Date   

Re: Ten dirty little secrets KM leaders can't ignore - #1: People are lazy #discussion-starter

Murray Jennex
 

I actually like saying people are lazy mainly because I don't use lazy in a negative context.  I spent 20 years also being an engineer and it is well known in the engineering field that "lazy" engineers make the greatest inventions and contributions.  Not because they don't want to work, but because they don't want to work needlessly and so find ways to make work simpler and easier and even faster.  This is what I think of as "lazy" simply not wanting to do needless work.  In this context it makes perfect sense that people want to see value in doing something before they go do it.  As a "lazy" engineer, academic, project manager, and KM researcher, the below statement is too long, I opt to just say lazy...murray jennex
 

In a message dated 1/7/2013 1:58:50 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, gvalawebb@... writes:
Thanks for commenting. And I think you're absolutely right - there is a lot tied up in "people are lazy".

A fuller statement might be to say that people are not lazy so much as they are "a pattern-recognition machine that is constantly trying to predict the near future" using satisficing decision-making approach that tends to reuse existing set of mental models rather than developing a new one (and sometimes they do this entirely subconsciously).

So, to get people to try something new you have to make the new thing "easy" to do right away while making the "old" thing(s) harder to do.

As to your comment about change management, I would refer you to dirty-little secret #7: "We're emotional animals that think – not thinking animals that feel" and the SCARF model for using that insight (along with neuroplasticity) to think about change management (there's a link to the relevant resource in the blog post).

Gordon

--- In sikmleaders@..., Jack Vinson  wrote:
>
> Fun article, Gordon. Thanks for writing it.
>
> As far as point #1, it seems like there are a lot of ideas tied up in this
> relatively "simple" statement. The change management world has been having
> this conversation a lot.
>
> People don't like change when they don't feel a part of it.  Or if they
> don't believe / see how it will benefit them.  Or if it looks like it will
> be more work. Or ...
>
> One thing I like to do is as lots of questions around how they do things
> now and what is working (and not working).  Along with implementing the New
> Thing (KM or otherwise), there are some Old Things that need to be stopped
> or significantly changed.  This is much more than fixing the process before
> you automate it. It's looking at the change from multiple perspectives to
> see if we can eliminate the annoying things and create more of what people
> like.
>
>
>
> Regards-
>
> --
> Jack Vinson
> (m) 847.212.5789
>
>
>
> On Mon, Jan 7, 2013 at 10:04 AM, gordonvalawebb  wrote:
>
> > I recently read Stewart Thornhill's article "Ten dirty little secrets of
> > successful entrepreneurs"  from the Ivey School of Business. I thought many
> > of them, with some adaptation, could apply to KM and innovation leadership
> > (since we typically have to be entreprenurial in order to be successful).
> >
> > I largely took his list and give it a KM / innovation twist. I thought,
> > for the purposes of discussion, I'd put them out one at a time. For the
> > full list see my blog post at http://www.dynamicadaptation.com/?p=294
> >
> > So - from the ten dirty secrets for KM / innovation leaders - here's # 1:
> >
> > 1. People are lazy:
> >
> > They are looking for the lowest-effort way to do something. This has
> > implications for when we introduce new capabilities. They inherently feel,
> > at the beginning, as if they are or will be more work than the old way of
> > doing things. This also applies to organizational leaders – they want the
> > easiest, least effort, way for them (so you have to make it easy for them
> > to understand what you are doing).
> >
> >
> >
> > ------------------------------------
> >
> > Yahoo! Groups Links
> >
> >
> >
> >
>



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/

<*> Your email settings:
    Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/join
    (Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
    sikmleaders-digest@...
    sikmleaders-fullfeatured@...

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
    sikmleaders-unsubscribe@...

<*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
    http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


Re: Ten dirty little secrets KM leaders can't ignore - #1: People are lazy #discussion-starter

gordonvalawebb <gvalawebb@...>
 

Thanks for the comment.

In short I would say that culture trumps strategy (and tactics) every time. That is: every organization has a "culture" - and it is an extraordinarily powerful force.

I'm not sure I understand the concept of a "pathological nature of organizations". I need to reflect more on your blog posting before I can comment on that.

Gordon

--- In sikmleaders@..., Stephen Bounds wrote:

Hi Jack and Gordon,

I think the thing that most people forget about organisations is that
most of them are pretty unnatural. We mash together a whole of people
with little in common except their need to have money, and perhaps some
broader commonality in terms of skills and interests, and then expect
them to actively participate in an organisation's change effort!

I think that organisational psychology (for lack of a better term) is a
hugely important and under-explored issue. I talk more about the
pathological nature of many organisations here:
http://bounds.net.au/node/84

In the context of KM and change management more broadly, one observation
is that whenever there is a detectable "organisational culture", it
means that there are norms that are being successfully enforced
(formally or informally) as an expectation of continued employment.
This is the essence of change management, since people will then either
adapt in line with that culture or leave -- in either case, moving the
organisation closer to the desired end state.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

On 8/01/2013 5:37 AM, Jack Vinson wrote:
Fun article, Gordon. Thanks for writing it.

As far as point #1, it seems like there are a lot of ideas tied up in
this relatively "simple" statement. The change management world has been
having this conversation a lot.

People don't like change when they don't feel a part of it. Or if they
don't believe / see how it will benefit them. Or if it looks like it
will be more work. Or ...


Re: Ten dirty little secrets KM leaders can't ignore - #1: People are lazy #discussion-starter

gordonvalawebb <gvalawebb@...>
 

Thanks for commenting. And I think you're absolutely right - there is a lot tied up in "people are lazy".

A fuller statement might be to say that people are not lazy so much as they are "a pattern-recognition machine that is constantly trying to predict the near future" using satisficing decision-making approach that tends to reuse existing set of mental models rather than developing a new one (and sometimes they do this entirely subconsciously).

So, to get people to try something new you have to make the new thing "easy" to do right away while making the "old" thing(s) harder to do.

As to your comment about change management, I would refer you to dirty-little secret #7: "We're emotional animals that think – not thinking animals that feel" and the SCARF model for using that insight (along with neuroplasticity) to think about change management (there's a link to the relevant resource in the blog post).

Gordon

--- In sikmleaders@..., Jack Vinson wrote:

Fun article, Gordon. Thanks for writing it.

As far as point #1, it seems like there are a lot of ideas tied up in this
relatively "simple" statement. The change management world has been having
this conversation a lot.

People don't like change when they don't feel a part of it. Or if they
don't believe / see how it will benefit them. Or if it looks like it will
be more work. Or ...

One thing I like to do is as lots of questions around how they do things
now and what is working (and not working). Along with implementing the New
Thing (KM or otherwise), there are some Old Things that need to be stopped
or significantly changed. This is much more than fixing the process before
you automate it. It's looking at the change from multiple perspectives to
see if we can eliminate the annoying things and create more of what people
like.



Regards-

--
Jack Vinson
(m) 847.212.5789



On Mon, Jan 7, 2013 at 10:04 AM, gordonvalawebb wrote:

I recently read Stewart Thornhill's article "Ten dirty little secrets of
successful entrepreneurs" from the Ivey School of Business. I thought many
of them, with some adaptation, could apply to KM and innovation leadership
(since we typically have to be entreprenurial in order to be successful).

I largely took his list and give it a KM / innovation twist. I thought,
for the purposes of discussion, I'd put them out one at a time. For the
full list see my blog post at http://www.dynamicadaptation.com/?p=294

So - from the ten dirty secrets for KM / innovation leaders - here's # 1:

1. People are lazy:

They are looking for the lowest-effort way to do something. This has
implications for when we introduce new capabilities. They inherently feel,
at the beginning, as if they are or will be more work than the old way of
doing things. This also applies to organizational leaders – they want the
easiest, least effort, way for them (so you have to make it easy for them
to understand what you are doing).



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




Re: Suggestions for organizing resources on social impact #request

Paula Cohen
 

Hi Katharine,

This is quite an extensive list. Great effort. You can get a start on the taxonomy by tagging the items.  
You may want to check out SeToolbelt (http://www.setoolbelt.org/) that is also included in the Social Enterprise Alliance Knowledge center to see how they've organized SE resources. 
Have you considered collaborating with a resource, as an example The Foundation Center. since many of your links are for NY-based groups or another that could incorporate your resources into an already existing platform?  

Hope this helps,
Paula Cohen
Knowledge for Impact (http://practicalknowledgemanagement.wordpress.com/)
Cambridge, MA. 


On Thu, Jan 3, 2013 at 11:33 AM, Katharine Bierce <kbierce@...> wrote:
 

Hi there,


Along with others such as Belinda Chiang and Bert-Ola Bergstrom, I have compiled a pretty comprehensive online resource for social innovation and impact investment platforms.
https://docs.google.com/document/edit?id=1uSbfCbZg5_tjKWJYNV38SrYdZrlbgrO8R7E866Iw3uA&hl=en

The social innovation community needs to build something better than a Google Doc, though.  It should be searchable, with a good taxonomy, updatable and editable by each participant in the ecosystem, with appropriate quality controls and metrics.

Do any of you have suggestions on how to best organize this knowledge?

Thanks,

Katharine

--
Katharine Bierce
kbierce@...
914-262-0314 cell
my blog
Twitter: @kbierce




--
Paula Cohen
Information and Knowledge Services
Cambridge, MA.
617.413.8324


Re: Ten dirty little secrets KM leaders can't ignore - #1: People are lazy #discussion-starter

Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Jack and Gordon,

I think the thing that most people forget about organisations is that most of them are pretty unnatural. We mash together a whole of people with little in common except their need to have money, and perhaps some broader commonality in terms of skills and interests, and then expect them to actively participate in an organisation's change effort!

I think that organisational psychology (for lack of a better term) is a hugely important and under-explored issue. I talk more about the pathological nature of many organisations here:
http://bounds.net.au/node/84

In the context of KM and change management more broadly, one observation is that whenever there is a detectable "organisational culture", it means that there are norms that are being successfully enforced (formally or informally) as an expectation of continued employment. This is the essence of change management, since people will then either adapt in line with that culture or leave -- in either case, moving the organisation closer to the desired end state.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

On 8/01/2013 5:37 AM, Jack Vinson wrote:
Fun article, Gordon. Thanks for writing it.

As far as point #1, it seems like there are a lot of ideas tied up in
this relatively "simple" statement. The change management world has been
having this conversation a lot.

People don't like change when they don't feel a part of it. Or if they
don't believe / see how it will benefit them. Or if it looks like it
will be more work. Or ...


Re: Ten dirty little secrets KM leaders can't ignore - #1: People are lazy #discussion-starter

Jack Vinson <jackvinson@...>
 

Fun article, Gordon. Thanks for writing it.  

As far as point #1, it seems like there are a lot of ideas tied up in this relatively "simple" statement. The change management world has been having this conversation a lot. 

People don't like change when they don't feel a part of it.  Or if they don't believe / see how it will benefit them.  Or if it looks like it will be more work. Or ...  

One thing I like to do is as lots of questions around how they do things now and what is working (and not working).  Along with implementing the New Thing (KM or otherwise), there are some Old Things that need to be stopped or significantly changed.  This is much more than fixing the process before you automate it. It's looking at the change from multiple perspectives to see if we can eliminate the annoying things and create more of what people like.   



Regards-

-- 
Jack Vinson
(m) 847.212.5789



On Mon, Jan 7, 2013 at 10:04 AM, gordonvalawebb <gvalawebb@...> wrote:
I recently read Stewart Thornhill's article "Ten dirty little secrets of successful entrepreneurs"  from the Ivey School of Business. I thought many of them, with some adaptation, could apply to KM and innovation leadership (since we typically have to be entreprenurial in order to be successful).

I largely took his list and give it a KM / innovation twist. I thought, for the purposes of discussion, I'd put them out one at a time. For the full list see my blog post at http://www.dynamicadaptation.com/?p=294

So - from the ten dirty secrets for KM / innovation leaders - here's # 1:

1. People are lazy:

They are looking for the lowest-effort way to do something. This has implications for when we introduce new capabilities. They inherently feel, at the beginning, as if they are or will be more work than the old way of doing things. This also applies to organizational leaders – they want the easiest, least effort, way for them (so you have to make it easy for them to understand what you are doing).



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/

<*> Your email settings:
    Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/join
    (Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
    sikmleaders-digest@...
    sikmleaders-fullfeatured@...

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
    sikmleaders-unsubscribe@...

<*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
    http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



Re: Ten dirty little secrets KM leaders can't ignore - #1: People are lazy #discussion-starter

Gerard <gerard.bredenoord@...>
 

I did agree – but I also think it is a cop-out to generalise.

 

If we average it all out I agree people will follow the path of least resistance – Is that lazy or just efficient. I also believe Km was never designed to make everybody happy. Thus averages or generalisations have been the root of many of our challenges (especially technology based challenges).

 

The quote that resonates the most when I talk to busy people in busy firms is: “The best knowledge always comes from the busiest people.”

 

We need nuggets of gold not heaps of rubble.

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of gordonvalawebb
Sent: 07 January 2013 15:04
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Ten dirty little secrets KM leaders can't ignore - #1: People are lazy

 

 

I recently read Stewart Thornhill's article "Ten dirty little secrets of successful entrepreneurs" from the Ivey School of Business. I thought many of them, with some adaptation, could apply to KM and innovation leadership (since we typically have to be entreprenurial in order to be successful).

I largely took his list and give it a KM / innovation twist. I thought, for the purposes of discussion, I'd put them out one at a time. For the full list see my blog post at http://www.dynamicadaptation.com/?p=294

So - from the ten dirty secrets for KM / innovation leaders - here's # 1:

1. People are lazy:

They are looking for the lowest-effort way to do something. This has implications for when we introduce new capabilities. They inherently feel, at the beginning, as if they are or will be more work than the old way of doing things. This also applies to organizational leaders – they want the easiest, least effort, way for them (so you have to make it easy for them to understand what you are doing).


Ten dirty little secrets KM leaders can't ignore - #1: People are lazy #discussion-starter

gordonvalawebb <gvalawebb@...>
 
Edited

I recently read Stewart Thornhill's article "Ten dirty little secrets of successful entrepreneurs" from the Ivey School of Business. I thought many of them, with some adaptation, could apply to KM and innovation leadership (since we typically have to be entreprenurial in order to be successful).

I largely took his list and give it a KM / innovation twist. I thought, for the purposes of discussion, I'd put them out one at a time. For the full list see my blog post at http://web.archive.org/web/20130521055237/http://www.dynamicadaptation.com/?page_id=75

So - from the ten dirty secrets for KM / innovation leaders - here's # 1:

1. People are lazy:

They are looking for the lowest-effort way to do something. This has implications for when we introduce new capabilities. They inherently feel, at the beginning, as if they are or will be more work than the old way of doing things. This also applies to organizational leaders – they want the easiest, least effort, way for them (so you have to make it easy for them to understand what you are doing).


Re: "Big data" - does it have anything to do with knowledge management? #data-science

Steve Ardire <sardire@...>
 

So my questions are: Does the term "Big Data" mean anything to you? And does it have anything to do with knowledge management?

Yes and Yes and for more see We don’t need more data scientists — just make big data easier to use http://gigaom.com/2012/12/22/we-dont-need-more-data-scientists-just-simpler-ways-to-use-big-data/

Steve Ardire
Twitter: @sardire skype: sardire


On Mon, Jan 7, 2013 at 5:44 AM, JoeR <joe.raimondo@...> wrote:
Joe Raimondo


Re: "Big data" - does it have anything to do with knowledge management? #data-science

Joe Raimondo
 

Matt:
With regard to "bid data" and KM, I share your consternation and confusion. Using the term data, for example, conjures for me flowchart symbols for databases, or a SQL Server Admin interface. And big--it conjures mainly hype, as you noted.
That said, I have been engaged in a technology project that involves exploring some new technology approaches to KM--particularly in the realm of adopting NoSQL databases and MapReduce techniques. This is an example where we have been exploring application of some of these emerging technologies and how they engulf some of our common conceptions about how and where data are stored and accessed. Moreover, it has an impact on some of the basic models that people concerned with KM uses , e.g.,search and findability, structuring, sorting, and tagging, etc. A whole new world of capabilities is coming on lone. It's very exciting in terms of potential. but understand that the technology is still raw and it reveals its secrets reluctantly.
As noted, when I see the word data, I'm thinking of databases as a single thing. I'm not thinking so much the processes that create the data, the interactions the data represents, or the means by which the data is transformed into knowledge or insight--something I now know as a result of arranging the content of the data and displaying it in a particular way that I didn't know before. That said, I think it's useful to tease apart the three main phases of a "bid data" model:
- Input.
- Rendering and storage
- Access, analysis and output
Again, from a grunt-level technology perspective, you can see how this is vital. But from a KM perspective, we can now drop sensors into many more parts of the organization, from the log file level on up, to start to get some insight.
The key notion from "big data" is actually the analytics part--the analysis and output component. Yo can envision systems that provide near-real-time indicators of a variety of signal from low levels that can be statistically analyzed to show demonstrable and valid lift in performance. You can then use these indicators as a means to dive into the knowledge base of that group--everything is stored and tracked and accessible and render-able. It changes the perspective on the performance management game.
= Joe Raimondo =
Ontologique

--- In sikmleaders@..., Matt Moore wrote:

Hi,

Over the last 18 months, I've been unable to avoid the phrase 'big data". It's a buzz term that covers a lot of different activities and tools. It's vague but it's not meaningless and I'm deliberately not going to define it in this email. I've written an introductory article that provides on the topic that should come out in a few months (ah, the joys of the traditional publishing process). I'm thinking of following it up with an article that features some specific examples and also some quotes from people that have interesting opinions on the topic. My angle is very much from an information management / knowledge management perspective rather than, say, a pure data analytics perspective.

So my questions are: Does the term "Big Data" mean anything to you? And does it have anything to do with knowledge management?

Thanks in advance.

Matt Moore

BTW For anyone I do quote in the article, I will always ask your permission to do so first.


Re: PKM solution using SharePoint & other MS tools #PKM #SharePoint

gordonvalawebb <gvalawebb@...>
 

I think Matt and Stephen have hit on exactly the right points (first and foremost: what is the business value? Secondly that social networking platforms can - although they are tricky - can have some of the effect you're looking for (plus many others)).

Three ideas I'd offer:
  1. there can be a business continuity risk (i.e. key player(s) who could leave at any time) that can be a strong business driver (but requires the organization to be focused on where that risk really is). You can build on top of existing risk processes to find and mitigate these risks
  2. K transfer from departing staff to existing (or even future staff) is very context dependent - you likely need a portfolio of approaches (e.g. have them write stuff down (and there are various ways to do that) or pair newbie with "oldie" in overlap period or do a video taped interview or put "oldie" on retainer to answer questions once they've left or . . .
  3. Its not just the "K" - it can also the hand off of relationships / networks

All the best,

Gordon


--- In sikmleaders@..., "Andre" wrote:
>
> They would like to enable their employees to capture personal insights and valuable experiences which would normally be forgotten or lost when the employee leaves the company. OneNote is one of the tools being considered for this purpose - perhaps the OneNote file could be stored on a SharePoint site where it could be shared with others or exposed through search.
>
> I realize that this is not a purely technological problem and thus cannot be solved with technology alone. However, I'd like to know what you've seen in the field for PKM for large groups of employees, esp. with MS tools such as SharePoint, OneNote, etc? Some people will take detailed notes, others will see it as a chore. How do we make it accessible to as many employees as possible? The client would also like to be able to monitor and report on the progress - i.e. demonstrate the business value.
>
> Thank you for your replies,
>
> Andre
>
>
> --- In sikmleaders@..., "Robert L. Bogue" wrote:
> >
> > My first reaction is to ask what is meant by personal knowledge management. There are a variety of answers to the question based on what is meant by personal knowledge management. For instance, part of my personal strategy for my knowledge management is to post it to a blog. Another part of the strategy is copious notes in OneNote... That's backed up by a library of word and PDF documents... What is it that they want to help people manage? Step-by-step procedures? Insights?
> >
> > -------------------
> > Robert L. Bogue, MS MVP: Microsoft Office SharePoint Server, MCSE, MCSA:Security, etc.
> > Find me Phone: (317) 844-5310 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog
> > Also known as The SharePoint Shepherd Learn more at http://www.sharepointshepherd.com/
> >
> > From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Jack Vinson
> > Sent: Friday, January 4, 2013 3:25 PM
> > To: SIKM Leaders (sikmleaders@...)
> > Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] PKM solution using SharePoint & other MS tools
> >
> >
> > My first reaction is that I can't think of much "personal" about SharePoint, but there are some possibilities if you can hook intelligently into Outlook (where people spend FAR too much of their time). Like the widgets that show network activity of people in an email - both within the SharePoint network and in the larger network, such as on LinkedIn. Maybe there is something similar for Yammer?
> >
> > And SharePoint does have capability for blogs and personal file shares. But I don't know how effective people are finding these tools - and how likely they are to use them, even if they do exist.
> >
> >
> >
> > Regards-
> >
> > --
> > Jack Vinson
> > (m) 847.212.5789
> >
> > On Fri, Jan 4, 2013 at 8:47 AM, Andre > wrote:
> > I'm working on developing a Personal Knowledge Management (PKM) solution for a potential client. They're a Microsoft shop and want to leverage SharePoint 2010 and other MS tools (OneNote, etc.). Just wondering if anyone can share their thoughts/experiences on doing something like this.
> >
> > Thank you for your time.
> >
> > Andre Galitsky
> > Richmond, VA
> >
> >
> >
> > ------------------------------------
> >
> > Yahoo! Groups Links
> >
>


Re: PKM solution using SharePoint & other MS tools #PKM #SharePoint

Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Andre,

I agree with Matt. The standard principles of work apply:
(a) if it's not valued, it won't be done
(anything that is mere lip service will be rapidly detected)
(b) people will do the minimum effort possible to avoid a penalty
(c) incentives work to the extent that alternative forms of action
are not more attractive (ie risk-weighted opportunity costs)

Aside from the motivation issues, a bigger problem is that you are trying to use a PKM tool (OneNote) in a non-PKM context. To me, PKM means improving one's *own* problem solving capacity rather than anything for the benefit of the organisation you work for.

You might as well mandate that all staff notebooks have to be surrendered for OCRing and sharing once they have been filled in. You may get some insights and experiences but you'll also get a huge volume of indecipherable notes and drawings of stick people!

What you're describing sounds much better suited to setting up an internal blogging or microblogging culture. As well as SharePoint blogs and forums (which are clunky), consider best-of-breed tools like Jive and Yammer which can integrate with SharePoint to surface insights and experiences. This is generally tricky and a big change for organisations who aren't used to non-hierarchical communications, but it has a better chance of long-term success.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

On 6/01/2013 9:17 PM, Matt Moore wrote:
Andre,

Can you tell us which industry this is and what the workers do? How many
of them are there? What is the level of staff turnover like? Do they
keep notes already? (I'm guessing from your comments below that they
don't). What exactly does the organisation want them to record?

You get them using OneNote. Or SharePoint. Or some combination of the
two: http://blogs.office.com/b/microsoft-onenote/archive/2012/07/06/using-onenote-on-sharepoint.aspx

However I suspect that the main issues are 1. Clearly articulating what
the organisation wants recording & why; and 2. Articulating the WIIFM
for workers. At the moment, it all seems it a bit vague - and hence
likely to end in an unsatisfactory manner for all concerned.

Cheers,

Matt

------------------------------------------------------------------------
*From:* Andre <andregalitsky@...>
*To:* sikmleaders@...
*Sent:* Sunday, 6 January 2013 2:58 PM
*Subject:* [sikmleaders] Re: PKM solution using SharePoint & other MS tools

They would like to enable their employees to capture personal insights
and valuable experiences which would normally be forgotten or lost when
the employee leaves the company. OneNote is one of the tools being
considered for this purpose - perhaps the OneNote file could be stored
on a SharePoint site where it could be shared with others or exposed
through search.

I realize that this is not a purely technological problem and thus
cannot be solved with technology alone. However, I'd like to know what
you've seen in the field for PKM for large groups of employees, esp.
with MS tools such as SharePoint, OneNote, etc? Some people will take
detailed notes, others will see it as a chore. How do we make it
accessible to as many employees as possible? The client would also like
to be able to monitor and report on the progress - i.e. demonstrate the
business value.

Thank you for your replies,

Andre


Re: PKM solution using SharePoint & other MS tools #PKM #SharePoint

Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Andre,

Can you tell us which industry this is and what the workers do? How many of them are there? What is the level of staff turnover like? Do they keep notes already? (I'm guessing from your comments below that they don't). What exactly does the organisation want them to record?

You get them using OneNote. Or SharePoint. Or some combination of the two: http://blogs.office.com/b/microsoft-onenote/archive/2012/07/06/using-onenote-on-sharepoint.aspx

However I suspect that the main issues are 1. Clearly articulating what the organisation wants recording & why; and 2. Articulating the WIIFM for workers. At the moment, it all seems it a bit vague - and hence likely to end in an unsatisfactory manner for all concerned.

Cheers,

Matt


From: Andre
To: sikmleaders@...
Sent: Sunday, 6 January 2013 2:58 PM
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: PKM solution using SharePoint & other MS tools

 
They would like to enable their employees to capture personal insights and valuable experiences which would normally be forgotten or lost when the employee leaves the company. OneNote is one of the tools being considered for this purpose - perhaps the OneNote file could be stored on a SharePoint site where it could be shared with others or exposed through search.

I realize that this is not a purely technological problem and thus cannot be solved with technology alone. However, I'd like to know what you've seen in the field for PKM for large groups of employees, esp. with MS tools such as SharePoint, OneNote, etc? Some people will take detailed notes, others will see it as a chore. How do we make it accessible to as many employees as possible? The client would also like to be able to monitor and report on the progress - i.e. demonstrate the business value.

Thank you for your replies,

Andre


"Big data" - does it have anything to do with knowledge management? #data-science

Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Hi,

Over the last 18 months, I've been unable to avoid the phrase 'big data". It's a buzz term that covers a lot of different activities and tools. It's vague but it's not meaningless and I'm deliberately not going to define it in this email. I've written an introductory article that provides on the topic that should come out in a few months (ah, the joys of the traditional publishing process). I'm thinking of following it up with an article that features some specific examples and also some quotes from people that have interesting opinions on the topic. My angle is very much from an information management / knowledge management perspective rather than, say, a pure data analytics perspective.

So my questions are: Does the term "Big Data" mean anything to you? And does it have anything to do with knowledge management?

Thanks in advance.

Matt Moore

BTW For anyone I do quote in the article, I will always ask your permission to do so first.


Re: PKM solution using SharePoint & other MS tools #PKM #SharePoint

Andre <andregalitsky@...>
 

They would like to enable their employees to capture personal insights and valuable experiences which would normally be forgotten or lost when the employee leaves the company. OneNote is one of the tools being considered for this purpose - perhaps the OneNote file could be stored on a SharePoint site where it could be shared with others or exposed through search.

I realize that this is not a purely technological problem and thus cannot be solved with technology alone. However, I'd like to know what you've seen in the field for PKM for large groups of employees, esp. with MS tools such as SharePoint, OneNote, etc? Some people will take detailed notes, others will see it as a chore. How do we make it accessible to as many employees as possible? The client would also like to be able to monitor and report on the progress - i.e. demonstrate the business value.

Thank you for your replies,

Andre

--- In sikmleaders@..., "Robert L. Bogue" wrote:

My first reaction is to ask what is meant by personal knowledge management. There are a variety of answers to the question based on what is meant by personal knowledge management. For instance, part of my personal strategy for my knowledge management is to post it to a blog. Another part of the strategy is copious notes in OneNote... That's backed up by a library of word and PDF documents... What is it that they want to help people manage? Step-by-step procedures? Insights?

-------------------
Robert L. Bogue, MS MVP: Microsoft Office SharePoint Server, MCSE, MCSA:Security, etc.
Find me Phone: (317) 844-5310 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog
Also known as The SharePoint Shepherd Learn more at http://www.sharepointshepherd.com/

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Jack Vinson
Sent: Friday, January 4, 2013 3:25 PM
To: SIKM Leaders (sikmleaders@...)
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] PKM solution using SharePoint & other MS tools


My first reaction is that I can't think of much "personal" about SharePoint, but there are some possibilities if you can hook intelligently into Outlook (where people spend FAR too much of their time). Like the widgets that show network activity of people in an email - both within the SharePoint network and in the larger network, such as on LinkedIn. Maybe there is something similar for Yammer?

And SharePoint does have capability for blogs and personal file shares. But I don't know how effective people are finding these tools - and how likely they are to use them, even if they do exist.



Regards-

--
Jack Vinson
(m) 847.212.5789

On Fri, Jan 4, 2013 at 8:47 AM, Andre > wrote:
I'm working on developing a Personal Knowledge Management (PKM) solution for a potential client. They're a Microsoft shop and want to leverage SharePoint 2010 and other MS tools (OneNote, etc.). Just wondering if anyone can share their thoughts/experiences on doing something like this.

Thank you for your time.

Andre Galitsky
Richmond, VA



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: PKM solution using SharePoint & other MS tools #PKM #SharePoint

Robert L. Bogue
 

My first reaction is to ask what is meant by personal knowledge management.  There are a variety of answers to the question based on what is meant by personal knowledge management.  For instance, part of my personal strategy for my knowledge management is to post it to a blog.  Another part of the strategy is copious notes in OneNote… That’s backed up by a library of word and PDF documents… What is it that they want to help people manage?  Step-by-step procedures?  Insights? 

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue, MS MVP: Microsoft Office SharePoint Server, MCSE, MCSA:Security, etc.

Find me Phone: (317) 844-5310  Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Also known as The SharePoint Shepherd Learn more at http://www.sharepointshepherd.com/

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Jack Vinson
Sent: Friday, January 4, 2013 3:25 PM
To: SIKM Leaders (sikmleaders@...)
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] PKM solution using SharePoint & other MS tools

 

 

My first reaction is that I can't think of much "personal" about SharePoint, but there are some possibilities if you can hook intelligently into Outlook (where people spend FAR too much of their time).  Like the widgets that show network activity of people in an email - both within the SharePoint network and in the larger network, such as on LinkedIn.  Maybe there is something similar for Yammer?

 

And SharePoint does have capability for blogs and personal file shares. But I don't know how effective people are finding these tools - and how likely they are to use them, even if they do exist.


 

 

Regards-


-- 
Jack Vinson
(m) 847.212.5789

 

On Fri, Jan 4, 2013 at 8:47 AM, Andre <andregalitsky@...> wrote:

I'm working on developing a Personal Knowledge Management (PKM) solution for a potential client.  They're a Microsoft shop and want to leverage SharePoint 2010 and other MS tools (OneNote, etc.).  Just wondering if anyone can share their thoughts/experiences on doing something like this.

Thank you for your time.

Andre Galitsky
Richmond, VA



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/

<*> Your email settings:
    Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/join
    (Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
    sikmleaders-digest@...
    sikmleaders-fullfeatured@...

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
    sikmleaders-unsubscribe@...

<*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
    http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

 


Re: PKM solution using SharePoint & other MS tools #PKM #SharePoint

Peter Dorfman <pwdorfman@...>
 

How, actually, are you defining "Personal Knowledge Management"? What's in scope?

Peter Dorfman
Lebanon, NJ


On Fri, Jan 4, 2013 at 8:47 AM, Andre <andregalitsky@...> wrote:
 

I'm working on developing a Personal Knowledge Management (PKM) solution for a potential client. They're a Microsoft shop and want to leverage SharePoint 2010 and other MS tools (OneNote, etc.). Just wondering if anyone can share their thoughts/experiences on doing something like this.

Thank you for your time.

Andre Galitsky
Richmond, VA



Re: PKM solution using SharePoint & other MS tools #PKM #SharePoint

Jack Vinson <jackvinson@...>
 

My first reaction is that I can't think of much "personal" about SharePoint, but there are some possibilities if you can hook intelligently into Outlook (where people spend FAR too much of their time).  Like the widgets that show network activity of people in an email - both within the SharePoint network and in the larger network, such as on LinkedIn.  Maybe there is something similar for Yammer?

And SharePoint does have capability for blogs and personal file shares. But I don't know how effective people are finding these tools - and how likely they are to use them, even if they do exist.



Regards-

-- 
Jack Vinson
(m) 847.212.5789



On Fri, Jan 4, 2013 at 8:47 AM, Andre <andregalitsky@...> wrote:
I'm working on developing a Personal Knowledge Management (PKM) solution for a potential client.  They're a Microsoft shop and want to leverage SharePoint 2010 and other MS tools (OneNote, etc.).  Just wondering if anyone can share their thoughts/experiences on doing something like this.

Thank you for your time.

Andre Galitsky
Richmond, VA



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/

<*> Your email settings:
    Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/join
    (Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
    sikmleaders-digest@...
    sikmleaders-fullfeatured@...

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
    sikmleaders-unsubscribe@...

<*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
    http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



Re: KM Maturity Model #maturity

Murray Jennex
 

I'm in the process of validating a KM success model that will satisfy the below question (at least in my mind it does) but it is a good question and one I've been working on for a few years, even hosting a KM value symposium at the Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences and a special issue on the topic in the International Journal of Knowledge Management.  An interesting observation on the below is that when I first started researching KM success measurement I had several tell me to stop as it defines KM too much.  Personally I feel you have to be able to measure when something is successful for it to have any value.  Thanks...murray
 

In a message dated 1/4/2013 2:35:19 A.M. Pacific Standard Time, km@... writes:
Hi Gordon & Chris,

You're right that a tailored roadmap is obviously less prescriptive than
an approach with defined endpoints.  But the problem with KM is getting
beyond method to evidence.

It's all very well to say "B is a better state to be in than A", but
where's our proof?  Bluntly, what basis do KM practitioners have for
many of their recommendations beyond faith?  It's very difficult to
generalise cause and effect beyond the anecdotal success of individual
organisations at the moment.

Realistically, in most cases our only way forward is safe-fail
experimentation.  KM techniques like positive deviance are a good
starting point (identifying a demonstrated improvement on what is
possible and using as a candidate for broader adoption) since the
evidential component is baked in to the technique itself.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

On 4/01/2013 9:04 AM, Gordon Vala-Webb wrote:
> "I use predefined maturity models  - / . . /with clients where it's
> helpful to them to have some explicit statements of "what's possible""
>
>
> My sense is that you use maturity models (among other things) to
> generate discussion. I can see the attraction of doing so.
>
> However I do think it is not what maturity models are intended to be. My
> understanding is that they are about "what should be" (rather than "what
> is possible") along some linear, hierarchical, path. That is - that
> there is a fixed number of states, organizations go through each state
> in sequence, and each state in the sequence is "higher" than the one
> before. Furthermore, every outside observer would agree as to what those
> stages are and which stage the organization is at. And so maturity
> models are typically used to assess where the organization is along that
> path (i.e. to see how "mature" or "immature" according to the model) -
> and to identify what they need to do next to move to the next stage.
>
> I just don't think we have - for KM - a robust and validated maturity
> model. And the danger of presenting them is that it may suggest a
> "maturity" that doesn't exist (or an immaturity) and leads organizations
> to follow them blindly.
>
> The solution is simple (if you want to generate discussion with
> organizational leaders): retitle "maturity models" and call them
> "Possible road map". And give organizations a couple to look at (all,
> obviously, related to their industry, size, etc.).
>
>


------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/

<*> Your email settings:
    Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/join
    (Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
    sikmleaders-digest@...
    sikmleaders-fullfeatured@...

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
    sikmleaders-unsubscribe@...

<*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
    http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


PKM solution using SharePoint & other MS tools #PKM #SharePoint

Andre <andregalitsky@...>
 

I'm working on developing a Personal Knowledge Management (PKM) solution for a potential client. They're a Microsoft shop and want to leverage SharePoint 2010 and other MS tools (OneNote, etc.). Just wondering if anyone can share their thoughts/experiences on doing something like this.

Thank you for your time.

Andre Galitsky
Richmond, VA

6661 - 6680 of 9974