Date   

Re: Taking on Library Services - seeking guidance #library

Simard, Albert <albert.simard@...>
 

Tammy –

 

You may find the following presentation useful:

 

http://www.slideshare.net/Al.Simard/the-knowledge-economywherefore-libraries

 

Al Simard

 


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Tammy
Sent: Friday, July 06, 2012 6:15 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Taking on Library Services - seeking guidance

 

 

In my pursuit of successful library management, I'm interested in your experiences, where applicable.

My KM responsibilities in our consumer goods company live within the insights division which also boasts of a incredible library veteran who is soon to retire. We are not hiring to fill his vacancy as I'll be taking on management of the library in addition to my current responsibilities. There is much to learn and knowledge transfer of our current library practices is progressing smoothly. If you have experience you can share, please do!

I am visiting SLA in a week, so plan to fill my mind with all things library there too. If you are going and can take a few minutes to connect in person, I'd look forward to it.

Thanks! A few of my curiosities follow below....

Best,

Tammy Bearden
Knowledge Management Leader
Consumer Understanding & Insight
Hallmark Cards, Inc.
816-545-0915 | tammy.bearden@...

--How do you align the library with the larger corporate mission?

--What are your primary library deliverables and services?

--What best practices or leading edge practices are you employing?

--What changes do you foresee making in the next 1-3 years?

--What other Corporate Libraries should I study in pursuit of successful library management?


Re: Job Opening in Kalamazoo, MI: Program Knowledge Analyst #jobs

Matthew Loxton
 

Hey Kirk,
I have an even better example - what about a "Knowledge Management Ambassador"?

In that job you would:
Coodinate (sic) web initiatives, from planning through implementation and support.  Primary emphasis will be on Worksite/iManager and supporting the use of a search engine for our intranet,  Working with others in KM, IT, User Support, and Training, this position will support lawyers, paralegals and staff in their use of iManage/WorkSite and other tools
http://www.bullhornreach.com/sites/rethinkrecruitment/job/337382_knowledge-management-ambassador-boston-ma
--
Kind regards
Matthew Loxton
mloxton@...
www.matthewloxton.com
www.google.com/profiles/mhloxton
"Putting knowledge assets to work"


Re: Taking on Library Services - seeking guidance #library

Connie Crosby
 

Hi Tammy:

Congratulations on the new responsibilities. Will you still have librarians/library staff working with you? 

I am a law librarian by training; my former role was as library manager in a Toronto law firm before I started consulting in KM, IM, social media and library management. I will be at SLA, and happy to meet with you. We can take the arrangements off-line.

Some quick responses to your questions that others might find of interest:

--How do you align the library with the larger corporate mission?

Look to see what organizational objectives are information/knowledge related. You have the opportunity now to tie internal and external information together. This may be a good time to conduct an information audit and gap analysis if you haven't done this recently to find out what information needs the organization has and how to bridge any gaps between existing services and what is needed. This is the type of work I do as part of my consulting so can give you some thoughts on that if you haven't done this before. 

--What are your primary library deliverables and services? 

When I was in the law firm it was varied:
> training of law students/ first year associates in legal research
> conducting advanced legal research 
> research guidance for lawyers and students
> conducting other research e.g. industry, news, government, country
> negotiation and oversight of contracts with online research service providers (this took up more time than you would expect)
> purchase and processing of new publications (including cataloguing where applicable)
> routing of new materials from the publishers 
> library budget management, invoice processing, tracking of online research for bill-back purposes
> weeding and finding new homes for old materials no longer needed

Many libraries also get involved in:

> copyright and digital rights management 
> digital assets management
> real-time delivery of information in key areas for the organization
> competitive intelligence (CI)
> business intelligence (BI)
> KM
> intranet / CMS
> records management

I also happened to be the firm's web master and administrated the firm's privacy committee while I was there.


--What best practices or leading edge practices are you employing? 

> just as with KM, it is difficult to transfer best practices from one library to another because user groups and organizations vary significantly
> libraries are attempting to automate as many of the processes as possible to free staff time up for more advanced work such as CI and KM. For example, new newsletter or journal issues arriving to a designated email address may be automatically checked in and distributed to those on routing lists without any human interaction

--What changes do you foresee making in the next 1-3 years? 

There are big shifts of special libraries into:
> delivering information from both internal and external sources at the point where the knowledge worker needs the information
> a stronger KM focus
> stronger ties to the marketing department
> real time information curation and delivery
> publishing
> development and maintenance of taxonomies and metadata for improved search results
> federated search
> increased tracking of online searches to determine usage levels (to show things like underused sources indicating that training may be needed or subscriptions may be reduced)
> use of social media tools
> providing just-in-time training via screencasting and other audio/video tools
> a greater awareness of UX


--What other Corporate Libraries should I study in pursuit of successful library management?

I will have to think about that. As far as law libraries go, Debevoise & Plimpton (http://www.debevoise.com/seems to be a real leader in library and KM. Steven Lastres speaks often about the work the firm is doing as an exemplar. I am sure you will see others at SLA.

I am currently reading the 2012 Ark Group report Adding Value in Corporate Libraries and Information Services by Constance Ard which I would recommend -- http://www.wlrstore.com/ark/Addinvalue-in-corporate-libraries-and-information-services.aspx -- It includes case studies and lots of resources. If you hang on a few days I am hoping to have a discount code to share for this book--it is about to go into its second printing already. Disclaimer: I authored the chapter on social media; however, I do not make any proceeds from the sale. I know, call me crazy. 

I hope this is helpful! Get in touch with me to arrange a time to meet. See you in Chicago!

Cheers,
Connie

Connie Crosby
Crosby Group Consulting
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
416-919-6719 | connie@... | http://twitter.com/conniecrosby
http://www.crosbygroup.ca | http://conniecrosby.blogspot.com | http://slaw.ca




Re: Our 500th Member #milestone

Joel Muzard <joel.muzard@...>
 

Glad to met you Marcia


Joel from Calama in Chile in the 6th Seminar on IT and Human Capital 




Le 2012-07-05 à 17:27, StanGarfield a écrit :

 

Welcome to Marcia Newton, the 500th member of the SIKM Leaders Community. Marcia wrote "I am a Global Knowledge Manager for KPMG in the UK and am interested in collaborating with colleagues who have similar roles and in discussing relevant topics of interest to this community."


Marcia, thanks for joining. You have come to the right place.



Re: Our 500th Member #milestone

Tammy Bearden
 

Welcome Marcia!


--- On Thu, 7/5/12, StanGarfield wrote:

From: StanGarfield
Subject: [sikmleaders] Our 500th Member
To: sikmleaders@...
Date: Thursday, July 5, 2012, 4:27 PM

 

Welcome to Marcia Newton, the 500th member of the SIKM Leaders Community. Marcia wrote "I am a Global Knowledge Manager for KPMG in the UK and am interested in collaborating with colleagues who have similar roles and in discussing relevant topics of interest to this community."


Marcia, thanks for joining. You have come to the right place.


Taking on Library Services - seeking guidance #library

Tammy Bearden
 

In my pursuit of successful library management, I'm interested in your experiences, where applicable.

My KM responsibilities in our consumer goods company live within the insights division which also boasts of a incredible library veteran who is soon to retire. We are not hiring to fill his vacancy as I'll be taking on management of the library in addition to my current responsibilities. There is much to learn and knowledge transfer of our current library practices is progressing smoothly. If you have experience you can share, please do!

I am visiting SLA in a week, so plan to fill my mind with all things library there too. If you are going and can take a few minutes to connect in person, I'd look forward to it.

Thanks! A few of my curiosities follow below....

Best,

Tammy Bearden
Knowledge Management Leader
Consumer Understanding & Insight
Hallmark Cards, Inc.
816-545-0915 | tammy.bearden@...


--How do you align the library with the larger corporate mission?

--What are your primary library deliverables and services?

--What best practices or leading edge practices are you employing?

--What changes do you foresee making in the next 1-3 years?

--What other Corporate Libraries should I study in pursuit of successful library management?


Re: Job Opening in Kalamazoo, MI: Program Knowledge Analyst #jobs

kbhouston@...
 

Hi Mr. Loxton,

You don't know me, but that's funny. If HR perfectly matched up job skills with job requirements, then somebody might think it easy, and they'd be out of a job. So a little crazy chaos is introduced, so that HR can ride to the rescue.

That's a bit harsh on HR, but its a difficult job situation.

Regards,

Kirk Broaddus




Quoting Matthew Loxton <mloxton@...>:

I did apply for the job but also had that sense of "umm..ok...but what does this position actually DO?"
It looks like somebody who read an article in the LIS journal wrote the job description - is it Library Science or is it Knowledge Management, is it about archival or putting knowledge to work?

I await a response with baited breath - well not too baited because 99% of HR departments never get back to applicants and selection is a matter of planetary conjunctions, sunspot activity, and random number generation :)

One might think that having undergrad in Information Science and a postgrad degree in knowledge management and having occupied director level roles in knowledge management would make the response rate less random when applying for jobs that have something to do with knowledge management, but if you do, might I interest you in a bridge?
--

Matthew Loxton
mloxton@...
www.matthewloxton.com
www.google.com/profiles/mhloxton
/"Putting knowledge assets to work"/


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Our 500th Member #milestone

Stan Garfield
 

Welcome to Marcia Newton, the 500th member of the SIKM Leaders Community. Marcia wrote "I am a Global Knowledge Manager for KPMG in the UK and am interested in collaborating with colleagues who have similar roles and in discussing relevant topics of interest to this community."

Marcia, thanks for joining. You have come to the right place.


New LinkedIn KM group for Standards & Accreditation #standards

Matthew Loxton
 

Please take a look at the IKMSAA (International Knowledge Management Standards & Accreditation Association)on LinkedIn.

The IKMSAA does not conflict with the aims of other KM groups, and is solely focused on driving standards & accreditation.

The purpose of IKMSAA is to (a) establish consensus-based industry standards for KM-related terminology/definitions, job titles/descriptions, and performance indicators, and (b) to accredit KM programs at academic institutions or public/private sector organizations as meeting an industry-standard core curriculum, in order to clarify the KM service to customers and, thereby, preserve KM as an industry.

The intention is to have the broadest possible membership of KM Practitioners in order to represent KM Practitioners as far as Standards & Accreditation issues are concerned.

Please join this LinkedIn group to participate and be heard on matters of standardization & accreditation.


Re: Approach to validating expertise or skill level #expertise #expertise-location

Nicky Hayward-Wright
 
Edited

Thank you to everyone for your response to my question on approaches to surfacing and validating expertise and skill. Also my apologies for my delay in this thank you.
 
I am in the early stages of resource gathering and it will be a while before I move forward; however I will keep you posted on my progress. 
 
My humble offering is the following resources: 
 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Victoria developed a “expertise location” program. This program was shared at the March 2012, Knowledge Management Round Table Victoria. Notes are available here http://storify.com/nickyhw/kmrtv-2012-03

 

 

Capability Development program at Vic Roads was discussed in the November 2011, KM Round Table. Notes are available here http://storify.com/nickyhw/kmrtv-2011-11 Of interest is the Dreyfus novice to expert model.

 
Also I have collated your responses in the attached document.
3378_expertise_locating_validating.docx
 
Once again thank you for generosity in sharing and also the robustness of conversation.
 
Regards
Nicky
 
Nicky Hayward-Wright
Advisor Knowledge Management
GS1 Australia
 


Re: Looking back: authoritative knowledge #governance

Ranta, Dan <dan.ranta@...>
 

The two things complement each other.  The informal feeds the formal structures / processes / methods.  It's a basic aspect of continuous improvement and a KM program built on continuous improvement has a good chance to remain viable and sustainable.  I am constantly fending off the "2.0 world" who can be quite adamant that the latest, greatest piece of software will take us to the top of the mountain.  Let me know if anyone gets to the top of that mountain and I will start to believe!


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Matt Moore
Sent: Friday, June 29, 2012 12:58 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL]Re: [sikmleaders] Looking back

 

Al,
 
My response to this is that a lot of KM programmes deal with "authoritative knowledge". A lot of the noise at the moment is around Enterprise 2.0 and collaboration / co-creation but a lot of the actual work I have done over the years (and do now) looks at things like standardised processes, policies and procedures.
 
I don't see those things going away.
 
Matt


Re: Looking back: authoritative knowledge #governance

Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Al,
 
My response to this is that a lot of KM programmes deal with "authoritative knowledge". A lot of the noise at the moment is around Enterprise 2.0 and collaboration / co-creation but a lot of the actual work I have done over the years (and do now) looks at things like standardised processes, policies and procedures.
 
I don't see those things going away.
 
Matt


Re: Success with process mapping and/or knowledge mapping? #mapping

Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Hi,
 
Having dabbled in process mapping, I'd note the following:
- Have a clear understanding of why your are mapping a process. Otherwise your map may not be helpful.
- Decide whether you are mapping the process as it should be ("to be") or as it is right now ("as is"). Make sure that everyone participating is clear on which you are trying to map.
- For "as is" mapping, try to confirm what people tell you they do with evidence that they actually do it that way.
- Don't rely on managers to know how a process actually gets executed (or not) unless they do the work themselves. Talk to the people actually doing the work.
- Expect to find multiple processes.
- Decide how much detail you need to go into. If you are working on some sort of system automation then you'll need a high level of detail. However more detail is not necessarily more useful from a process improvement perspective (and is generally more expensive).
- Try to quantify the importance of different process paths, esp. exceptions and reworks (which is really moving from process mapping towards process modelling).
- Remember that "to be" maps are only proposed solutions rather how you will actually work in the future.
- By all means "benchmark" your processes against other organisations but spend a lot of time understanding why they might be different. Don't just lift & shift.
 
Knowledge mapping is whole nother kettle of malarky.
 
Matt


Re: Looking back: authoritative knowledge #governance

Simard, Albert <albert.simard@...>
 

Thanks, Paul

 

 

I must admit that waiting 14 months (and counting) to obtain two signatures on a form that authorizes me to publish the knowledge services agenda may have influenced my decision to start this dialogue! (just a little)  

 

Al

 


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Paul McD
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2012 11:45 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Looking back

 

 

Absolutely, Al. One of the problems with the way KM has been and still is portrayed is as a different style of management. Nothing could be further from the truth. For KM to be relevant it needs to be realistic, as you describe. For KM to be useful it needs to be an enhancement to current management practice not a radical diversion from it. For KM to be understood and accepted it needs to be ultra pragmatic in its outlook and nature. IMHO there's far too much naivete in the way KM is articulated.
Paul


Re: Looking back: authoritative knowledge #governance

Simard, Albert <albert.simard@...>
 

Richard -

 

We seem to be about 100% on the same page.  Just as decisions span a spectrum from totally objective (e.g., mathematics) to totally subjective (e.g., feelings), the evidence underling knowledge spans a range from absolute proof to unsubstantiated belief.  Perhaps we could define categories of knowledge based on categories of evidence that supports it.  I know that there was a substantial discussion on the nature of evidence in SIKM a while ago and I suspect that there is much to review from there.  

 

The notion of authority, however, is different.  A person or a group decides that this knowledge is or is not usable in a legal, regulatory, policy, organizational, or other controlled context.  Evidence may be presented, but ultimately the decision may be based on little more than Pigeau’s psychological definition of knowledge: “something that a person believes to be true and encodes in memory for future use.  Note that this definition makes no claims about the actual validity of the belief.  In government, a decision may be based on politics. That makes it unmanageable, but very important from an organizational perspective.  Wining a Nobel prize for curing cancer doesn’t mean that it can be used by hospitals.  It has to be approved by a regulatory body for use and, an insurance company for coverage!  IMHO authoritative knowledge tends to be of a lower “quality” than most evidence-based knowledge because authoritative knowledge is invariably a compromise between many competing considerations and interests (e.g., “Not out of my budget, you don’t!”).

 

Scientific “authority” comes through the peer review and publication processes.  It is strong, but it cannot be proven.  Even scientific knowledge, however, isn’t the end-all and be-all in the real world.  Even so-called “facts” are subject to interpretation.  Have you ever watched a lawyer tie an unprepared scientist in knots?  Isn’t it possible that…

 

Further, scientific knowledge is always very narrow in scope; it has to be to cultivate the growing edge of the body of knowledge.  As a former scientist, I say thank goodness that the world isn’t run by scientists!!!  A policy analyst doesn’t have the luxury of eliminating variables until a relationship is defined in sufficiently narrow terms that it can be tested experimentally at the 99% level of confidence.  The policy wonk has to consider the whole system at once.  Give them 55-45 odds and they have to go with it.

 

Lots to think about.

 


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Richard Vines
Sent: Wednesday, June 27, 2012 6:23 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Looking back

 

 

Hi Al and Murray,

 

I have been an advocate for KM getting a better handle on this notion of authority for some time and have contributed to this in a number of papers. It is also one of the reasons why I have been so influenced by my colleagues in the archival domain because I think they have something to contribute in this space (for example, recent developments associated with the Encoded Archival Context standard and their advocates have something very useful to contribution).

 

But, beyond this, there is a need to better understand the nature of “authority of knowledge” itself and I agree with some of your points below Al. The debate about what gives something authority will have a long way to run and brings to the surface very challenging perspectives (constructivist versus realist perspectives for example)

 

In many ways, authority is a moving target at the moment with the disruptive impact of digital technologies (an example is the raging debate in Australia at the moment about the independence of journalists in newspapers and the claim they contribute to independent, authoritative content”).

 

Journal and peer review processes are still very relevant. At the same time, I think some of the notion of authority is beginning to migrate much closer towards to source of any problem context. This is where context based metadata is beginning to be shown as helpful in this whole are of authority (and can also assist with interoperability as well). THe importance of context metadata is being perceived as more fundamentally important to emergency management systems etc as well.

 

I have found the notion of knowledge hierarchy as quite a helpful way of thinking about this because it creates a framework for integrating personal / tacit / anecdotal knowledge through different manifestations of explicit and what we have called “formal knowledge” or peer authorised etc. In this way, there is not an us them view about tacit versus explicit, subjective versus objective etc etc. Knowledge is an emergent property and through time becomes manifest in different ways and formats and expressions.

 

But, it will  be interesting to see over time how new expressions of authority systems emerge and become manifest in organisations and in citizen centric program delivery frameworks.

 

Cheers for now

 

 

R

 _,_.___

.


Re: Looking back: authoritative knowledge #governance

Paul McDowall
 

Absolutely, Al. One of the problems with the way KM has been and still is portrayed is as a different style of management. Nothing could be further from the truth. For KM to be relevant it needs to be realistic, as you describe. For KM to be useful it needs to be an enhancement to current management practice not a radical diversion from it. For KM to be understood and accepted it needs to be ultra pragmatic in its outlook and nature. IMHO there's far too much naivete in the way KM is articulated.
Paul

--- In sikmleaders@..., "Simard, Albert" <albert.simard@...> wrote:

I contend that knowledge management needs to take a step backward.



In our headlong rush to put distance between KM and industrial era
management, we left something important behind. While engagement and
synergy and creation are wonderful to behold, organizations are still
organizations. They are run by people who have authority and make
decisions and allocate limited resources to enable action. Having a
compelling body of evidence in hand is necessary but not sufficient; one
must also be authorized to use it.



There's a body of literature on "authoritative knowledge," although it
receives scant mention in the KM literature. I define it as knowledge
that has been formally reviewed and approved for use by an organization
or that has been institutionalized by being embedded into organizational
policies, procedures, or positions.



Further, there is a place in society for authoritative hierarchies and
command and control decision making. And it's not just in the military.
When driving through a green light, you want assurance that the other
person will stop at the red. When you buy food at a grocery store, you
want to know that a regulatory body has inspected it and that it's safe
to eat. When a medical scientist develops an improved treatment for
cancer, it cannot be used until a medical board formally approves it.



Despite knowing the righteous path forward, crossing the boundary
between explicit and authoritative knowledge can be a substantial
challenge. Many KM initiatives have failed to establish or sustain
themselves despite strong (albeit sometimes anecdotal) evidence of its
benefits.



This is an important missing piece of the KM puzzle and we, as
practitioners, need to understand it better if KM is to succeed.



Al Simard


Re: Looking back: authoritative knowledge #governance

Simard, Albert <albert.simard@...>
 

Murray

 

I’m glad to hear that the crisis management community is beginning to discuss KM J  I evolved from that community to KM in the late 90s.  

 

The history of information systems and forest fire management actually began about half a century ago.  My involvement started in the 1970s.  For example, see “An Executive Information System to Support Wildfire Disaster Declarations,” published in Interfaces in November 1990 (V20, #6) and “A Global Disaster Information Service: A proposal” presented at the UN World Conference on Disaster Reduction, Kobe, Japan in 2005.

 

My interest in the role of authoritative knowledge and authoritative hierarchies in organizations began when I migrated to Defence R&D Canada.  It soon became clear that the command and control culture wasn’t about to change (nor should it) and I started asking the question: “Now what?”  The result was the knowledge manageability framework (based on the Cynefin sense-making framework), one component of which is authoritative hierarchies and knowledge.  I gradually came to realize that this applies to most (all?) organizations – not just the military.

 

Hence my notion of the need for a new KM paradigm, which can only result from dialogue across the KM community.  Note that I didn’t use the term “paradigm shift” as in the hard sciences, where there is only one paradigm at a time (except during periods of shifting).  In social sciences, there are multiple parallel paradigms, because none is provably correct.

 

 

Al


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of murphjen@...
Sent: Thursday, 28 June 2012 7:50 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Looking back

 

One area where authoritative knowledge and KM are being discussed is in Crisis Response and Management.  I'm editor in chief for the International Journal of Knowledge Management and the International Journal of Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management and have seen a slow growing trend (and have contributed to it) of KM articles addressing crisis response issues, and of course, vice versa (crisis response articles addressing KM issues in crisis response).  I also most of the discussion on organizational and authoritative issues in KM relating to KM strategy in the academic literature and agree that the current emphasis on social media and collaborative systems in KM is not as focused on these issues.  That said, I think we well be getting a series of integrative KM articles as the pendulum on issues swings and I can see that the pendulum is already heading back towards the organizational focus.  So Al, in a long winded way I'm agreeing with you on the need for the focus but I think it is already happening...murray jennex

 _,_.___

.


Re: Success with process mapping and/or knowledge mapping? #mapping

Simard, Albert <albert.simard@...>
 

Lisa –

 

I am currently in the throes of developing a knowledge services architecture for Defence R&D Canada.  The overall purpose it to link unstructured knowledge work to structured information technology through semi-structured services.  It is primarily a process mapping exercise.  I have not attempted to map knowledge itself.  Although I use concepts from enterprise architecture (multiple views, the Zachman framework), the KSA is different in that it doesn’t attempt to identify the flow of specific information or knowledge artifacts.  Rather, it identifies 19 kinds of work that we do (e.g., producing intelligence, creating knowledge, providing advice) and the knowledge services (e.g., knowledge repositories, directory of expertise, collaboration sites) that are needed to support that work.  I’m currently about a third of the way through.  Here’s the benefit part of the document.

 

A comprehensive Knowledge-Services Architecture (KSA) that considers all of the issues related to supporting knowledge management serves a number of strategic organizational roles.  The overall goal of the KSA is to increase the productivity and effectiveness of knowledge work through good system design.  Further, because initial decisions are increasingly difficult and costly to change as a system progresses through its development and implementation life cycle, a good, flexible blueprint at the outset is key to cost-effectiveness and ultimate success. 

 

The KSA should:  

 

  • Transform relatively intangible business strategy, goals, and intent into a more concrete, operational, and usable form.

·         Structure a complex environment.  By revealing hidden patterns and relationships, it helps in understanding service processes – a precursor to measurement and management.

·         Describe how all aspects of knowledge services relate to the intended business result to help select appropriate approaches for each component of the knowledge-services system.

·         Explain how technology, information management, and knowledge management support organizational concerns, business processes, and social interaction.

·         Provide a sound basis for: designing, developing, validating, and integrating system components.

·         Facilitate implementing the system within the organization’s business and social environment. 

 

A KSA provides a number of direct organizational benefits in addition to its strategic roles.  An architecture:

 

·         Increases the likelihood of successful system development and implementation.

·         Enables balancing competing system requirements and constraints at the outset.

·         Increases system usability, performance, and effectiveness through good design.

·         Validates the logic, functionality, and interoperability of the system.

·         Supports planning and scheduling of system development and implementation.

·         Reduces subsequent problems that increase in difficulty through the system life cycle.

·         Provides a common taxonomy to facilitate communication and dialogue about the system.

·         Diagrams system components and their interactions to increase user understanding.

 

Only time will tell if it actually delivers the proposed benefits.

 

Al Simard

 

Hello everyone,

We are considering going through a process mapping and knowledge mapping process as one of our KM initiatives here at my company. I have a Knowledge Mapping book from the APQC that I am using as a guide to structure and facilitate this process.

I wanted to find out if anyone else has done process mapping or knowledge mapping at your company and whether or not you have found it to be helpful in identifying knowledge assets, knowledge gaps, information about the knowledge landscape to help managers. Have you found it to be worth the time and effort and has it been valuable?

Thanks for your thoughts around this topic.

Lisa Olivia

 


Re: Success with process mapping and/or knowledge mapping? #mapping

Stan Garfield
 

Lisa,

If you search the discussion board archives of this Yahoo Group for "knowledge mapping" you will get 28 results. Here is one thread that had a lot of discussion: http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/message/1777

Regards,
Stan


Re: Success with process mapping and/or knowledge mapping? #mapping

Cory Banks
 

Lisa,

Very valuable if done for the right reasons and the the right way.

The right way will depend on the environment you are working in (Culture, engagement of staff etc..) existing practices, past experiences (have you ever been six sigma'd?).

The right reasons have to be doing it for the benefit of the greater organisation and not just to populate a box in your enterprise architecture, develop requirements for an application or just because the manager wants to see a pretty picture.

The process map is the output but it is the journey that matters.

If you can engage people in:
  • taking ownership for their practice, 
  • taking pride in the work they do, 
  • have the humility to admit there may be better way of doing it ( and they don't have all the answers), 
  • seeking the right information and knowledge required and generated by the activity,
  • enrol a leader to take responsibility for the end-to-end process (not just their 'bit'), 
  • give them the skills to analyse and measure what happens 
  • open their minds to improve what is possible - 
then it doesn't really matter what technique/method/notation/tool you use. 

Find what is fit for purpose.

Cory

On 28/06/2012, at 5:17 AM, lfraley70 wrote:

 

Hello everyone,

We are considering going through a process mapping and knowledge mapping process as one of our KM initiatives here at my company. I have a Knowledge Mapping book from the APQC that I am using as a guide to structure and facilitate this process.

I wanted to find out if anyone else has done process mapping or knowledge mapping at your company and whether or not you have found it to be helpful in identifying knowledge assets, knowledge gaps, information about the knowledge landscape to help managers. Have you found it to be worth the time and effort and has it been valuable?

Thanks for your thoughts around this topic.

Lisa Olivia


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