Date   

Re: Tradeoffs in Information Architecture #information-architecture

Andrew Gent <ajgent@...>
 

>>As for Klein’s book – which one are you referring to?  

Laura Klein's UX for Lean Startups is the book I was thinking of. Not IA specific, but much of it is equally applicable. 

--Andrew


Re: Tradeoffs in Information Architecture #information-architecture

Robert L. Bogue
 

Andrew –

 

I agree. Validation is a natural part of the IA process.  I’m a bit more structured in my approach, asking folks to address pros/cons at the start.

 

As for Klein’s book – which one are you referring to?  First, I assume you’re speaking of Gary Klein.  Sources of Power and Seeing What Others Don’t are both good books but I’m not connecting to what you’re referring to.  Perhaps you’re referencing one of his books I’ve not read.

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... <sikmleaders@...>
Sent: Thursday, April 25, 2019 3:20 PM
To: Robert Bogue rbogue@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Tradeoffs in Information Architecture

 

 

Hi Rob,

 

I am not necessarily discussing a validation of the actual structure (since this is a class), as much as the method. (Well, I'd recommend both but validating the resulting structure is a much bigger project and farther down the development path.)  

 

My thinking is more along the lines of very early paper prototyping. Say someone says "let's go with a folksonomy". Take five members of your target provider audience give them one piece of information they would likely submit and ask them to tag it. See what the results are. Repeat the exercise with your target consumers -- either ask them what categories they would look for to find the content or show them stickies with the folksonomy from step 1 and ask them which they would choose to find a piece of information.

 

I give this as an example of how you can verify assumptions about what approach to use as early as possible. For teaching, I was simply thinking it would be useful to ask the students to think about what technique they would use to verify their assumptions -- teach verification as a natural part of the process. Maybe give them some example approaches they could choose from. (That's where Klein's book is a good resource.)

 

--Andrew

 

 



Re: Tradeoffs in Information Architecture #information-architecture

Andrew Gent <ajgent@...>
 

Hi Rob,

I am not necessarily discussing a validation of the actual structure (since this is a class), as much as the method. (Well, I'd recommend both but validating the resulting structure is a much bigger project and farther down the development path.)  

My thinking is more along the lines of very early paper prototyping. Say someone says "let's go with a folksonomy". Take five members of your target provider audience give them one piece of information they would likely submit and ask them to tag it. See what the results are. Repeat the exercise with your target consumers -- either ask them what categories they would look for to find the content or show them stickies with the folksonomy from step 1 and ask them which they would choose to find a piece of information.

I give this as an example of how you can verify assumptions about what approach to use as early as possible. For teaching, I was simply thinking it would be useful to ask the students to think about what technique they would use to verify their assumptions -- teach verification as a natural part of the process. Maybe give them some example approaches they could choose from. (That's where Klein's book is a good resource.)

--Andrew




Re: Tradeoffs in Information Architecture #information-architecture

Robert L. Bogue
 

Andrew –

 

Thanks for the note.  I’m still working on Stephen’s response from earlier this week.  His workshop is managing this same tension.  (This is my way of acknowledging that I’ve not responded to him yet because I’m still processing.)

 

I agree what I’m trying to do is hard.  That’s why I don’t think anyone has done it before.  (At least not that I can find.)

 

I think the point is not to make them a perfect information architect in one exercise.  The point is to expose the tensions and begin the process of thinking in shades of gray.

 

My point of view is that information architecture is about the organization of the information – that is the balance of making it easy to input the information (putability) and the ability to retrieve it (findability).

 

I have the Polar Bear book (and several others) and Morville/Rosenfeld don’t provide a direct list of the tensions.  My notes (which tend to elevate these sorts of things) doesn’t indicate that they directly addressed the idea either.

 

I don’t think I fully understand your point regarding validating the information architecture.  There are techniques like closed card sorts which can lead to a basic understanding of how effective the information architecture is but in practice I find this to be a pretty crude metric for how effective the information architecture will be largely to the low number of scenarios and people that are selected to do the closed card sort.  I tend to believe that there should be continued monitoring of “misses” rather than attempt to validate an architecture.  Are you proposing something different?

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... <sikmleaders@...>
Sent: Thursday, April 25, 2019 11:49 AM
To: Robert Bogue rbogue@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Tradeoffs in Information Architecture

 

 

Hi Robert,

 

Fascinating idea. Although what you are suggesting sounds reasonable, I am not sure you are going to find a practical generic list of tradeoffs at the level you need. Part of the problem is that -- from an IA perspective -- those tradeoffs come out of the requirements analysis. By that I mean, for example, folksonomy vs. managed taxonomy is driven by multiple factors starting with the end goal of the information. If it needs to be digested by external systems, the taxonomy may be dictated by those systems. Similarly, I have often found that security/secrecy concerns can place surprisingly heavy limitations on access to the resulting content on the other end of the system. 

 

To further complicate things, the familiarity and acceptance of the target audience to change and/or technical advances can influence what processes are likely to meet with success or failure.

 

Which isn't to say you shouldn't try this. I think it would be a great way to start people thinking of the options that are available to them. I don't have it with me at the moment and it has been a long time since I read it, but you might check Rosenfeld and Morville's polar bear book for such a list. (I'll check when I get home.)

 

I assume by "information architecture" you are thinking specifically of the organization of the information, not necessarily the mechanisms for collecting or applying the information (what might be called the input and output)?

 

One thing I would love to see, if I were working on such a project, would be to reinforce the testing/validation of the IA/KM solution. So asking people to place their project on such scales as flexible/folksonomy to managed/taxonomy or ad hoc (forums) to formal (reports) is good. but it would be great to then ask them to justify that placement based on specifics of the project details, using things like audience bias/culture, management buy-in, or governmental requirements. Then finally suggest ways they could then verify/test this hypothesis before getting too far down the road. (Laura Klein's UX for Lead Startups is a great reference for this.)

 

Andrew Gent

UX Architect, VoltDB inc.

 

 

On Monday, April 22, 2019, 9:43:53 AM EDT, Robert Bogue rbogue@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

 

 

Friends -

 

I’m working on something and I’d appreciate your input.  I’m working on an information architecture course.  It’s something that I’m expecting will be released through a partner for the mass market in both an instructor led and an on-demand online course.  As a result of the on-demand, online component, I’m spending some time trying to make sure that the exercises are something that a student could execute on their own – or with correspondence-based support.  I’ve got an idea for an exercise, I’m working on which has them trying to understand how they’ll want to bias their information architecture to get the results the organization wants.  For instance, it may be that ease of capture is more important than metadata completeness.  It could be that it’s more important to discover new terms that are in use in the organization (folksonomy) or that it’s more important that the key terms be controlled (taxonomy).

 

I’m thinking I’ll have the students selecting a point on the continuum between these two points once they’ve identified the goals of the organization, division, department, and project.  I’ve got a few ideas for the ways to express the tradeoffs that need to be made (see the examples above) but I’ve not seen anywhere that the kinds of tradeoffs that need to be made in designing information architectures have been listed.  I’d love to get everyone’s input on the kinds of tradeoffs that must be made when designing systems for knowledge management – and in general.

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

 


Re: Tradeoffs in Information Architecture #information-architecture

Andrew Gent <ajgent@...>
 

Hi Robert,

Fascinating idea. Although what you are suggesting sounds reasonable, I am not sure you are going to find a practical generic list of tradeoffs at the level you need. Part of the problem is that -- from an IA perspective -- those tradeoffs come out of the requirements analysis. By that I mean, for example, folksonomy vs. managed taxonomy is driven by multiple factors starting with the end goal of the information. If it needs to be digested by external systems, the taxonomy may be dictated by those systems. Similarly, I have often found that security/secrecy concerns can place surprisingly heavy limitations on access to the resulting content on the other end of the system. 

To further complicate things, the familiarity and acceptance of the target audience to change and/or technical advances can influence what processes are likely to meet with success or failure.

Which isn't to say you shouldn't try this. I think it would be a great way to start people thinking of the options that are available to them. I don't have it with me at the moment and it has been a long time since I read it, but you might check Rosenfeld and Morville's polar bear book for such a list. (I'll check when I get home.)

I assume by "information architecture" you are thinking specifically of the organization of the information, not necessarily the mechanisms for collecting or applying the information (what might be called the input and output)?

One thing I would love to see, if I were working on such a project, would be to reinforce the testing/validation of the IA/KM solution. So asking people to place their project on such scales as flexible/folksonomy to managed/taxonomy or ad hoc (forums) to formal (reports) is good. but it would be great to then ask them to justify that placement based on specifics of the project details, using things like audience bias/culture, management buy-in, or governmental requirements. Then finally suggest ways they could then verify/test this hypothesis before getting too far down the road. (Laura Klein's UX for Lead Startups is a great reference for this.)

Andrew Gent
UX Architect, VoltDB inc.
 

On Monday, April 22, 2019, 9:43:53 AM EDT, Robert Bogue rbogue@... [sikmleaders] wrote:


 

Friends -

 

I’m working on something and I’d appreciate your input.  I’m working on an information architecture course.  It’s something that I’m expecting will be released through a partner for the mass market in both an instructor led and an on-demand online course.  As a result of the on-demand, online component, I’m spending some time trying to make sure that the exercises are something that a student could execute on their own – or with correspondence-based support.  I’ve got an idea for an exercise, I’m working on which has them trying to understand how they’ll want to bias their information architecture to get the results the organization wants.  For instance, it may be that ease of capture is more important than metadata completeness.  It could be that it’s more important to discover new terms that are in use in the organization (folksonomy) or that it’s more important that the key terms be controlled (taxonomy).

 

I’m thinking I’ll have the students selecting a point on the continuum between these two points once they’ve identified the goals of the organization, division, department, and project.  I’ve got a few ideas for the ways to express the tradeoffs that need to be made (see the examples above) but I’ve not seen anywhere that the kinds of tradeoffs that need to be made in designing information architectures have been listed.  I’d love to get everyone’s input on the kinds of tradeoffs that must be made when designing systems for knowledge management – and in general.

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

 


Driving innovation through community #innovation #CoP

Stacie Jordan Brenkovich
 

Hi everyone I am looking to understand how you might be leveraging your communities of practice to drive innovative thinking (ideas/solutions) for your internal or external clients. For example, crowdsourcing around a particular business challenge, piloting ideas/asking the community for feedback, bringing in external speakers, etc. Thanks!!


Re: The role of KM in future-proofing consultancy firms #consulting

Jasper Lavertu
 

Hi Matt,

Many thanks for your valuable contribution. I'll keep you posted regarding my essay and the feedback I get from my university.

Cheers,
Jasper


Re: Tradeoffs in Information Architecture #information-architecture

Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Rob,

This is not exactly what you're asking for, but I ran a workshop on fit-for-purpose data structures 18 months back which covers some of this ground:
https://www.slideshare.net/bounds/designing-fit-for-purpose-data-structures-141642097

Happy to chat if you have any questions.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 22/04/2019 11:39 pm, Robert Bogue rbogue@... [sikmleaders] wrote:

Friends -

Im working on something and Id appreciate your input. Im working on an information architecture course. Its something that Im expecting will be released through a partner for the mass market in both an instructor led and an on-demand online course. As a result of the on-demand, online component, Im spending some time trying to make sure that the exercises are something that a student could execute on their own or with correspondence-based support. Ive got an idea for an exercise, Im working on which has them trying to understand how theyll want to bias their information architecture to get the results the organization wants. For instance, it may be that ease of capture is more important than metadata completeness. It could be that its more important to discover new terms that are in use in the organization (folksonomy) or that its more important that the key terms be controlled (taxonomy).

Im thinking Ill have the students selecting a point on the continuum between these two points once theyve identified the goals of the organization, division, department, and project. Ive got a few ideas for the ways to express the tradeoffs that need to be made (see the examples above) but Ive not seen anywhere that the kinds of tradeoffs that need to be made in designing information architectures have been listed. Id love to get everyones input on the kinds of tradeoffs that must be made when designing systems for knowledge management and in general.

Rob

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310 M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog


Tradeoffs in Information Architecture #information-architecture

Robert L. Bogue
 

Friends -

 

I’m working on something and I’d appreciate your input.  I’m working on an information architecture course.  It’s something that I’m expecting will be released through a partner for the mass market in both an instructor led and an on-demand online course.  As a result of the on-demand, online component, I’m spending some time trying to make sure that the exercises are something that a student could execute on their own – or with correspondence-based support.  I’ve got an idea for an exercise, I’m working on which has them trying to understand how they’ll want to bias their information architecture to get the results the organization wants.  For instance, it may be that ease of capture is more important than metadata completeness.  It could be that it’s more important to discover new terms that are in use in the organization (folksonomy) or that it’s more important that the key terms be controlled (taxonomy).

 

I’m thinking I’ll have the students selecting a point on the continuum between these two points once they’ve identified the goals of the organization, division, department, and project.  I’ve got a few ideas for the ways to express the tradeoffs that need to be made (see the examples above) but I’ve not seen anywhere that the kinds of tradeoffs that need to be made in designing information architectures have been listed.  I’d love to get everyone’s input on the kinds of tradeoffs that must be made when designing systems for knowledge management – and in general.

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

 


Job Opening: Data Scientist #jobs

Stan Garfield
 

If interested, respond directly to:

Abhishek Bhatia <abhishek.bhatia@...>

Position          : Data Scientist - Analytics Project

Location         : Piscataway NJ, Dallas TX , Santa Clara CA

Duration         : Full Time/ Contract

 

Role & Responsibilities:

•          Own and deliver problem solving in Data Science engagements with Fortune 50 clients

•          Work on a team with diverse clients and industries delivering analytics solutions and help clients turn data into actionable insights that drive tangible outcomes

•          Support Client leadership teams to help make better decisions.

•          Work with stakeholders throughout the organization to identify opportunities for leveraging data to drive business solutions and help establish near-term and long-term strategies.

•          Lead the development of predictive models and machine-learning algorithms

•          Enhance data collection procedures by assessing the effectiveness and accuracy of data sources and data gathering techniques

•          Spearhead initiatives to process, clean, and verify the integrity of data used for analysis

•          Communicate complex ideas across all levels of organization using clear data- visualizations techniques

 

Background (Education / Experience):

•         Bachelors (Masters preferred) degree in Math’s, Stats, or Comp. Sc. etc.  relevant quantitative & qualitative research and analytics experience, comfortable working with databases and large datasets

•          Proficiency with data querying languages (e.g. SQL), scripting languages (e.g. Python), or statistical/mathematical software (e.g. R, SAS)

•          Experience in creating data driven visualizations to describe an end-to-end system (e.g. Tableau, GCP)

•          Strong knowledge of statistical techniques and expertise in use of statistical packages , experience with ML Algorithms

•          Excellent verbal and written communication skills with the ability to effectively advocate technical solutions to engineering teams and business audiences

•          Highly skilled in data and math/statistical methods (i.e. modeling, algorithms)

•          Evidence of using of relevant statistical measures such as confidence intervals, significance of error measurements, development and evaluation data sets, etc. in data analysis projects

•          Experience in processing, filtering, and presenting large quantities of data

•          Actively involved in Feature Engineering, Model Building, Data Preparation & Model Productionalization

•          Demonstrable track record of dealing well with ambiguity, prioritizing needs, and delivering results in a dynamic environment


April 2019 SIKM Call: Louis-Pierre Guillaume - Measuring the value of communities: Schneider Electric case study #case-studies #CoP #value #monthly-call

Stan Garfield
 
Edited

TO: SIKM Leaders Community

Today we held our 164th monthly call. Here are the details:

Thanks to Louis-Pierre for presenting and to Joel Muzard, Tom Barfield, and Linda Hummel for participating in the conversation. Please continue the discussion by replying to this thread.


April 2019 SIKM Call: Louis-Pierre Guillaume - Measuring the value of communities: Schneider Electric case study #case-studies #CoP #value #monthly-call

Stan Garfield
 

This is a reminder of tomorrow's monthly call from 11 am to 12 noon EDT.

SIKM Leaders Community Monthly Call



Machine Learning & Information Management Videos & Podcast #AI #podcast #video

Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Hi All,


Paul Kennedy (UTS): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H56ddueWaaw

Glen Humphries (NSW State Records): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_cR_UAFK1SM

Matthew Golab (Gilbert + Tobin): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tQ-sBTfaW98

Q&A: https://soundcloud.com/user-722164145/q-a-session-from-the-machine-learning-for-information-management-information-session/s-Vq9ZT


Speakers:


Paul Kennedy is Director of the Biomedical Data Science Laboratory in the UTS Centre for Artificial Intelligence. Prof Kennedy has been a General Chair of the Australasian Data Mining Conference (AusDM) since 2007 and has been coeditor of the AusDM proceedings since 2006. He is an ARC Expert Assessor and has coauthored over 100 publications.


Glen Humphries is currently a Senior Advisor, Transfer Planning at NSW State Archives and Records Authority. He has previously worked for Archives New Zealand from 2006 to 2014 where he gained a wide knowledge of archival practices before moving to Australia. Glen joined State Archives in August 2015 and has been working on a number of digital transfers of various sizes and ages.


Matthew Golab is the head of Legal Informatics at Gilbert + Tobin. He leads a specialised in-house multidisciplinary legal informatics team that utilises a variety of data analytics and eDiscovery, and other AI technology tools. Matthew has more than 20 years of experience in the legal technology industry, including two of Australia's preeminent law firms, Allens for 13 years and Gilbert + Tobin for seven years. Matthew is Chair of the Association of Litigation Support Managers (ALSM), NSW chapter, and an advisory board member of Information Governance ANZ.


Regards,


Matt Moore



Knowledge & Information Management Opportunity #jobs

Howie Cohen
 

Knowledge & Information Management Opportunity at Shaw AFB, South Carolina with MacAulay-Brown

MacAulay-Brown Inc., An Alion Company currently has a position available at Shaw AFB, SC for a Knowledge & Information Management position that we are actively trying to fill. I came across your profile and your qualifications and experience is exactly what we are in search of in a candidate. If you are interested in hearing more about this opportunity, you can reach out to me directly by e-mail at matt.snyder@...


On Wed, Apr 10, 2019 at 2:03 PM stangarfield@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

From Patrick O'Keefe


We're hiring a US-based community manager for my team at The Community Company:  https://community.co/jobs/ community-manager/.

It's a junior-to-mid level role, but it's a great opportunity for someone who maybe has some experience in a community-facing role, but maybe they haven't been given the chance to fully take ownership of a community or portfolio of communities. And they want that chance. They should:

▪️ Want freedom and responsibility, and the consequences that come along with them.

▪️ Want to do pure community work. I won't have them arguing with Arby's on Twitter.

▪️ Want to work in a supportive team that shares and collaborates. Not just a platitude.

▪️ Are detail oriented. Presentation, grammar, punctuality. It all matters. As Jadakiss once said, "You don't sweat the small things, they become drastic."

As an aside, if someone looking at this is timid because they haven't worked with a media brand, or the person they are thinking of hasn't, I would adjust that thinking. I (and we) respect community knowledge, and understand how it translates across industries. For example, there have been some well-publicized gaming industry layoffs. If you know someone who was caught up in those, who has solid experience in community, and wants to get out of that space, this could be a great way to do it.

Patrick O'Keefe
Host of Community Signal http://www.communitysignal. com, a podcast for the online community pros
Community-focused speaker and author of Managing Online Forums http://www. managingonlineforums.com



Job Opening: US-based community manager #jobs

Stan Garfield
 

From Patrick O'Keefe


We're hiring a US-based community manager for my team at The Community Company:  https://community.co/jobs/ community-manager/.

It's a junior-to-mid level role, but it's a great opportunity for someone who maybe has some experience in a community-facing role, but maybe they haven't been given the chance to fully take ownership of a community or portfolio of communities. And they want that chance. They should:

▪️ Want freedom and responsibility, and the consequences that come along with them.

▪️ Want to do pure community work. I won't have them arguing with Arby's on Twitter.

▪️ Want to work in a supportive team that shares and collaborates. Not just a platitude.

▪️ Are detail oriented. Presentation, grammar, punctuality. It all matters. As Jadakiss once said, "You don't sweat the small things, they become drastic."

As an aside, if someone looking at this is timid because they haven't worked with a media brand, or the person they are thinking of hasn't, I would adjust that thinking. I (and we) respect community knowledge, and understand how it translates across industries. For example, there have been some well-publicized gaming industry layoffs. If you know someone who was caught up in those, who has solid experience in community, and wants to get out of that space, this could be a great way to do it.

Patrick O'Keefe
Host of Community Signal http://www.communitysignal. com, a podcast for the online community pros
Community-focused speaker and author of Managing Online Forums http://www. managingonlineforums.com



Re: The role of KM in future-proofing consultancy firms #consulting

Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Hi Jasper,

I hope you fully reference the replies in your essay! I am going to say some controversial things (I am definitely not rubbing my hands together in anticipation).

"Statement 1:The gig economy (the rise of freelancers) is one of the biggest emerging trends in the labour market, and it’s set to change the business landscape over the next decade, including the management consultancy sector."

I can remember discussing flexible labour markets in a global consulting firm back in 2004 . The idea was that trad consulting firms would get swept away by a tide of virtualized Uber-style consulting networks. This largely hasn't happened. What has happened is that many former consultants have gone client side and clients are now much more sophisticated buyers of consulting services. Well, sometimes they are. Not always.

"Statement 2: In a changing digital world consulting will significantly change over the next years. Digital is changing the operating model, services, and strategies of consulting firms"

Consulting firms need to change their service offerings every 2-5 years anyway. (as new needs, wants and fads emerge and old ones fade away) The off-shoring trend of the 90s/00s had a huge impact on professional services. Digital trends such as robotic process automation and artificial intelligence will have a similar impact on consulting firms. Exactly how much of an impact remains to be seen.
  
"Statement 3: A new generation is rising, and they want to put companies into motion and bring innovation, including to the consultancy firms themselves. The new generation have other values and drives (they value diversity and social justice within a whole new global context and they’ve been raised to learn in teams and work for the collective)."

No. Much of the hype about generational differences is seriously overblown and not supported by the evidence (including the comments about social justice and collective work). Data from the US indicates that new business formation is actually dropping. Even in the high-profile froth of Silicon Valley (which post-2008 took over from Wall Street as the place newly-minted MBAs went to play at being businesspeople), most startups are founded by people in their 40s. As Chuck D said, don't believe the hype.

Regards,

Matt

  




.


The role of KM in future-proofing consultancy firms #consulting

Jasper Lavertu
 

For an essay I am looking for information regarding KM at management consultancy firms. I hope somebody can help me answering some questions.


Below there are three statements. For every statement there are three questions (identical for each statement)

  1. Is the statement considered a threat or an opportunity, and why?
  2. What is the firm doing in respond to this statement?
  3. What role can/should KM play in answering this issue?


Statement 1:The gig economy (the rise of freelancers) is one of the biggest emerging trends in the labour market, and it’s set to change the business landscape over the next decade, including the management consultancy sector.


Statement 2: In a changing digital world consulting will significantly change over the next years. Digital is changing the operating model, services, and strategies of consulting firms.


Statement 3: A new generation is rising, and they want to put companies into motion and bring innovation, including to the consultancy firms themselves. The new generation have other values and drives (they value diversity and social justice within a whole new global context and they’ve been raised to learn in teams and work for the collective).


-------------

I truly appreciate your time and effort. Many thanks in advance.


Kind regards,


Jasper Lavertu

KM Specialist @ Feadship Royal Dutch Shipyards & parttime MSc student at the University of Amsterdam





Re: Global community platforms and languages #CoP #local #tools

Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Aaron,

Thanks for the additional context. I think Martin is spot on that you'll need some good process disciplines no matter what platform you eventually adopt.

For what it's worth, here are the capabilities I suggest you will need. While some customisation would likely be required for any platform to achieve this, you can minimise it through smart design and good pre-planning:

  • A multilingual thesaurus to facilitate organisation and discovery. The World Bank has already done some good work here for a topic thesaurus, however it's only in English. Assuming you have a similarly broad topic focus, I suggest it might be worthwhile to develop a full multi-lingual thesaurus of the top-level and second-level concepts. This then provides a fairly simple way to categorise and expose ad hoc questions, working groups, and committees across the globe in the language of choice. SKOS and SKOS-XL provide a good modelling paradigm for this work.

  • A robust group structure that encourages both local and global community formation. This could be as simple as creating spaces with a Directory that captures metadata such as relevant topics, sponsoring organsations, locations and/or languages. These can then be exposed through browsing and/or search.

  • Support for summary and translation relationships. The goal here is to encourage translations and other value-add activities, while making it easy to track back to the source. For example in a SharePoint paradigm, you could trigger a Flow that allows users to attach a summary or translation to a source document, which would then automatically picks up associated metadata (such as source location, metadata and author) before republication. Ideally it keeps track of source so that you can see the origin of documents.

  • Multilingual calendars. Unfortunately I don't think there's a shortcut here. You just have to maintain multiple calendars in each of your core languages and keep them in sync through labour. You could try an auto-translation tool to put event stubs in place for each language, but assuming there will need to be fair degree of curation no matter what, I suspect that's a false economy.

  • Local and global moderators/support staff. Having dedicated staff do translations, housekeeping, space creation and management etc, will do wonders to make the site really hum.

Overall I'd be leaning towards an Office 365 solution for ease of deployment and scalability, but honestly there are lots of platforms capable of handling the problem technologically. Getting a clear picture on your supporting information infrastructure and governance will be the most important part.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 30/03/2019 1:42 am, Aaron F Buchsbaum abuchsbaum@... [sikmleaders] wrote:

 

Many kind thanks to Tom, Martin, and Stephen. Some additional thoughts based on each.

 

Tom – I was a bit taken aback by some of your phrasing (“isn’t anything unusual”, “KM 101”, “adopters… back in the 90’s”), and then realized I’d perhaps not given enough context. The scenario at hand is for external client use. It involves government clients who are either Cabinet Ministers or Managers/Directors of units within ministries. It is a mix of Low, Middle, and High income countries, some of whom have political differences or are wary to be associated with certain others. As individuals, some started using a computer in their teens or later and should not be assume to be natively comfortable across UIs. On the language front, I don’t know, for instance, how many use an English keyboard or an Arabic one, or what their browser UI or CPU OS is set to for language. It is a bit challenging—though feasible--to sort that out through surveys and staff follow-up. That sid I have some familiarity with their overall language preferences, which is that when 50 of them will be in DC together in two weeks, 20 of them request translation to/from English. I can appreciate that these “sort themselves out in various ways”, but I’d like to set a higher bar where I can stand in front of my Vice President and say confidently that the technology solution for discussion, event sharing, and file sharing is able to be understood and navigated with ease. Else, like many platforms, the net result will be continued 1:1 emails between these clients and the closest World Bank country staff, which eventually come back to our small central team of 8, and require bespoke communications and file attachments. In such a scenario, the platform investment has poor returns. Very glad to hear further thoughts given the above, and apologies again for not sharing sufficient info.

 

Martin – many thanks for this useful example. There will be natural language groups, and at present we plan 1-2 global gatherings each year (we will see if that continues, based on funding). Your note on requiring discipline to keep things relatively equal across languages is well taken. I would love if a platform can handle some of that discipline 😊  Else I already envisage solutions where we create 3 guidance notes in three languages.

 

Stephen – you pose many fair questions.

- multilingual systems interface? --- yes

- single URL – not critical, but at least similar domain (e.g. worldbank.org vs. banquemondial.org)

- document translation – that would be beautiful, but I think is a lot to ask of a system. Do you know of anything that handles this reasonably? Else I would revert to Martin’s comments and use some ‘discipline’ (i.e. process) to make sure key contributions in native languages were being translated as needed, or at least summaries of them.

- mobile browser (or app) – yes, but willing to forego if other aspects of platform are strong

- success – oh that word! 😊 To be frank, no, it isn’t fully known. The full scope of the project is “increasing investments in human capital” (Aspirational! Although measurable, with difficulties). A successful platform, in order to contribute to that goal, will (1) provide a convening structure for discussions and questions in between in-person or synchronous web-based events (webinars, video conferences), will (2) be the trusted project knowledge repository that is top-of-mind for the client group in question, and will (3) reflect the amount of activity this high-level community undertakes by showing events happening around the world under the umbrella of human capital.

 

Many thanks again for all responses so far. Glad to hear more.

 

Aaron  

 

 

 

Aaron Buchsbaum | Knowledge Management Officer

The World Bank. Washington, DC

P:   202.473.9711

E:   abuchsbaum@...

 

   #investinpeople

   @aaronbuchsbaum

   www.worldbank.org/humancapital

 

 


Re: Global community platforms and languages #CoP #local #tools

Martin Dugage
 

Have a look at Hivebrite. https://hivebrite.com
It’s really a cool community platform
M

Le ven. 29 mars 2019 à 17:09, Louis-Pierre Guillaume louis-pierre@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> a écrit :
 


Hi Aaron,

Not that unusual for those of us who have lead enterprise community management programs in multinational companies.

Before answering fully, I would ask some questions:
  • Could you define what is a community for you?
  • How many communities do you have?
  • How many communities of practice (CoP), organized with a leader, sponsor, charter ... ?
  • How many people per community? Min, max, average?
  • Do you have a community management program that federates and support the CoPs ? The other communities?
  • Internal or external communities, or a mix of both?
When I was the Director of Knowlegde Management at Schneider Electric, we looked at TEAMS vs YAMMER.

TEAMS
TEAMS is OK if you have communities with less than 50 members. Beyond, the management of the members is a chore.
The teams in TEAMS are private by default. Not good for serendipity.
There is no list of the teams in TEAMS. So, impossible to find out which communities I could be a member of.

YAMMER
Good for large communities beyond 50 members
YAMMER groups are open by default; good for serendipity
Easy to find the group you want to be a member of.

LANGUAGE
For YAMMER, Schneider Electric chose English for multi-country communities. For local one, they could keep their own language.
For TEAMS, as it is a closed environment, up to the members.

COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT
Schneider Electric has a central team with one FTE who leads the 200 communities of practice. The 2000+ "communities" on Yammer and the 10000+ teams on TEAMS are on their own. The program promotes a framework, with best practices, rules, and measurement. The leaders of the CoPs are organised in a CoP (we eat our own dog food :-).

Hoping I have answered some of your questions,

Cheers
Louis-Pierre
_________________________________________________

Louis-Pierre Guillaume
Consulting in Knowledge Management, Communities & Collaboration
+33 6 10 33 63 21
louis-pierre.guillaume@...

www.amallte.com

LinkedIn - Twitter - Medium



Le mar. 26 mars 2019 à 17:35, Aaron F Buchsbaum abuchsbaum@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> a écrit :
 

Hi friends,

 

I have a rather gnarly, but not unusual problem.

 

I am asked to create a community platform. Ideal functions are file sharing, calendar, and discussions. Everything else is nice-to-have.

 

The user base comes from (1) at least 57 different countries, (2) in general are time-deprived, (3) have widely varying levels of familiarity with computers and web browsing, and (4) speak different languages.

 

Can anyone speak to this type of scenario, and how to promote multi-lingual ease-of-use and interaction generally? Happy to hear thoughts from platform/technology end as well as facilitation/community management end.

 

Massive thanks for your thoughts. Bonus points if you have used ‘Adobe Communities’ or ‘Microsoft Teams’ (or Slack) in similar scenarios.

 

Aaron Buchsbaum | Knowledge Management Officer

The World Bank. Washington, DC

P:   202.473.9711

E:   abuchsbaum@...

 

   #investinpeople

   @aaronbuchsbaum

   www.worldbank.org/humancapital

 

 


Re: Global community platforms and languages #CoP #local #tools

Louis-Pierre Guillaume
 


Hi Aaron,

Not that unusual for those of us who have lead enterprise community management programs in multinational companies.

Before answering fully, I would ask some questions:
  • Could you define what is a community for you?
  • How many communities do you have?
  • How many communities of practice (CoP), organized with a leader, sponsor, charter ... ?
  • How many people per community? Min, max, average?
  • Do you have a community management program that federates and support the CoPs ? The other communities?
  • Internal or external communities, or a mix of both?
When I was the Director of Knowlegde Management at Schneider Electric, we looked at TEAMS vs YAMMER.

TEAMS
TEAMS is OK if you have communities with less than 50 members. Beyond, the management of the members is a chore.
The teams in TEAMS are private by default. Not good for serendipity.
There is no list of the teams in TEAMS. So, impossible to find out which communities I could be a member of.

YAMMER
Good for large communities beyond 50 members
YAMMER groups are open by default; good for serendipity
Easy to find the group you want to be a member of.

LANGUAGE
For YAMMER, Schneider Electric chose English for multi-country communities. For local one, they could keep their own language.
For TEAMS, as it is a closed environment, up to the members.

COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT
Schneider Electric has a central team with one FTE who leads the 200 communities of practice. The 2000+ "communities" on Yammer and the 10000+ teams on TEAMS are on their own. The program promotes a framework, with best practices, rules, and measurement. The leaders of the CoPs are organised in a CoP (we eat our own dog food :-).

Hoping I have answered some of your questions,

Cheers
Louis-Pierre
_________________________________________________

Louis-Pierre Guillaume
Consulting in Knowledge Management, Communities & Collaboration
+33 6 10 33 63 21
louis-pierre.guillaume@...

www.amallte.com

LinkedIn - Twitter - Medium



Le mar. 26 mars 2019 à 17:35, Aaron F Buchsbaum abuchsbaum@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> a écrit :
 

Hi friends,

 

I have a rather gnarly, but not unusual problem.

 

I am asked to create a community platform. Ideal functions are file sharing, calendar, and discussions. Everything else is nice-to-have.

 

The user base comes from (1) at least 57 different countries, (2) in general are time-deprived, (3) have widely varying levels of familiarity with computers and web browsing, and (4) speak different languages.

 

Can anyone speak to this type of scenario, and how to promote multi-lingual ease-of-use and interaction generally? Happy to hear thoughts from platform/technology end as well as facilitation/community management end.

 

Massive thanks for your thoughts. Bonus points if you have used ‘Adobe Communities’ or ‘Microsoft Teams’ (or Slack) in similar scenarios.

 

Aaron Buchsbaum | Knowledge Management Officer

The World Bank. Washington, DC

P:   202.473.9711

E:   abuchsbaum@...

 

   #investinpeople

   @aaronbuchsbaum

   www.worldbank.org/humancapital

 

 

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