ago I posted about the whiteboard social network analysis activity we do at KMLF.  Last night I facilitated a "verbal wiki" - a facilitated conversation about a range of knowledge related topics the students have research and linked in their wiki.  With the wiki written, the students each shared what they had learnt in the "Conversation that Matters" format.  The activity was "captured" as a single image representing the links between the topics as they happened in the conversation.  Deliberately there was no specific structure to the conversation, they were asked to add their learnings at a point in the conversation where it appeared to link to what was being said.

Definitely a rich learning experience for the students and a great way to learn, combining research, wiki, conversation and rich image through emergent interactions between people with related interests.  The image a short blog post can be found here: http://organizationalzoo.blogspot.com/2010/03/wiki-conversation-visualised.html

Regards
Arthur Shelley
Tweeting as Metaphorage



Re: How to get people more willing to ask for help in a public forum #trust #motivation #CoP

Nancy Dixon
 

Excellent! Kudos to Bruce Karney!
Nancy
Nancy M. Dixon
Common Knowledge Associates
 512 912 6100

now blogging at www.nancydixonblog.com







Re: KM Leaders: What are your top 1-3 priorities in 2010? #state-of-KM

 

We deployed SharePoint in our infrastructure the end of 2009 and are seeing tremendous excitement from our newly formed communities. Our strategy last year was to define priority projects and show value quickly.

Top 3 Priorities for 2010 and beyond.

1. Focused Deployment Strategy. Stay on top of the demand for collaboration and business process improvements by effectively prioritizing groups tied directly to the organization goals and mission. Use both informal networks and formal channels to communicate success stories of how groups are using the new tools to solve real business problems. We hope to have all Departments leveraging SharePoint to support their Managed Content, Collaboration, and selected Business Processes by the end of the year. We are taking a phased approach focusing on highest value content and critical projects and processes first.

2. Increase our KM Maturity and Adoption. Increase adoption of new ways of working through focused attention to Personal KM techniques that are easiest to integrate into employees' day to day work. Educate the internal KM team on how to leverage out of the box technologies to solve communication problems and get work done. Nurture our power users to be the advocates of the KM mission and help fellow employees use the methods and technology when solving collaboration issues. We want to get to a place where people will help each other adopt the new tools to share knowledge and make better decisions.

3. Create a Helping Culture. Engage our Internal Clients and provide superior customer service. Do the best we can to listen and understand our internal customers' pain. Recommend and clearly articulate the path that can be taken to address their collaboration and process improvement requirements.

Dee Anne (Kotzur) Gavlick
Knowledge Manager
International Partnership for Microbicides
8401 Colesville Road, Suite 200
Silver Spring, MD 20910
http://www.linkedin.com/in/deeannegavlick

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <tman9999@...> wrote:

Take 2 :-)

Would like to hear from CKOs, KM Leaders, Community Leaders, other practictioners who are responsible for KM in their organizations. What are your main strategic objectives for KM in 2010? Thanks.

-Tom Short
TSC
San Francisco, CA

7241 - 7260 of 9247