Date   

KM Reading Lists #books

Stan Garfield
 

I just updated my list of Knowledge Management Books. If you have other books or reading lists you think I should add, please reply with links.


A longer list of books mentioned in my Profiles in Knowledge Series and earlier blog posts is also available. The two most recent articles in the series are:


Invitation to participate :: Agile Knowledge-LAB #agile

Joel Muzard
 

Invitation to participate :: Online Knowledge-LAB :: Collective Intelligence in Action :: June 18, 2019

Theme:
The Personal and Organizational Agile Transformations triggered by the need of more complex actions : Teaming for Results
http://www.a-i-a.com/k-net/K-Lab-events.html

Come to share your ideas and experiences and participate to the co-construction of the social mind!
K-LAB is now scheduled for :
Date: Tuesday, June 18, 2019
Time:
10:00 San Francisco Time Zone
13:00 h EDT Toronto, Ottawa and New York Time Zone
18:00 in London Time Zone and at WeWork
http://www.a-i-a.com/k-net/K-Lab-events.html






Re: The role of KM in future-proofing consultancy firms #consulting

Jasper Lavertu
 
Edited

Hi Matt (and others),
 
One last message in this thread.
 
My essay (the role of KM in future-proofing established consultancy firms), which was written in the framework of my parttime MSc studie, has been graded with an avarage of 8.3 (out of ten).
 
Matt, again many thanks for your contribution. 
The essay is attached to this message for those interested.
Kind regards,
Jasper
KM Specialist @ Feadship Royal Dutch Shipyards & parttime MSc student at the University of Amsterdam


Re: KM for Data Science #data-science #knowledge-graph

Stan Garfield
 


Re: Presentation management recommendations SharePoint 2016 #tools

Stan Garfield
 

Caitlin, thanks for your query.

I think you have four alternatives:
  1. Use Microsoft technology as is.
  2. Use some other company's product to supplement/complement Microsoft technology.
  3. Use some other company's product instead of Microsoft technology.
  4. Build your own custom solution.
Here are the products I found:


Job Posting - Dropbox Technical Program Manager #jobs

Maureen Mason
 

Hello


My team at Dropbox is hiring a Technical Program Manager and the role will be a bit of a jack of trades but I would love to get a candidate with a background in Knowledge Management or L&D.


The role is based in our San Francisco office. 


Here is the description and a link to apply. 


Let me know if you have any questions. 


Best, 

Maureen 


Community Roles #jobs

Padraig Gibbons
 

Currently hiring for two Community Enablement roles within a Global Collaboration & Knowledge Management function. Likely candidates will have a background in professional services or technically focused organizations helping stakeholders to come together around pressing business topics (market development, solution development, project delivery etc.). Need to be comfortable selling the proposition to internal customers. Strong preference to be London based but would consider rock star candidates in other major European and North American markets.


https://jobs.kpmgcareers.co.uk/job/London-Community-Manager/560964000/

 

https://jobs.kpmgcareers.co.uk/job/London-Community-Strategist/560964200/


Presentation management recommendations SharePoint 2016 #tools

Caitlin Darisse
 

Hello SIKM Community,

 

I’m trying to find a presentation management solution for my firm (similar to SharePoint Slide Libraries).  However, we have SharePoint 2016 on prem, and we are not yet on Office 365, so I don’t think the slide library is an option with our current system. 

 

I’d like to avoid getting a third party solution like Shufflrr if possible.  We do have enterprise Box.com, but it’s not integrated with our SharePoint platform, so I’m not sure if that would offer anything. 

 

Do other companies have alternatives for presentation management?  Thank you for any guidance or advice you can offer!

 

Best,

 

Caitlin Darisse

Senior Knowledge Manager

FSG.org | caitlin.darisse@... | LinkedIn

617-502-6169 (O)

179 Lincoln Street, 3rd Floor | Boston, MA 02111

 

Pronouns: she/her/hers

 


Re: CoPs Implementation using ESN (e.g. Yammer) and/or Messaging (e.g. Teams) #ESN #CoP #Yammer

Susan Hanley
 

Today, every Yammer group is backed by an Office 365 Group - which means you get a SharePoint team site in which you can store all of your documents, tools, etc. In addition, you can embed the conversations part of your Yammer group on a SharePoint communication site - which allows you to have collaborative and authoritative content all associated with your Yammer conversations. So, Yammer is much more than a discussion board - it can be your conversations plus your shared body of knowledge, all managed in a platform that can be part of your compliance and security framework.


Re: CoPs Implementation using ESN (e.g. Yammer) and/or Messaging (e.g. Teams) #ESN #CoP #Yammer

Louis-Pierre Guillaume
 

When I was leading the Knowledge Management Office of Schneider Electric, we were faced with the dilemma of Yammer vs Teams when IT deployed Office 365 two years ago.

Our assumptions and constraints were (may have changed since):
  • Yammer is targeting enterprise social network. A community of practice can easily use a Yammer group for its discussion. Yammer groups are by default "open" to anyone in the company. Thus people who are not members can be invited to look at discussions and participate as needed. This increases serendipity. The functionalities are simple, so anyone can use it. When the group is open, no need to waste your time managing the membership (ins and outs).Discussion groups and discussions can be easily found with search (providing they are open).
  • Teams is targeting teams and project teams. Teams spaces are by default "restricted" to the members of the space. Thus one has to be invited to be a member for this space to participate to any discussion. When the space gets large, say over 30 people, it is a chore to manage membership. Search return results only for Teams space you are a member of. Teams requires a little bit of training to use it properly, otherwise it can easily become a mess (too many channels, too many files under the same root folder). And even if your set your Team Space as "public",there is no directory to locate the Teams spaces that may interest you. Not good for serendipity.
Thus we came with the following recommendations
  • A Schneider community of practice should use Yammer as the default discussion place if its size is larger than 30 members. Open group should be the default.
  • When a community wants to work on specific community projects, it should use Teams
  • The community leader and its core team should use Teams for their leadership discussions

---------------
Louis-Pierre GUILLAUME
CEO of Amallte
Consulting in Digital Transformation & Knowledge Management
www.amallte.com


Re: CoPs Implementation using ESN (e.g. Yammer) and/or Messaging (e.g. Teams) #ESN #CoP #Yammer

Jasper Lavertu
 

Hi Jan,

You can integrate Yammer in Teams and use this integrated environment as a basis/template for all your CoP's (Teams is just an interface on top of SharePoint, with various functionalities/apps to choose from)

For the different users it seems like one and the same collaboration environment with certain functionalities (incl. yammer functionality). When considering setting up a CoP you want to achieve something with it, the purpose of the CoP. Based on that you can select the desired functionalities from the template.

That way you don't create two kinds of CoP implementation approaches, but one basic approach with for every CoP a tailored configuration of the collaboration space.


Why choose if you can have best of both?!

Good luck with your CoP's and have fun.

Jasper Lavertu


---In sikmleaders@..., <mrdugage@...> wrote :

If you consider that a community of practice is both a group of people AND a shared body of knowledge (documents, codes, tools, standards, potion papers etc.), then yammer is definitely not sufficient. If KM is about converting personal knowledge obtained through experience into organizational knowledge owned by the company - which is the reason why companies pay the time you spend interacting with others inside your community - then you need to be able to show what the community has produced. And an ongoing discussion on yammer, albeit vibrant, is not enough. If you are not paying for the service on Facebook or youtube, it’s because Facebook and YouTube own the valuable knowledge stored in the platform - or at least part of it. From a company perspective, what was most valuable in the robotics community I supported in my company was the extensive and very well organized database of projects, suppliers, pictures, glossaries and standards they had consolidated for their members to use... and for our company to own.
A CoP is not only a discussion group.

On Wed, May 22, 2019 at 12:18 AM sue@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Just this morning, Microsoft announced some new capabilities for Yammer, which reinforce my belief that Yammer is "the" platform for Communities of Practice in Microsoft 365. One new feature (which is not part of Teams) is the ability to flag a post as a question and then designate a response as a "best reply." Yammer communities and conversations have a great integration into SharePoint that allow you to create visibility for the community in a communication site and interact with the community without ever leaving SharePoint (using the new Yammer Conversations web part). You can achieve some of the objectives of communities in Teams for small organizations, but for larger organizations, Yammer today and Yammer in the future would be my first choice for communities of practice. I love Microsoft Teams and see Teams as the hub for teamwork and team collaboration, but I prefer Yammer for enterprise communities. Here is a link to today's Yammer announcements from the SharePoint Conference: https://techcommunity.microsoft.com/t5/Yammer-Blog/New-Yammer-investments-announced-at-SharePoint-Conference-add/ba-p/621940.

--
Rgds _Martin R. Dugage


Re: CoPs Implementation using ESN (e.g. Yammer) and/or Messaging (e.g. Teams) #ESN #CoP #Yammer

Martin Dugage
 

If you consider that a community of practice is both a group of people AND a shared body of knowledge (documents, codes, tools, standards, potion papers etc.), then yammer is definitely not sufficient. If KM is about converting personal knowledge obtained through experience into organizational knowledge owned by the company - which is the reason why companies pay the time you spend interacting with others inside your community - then you need to be able to show what the community has produced. And an ongoing discussion on yammer, albeit vibrant, is not enough. If you are not paying for the service on Facebook or youtube, it’s because Facebook and YouTube own the valuable knowledge stored in the platform - or at least part of it. From a company perspective, what was most valuable in the robotics community I supported in my company was the extensive and very well organized database of projects, suppliers, pictures, glossaries and standards they had consolidated for their members to use... and for our company to own.
A CoP is not only a discussion group.

On Wed, May 22, 2019 at 12:18 AM sue@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Just this morning, Microsoft announced some new capabilities for Yammer, which reinforce my belief that Yammer is "the" platform for Communities of Practice in Microsoft 365. One new feature (which is not part of Teams) is the ability to flag a post as a question and then designate a response as a "best reply." Yammer communities and conversations have a great integration into SharePoint that allow you to create visibility for the community in a communication site and interact with the community without ever leaving SharePoint (using the new Yammer Conversations web part). You can achieve some of the objectives of communities in Teams for small organizations, but for larger organizations, Yammer today and Yammer in the future would be my first choice for communities of practice. I love Microsoft Teams and see Teams as the hub for teamwork and team collaboration, but I prefer Yammer for enterprise communities. Here is a link to today's Yammer announcements from the SharePoint Conference: https://techcommunity.microsoft.com/t5/Yammer-Blog/New-Yammer-investments-announced-at-SharePoint-Conference-add/ba-p/621940.

--
Rgds _Martin R. Dugage


Re: CoPs Implementation using ESN (e.g. Yammer) and/or Messaging (e.g. Teams) #ESN #CoP #Yammer

 

Agree with Yammer for enterprise-wide CoPs. Note Teams membership limit is 5,000.

 

The official MSFT positioning is:

1.  Kaizala is recommended in emerging markets in scenarios where you are supporting an open network of people. Users can join Kaizala with just a phone number, with an option to connect their AAD identity

2.  Teams is the center of collaboration & communication for Office 365 in the inner loop for your employees.

3.  Yammer is best for broad organization wide communities.

 

I have no experience with Kaizala (yet) that is the latest addition in O365 - Kaizala lets you send instant messages, Kaizala Actions, and invoices. It also lets you easily schedule work, provide training materials, and send attachments like pictures, documents, videos, audio files, and more. Kaizala enables instant feedback from others about anything you want. With Kaizala Actions, you can send out polls and surveys to thousands of people. Everyone’s responses are automatically aggregated and presented in a readable report.

 

Best,

 

Jean-Claude Monney

Former MSFT CKO.

 

 

From: <sikmleaders@...> on behalf of "sue@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...>
Reply-To: "sikmleaders@..." <sikmleaders@...>
Date: Tuesday, May 21, 2019 at 3:18 PM
To: "sikmleaders@..." <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: CoPs Implementation using ESN (e.g. Yammer) and/or Messaging (e.g. Teams)

 

 

Just this morning, Microsoft announced some new capabilities for Yammer, which reinforce my belief that Yammer is "the" platform for Communities of Practice in Microsoft 365. One new feature (which is not part of Teams) is the ability to flag a post as a question and then designate a response as a "best reply." Yammer communities and conversations have a great integration into SharePoint that allow you to create visibility for the community in a communication site and interact with the community without ever leaving SharePoint (using the new Yammer Conversations web part). You can achieve some of the objectives of communities in Teams for small organizations, but for larger organizations, Yammer today and Yammer in the future would be my first choice for communities of practice. I love Microsoft Teams and see Teams as the hub for teamwork and team collaboration, but I prefer Yammer for enterprise communities. Here is a link to today's Yammer announcements from the SharePoint Conference: https://techcommunity.microsoft.com/t5/Yammer-Blog/New-Yammer-investments-announced-at-SharePoint-Conference-add/ba-p/621940.


Re: CoPs Implementation using ESN (e.g. Yammer) and/or Messaging (e.g. Teams) #ESN #CoP #Yammer

Susan Hanley
 

Just this morning, Microsoft announced some new capabilities for Yammer, which reinforce my belief that Yammer is "the" platform for Communities of Practice in Microsoft 365. One new feature (which is not part of Teams) is the ability to flag a post as a question and then designate a response as a "best reply." Yammer communities and conversations have a great integration into SharePoint that allow you to create visibility for the community in a communication site and interact with the community without ever leaving SharePoint (using the new Yammer Conversations web part). You can achieve some of the objectives of communities in Teams for small organizations, but for larger organizations, Yammer today and Yammer in the future would be my first choice for communities of practice. I love Microsoft Teams and see Teams as the hub for teamwork and team collaboration, but I prefer Yammer for enterprise communities. Here is a link to today's Yammer announcements from the SharePoint Conference: https://techcommunity.microsoft.com/t5/Yammer-Blog/New-Yammer-investments-announced-at-SharePoint-Conference-add/ba-p/621940.


Re: What is the most challenging question for the KM community? What is our biggest fear? #state-of-KM

Stan Garfield
 


May 2019 SIKM Call: Paul McDowall - Applying KM to a Business Need: Strategic Onboarding, a case study #monthly-call #onboarding #case-studies

Stan Garfield
 
Edited

TO: SIKM Leaders Community

Today we held our 165th monthly call. Here are the details:

Thanks to Paul for presenting and to Linda Hummel for participating in the conversation. Please continue the discussion by replying to this threadFor an article about this community and its history, see SIKM Leaders Community: A community of practice for knowledge management.


Re: CoPs Implementation using ESN (e.g. Yammer) and/or Messaging (e.g. Teams) #ESN #CoP #Yammer

Jan Hutter
 

Hey Douglas

Sure, no worries! It's great that you mentioned the (critical) people aspects as I didn't do it in my initial question ;-).

Cheers


Re: CoPs Implementation using ESN (e.g. Yammer) and/or Messaging (e.g. Teams) #ESN #CoP #Yammer

Douglas Weidner
 

Jan, tman

Good questions, but I'd rank another even higher.
Do we know how to make CoPs successful? That question might be a few key bulet points of which tman's two are included.

But if prioritized, the order of the two would no doubt be reversed.

Douglas Weidner

On Mon, May 20, 2019 at 9:02 PM tman9999@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Jan - I’d start by considering these two questions:
1. What tools/platforms are already deployed; and of those, which ones have good traction?
2. What business issue are you aiming to address with CoPs?


Re: What is the most challenging question for the KM community? What is our biggest fear? #state-of-KM

Douglas Weidner
 

Thank you Andre,

We should sort this out, because eventually an organization with good aptitude (skills and competencies) will not be able to compete with an organization with aptitude, but also really good attitude.(however we describe it).

Cheers,
Douglas Weidner

On Mon, May 20, 2019 at 8:14 PM Andre Saito andsaito@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Hello, 

I am a bit late in the conversation, but let me to add a thought on the aptitude & attitude discussion Douglas started.

I also consider attitude as a sort of personal tacit knowledge, and one effective way I am seeing organisations act to affect employees' attitudes is to foster an inspiring culture (which I consider a sort of collective tacit knowledge). Many tech startups are using an inspiring culture as a potent way to get alignment and engagement.

At some point, Murray comments that tacit and personal knowledge might not be the same, but don't really argue on that.

I suggest that personal knowledge may be tacit, and tacit knowledge may be personal (individual), but may also be social, or collective. In this sense, culture as shared understandings and beliefs, principles, norms, customs, etc., is a sort of collective tacit knowledge. Cultivating such collective tacit knowledge is a way to tune in, or align, individuals' attitudes - a sort of individual tacit knowledge.

So, I have been tinkering with the idea of collective knowledge (e.g., when knowledge becomes *organisational*?), which works differently from individual knowledge, and thought it would be worthwhile to consider the concept of collective tacit knowledge. 

Thank you for the conversation, it has been really inspiring!

Andre Saito
SBGC - Sociedade Brasileira de Gestao do Conhecimento
(Brazilian KM Society)


On Thu, May 16, 2019 at 1:35 PM Douglas Weidner douglas.weidner@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

tman9999,
I agree with your comments and descriptions.
I especially agree that attitude is tacit K (or implicit, but I'll not nit-pick). However, that is not the issue I'm raising.

I'm stating that as KMers, we need to do far more about the attitudinal aspect of K (if that is the right word, which is why I usually add motivation, passion, persistence, grit , Social IQ, etc, so there is no misunderstanding that attitudes are different form aptitudes - skills,competencies, etc.).

We as KMers, are fairly good at traditional change mgmt. (telling folks about an upcoming new KM system or other KM initiative, and training them to use/do it correctly).

We as KMers, are less good at convincing them that such a system/initiative is beneficial.

We as KMers, are not good at all at transforming the organization for K-Age excellence, especially not transforming individuals to be highly engaged, highly motivated employees, excelling at their daily activities. 

That will be the ultimate KM discriminator, in my humble opinion.

Douglas Weidner
Exec Chairman, KM Institute

On Thu, May 16, 2019 at 11:45 AM tman9999@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Doug wrote: 

>>>But, what about aptitude (aka skills and competencies) vs. attitude (motivation, persistence, passion, etc. etc.).<<<

Both are aspects of tacit knowledge - the embodied knowledge contained in a worker's head. It is local and sticky - hard or impossible to codify, not readily transferable (ever try to transfer an attitude??), yet often the greatest source of value creation in knowledge-based work. 

At the highest, most abstract level, I think of tacit knowledge (comprising aptitudes, skills,abilities, talent, attitudes, etc), as one of the four knowledge-based resources of the firm. It, along with others include: 
  • tacit knowledge
  • social capital
  • documents, information, IP, "stuff"
  • infrastructure (work processes, IT, office sites, etc).
The goal of KM, then, is to maximize the value add of the firm's knowledge-based resources. The way to measure the success of any efforts aimed at doing so is by measuring value through innovation (products as well as processes) and value through productivity improvement/OpEx reduction. 

I have yet to see any of the scores of KM activities and tools that do not fit into the above description. There are scores of of types of legitimate KM activities and interventions, and whole consulting firms have been built on their prowess in only one or two of them. 

This framework is one I have used for educating clients for whom KM is a new construct; and they are likely not even sure where to get started, or what the benefits would be (in other words, probably none of the folks in this forum!).

 I have also used it as a diagnostic framework, to figure out where the highest/best application of KM might be, how it might add value (i.e., which of the scores of possible KM tools/interventions/approaches to explore), and what type and amount of value is possible. 


Re: CoPs Implementation using ESN (e.g. Yammer) and/or Messaging (e.g. Teams) #ESN #CoP #Yammer

Douglas Weidner
 

Jan,

It was a good question to ask.

But for many, that is the only question they ask, which would be a big mistake.
Hence my comment. 

I didn't mean to in any way offend you, but rather serving in my instructional role to all KMers.

Cheers to you as well,
Douglas Weidner
Chief CKM Instructor

On Mon, May 20, 2019 at 3:18 PM jan.hutter@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Hi Douglas


Thanks for your comments. Agree, tools are not the primary issue for the success of CoP's and I am aware of that. Nevertheless, when tools are considered/needed, I would like to give meaningful guidance, in particular when the available tool stack provides different possibilities. That's why I asked this question.

Cheers
Jan 

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