Date   

Re: Examples of organizations taking a genuinely strategic approach to knowledge management #call-for #case-studies

Lee, Jim <jlee@...>
 

In a recent study of ours, I found that both Michelin and Rolls-Royce to have the strategic intent for knowledge that you’re interested in.

……………………………………....

Jim Lee, PMP

KM Senior Advisor, APQC

+1-713-893-7790 - Direct

+1-216-338-3548 - Mobile

jlee@...

www.apqc.org

 

APQC’s 15th Annual KM Conference and Training is back in Houston in April 2010. If YOU only ATTEND one conference in 2010, make it this ONE

 


Examples of organizations taking a genuinely strategic approach to knowledge management #call-for #case-studies

Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Hello,

I'd like to know if anyone on this list has come across an organization that they think is using either knowledge management or organizational learning principles in a genuinely strategic way - i.e. it's actually influencing the strategic direction of the organization.

If you would like to put forward your own organization then that is fine (but I may be a little sceptical).

The reason for this request is there's a part of the book that I'm writing where I want to explore this situation (although anything you send to me publicly or privately will be not be published without your permission).

Regards,

Matt


Re: Knowledge Workers? #workplace

Tom <tman9999@...>
 

Hello Tiffany - great points. The Greeks used the word metis to describe the kind of knowledge that one develops through experience over time. It is not easily describable, much less tranmittable, and therefore difficult for companies to focus on - yet it is precisely the kind of knowledge that makes them anxious when they consider losing someone like the mailroom supervisor you described. My friend and colleague, Larry Prusak, introduced me to this concept while we were at IBM, and he wrote a nice short piece about it here.

Cheers!

-Tom Short
Knowledge Transfer, Metrics
tom.short at sbcglobal.net
http://shortnames.wordpress.com/


--- In sikmleaders@..., Tiffany Tyler wrote:
>
> In reference to the knowledge in a secretary or other support staff, I think
> that "surprise" is (should be) a big wakeup call to managers.  Support staff
> hold all kinds of tacit knowledge that keeps the enterprise running.  If you
> do an organizational network analysis as part of your loss risk, or any
> other KM project, you find those "hidden" critical points in EVERY
> organization.  My personal favorite was a mailroom supervisor.  I  have
> found many of my previous clients resistant to the idea of including support
> staff in KM exercises until I do a small test.
>
> "What would happen to this department if (X) left for 60 days?"
>
>
> *Tiffany Tyler*
> Human Capital Specialist
> Resources Global Professionals


Re: Knowledge Workers? #workplace

Murray Jennex
 

sorry all, fat fingers, what I was saying is that the key component of our process was a skills and capabilities catalog.  This also ties in well with the strategy discussion that's been going on as all our assessments were tied to identifying persons with key knowledge for the organization.  Thanks...murray
 

In a message dated 4/8/2010 6:47:33 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, albert.simard@... writes:


Tiffany –

 

Actually, this is exactly why, in the Canadian Forest Service, we developed a Directory of Expertise and Skills” (DOES) to include the valuable knowledge held by those who are not classed as Subject Matter Experts.

 

 Al


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of bill@...
Sent: Wednesday, April 07, 2010 10:21 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Workers?

 

 

Tiffany

 

You are so right!! 

 

So consider, “Knowledge is where you find it!”

 

Bill

 

Bill Kaplan CPCM | Great Falls, Virginia 22066 | 571.934.7408 | 703.401.4198 (direct) | Linked In: www.linkedin.com/in/ckobillkaplan

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Learn more about that value we provide at www.workingknowledge-csp.com

 

 

The information contained in this e-mail and any attachments is intended solely for the use of the individual or individuals to whom it is addressed and others who are authorized to receive it. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that unauthorized use, copying or disclosure is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. If you have received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately.  Since this communication may contain confidential or legally privileged information, please do not forward to any third party without written authorization from the sender or Working KnowledgeCSP.

 

From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tiffany Tyler
Sent: Wednesday, April 07, 2010 09:03
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Workers?

 

 

In reference to the knowledge in a secretary or other support staff, I think that "surprise" is (should be) a big wakeup call to managers.  Support staff hold all kinds of tacit knowledge that keeps the enterprise running.  If you do an organizational network analysis as part of your loss risk, or any other KM project, you find those "hidden" critical points in EVERY organization.  My personal favorite was a mailroom supervisor.  I  have found many of my previous clients resistant to the idea of including support staff in KM exercises until I do a small test.

"What would happen to this department if (X) left for 60 days?"


Tiffany Tyler
Human Capital Specialist
Resources Global Professionals

On Tue, Apr 6, 2010 at 8:07 PM, <murphjen@aol.com> wrote:

 

John has attended many of our KM sessions at HICSS and I've had the pleasure of conversing.  Our group at HICSS tends to agree with John only in a reverse way, we just consider everyone a knowledge worker to some degree.  A few months ago I mentioned my knowledge loss risk process and the funny thing when we piloted it was that the long term executive secretary scored very high on the potential to be a loss of knowledge should she leave, it kind of surprised the clients...murray

 

 

In a message dated 4/6/2010 12:34:43 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, fred@nickols.us writes:

John Seely Brown is one of the authors of a very interesting piece at this link:

It calls into question the validity and utility of identifying people as knowledge workers.

Fred Nickols
fred@nickols.us

 

 


Re: Knowledge Workers? #workplace

Murray Jennex
 

Good point Al, this was exactly why also the
 

In a message dated 4/8/2010 6:47:33 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, albert.simard@... writes:


Tiffany –

 

Actually, this is exactly why, in the Canadian Forest Service, we developed a Directory of Expertise and Skills” (DOES) to include the valuable knowledge held by those who are not classed as Subject Matter Experts.

 

 Al


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of bill@...
Sent: Wednesday, April 07, 2010 10:21 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Workers?

 

 

Tiffany

 

You are so right!! 

 

So consider, “Knowledge is where you find it!”

 

Bill

 

Bill Kaplan CPCM | Great Falls, Virginia 22066 | 571.934.7408 | 703.401.4198 (direct) | Linked In: www.linkedin.com/in/ckobillkaplan

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Learn more about that value we provide at www.workingknowledge-csp.com

 

 

The information contained in this e-mail and any attachments is intended solely for the use of the individual or individuals to whom it is addressed and others who are authorized to receive it. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that unauthorized use, copying or disclosure is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. If you have received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately.  Since this communication may contain confidential or legally privileged information, please do not forward to any third party without written authorization from the sender or Working KnowledgeCSP.

 

From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tiffany Tyler
Sent: Wednesday, April 07, 2010 09:03
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Workers?

 

 

In reference to the knowledge in a secretary or other support staff, I think that "surprise" is (should be) a big wakeup call to managers.  Support staff hold all kinds of tacit knowledge that keeps the enterprise running.  If you do an organizational network analysis as part of your loss risk, or any other KM project, you find those "hidden" critical points in EVERY organization.  My personal favorite was a mailroom supervisor.  I  have found many of my previous clients resistant to the idea of including support staff in KM exercises until I do a small test.

"What would happen to this department if (X) left for 60 days?"


Tiffany Tyler
Human Capital Specialist
Resources Global Professionals

On Tue, Apr 6, 2010 at 8:07 PM, <murphjen@aol.com> wrote:

 

John has attended many of our KM sessions at HICSS and I've had the pleasure of conversing.  Our group at HICSS tends to agree with John only in a reverse way, we just consider everyone a knowledge worker to some degree.  A few months ago I mentioned my knowledge loss risk process and the funny thing when we piloted it was that the long term executive secretary scored very high on the potential to be a loss of knowledge should she leave, it kind of surprised the clients...murray

 

 

In a message dated 4/6/2010 12:34:43 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, fred@nickols.us writes:

John Seely Brown is one of the authors of a very interesting piece at this link:

It calls into question the validity and utility of identifying people as knowledge workers.

Fred Nickols
fred@nickols.us

 

 


Re: Knowledge Workers? #workplace

Murray Jennex
 

In the particular case I cited the client realized that there are two kinds of experience, the direct experience of leading/doing projects and then the observational experience of being there when projects and activities happen.  I had purposefully included both types of experience in the evaluation as both can tell the "story" of what happened.  This is something I think a lot of organizations don't realize.  Observational skill transforms into great knowledge capture/retention and many staff personnel have this skill....murray
 
Murray E. Jennex
San Diego State University
Editor in Chief International Journal of Knowledge Management
 

In a message dated 4/8/2010 11:01:40 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, tman9999@... writes:


Hello Tiffany - great points. The Greeks used the word metis to describe the kind of knowledge that one develops through experience over time. It is not easily describable, much less tranmittable, and therefore difficult for companies to focus on - yet it is precisely the kind of knowledge that makes them anxious when they consider losing someone like the mailroom supervisor you described. My friend and colleague, Larry Prusak, introduced me to this concept while we were at IBM, and he wrote a nice short piece about it here.

Cheers!

-Tom Short
Knowledge Transfer, Metrics
tom.short at sbcglobal.net
http://shortnames.wordpress.com/

--- In sikmleaders@..., Tiffany Tyler wrote:
>
> In reference to the knowledge in a secretary or other support staff, I think
> that "surprise" is (should be) a big wakeup call to managers.  Support staff
> hold all kinds of tacit knowledge that keeps the enterprise running.  If you
> do an organizational network analysis as part of your loss risk, or any
> other KM project, you find those "hidden" critical points in EVERY
> organization.  My personal favorite was a mailroom supervisor.  I  have
> found many of my previous clients resistant to the idea of including support
> staff in KM exercises until I do a small test.
>
> "What would happen to this department if (X) left for 60 days?"
>
>
> *Tiffany Tyler*
> Human Capital Specialist
> Resources Global Professionals


Re: Knowledge Workers? #workplace

Simard, Albert <albert.simard@...>
 

Tiffany –

 

Actually, this is exactly why, in the Canadian Forest Service, we developed a Directory of Expertise and Skills” (DOES) to include the valuable knowledge held by those who are not classed as Subject Matter Experts.

 

 Al


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of bill@...
Sent: Wednesday, April 07, 2010 10:21 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Workers?

 

 

Tiffany

 

You are so right!! 

 

So consider, “Knowledge is where you find it!”

 

Bill

 

Bill Kaplan CPCM | Great Falls, Virginia 22066 | 571.934.7408 | 703.401.4198 (direct) | Linked In: www.linkedin.com/in/ckobillkaplan

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Learn more about that value we provide at www.workingknowledge-csp.com

 

 

The information contained in this e-mail and any attachments is intended solely for the use of the individual or individuals to whom it is addressed and others who are authorized to receive it. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that unauthorized use, copying or disclosure is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. If you have received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately.  Since this communication may contain confidential or legally privileged information, please do not forward to any third party without written authorization from the sender or Working KnowledgeCSP.

 

From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tiffany Tyler
Sent: Wednesday, April 07, 2010 09:03
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Workers?

 

 

In reference to the knowledge in a secretary or other support staff, I think that "surprise" is (should be) a big wakeup call to managers.  Support staff hold all kinds of tacit knowledge that keeps the enterprise running.  If you do an organizational network analysis as part of your loss risk, or any other KM project, you find those "hidden" critical points in EVERY organization.  My personal favorite was a mailroom supervisor.  I  have found many of my previous clients resistant to the idea of including support staff in KM exercises until I do a small test.

"What would happen to this department if (X) left for 60 days?"


Tiffany Tyler
Human Capital Specialist
Resources Global Professionals

On Tue, Apr 6, 2010 at 8:07 PM, <murphjen@aol.com> wrote:

 

John has attended many of our KM sessions at HICSS and I've had the pleasure of conversing.  Our group at HICSS tends to agree with John only in a reverse way, we just consider everyone a knowledge worker to some degree.  A few months ago I mentioned my knowledge loss risk process and the funny thing when we piloted it was that the long term executive secretary scored very high on the potential to be a loss of knowledge should she leave, it kind of surprised the clients...murray

 

 

In a message dated 4/6/2010 12:34:43 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, fred@nickols.us writes:

John Seely Brown is one of the authors of a very interesting piece at this link:

It calls into question the validity and utility of identifying people as knowledge workers.

Fred Nickols
fred@nickols.us

 

 


Re: Knowledge Workers? #workplace

 

Tiffany

 

You are so right!! 

 

So consider, “Knowledge is where you find it!”

 

Bill

 

Bill Kaplan CPCM | Great Falls, Virginia 22066 | 571.934.7408 | 703.401.4198 (direct) | Linked In: www.linkedin.com/in/ckobillkaplan

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Learn more about that value we provide at www.workingknowledge-csp.com

 

 

The information contained in this e-mail and any attachments is intended solely for the use of the individual or individuals to whom it is addressed and others who are authorized to receive it. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that unauthorized use, copying or disclosure is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. If you have received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately.  Since this communication may contain confidential or legally privileged information, please do not forward to any third party without written authorization from the sender or Working KnowledgeCSP.

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Tiffany Tyler
Sent: Wednesday, April 07, 2010 09:03
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Workers?

 

 

In reference to the knowledge in a secretary or other support staff, I think that "surprise" is (should be) a big wakeup call to managers.  Support staff hold all kinds of tacit knowledge that keeps the enterprise running.  If you do an organizational network analysis as part of your loss risk, or any other KM project, you find those "hidden" critical points in EVERY organization.  My personal favorite was a mailroom supervisor.  I  have found many of my previous clients resistant to the idea of including support staff in KM exercises until I do a small test.

"What would happen to this department if (X) left for 60 days?"


Tiffany Tyler
Human Capital Specialist
Resources Global Professionals

On Tue, Apr 6, 2010 at 8:07 PM, <murphjen@...> wrote:

 

John has attended many of our KM sessions at HICSS and I've had the pleasure of conversing.  Our group at HICSS tends to agree with John only in a reverse way, we just consider everyone a knowledge worker to some degree.  A few months ago I mentioned my knowledge loss risk process and the funny thing when we piloted it was that the long term executive secretary scored very high on the potential to be a loss of knowledge should she leave, it kind of surprised the clients...murray

 

 

In a message dated 4/6/2010 12:34:43 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, fred@... writes:

John Seely Brown is one of the authors of a very interesting piece at this link:

It calls into question the validity and utility of identifying people as knowledge workers.

Fred Nickols
fred@...

 

 


Re: Request for strategy assistance #strategy

jason.swan@...
 

All,

 

Before I let too much time go by, I want to thank y’all for the generous offers of help and information and for the samples and supporting documentation that have been freely distributed.  Since KM is only one of my projects, it may take me a couple of days to get back to all who have contacted me.   I just want to express my appreciation via the forum, and will get in touch with those who responded to my request directly.

 

BTW, I don’t wish to end this discussion…  I just had so many responses that I felt a need to offer thanks before too much time goes by.

 

Regards,

 

Jason Swan

Lead Instructional Systems Designer

-----------------------------------------

 

1228 E. Main St.

Havelock, NC 28532

Phone: (252) 444-0927

Fax: (252) 444-3129

 


Re: Knowledge Workers? #workplace

Tiffany Tyler
 

In reference to the knowledge in a secretary or other support staff, I think that "surprise" is (should be) a big wakeup call to managers.  Support staff hold all kinds of tacit knowledge that keeps the enterprise running.  If you do an organizational network analysis as part of your loss risk, or any other KM project, you find those "hidden" critical points in EVERY organization.  My personal favorite was a mailroom supervisor.  I  have found many of my previous clients resistant to the idea of including support staff in KM exercises until I do a small test.

"What would happen to this department if (X) left for 60 days?"


Tiffany Tyler
Human Capital Specialist
Resources Global Professionals


On Tue, Apr 6, 2010 at 8:07 PM, <murphjen@...> wrote:
 

John has attended many of our KM sessions at HICSS and I've had the pleasure of conversing.  Our group at HICSS tends to agree with John only in a reverse way, we just consider everyone a knowledge worker to some degree.  A few months ago I mentioned my knowledge loss risk process and the funny thing when we piloted it was that the long term executive secretary scored very high on the potential to be a loss of knowledge should she leave, it kind of surprised the clients...murray
 
 
In a message dated 4/6/2010 12:34:43 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, fred@... writes:
John Seely Brown is one of the authors of a very interesting piece at this link:

It calls into question the validity and utility of identifying people as knowledge workers.

Fred Nickols
fred@...
 



Re: Request for strategy assistance #strategy

Murray Jennex
 

I've seen a lot of good responses and so I'd thought I'd throw in something a little different based on a study of utilities doing Y2K:
 

Jennex and Weiss (2001) studied Utility Y2K projects to determine what knowledge benefits were gained - Found significant knowledge benefits but little being done to capture them

 

Jennex, Olfman, and Addo (2003) hypothesized that knowledge benefits weren’t being captured due to a lack of a KM strategy:

Used a survey to collect data on KM programs and strategy

Used MANOVA to analyze results

Found that organizations that had a knowledge management organization and strategy both during Y2K and after were doing significantly more to capture knowledge benefits than organizations that didn’t have a KM program or that only had one during Y2K or after

Used twice as many capture actions as the other 2 groups

 

Expected Actions From KM Strategy (as identified by the survey)

Modification of processes/procedures as a result of Organizational Learning

Creation of new processes/ procedures as a result of Organizational Learning

Creation/Modification of KM support tools to support the KMS and knowledge use

Increased utilization of personnel who create, share, and/or utilize organizational knowledge at higher levels of authority/responsibility

Use of lessons learned reports or post activity assessment to review and capture what was learned during organizational activities

Creation of a learning organization

 

So what I learned from this is that an organization is much more likely to succeed in capturing and reusing knowledge if they have a KM strategy and a listing of activities that had greater than 90% agreement on.  I think it very interesting that the above is pretty consistent with the previous posts.  Thanks....murray jennex (San Diego State University, editor in chief International Journal of Knowledge Management)

 

In a message dated 4/6/2010 7:55:56 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, jason.swan@... writes:


Hi all,

 

I recently found your group and have been appreciating the depth of the discussion that has been going on here for the last week, or so.  However, at this point, I’m in need of some “nuts-and-bolts” type of information.

 

I work for a company that is part of L-3 Communications.  We supply training and engineering support services to the US military.  I’ve been give the responsibility for directing our company’s knowledge management initiative, including the development of a knowledge management system.  Our company is more than 25 years old, we have more than 500 employees and more than 30 locations around the world.  Like many companies, we haven’t yet crossed the bridge to becoming a learning organization, and we struggle with knowledge attrition and wasted effort.

 

Since being tasked with developing a KMS, I have assembled a team and we have recognized that we need to approach KM as a human system, rather than a technology system.  We have support from our executive management to initiate behavior changes as well as technological changes at a corporate level.  However, no one in our company has experience with developing or deploying a KMS.  We have made excellent progress by researching and reading, and I’ve made some valuable connections with other L-3 Communications personnel, but I am still unable to get on top of the strategy.  I feel like I need a defined strategy before I can make more progress in our effort.

 

I have no idea what the strategy should look like or what a good “model” strategy would contain.  Can anyone share examples of strategies that might provide me with some direction?  We have long-range goals, and we are stirring around some ideas for short-range goals.  And our business has some important strategies for acquiring and maintaining business.  How do those things relate to a specific KM strategy?  What are the components of a KM strategy?  How does the KM strategy inform subsequent steps of design and implementation?  Once we have a strategy, I feel like I can draft out a roadmap to get us to implementation. 

 

Thanks in advance!

 

Regards,

 

Jason Swan

Lead Instructional Systems Designer

-----------------------------------------

 

1228 E. Main St.

Havelock, NC 28532

Phone: (252) 444-0927

Fax: (252) 444-3129

 

 


Re: Request for strategy assistance #strategy

Stephen Bounds
 

Patrick's comments about ensuring that your strategy ties in to the broader business objectives is spot on.

Also, just to follow on from Fred's comments about strategy -- if you've never written a strategy document before then it can be a bit daunting.

When I first switched from a technical position into a management role a few years back, I documented some of the lessons I learnt at the time as a "Business Basics" series on my blog: http://bounds.net.au/node/5

In particular, you might find the article "Writing a strategy document" to be useful.

I'm by no means an expert but these resources got me started at a time when I felt like I had been thrown in the deep end!

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

On 7/04/2010 2:49 AM, Fred wrote:


Jason:

I think you've gotten some good responses re "KM Strategy" so I'll go up
a click to strategy itself. Strategy, along with tactics, is a means to
an end; it speaks to how a particular goal or objective will be
attained. So you have to be clear about the ends in order to formulate a
strategy.


Re: Request for strategy assistance #strategy

Patrick Lambe
 

This is an excellent set of slides, Stan.

Jason, the important thing to note is that the focus is on corporate goals/objectives (see Stan's slide 6), and then you/your management team asks the question, how can KM interventions support the achievement of these goals?

It's quite easy to get distracted by this new beast "KM" and focus on it, rather than on the corporate goals it's supposed to be enabling. This extends to the language you use. Keep bringing it back to the goals you are furthering, and you'll be on reasonably solid ground.

I have used an adapted form of the Mauborgne and Kim Strategy Canvas (from their book Blue Ocean Strategy) with senior management teams, to map how knowledge supports each of their corporate goals, what gaps need to be met, and what should be prioritised. Happy to describe this further offline.

P

Patrick Lambe


Have you seen our KM Method Cards or
Organisation Culture Cards?  





On Apr 7, 2010, at 6:44 AM, StanGarfield wrote:


The slides that I recently presented to KM Chicago may be helpful. They are taken from my book.

 

 



Re: Knowledge Workers? #workplace

Arthur Shelley
 

Matt and Fred,

 

Certainly this strategy worked very well when we developed the global Chocolate Expert community at Cadbury.

We were specifically looking for collaborative opportunities using the strapline:  Connect, Collaborate, Capitalise.  We were able to collate many success stories with tangible benefits and I would still argue that the intangibles were still far more important to performance improvement in terms of engagement, participation, mentoring and development of new employees and increased leverage of collective capabilities.

 

After it was interacting for about 18 months we did a social network analysis which showed many new connections between people across the world. Although the numbers active in the teleconferences were relatively low (10-20 typically), the SNA showed a community of 247 people, 50 of which were outside the organisation (represented by past employees, suppliers, customers etc).  The reach of the informal network is important to knowledge flow and flow increases rapidly when people have specific requirements to collaborate around.

Regards,
Arthur Shelley
Founder: Intelligent Answers & Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
Author:
The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
Twitter:
Metaphorage
Blog: http//organizationalzoo.blogspot.com 
Ph +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley 
Free Zoo Behavioural Profiles:
www.organizationalzoo.com


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Matt Moore
Sent: Wednesday, 7 April 2010 10:25 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Workers?

 

 

Nice one, Fred. One comment that stood out for me was:

"We should aggressively create opportunities for people within our organization to work together with leading edge talent outside our organization so that both sides can develop their talent even more rapidly. In driving scalable learning, we must expand our horizons far beyond the boundaries of our own firm."

 

 


From: Fred us>
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wed, April 7, 2010 5:24:28 AM
Subject: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Workers?

 

John Seely Brown is one of the authors of a very interesting piece at this link:

http://www.bloomber g.com/apps/ harvardbusiness? sid=H12a9b09b214 df3fdba284650b69 531c4

It calls into question the validity and utility of identifying people as knowledge workers.

Fred Nickols
fred@nickols. us

 


Re: Knowledge Workers? #workplace

Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Nice one, Fred. One comment that stood out for me was:

"We should aggressively create opportunities for people within our organization to work together with leading edge talent outside our organization so that both sides can develop their talent even more rapidly. In driving scalable learning, we must expand our horizons far beyond the boundaries of our own firm."



From: Fred
To: sikmleaders@...
Sent: Wed, April 7, 2010 5:24:28 AM
Subject: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Workers?

 

John Seely Brown is one of the authors of a very interesting piece at this link:

http://www.bloomber g.com/apps/ harvardbusiness? sid=H12a9b09b214 df3fdba284650b69 531c4

It calls into question the validity and utility of identifying people as knowledge workers.

Fred Nickols
fred@nickols. us



Re: Request for strategy assistance #strategy

Stan Garfield
 

The slides that I recently presented to KM Chicago may be helpful. They are taken from my book.

 

 


Re: Knowledge Workers? #workplace

Murray Jennex
 

John has attended many of our KM sessions at HICSS and I've had the pleasure of conversing.  Our group at HICSS tends to agree with John only in a reverse way, we just consider everyone a knowledge worker to some degree.  A few months ago I mentioned my knowledge loss risk process and the funny thing when we piloted it was that the long term executive secretary scored very high on the potential to be a loss of knowledge should she leave, it kind of surprised the clients...murray
 
 

In a message dated 4/6/2010 12:34:43 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, fred@... writes:
John Seely Brown is one of the authors of a very interesting piece at this link:

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/harvardbusiness?sid=H12a9b09b214df3fdba284650b69531c4

It calls into question the validity and utility of identifying people as knowledge workers.

Fred Nickols
fred@...
 


Knowledge Workers? #workplace

Fred Nickols
 
Edited

John Seely Brown is one of the authors of a very interesting piece at this link:

http://web.archive.org/web/20100510193057/https://www.bloomberg.com/apps/harvardbusiness?sid=H12a9b09b214df3fdba284650b69531c4
or
https://hbr.org/2010/04/are-all-employees-knowledge-wo.html

It calls into question the validity and utility of identifying people as knowledge workers.

Fred Nickols
fred@nickols.us


Re: Request for strategy assistance #strategy

Fred Nickols
 

Jason:

I think you've gotten some good responses re "KM Strategy" so I'll go up a click to strategy itself. Strategy, along with tactics, is a means to an end; it speaks to how a particular goal or objective will be attained. So you have to be clear about the ends in order to formulate a strategy. From your inquiry, it seems you have been tasked to develop a knowledge management system (KMS). The first order of business for you is to pin down just what that means. Moreover, a KMS, like strategy, is a means to an end so you need also to pin down the ends this KMS will lead to. Some obvious questions follow:

Just what is meant by a KMS in this context?
How would things be different if a KMS were in place?
What business results is the KMS expected to produce or enhance?
Do you build it and roll it out all at once or in stages?
However you've defined KMS, how will people have to adjust and adapt to it? Who is likely to support or oppose it? Whose support do you need?

I could go on and on; so could others on this list and so could you. Therein lies my point: You need a long list of questions like these and others related to them in order to get clear about just what it is you're going to put in place and call a KMS and what kinds of changes are involved in doing that. Your "strategy" will emerge from that kind of thinking and analysis.

Finally, keep in mind the link between strategy and execution.

If you've got the right strategy but don't execute well, you will have muffed it.

If you've got the wrong strategy and you do execute it well, you run the risk of shooting yourself in the foot.

If you've got the wrong strategy and don't execute well, your effort is doomed from the beginning.

Only if you've got the right strategy and execute it well do you have a chance of succeeding.

The right strategy will emerge from some solid strategic thinking rooted in questions like those above and others you can add to the list. Good execution? Well, I'll assume you and your folks can do that.

Good luck,

Fred Nickols
Managing Partner
Distance Consulting LLC
fred@nickols.us
www.skullworks.com

"Assistance at a Distance"

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, jason.swan@... wrote:

Hi all,



I recently found your group and have been appreciating the depth of the
discussion that has been going on here for the last week, or so.
However, at this point, I'm in need of some "nuts-and-bolts" type of
information.



I work for a company that is part of L-3 Communications. We supply
training and engineering support services to the US military. I've been
give the responsibility for directing our company's knowledge management
initiative, including the development of a knowledge management system.
Our company is more than 25 years old, we have more than 500 employees
and more than 30 locations around the world. Like many companies, we
haven't yet crossed the bridge to becoming a learning organization, and
we struggle with knowledge attrition and wasted effort.



Since being tasked with developing a KMS, I have assembled a team and we
have recognized that we need to approach KM as a human system, rather
than a technology system. We have support from our executive management
to initiate behavior changes as well as technological changes at a
corporate level. However, no one in our company has experience with
developing or deploying a KMS. We have made excellent progress by
researching and reading, and I've made some valuable connections with
other L-3 Communications personnel, but I am still unable to get on top
of the strategy. I feel like I need a defined strategy before I can
make more progress in our effort.



I have no idea what the strategy should look like or what a good "model"
strategy would contain. Can anyone share examples of strategies that
might provide me with some direction? We have long-range goals, and we
are stirring around some ideas for short-range goals. And our business
has some important strategies for acquiring and maintaining business.
How do those things relate to a specific KM strategy? What are the
components of a KM strategy? How does the KM strategy inform subsequent
steps of design and implementation? Once we have a strategy, I feel
like I can draft out a roadmap to get us to implementation.



Thanks in advance!



Regards,



Jason Swan

Lead Instructional Systems Designer

-----------------------------------------





1228 E. Main St.

Havelock, NC 28532

Phone: (252) 444-0927

Fax: (252) 444-3129


Re: Request for strategy assistance #strategy

Allan Crawford
 

Jason,
 
Another book that you might want to look at is Learning to Fly by Collison and Parcell.  It provides not only a good overall KM model, but also provides an excellent "how to section" on a wide variety of KM techniques and processes. 



From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of crosspe2@...
Sent: Tuesday, April 06, 2010 8:55 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Request for strategy assistance

 

Hello Jason,
I might suggest the easiest place to start would be by getting a copy of the book, "The Complete Idiot's Guide to Knowledge Management". It has a section on KM strategy, but in actuality the structure of the whole book (as seen through the Table of Contents, for example) is itself a great starting point for defining a structure for a holistic organizational strategy for KM. (and not just for Idiots. :)
Pete Crossley

Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


From: jason.swan@l-3com.com
Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2010 10:55:41 -0400
To: yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [sikmleaders] Request for strategy assistance

 

Hi all,

I recently found your group and have been appreciating the depth of the discussion that has been going on here for the last week, or so.  However, at this point, I’m in need of some “nuts-and-bolts” type of information.

I work for a company that is part of L-3 Communications.  We supply training and engineering support services to the US military.  I’ve been give the responsibility for directing our company’s knowledge management initiative, including the development of a knowledge management system.  Our company is more than 25 years old, we have more than 500 employees and more than 30 locations around the world.  Like many companies, we haven’t yet crossed the bridge to becoming a learning organization, and we struggle with knowledge attrition and wasted effort.

Since being tasked with developing a KMS, I have assembled a team and we have recognized that we need to approach KM as a human system, rather than a technology system.  We have support from our executive management to initiate behavior changes as well as technological changes at a corporate level.  However, no one in our company has experience with developing or deploying a KMS.  We have made excellent progress by researching and reading, and I’ve made some valuable connections with other L-3 Communications personnel, but I am still unable to get on top of the strategy.  I feel like I need a defined strategy before I can make more progress in our effort.

I have no idea what the strategy should look like or what a good “model” strategy would contain.  Can anyone share examples of strategies that might provide me with some direction?  We have long-range goals, and we are stirring around some ideas for short-range goals.  And our business has some important strategies for acquiring and maintaining business.  How do those things relate to a specific KM strategy?  What are the components of a KM strategy?  How does the KM strategy inform subsequent steps of design and implementation?  Once we have a strategy, I feel like I can draft out a roadmap to get us to implementation. 

Thanks in advance!

Regards,

Jason Swan

Lead Instructional Systems Designer

-----------------------------------------

1228 E. Main St.

Havelock, NC 28532

Phone: (252) 444-0927

Fax: (252) 444-3129

7361 - 7380 of 9381