Date   

Re: Enterprise Patterns of User Profiles #profiles #expertise-location

Howie Cohen
 

Chris,  

          I am happy to talk to you about this.  I will have some time next week, we can set up a call.   Are you going to APQC by chance? 

Howie 

On Fri, Mar 27, 2015 at 5:23 PM, cmacomber@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Hello Howie,

Encouraging companies to finally put effort into understanding their most important asset, their people, is often harder than it should be, so congrats!  First, some full disclosure, I'm the CEO of WhoKnows, and we have a platform that addresses exactly the problem you're facing, so I apologize if this comes across as a sales pitch.  However, I honestly believe this could be a case where the product is the best answer to a question.

Basically, we have built a machine learning platform to automatically consolidate existing profiles and then analyze online content and work activity to automatically build a private network of expertise and relationships.  All of this is done with a focus on the employee's privacy, and over 90% of our users now have up-to-date comprehensive profiles about what they know.  We're already deployed at multiple F500 and mid-market companies and have passed numerous privacy and security audits across the world.

Rather than continue pitching on the forum, feel free to reach out to me at chris@... if you'd like to hear more!

Cheers,
Chris



Re: Enterprise Patterns of User Profiles #profiles #expertise-location

Albert Simard
 

In our experience, the largest hurdles that must be overcome are consistency, currency, and completeness.

 

·         Consistency: Different systems and individuals will use variations in terminology for the same thing.  Humans, being human, also make mistakes when inserting data.  These require some sort of error checking, editorial review, and/or mapping between terminology variations. 

·         Currency: Organizational directories are frequently out of date or incorrect, particularly for temporary situations.  Individuals are in the best position to know their current situation.  But there must be a simple process in place for them to correct outdated or incorrect organizational data.

·         Completeness:  A critical mass of individuals must be sufficiently engaged to participate, access, and review their data on a regular basis.  Although 100% participation is not achievable (even in the military!) once a critical mass is achieved (75%+, IMHO), those who don’t play in the sandbox will be gradually marginalized.  


Re: Enterprise Patterns of User Profiles #profiles #expertise-location

cmacomber@...
 

Hello Howie,
Encouraging companies to finally put effort into understanding their most important asset, their people, is often harder than it should be, so congrats!  First, some full disclosure, I'm the CEO of WhoKnows, and we have a platform that addresses exactly the problem you're facing, so I apologize if this comes across as a sales pitch.  However, I honestly believe this could be a case where the product is the best answer to a question.

Basically, we have built a machine learning platform to automatically consolidate existing profiles and then analyze online content and work activity to automatically build a private network of expertise and relationships.  All of this is done with a focus on the employee's privacy, and over 90% of our users now have up-to-date comprehensive profiles about what they know.  We're already deployed at multiple F500 and mid-market companies and have passed numerous privacy and security audits across the world.

Rather than continue pitching on the forum, feel free to reach out to me at chris@... if you'd like to hear more!

Cheers,
Chris


Re: Enterprise Patterns of User Profiles #profiles #expertise-location

vs_shenoy@...
 

Howie,

There are multiple ways to consolidate people information in an organization but would still require the user to provide the most relevant information (like LinkedIn profiles) about expertise, though some information can be provisioned from staffing profiles and content shared on an asset management system. This has been done on SharePoint but requires customization and ideally having most of the information on a single platform. Stan Garfield and Lee Romero can share greater details of how this is done at Deloitte using a people profiles network. Ideally greater voluntary contribution of information enables stronger connections between people and information. 

I am not sure I understand what the scope of your analysis is? 

Thanks,
Vinod


Re: Enterprise Patterns of User Profiles #profiles #expertise-location

darin.hawley@...
 

Hello! I've been lurking here since last fall when I attended my first KM World conference and Stan Garfield's Knowledge Management 101 workshop. I've worked as an Enterprise Architect at Cargill for several years and have recently taken an interest raising my skills (and my company's maturity) in Knowledge Management. This is a topic area I know a bit about, so I thought I would finally jump in and share some of my thoughts.

 

I agreed with Alice that the most appropriate pattern is probably a data warehouse. No single system is going to be the master for all profile information, each is (or should be) authoritative for a subset of elements. Cargill has an HR data warehouse, but it doesn't currently contain a full set of profile information the way you described. Alternatively, and ambitiously, you could develop a central profile management system that becomes the front end for each of these backend systems. That would have the added benefit of solving the end user problem of having to maintain or request changes to profile information in multiple places.

 

I'm curious to know what analysis you'd like to do and how it relates to knowledge management. I am personally fascinated by identity data and how it enables us to find and relate to our colleagues more effectively. I can't tell you what a boon it has been for me to have Lync presence for scanning the role and org context of someone I'm addressing in a conversation, or being able to search for keywords and find PEOPLE in SharePoint who have matching items in their profile.

 

What I really wish I had, and perhaps what you're after, is visualizing the workforce along several dimensions (e.g. job function, employment type, level of experience, managerial level, geographical distribution). I would like to develop several personas based on this segmentation analysis that would help provide more targeted services.

 

Hope this is helpful, cheers!




Re: Enterprise Patterns of User Profiles #profiles #expertise-location

Alice MacGillivray <alice@...>
 

Good morning Howard. I was faced with a similar challenge many years ago (so the technologies have changed but perhaps the principles have not). In my case, I wanted staff to be able to easily run useful ad hoc reports about pieces of land they were managing. So in this case, it was those properties—rather than people—that required data integration/

The technology of the time was a data warehouse. In many cases, data (about risks, facilities, visitors, visitor satisfaction, etc.) were already associated with an ID for the piece of land (as people’s names would be). In some cases, we integrated spatial data too, but you probably wouldn’t need to do that.

The warehouse environment made this possible (as subsequent web tools would). I hired a DBA to do fairly minimal work between the back and front ends when things didn’t work quite right. I initially used a clunky tool and then moved to Oracle Discoverer (doubt it exists now but the name is pretty descriptive).

We had no big confidentiality issues. Only staff accessed the data and none of it required special clearances.

We had several ongoing management questions and decisions so I set up reports to answer those questions and help with decisions. People could customize those reports (for example for the 13 pieces of land they managed or for all properties with high fire hazards). 

One of the interesting things about this project was that I wasn’t a techie, though I sure climbed up a learning curve to the point where the IT folks wanted me working for them. I had to do a lot of people-research to even learn this was possible. When I finally met the person who understood (a CMA in a finance shop elsewhere in government) he said “I’ve been waiting 4 years for someone from your department to ask this question.”

Field staff and executives were both very supportive of the results, which was a rare occurrence! 

This may not sound like a KM initiative, but I believe it was a very successful one. The technology was used to stimulate and support dialogue, decision making and innovations by diverse groups of staff. It really helped people see their work in a larger context. Some of this work happened in an annual process we had developed, but for many the tool was used increasingly to get better context for day-to-day work. 

Perhaps there are some ideas here that can be adapted for your setting?

Alice

Alice MacGillivray, PhD

Please think before you print.





Re: Enterprise Patterns of User Profiles #profiles #expertise-location

Harman Jon GBJH <jon.harman@...>
 

I looked at various systems (e.g. Metasight from The Morphix Company) for generating user profiles several years ago.  They did this by looking at titles of emails that people sent and received and so deduced the interests and likely skills of that person.  As you can imagine there were many data protection concerns at that time and probably still would be now.  However, the world is moving this way – Amazon knows what I am interested in because of my activity on its site.   

 

I would recommend that the profiles are stored in one central place, such as Sharepoint profiles, and then other systems look up on this. 

 

Jon Harman
R&D Networks and Knowledge Management Team

Networks & Learning Lead

Office: Jealott's Hill, Building 89/8
Phone: +44 (0)1344 41 3868     
Mobile: +44 (0)77383 12889                         
e-mail: jon.harman@...  

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: 20 March 2015 14:31
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Enterprise Patterns of User Profiles

 

 

Good Morning SIKM! 


            One of the best things about working in this space is there is always something to learn.  I am thinking about a challenge that I haven't had to deal with before and I wonder if any of you have experience or advice for me.   

 

We have a number of systems that have user profile information.  For example, a talent management system will have name, address, image, uid etc. and a CMS SharePoint or other could house the same kind of data but in many cases a user will have to update this information themselves.    I have seen some enterprise service patterns that use LDAP to feed certain data to various systems but I am curious if there is a system or capability that itself is an enterprise resource to provision enterprise user information.   The other question is that would this same system or capability be able to ! compose or pull content from other systems to perform some analysis.    What are your thoughts or experiences?  

 

Best, 
Howie 




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Enterprise Patterns of User Profiles #profiles #expertise-location

Howie Cohen
 

Good Morning SIKM! 

One of the best things about working in this space is there is always something to learn.  I am thinking about a challenge that I haven't had to deal with before and I wonder if any of you have experience or advice for me.   

We have a number of systems that have user profile information.  For example, a talent management system will have name, address, image, uid etc. and a CMS SharePoint or other could house the same kind of data but in many cases a user will have to update this information themselves.    I have seen some enterprise service patterns that use LDAP to feed certain data to various systems but I am curious if there is a system or capability that itself is an enterprise resource to provision enterprise user information.   The other question is that would this same system or capability be able to compose or pull content from other systems to perform some analysis.    What are your thoughts or experiences?  

Best, 
Howie 


March 2015 SIKM Call: Doug Madgic, Andre Karamanian - The Culture Change Mosaic: Key Practices to Drive Knowledge Sharing and Services Differentiation within Your Organization #monthly-call #culture

Stan Garfield
 
Edited

TO: SIKM Leaders Community

Today we held our 118th monthly call.

Thanks to Doug and Andre for presenting, to Joel Muzard for recording, to those who live tweeted, and to those who participated in the discussion. You can continue the discussion by replying to this thread.


Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences #call-for #conferences

Stan Garfield
 


From Vince Scovetta

 
 
As a fellow KM researcher and evangelist, I'd like to invite you (or your colleagues) to consider submitting your research to the IEEE - Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS). Please visit http://www.hicss.org/#!calls/ c1cd9 or send me an email (vincent.scovetta@...) if you are interested.

Respectfully,
Vince


March 2015 SIKM Call: Doug Madgic, Andre Karamanian - The Culture Change Mosaic: Key Practices to Drive Knowledge Sharing and Services Differentiation within Your Organization #monthly-call #culture

Stan Garfield
 

This is a reminder of tomorrow's monthly call from 11 am to 12 noon EDT.


Re: EY Job Opening in Cleveland: Social Engagement, Innovation & Research Lead #jobs

Linda Hummel
 

Thanks for posting this Stan .
If anyone is interested and would like more info I am familiar with this position. I could possibly put in a referral for you as well. Please email me at Linda.Hummel@...


Best regards,
Linda Hummel 
EY global awareness and adoption lead

On Mar 9, 2015, at 12:42 PM, "stangarfield@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Social Engagement, Innovation & Research Lead

https://ey.taleo.net/careersection/gexp01/jobdetail.ftl?job=CLE0015L




EY Job Opening in Cleveland: Social Engagement, Innovation & Research Lead #jobs

Stan Garfield
 


Re: KMers in Seattle #local

Nancy Dixon
 

Tanya,
It's good to hear from you.  Do you know who the KM contact would be at Gates or Deloitte. I have a contact now for Microsoft. What about Boeing?

So tell me about what you are doing now in Seattle? In a KM job?   Enjoying a different climate?

Nancy

On Mar 7, 2015, at 9:06 AM, "Tanya Houseman tanyahouseman@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

 Hi Nancy,

I am a recent graduate of Columbia University's IKNS program (we have discussed SharePoint before). I am based in Seattle. I can't think of any different companies than what has already been listed by the SIKMLEADERS. (Microsoft, Bill and Melinda Gates, Deloitte, etc.)

I know that ExtraHop is trying to establish a program.

Please let me know if I can help you with any coordination from here in Seattle.

Cheers,

Tanya Houseman


On Mar 5, 2015, at 7:15 PM, Nancy Dixon nancydixon@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

I have a Chinese client, a large telecommunication company, Huawei. The Director of KM for Huawei will  be in Seattle Washington Mar 15-20. He would like to interview some companies in Seattle that have good KM programs.  Any suggestions  of who I might contact? 


Nancy
 





Re: KMers in Seattle #local

Tanya Houseman <tanyahouseman@...>
 

 Hi Nancy,

I am a recent graduate of Columbia University's IKNS program (we have discussed SharePoint before). I am based in Seattle. I can't think of any different companies than what has already been listed by the SIKMLEADERS. (Microsoft, Bill and Melinda Gates, Deloitte, etc.)

I know that ExtraHop is trying to establish a program.

Please let me know if I can help you with any coordination from here in Seattle.

Cheers,

Tanya Houseman


On Mar 5, 2015, at 7:15 PM, Nancy Dixon nancydixon@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

I have a Chinese client, a large telecommunication company, Huawei. The Director of KM for Huawei will  be in Seattle Washington Mar 15-20. He would like to interview some companies in Seattle that have good KM programs.  Any suggestions  of who I might contact? 


Nancy
 


Re: KMers in Seattle #local

Nancy White
 

From an org standpoint, I know this is something the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has grappled with...


Re: KMers in Seattle #local

 

Nancy,

I’ll be in Seattle that week and be glad to contribute.

Please use my Microsoft email for communications.

Please advise.

Best--

Jean-Claude F. Monney

Global KM Lead
Office of the CTO
Enterprise Services

Office: +1 512 795-5303

Mobile: +1 512 426-4037

jemonney@...

           

 

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Friday, March 6, 2015 3:47 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: KMers in Seattle

 

 

Nancy, here are some suggestions:

 

Seattle

1.    Barbara Bowen, PhD

2.    Daniel Rasmus

3.    Dave Thomas

4.    Tanya Houseman

5.    Jim Coogan

6.    Paulette DeGard

7.    Ephraim Julius Freed

8.    Nancy Wright White

 

Vancouver

1.    Dan Pontefract

2.    Brad Palmer

3.    Amy Brooks

4.    Susie Soetarto

5.    Murray N Clark


Re: KMers in Seattle #local

Stan Garfield
 


KMers in Seattle #local

Nancy Dixon
 

I have a Chinese client, a large telecommunication company, Huawei. The Director of KM for Huawei will  be in Seattle Washington Mar 15-20. He would like to interview some companies in Seattle that have good KM programs.  Any suggestions  of who I might contact? 

Nancy
 


Re: Your KM vision requested #vision

Arthur Shelley
 

Excellent topic to explore Murray
Most definite interested to receive a copy. Facilitated a conversation on this exact topic with my KM for Project Managers class tonight.

I wrote a piece on understanding implications of using cloud usage patterns for commercial gain recently which I will send across to you. It should be out any moment now (Forward to a new book)

Arthur
Tweeting as Metaphorage

On 2 Mar 2015, at 10:34, murphjen@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Thanks Arthur for the comments, legal is a big issue and what got me going on it was a paper a MBA/JD student and I presented at the KM track at the Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, it was titles "Yours, Mine, or Ours: Discussing Ownership of Collaborative Works in the Cloud.  What we found that in the US the laws are almost counter to collaborative intra-organizational work.  I'm happy to share the paper if anyone is interested....murray
 
In a message dated 3/1/2015 1:14:46 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, sikmleaders@... writes:


Hi Murray,
Thank you for your insights. The potential synergies between KM and law are enormous, though challenged by the fact that most KM value comes from the application of tacit knowledge in specific contexts and leveraging relationships.

These things are difficult (but possible) to measure and hard to say exactly where the value came from as it is often through socialisation of diverse expertise that the new knowledge is created (so where does it get credited to - something laws and budgets prefer to make clear). I wrote a piece on measuring and estimating tangible value creation from seemingly intangible outcomes in 2009 explaining how to create plausible connections between what happened and valued outputs. This is necessary in order to influence business stakeholders in the language they understand (dollars). The real challenge in law is assigning the value to POTENTIAL, because IP does not have realised value until someone appl ies it. Knowledge and IP are like cash - simply existing does little, they need to flow to create new value. This requires trusted relationships, a wildness to constructively engage in open say sands preparedness to share the value created. Difficult things to clearly define in a legal contract as history of legal disputes shows.

Arthur
Tweeting as Metaphorage

On 1 Mar 2015, at 17:22, murphjen@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

 
There has been a lot of good stuff posted so I won't reiterate it, however, I will point out the darkside trends we have to be aware of:
 
KM will have to work with security to create a secure way of storing, sharing, transferring, and using knowledge
 
KM and the legal system will have to work together to catch up so that the law understands and supports knowledge creation, sharing, and use in intra-organizational teams, and in particularly, with teams that work across national boundaries
 
KM will have to overcome the large numbers of thought leaders that will be retiring (not just over the next 3 years but for awhile), this will be the great challenge, making succession within organizations, industries, and societies seamless, it is important as if we can't do this then why do KM?
 
measuring national creation, usage, and sharing of knowledge measures more reliable and real (this is the KAM and KEI) and will become better measures of the knowledge society
 
KM and knowledge society will continue to work together, especially as the Internet of Things grows to be more predominant
 
Probably more but this is it for now
 
Murray E. Jennex, Ph.D., P.E., CISSP, CSSLP, PMP
Professor, San Diego State University
Editor in Chief International Journal of Knowledge Management
Co-editor in Chief International Journal of Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management

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