Date   

Re: Collaborative work exercises #collaboration

Katrina Pugh
 

Hi, Stan and Sandra
Stan's list is terrific.  Here's the presentation I did in 2017 for the SIKM leaders' community on collaboration and conversation, with summarizing research on collaboration. (Fundamentally, all collaboration takes shared purpose, structure, and psychological safety).  This summarizes a lot of the ideas from the course I teach at Columbia, Networks and Collaboration.
https://www.slideshare.net/Katepugh/pugh-collaboration-and-four-discussion-disciplines-for-sikm-171017  

Kate

Katrina Pugh
AlignConsulting | Collaboration AI and Strategy 
Columbia University | Info and Knowledge Strategy Master's Program Faculty
Mobile 617-967-3910


On Mon, Sep 16, 2019 at 9:40 AM stangarfield@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Sandra, thanks for the clarification.  Here are a few articles that may be helpful.

I encourage other SIKM members to reply with their suggestions.
  1. A Surefire Way to Build Widespread Collaboration Across Your Organization by Nancy Dixon
  2. Now That’s Radical! Build a More Collaborative, Productive Team With More (Yes, More!) Meetings by Nancy Settle-Murphy
  3. Coalescing a New Team – Creating Ties That Bind by Nancy Settle-Murphy
  4. Eight Ways to Build Collaborative Teams by Lynda Gratton and Tamara J. Erickson
  5. Collaboration Processes: Inside the Black Box by Ann Marie Thomson and James L. Perry
  6. How to Set Productive Collaboration into Action by Lisa Bodell
  7. Simple Exercise to Demonstrate Value of Collaboration by Jason Little






---In sikmleaders@..., <sandralopezm@...> wrote :

Hi, thanks Stan, I am currently working with a group of people from a bank in the knowledge management, among the issues to work is collaborative work, I would like a powerful practical activity that allows them to understand the issue, if you can help me I appreciate it

Sandra López
 

De: sikmleaders@... en nombre de stangarfield@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...>
Enviado: viernes, septiembre 13, 2019 11:36 p. m.
Para: sikmleaders@...
Asunto: [sikmleaders] Re: Collaborative work
 
 

Hi, Sandra.

Thanks for posting here.  Please reply with a few more details on what you are seeking.  This will make it easier for the members to respond helpfully.

Regards,
Stan


Re: Collaborative work exercises #collaboration

Stan Garfield
 

Sandra, thanks for the clarification.  Here are a few articles that may be helpful.

I encourage other SIKM members to reply with their suggestions.
  1. A Surefire Way to Build Widespread Collaboration Across Your Organization by Nancy Dixon
  2. Now That’s Radical! Build a More Collaborative, Productive Team With More (Yes, More!) Meetings by Nancy Settle-Murphy
  3. Coalescing a New Team – Creating Ties That Bind by Nancy Settle-Murphy
  4. Eight Ways to Build Collaborative Teams by Lynda Gratton and Tamara J. Erickson
  5. Collaboration Processes: Inside the Black Box by Ann Marie Thomson and James L. Perry
  6. How to Set Productive Collaboration into Action by Lisa Bodell
  7. Simple Exercise to Demonstrate Value of Collaboration by Jason Little






---In sikmleaders@..., <sandralopezm@...> wrote :

Hi, thanks Stan, I am currently working with a group of people from a bank in the knowledge management, among the issues to work is collaborative work, I would like a powerful practical activity that allows them to understand the issue, if you can help me I appreciate it

Sandra López
 

De: sikmleaders@... en nombre de stangarfield@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...>
Enviado: viernes, septiembre 13, 2019 11:36 p. m.
Para: sikmleaders@...
Asunto: [sikmleaders] Re: Collaborative work
 
 

Hi, Sandra.

Thanks for posting here.  Please reply with a few more details on what you are seeking.  This will make it easier for the members to respond helpfully.

Regards,
Stan


CFP: International Conference on Next Generation Libraries-2019 (NGL-2019), December 12-14, 2019 | NIT Rourkela, India. #call-for #conferences

Bhojaraju Gunjal
 

Invitation & Call for PapersSubmission extended to 30th September 2019

 

International Conference on Next Generation Libraries-2019 (NGL-2019)

New Trends & Technologies, Collaboration & Community Engagement, Future Librarianship, Library Spaces & Services

December 12-14, 2019 | NIT Rourkela, India

 Web: http://library.nitrkl.ac.in/elpes7/ | E-mail: ngl2019.india@...

  Full paper Submission extended to 30th September 2019

Dear Professional Colleagues,

 

It gives us immense pleasure to inform you that the International Conference on Next Generation Libraries-2019 (NGL-2019) on New Trends & Technologies, Collaboration & Community Engagement, Future Librarianship, Library Spaces & Services which will be held from December 12-14, 2019 at TIIR Auditorium, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, India.

This conference is organised by Biju Patnaik Central Library, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, India in association with Special Libraries Association (SLA, USA) - Asian Chapter, United Nations, India and IFLA-Asia and Oceania  NGL-2019 will provide a platform to discuss on the above themes along with related issues and challenges and probable solutions to overcome risks associated with the future of different types of libraries. NGL-2019 provides an excellent opportunity for all including Librarians, Information Professionals, Knowledge Managers, Researchers and Practitioners to share experiences, ideas, research results, meeting and networking in all aspects of new Emerging Technology in Libraries.

Therefore, on behalf of the Organizing Committee, I extend you a warm invitation to Call for Papers and Participate in the NGL- 2019 in which renowned personalities from the library profession will deliberate across the globe. I am sure that the discussions and interaction during the conference will promote a wider understanding of the subject. I take this opportunity to extend my invitation to you to contribute the research/case studies to theme and sub-themes for the presentation and publication. I look forward to receiving your paper and solicit your participation in this prestigious conference.

Important Dates:

Full Paper submission deadline:

30th  September 2019 (Extended)

Full Paper  Notification of acceptance:

10th  October 2019

Final Paper Submission deadline:

15th October 2019

Registration deadline for Authors:

1st  November  2019

Conference Dates:

12-14  December 2019

For more details about Call for Papers, Registration and other details refer: http://library.nitrkl.ac.in/elpes7/

We look forward to meeting you at Rourkela, India.

 

With regards

Bhojaraju Gunjal, Ph.D

Convener & Organizing Secretary - NGL-2019

Deputy Librarian, Biju Patnaik Central Library,

National Institute of Technology Rourkela.

Rourkela - 769008. Odisha. INDIA.

Phone: 0061-2462101 / 9040511891

E-mail: ngl2019.india@... ;  library@...

Web: http://library.nitrkl.ac.in/elpes7/


Re: Collaborative work exercises #collaboration

Sandra Lopez
 

Hi, thanks Stan, I am currently working with a group of people from a bank in the knowledge management, among the issues to work is collaborative work, I would like a powerful practical activity that allows them to understand the issue, if you can help me I appreciate it

Sandra López
 

De: sikmleaders@... en nombre de stangarfield@... [sikmleaders]
Enviado: viernes, septiembre 13, 2019 11:36 p. m.
Para: sikmleaders@...
Asunto: [sikmleaders] Re: Collaborative work
 
 

Hi, Sandra.

Thanks for posting here.  Please reply with a few more details on what you are seeking.  This will make it easier for the members to respond helpfully.

Regards,
Stan


Re: Collaborative work exercises #collaboration

Stan Garfield
 

Hi, Sandra.

Thanks for posting here.  Please reply with a few more details on what you are seeking.  This will make it easier for the members to respond helpfully.

Regards,
Stan


Collaborative work exercises #collaboration

Sandra Lopez
 

Hello, some have any group activity to collaborative work for a group pf 16 people?
Tks
 

IEO. Sandra Maria Lopez Muriel. PhD telecomunicaciones

Conscious Business Coach

Consultora Gestión del conocimiento y soluciones en Sharepoint 

Docente investigador Gestión del conocimiento

 

El contenido de este mensaje puede ser información privilegiada y confidencial. Si usted no es el destinatario real del mismo, por favor informe de ello a quien lo envía y destrúyalo en forma inmediata.”
 
 


Seeking KM employment in Boston or remote #jobs #personal

Ray Sims
 

Hello,

 

I have 16 years of knowledge management experience -- six years as the leader of a KM function at Cambridge Technology Partners and Novell, and 10 years as knowledge manager for the Technology, Media, and Telecommunications industry vertical at Deloitte. I also have experience and skill as a business analyst, project manager, and product owner. I have worked for manufacturing, software, and professional services firms.

 

I am currently in early retirement and anxious to get back to work in a challenging KM role as a manager or individual contributor.

 

I live north of Boston and I am open to considering junior roles and contract, part-time, or temporary positions.

 

Best regards,

 

Ray Sims

https://www.linkedin.com/in/rsims/

http://the12thchapter.com

https://twitter.com/rsims


Annual SIKM Dinner at KMWorld 2019 in DC #KMWorld

Stan Garfield
 

Please join us for the 11th Annual SIKM Leaders Community Dinner at KMWorld 2019

  • When: Wednesday, November 6 at 6:30 PM
  • Where: Pi Pizzeria, 3761 Chesapeake St NW, Washington, DC


RSVP to let us know you will be attending and follow up by pre-paying to confirm your seat by October 26, 2019.


Thanks to Sue Hanley for arranging the dinner and to Arno Boersma and Neesham Spitzberg for handling the logistics. Sue won't be able to attend, but she scheduled it for us. Arno and Neesham once again offered to fill in for Sue in the important role of dinner coordinators, as they did in 2015.


Last year’s dinner sold out, so please sign up early! We can only accommodate 40 people as part of our group reservation. You can forward the invitation link to colleagues, but each person will need to RSVP and pre-pay individually.

 

There are two steps to register:

  1. RSVP using Evite. You only need to RSVP if you are coming.
  2. Confirm your seat by pre-paying using PayPal. Send the payment to the account arnovation@... and include “SIKM Dinner” and your name so we can keep track. It won't be possible to pay at the restaurant.


The price varies depending on how you choose to pay. It includes dinner, dessert, non-alcoholic beverages, tax, and tip.

  • If you are paying from inside the US via your bank account, the price is $37.00.
  • If you are paying via credit card inside the US, the price is $38.37 (to account for the PayPal credit card processing fee).
  • If you are paying from outside the US in foreign currency or via credit card, the price is $39.50 USD (to cover the added PayPal fees).

A cash bar is available. The meal will be served buffet style and includes garlic bread, a vegetable appetizer, two types of hearty salads, six varieties of pizza, and an assortment of desserts.


To send your payment via PayPal, under "Send Money," choose the second option: "Send to friends and family in the US."  There will be a small fee added to your charge if you use a credit card or if you are paying from outside the US. If you pay using your PayPal balance or US bank account, there is no fee.


If you have questions, send email to Arno Boersma at arnovation@...



Data Ethics Videos - Sydney - 3 Sept 2019 #video

Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

The following talks and Q&A from our recent event may be of interest. 
 Passiona Cottee: https://youtu.be/0h3ekHQCK9M 
Matthew Beard: https://youtu.be/Hk9bKuCRYsA 
Elija Perrier: https://youtu.be/d8f34_ND2lc 
Tiberio Caetano: https://youtu.be/NSkbIu2ILvc 
Panel: https://youtu.be/MTfhCOTyPkM 

Please subscribe to our channel for future videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4GrdIijpxxQFx3SLb8gaxA 

Data is now seen as a key resource and artificial intelligence applications are being used more and more by businesses and governments for decision-making, optimization and automation. It is becoming increasingly clear that if these activities are badly managed, people can suffer harm as a result of bad decisions, thoughtless design, and embedded prejudices. This session will explore the practicalities of: - Understanding the broader impact and risks of data design decisions. - Engaging the right stakeholder groups to ensure these risks are mitigated. - Making trade-offs in the design process. 

Passiona Cottee collaborates on projects at the nexus of data, automation, privacy and ethics across both public and private sectors. She currently works as data scientist at the CBA and a sessional lecturer in privacy law at UTS. Passiona fuses Bachelor, Graduate and Masters qualifications in law and data science to enable the ethical use of machine learning. 
Matt Beard is a husband, dad, pop culture nerd and moral philosopher with an academic background in applied and military ethics. He is an Associate Lecturer at the University of Notre Dame Australia. Matt is also a Fellow at The Ethics Centre, undertaking research into ethical principles for technology. 
Elija Perrier is a PhD candidate in quantum machine learning & AI at UTS. He is also a professional support lawyer at Hall & Wilcox. 
Tiberio Caetano is Chief Scientist at the Gradient Institute. He has spent the last 20 years working on machine learning in numerous roles as a student, researcher, academic, entrepreneur and practitioner. He spent 10 years at NICTA and in 2012 he co-founded Ambiata, a data science NICTA spin-off focusing on applying rigorous scientific methodologies for personalised decision-making using machine learning, causal inference and randomised controlled trials.


Nairobi.Knowledge.Week #local

Atsu Sename
 
Edited

Programme+Nairobi.Knowledge.Week+23-27+September+2019.pdf

Dear friends, partners, colleagues,

the programme for Nairobi.Knowledge.Week taking place from 23-27 September at the UN Office Nairobi is finally done and ready to be sent out.

The programme is attached, but it will change during the next weeks, so rather provide the link to the website: https://www.knowledge.city/nairobi/ or to the programme itself: http://www.knowledge.city/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/Programme-Nairobi.Knowledge.Week-23-27-September-2019.pdf


 




Envoyé par BlueMail


Re: Identification of Potential Business Value #value

Douglas Weidner
 

Jeff, 
I fully agree.

The early US DoD KBase I disclosed -- 'Connect & Collect', had the same ongoing enrichment scheme.

When the KBase 'Collection' was inadequate, 'Connections' resulted. 
Those discussions were meant to be collected for ongoing KBase enrichment..

Douglas Weidner

On Sun, Aug 25, 2019 at 3:49 PM jstemke@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Hi Robert,


Tom Short’s suggestion to capture context by linking knowledge artifacts to specific processes or tasks and features within existing processes is relevant and realistic. For Chevron, this turned out to be with a Q&A process.


A typical example was our refinery KM site. After a large merger, we needed to connect over 2000 refinery engineers and operators to our best practices to ensure high quality global operations. The best practice library was very comprehensive, but difficult for the new engineers to navigate due to their different backgrounds.


We designed a Q&A tool using refinery process and equipment terms (the metadata) which were familiar to all the new engineers. One of the pre-launch steps asked each engineer to complete a profile by selecting items from the two lists that they knew something about. If time was of the essence, the engineer facing a problem could find someone to call  for quick help.


When an engineer ran into a plant problem, he or she just posted a question and selected relevant metadata. Emails were sent to engineers whose profile had matching metadata. Often the engineer received multiple suggestions in a few days. We asked the engineer to “close the loop” by documenting the actual solution and estimating the value to their refinery in terms of cost and/or time savings.


We documented an average of $10-20 million/year in business value savings.


The new knowledge, which included the problem, relevant metadata, suggested solutions and the actual solution employed was easily and quickly tagged and available for future problems. Even answers that didn’t fit the original problem could easily apply to another problem in the future. Thus, you may not want to discard it.


Most of today’s KM technology tools don’t offer this capability. We did this with Lotus Notes back in the day. Fortunately, I have discovered that it is possible to build the same capabilities in SharePoint.


--Jeff



Re: Big news: a new KM community in the Netherlands - let's share knowledge #local

Jasper Lavertu
 

Hi everybody,

A big thank you for all the replies in this thread and the ones directly via email. Fantastic to see that you are interested. I will share more details regarding the first meeting of the KM community via email.

Again many thanks.
Jasper



Re: Identification of Potential Business Value #value

jstemke@...
 

Hi Robert,


Tom Short’s suggestion to capture context by linking knowledge artifacts to specific processes or tasks and features within existing processes is relevant and realistic. For Chevron, this turned out to be with a Q&A process.


A typical example was our refinery KM site. After a large merger, we needed to connect over 2000 refinery engineers and operators to our best practices to ensure high quality global operations. The best practice library was very comprehensive, but difficult for the new engineers to navigate due to their different backgrounds.


We designed a Q&A tool using refinery process and equipment terms (the metadata) which were familiar to all the new engineers. One of the pre-launch steps asked each engineer to complete a profile by selecting items from the two lists that they knew something about. If time was of the essence, the engineer facing a problem could find someone to call  for quick help.


When an engineer ran into a plant problem, he or she just posted a question and selected relevant metadata. Emails were sent to engineers whose profile had matching metadata. Often the engineer received multiple suggestions in a few days. We asked the engineer to “close the loop” by documenting the actual solution and estimating the value to their refinery in terms of cost and/or time savings.


We documented an average of $10-20 million/year in business value savings.


The new knowledge, which included the problem, relevant metadata, suggested solutions and the actual solution employed was easily and quickly tagged and available for future problems. Even answers that didn’t fit the original problem could easily apply to another problem in the future. Thus, you may not want to discard it.


Most of today’s KM technology tools don’t offer this capability. We did this with Lotus Notes back in the day. Fortunately, I have discovered that it is possible to build the same capabilities in SharePoint.


--Jeff



Re: Identification of Potential Business Value #value

Douglas Weidner
 

tman,
What you have described is essentially something I designed for the US DoD in 1994.
It was to house their Business Process Re-engineering methodology, which a team of us BPR consultants had documented.

The question was how to publish it for wide distribution.

In 1994, a hard copy manual would have been the traditional solution.
But, to save trees and many other reasons such as frequent updates, and to start leveraging DoDs IT network, I suggested an approach we ultimately called a Knowledge Base. 
It was housed in a KBase Tool (Microsoft Access and Visual Basic 3.0 for those who know such s/ware). In those days, a KBase was definitely not a repository.

A methodology is analogous to a process, typically with a work breakdown structure (WBS).
Each WBS activity had a description and any number of attached (associated) objects.

These three components are essential and remain the main ingredients of today's granular, process-oriented KBases.

In 1995, DoD funded the development of a KM methodology, which was housed on the same tool (VB 5.0 by then).
That early KM Methodology was the core for the eventual KM Institute's KM Methodology.

As a KM Consultant, I later recommended the KBase use to the UN. 
But I recommended integration of CoPs, for which I coined an expression "Connect & Collect", where 'Collect' referenced the KBase content and 'Connect' referenced the CoP when the KBase content was inadequate or some K nugget (object) needed clarification.

The above history and the evolution of KBases is described more fully in a chapter in the book, 
Knowledge Management Matters - Words of Wisdom from Leading Practitioners, 2018
Where is KM going?  One Long-Term Knowledge Manager’s Perspectives on KM’s Roots by Chronological Stages 

If anyone would like a copy of my chapter, just ping me at: douglas.weidner@...

On Fri, Aug 23, 2019 at 10:49 AM tman9999@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

“My kingdom for a nail....”

Yes, context is everything when it comes to valuing knowledge assets and artifacts. Back in the early JIT days (Just In Time) a common shorthand for one its core concepts was “I want what I want when I want it.” KM thought-leader Larry Prusak quoted a modified version of this: “I know what I know when I know it.” Both are relevant here.

A knowledge worker may not even be aware of the value of a given artifact even when they are in the midst of doing something that ultimately requires or would benefit them in completing it. Only upon hitting the sticking point does the worker recognize the gap between the requirements of the task and their ability to execute it. “I want what I want when I want it.”

This points to an easy way of inventorying artifacts: figure out a way to map them to specific processes or tasks and activities within existing processes.

Example: Electrical utility workers are trained in the classroom and then in the field via a union guild model. Due to the evolution of electrical network equipment that naturally occurs over decades, it is impossible to train for a given procedure on every variation of the equipment that that procedure could be performed on. So the classroom training on changing an overload fuse on a 600KVA panel focuses on the current version of those panels. But in the field a worker may come across a decades old panel that appears roughly the same as the one they saw in the classroom, except for the fact that following the sequence of steps for working on a new panel will result in a catastrophic failure if that sequence is applied when working on an old panel.

One possible solution: your idea of smartphone video comes into play here. Simply have an experienced worker video the correct procedure and upload it to a repository that houses a collection of said field videos.

Of course this leads to two important challenges:
1. How to tag these mini-tutorials so they are easily surfaced when searched for (I want what I want when I want it).
2. How to alert the worker that a) a procedure modification is needed here; and b) there is an artifact available to help them.

I used the example of the electric utility field workers because about 12 years ago I was on a ride-along with one of them and witnessed this scenario first-hand. Fortunately the field worker I was with was a veteran lineman who knew all about the need for a different procedure on the old panel. As I watched over his shoulder while he was working on it he explained to me how it required a different set of steps and what would happen if someone tried to complete the task using the “normal” approach (it involved a big “boom”). Even thought smartphones were still just emerging, the notion of videoing the procedure for this odd-ball panel seemed like a no-brainer - if we could come up with solutions to the above two questions.

Based on the above story, I hope it gives you some ideas about how you might approach your challenge. Start by cherry-picking the easy-to-value artifacts and developing a way to address the above two questions as related to known, existing processes. Your challenge is to come up with a way of putting knowledge assets and artifacts “in the way of” the knowledge worker who is executing against a given known workflow or process. Solve this and you’ll be well on your way toward gaining insight and understanding as to the value of a given artifact or asset, as well as laying down the infrastructure that will be usable for artifacts that may not be so easily mapped to a given process or task.


Re: Identification of Potential Business Value #value

tman9999@...
 

“My kingdom for a nail....”

Yes, context is everything when it comes to valuing knowledge assets and artifacts. Back in the early JIT days (Just In Time) a common shorthand for one its core concepts was “I want what I want when I want it.” KM thought-leader Larry Prusak quoted a modified version of this: “I know what I know when I know it.” Both are relevant here.

A knowledge worker may not even be aware of the value of a given artifact even when they are in the midst of doing something that ultimately requires or would benefit them in completing it. Only upon hitting the sticking point does the worker recognize the gap between the requirements of the task and their ability to execute it. “I want what I want when I want it.”

This points to an easy way of inventorying artifacts: figure out a way to map them to specific processes or tasks and activities within existing processes.

Example: Electrical utility workers are trained in the classroom and then in the field via a union guild model. Due to the evolution of electrical network equipment that naturally occurs over decades, it is impossible to train for a given procedure on every variation of the equipment that that procedure could be performed on. So the classroom training on changing an overload fuse on a 600KVA panel focuses on the current version of those panels. But in the field a worker may come across a decades old panel that appears roughly the same as the one they saw in the classroom, except for the fact that following the sequence of steps for working on a new panel will result in a catastrophic failure if that sequence is applied when working on an old panel.

One possible solution: your idea of smartphone video comes into play here. Simply have an experienced worker video the correct procedure and upload it to a repository that houses a collection of said field videos.

Of course this leads to two important challenges:
1. How to tag these mini-tutorials so they are easily surfaced when searched for (I want what I want when I want it).
2. How to alert the worker that a) a procedure modification is needed here; and b) there is an artifact available to help them.

I used the example of the electric utility field workers because about 12 years ago I was on a ride-along with one of them and witnessed this scenario first-hand. Fortunately the field worker I was with was a veteran lineman who knew all about the need for a different procedure on the old panel. As I watched over his shoulder while he was working on it he explained to me how it required a different set of steps and what would happen if someone tried to complete the task using the “normal” approach (it involved a big “boom”). Even thought smartphones were still just emerging, the notion of videoing the procedure for this odd-ball panel seemed like a no-brainer - if we could come up with solutions to the above two questions.

Based on the above story, I hope it gives you some ideas about how you might approach your challenge. Start by cherry-picking the easy-to-value artifacts and developing a way to address the above two questions as related to known, existing processes. Your challenge is to come up with a way of putting knowledge assets and artifacts “in the way of” the knowledge worker who is executing against a given known workflow or process. Solve this and you’ll be well on your way toward gaining insight and understanding as to the value of a given artifact or asset, as well as laying down the infrastructure that will be usable for artifacts that may not be so easily mapped to a given process or task.


Re: Identification of Potential Business Value #value

Sandra Lopez
 

murray jennex
 eciate if can share me the paper.

Tks.
 

IEO. Sandra Maria Lopez Muriel. PhD telecomunicaciones

Conscious Business Coach

Consultora Gestión del conocimiento y soluciones en Sharepoint 

Docente investigador Gestión del conocimiento

 

El contenido de este mensaje puede ser información privilegiada y confidencial. Si usted no es el destinatario real del mismo, por favor informe de ello a quien lo envía y destrúyalo en forma inmediata.”
 
 


El jue., 15 ago. 2019 a las 0:08, Murray Jennex murphjen@... [sikmleaders] (<sikmleaders@...>) escribió:
 

Yes, valuing knowledge and KM is hard and there won't be a single formula to do so.  So what I teach my students is to write a value story explaining the value you have determined and how you got there.  I tell them they may be right, they may not be right, but no one will know until they try and by writing the value story they give everyone else a place to start and comment on.  From this discussion we create a more refined value story and ultimately what the value is to our organization.  The problem for why there is no universal value story is that all organizations are a little different with different values.  No one story fits all.  My own research has validated about 20 measures that show where value in KM/knowledge use are generated..  I don't expect organizations to use all of them but rather a relevant subset comprised of those measures that are relevant to their context.  So, valuing is hard as it is organization specific.  If you'd like a copy of my paper let me know and I'll send it to you.....murray jennex

Yes, valuing knowledge and KM is hard and there won't be a single formula to do so.  So what I teach my students is to write a value story explaining the value you have determined and how you got there.  I tell them they may be right, they may not be right, but no one will know until they try and by writing the value story they give everyone else a place to start and comment on.  From this discussion we create a more refined value story and ultimately what the value is to our organization.  The problem for why there is no universal value story is that all organizations are a little different with different values.  No one story fits all.  My own research has validated about 20 measures that show where value in KM/knowledge use are generated.  I don't expect organizations to use all of them but rather a relevant subset comprised of those measures that are relevant to their context.  So, valuing is hard as it is organization specific.  If you'd like a copy of my paper let me know and I'll send it to you.....murray jennex




-----Original Message-----
From: Patrick Lambe plambe@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...>
To: sikmleaders <sikmleaders@...>
Sent: Wed, Aug 14, 2019 7:27 pm
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Identification of Potential Business Value



Hi Robert

The peculiarity (and the problem) in valuing information and knowledge is its context dependency. The same asset can be incredibly valuable in some circumstances, and worthless in others, with only minor changes in the environment. Moreover, the same asset can be an enabler in some circumstances and a disabler in others (Dorothy Leonard).

Edith Penrose (Theory of the Growth of the Firm, 1959) explored the challenge of valuing something with high but context dependent potentiality like capabilities and found herself at a loss for some kind of predictable formula. The Information Resource Management (IRM) movement in the 1970s tended to gravitate to the valuation of problems actually solved by information resources and systems - e.g. importance of decisions enabled (a loose equivalent of transacted value), while the core competencies movement (e..g. Gary Hamel and his KM followers) moved up the value stream by generalising to broad competences and looking at strategic goal alignment as a form of valuation. The intellectual capital movement aligned itself with the intangible asset accounting movement, and while it has a plurality of frameworks has failed, over 20+ years, (a) in getting a common model that can be widely adopted and (b) in explaining the transition between valuations high level strategic capabilities and how that value is constituted by its constituent granular information or knowledge assets.

In short, it’s a problem that has been beaten half to death, where the most useful and accepted work tends to be at high, strategic and aggregate levels, and the least convincing or useful work has been at the granular asset level. (One un-useful development of the IRM movement was to associate value with investment (cost) which led to the whole defensive "ROI of IM/KM movement" we still struggle with today) - completely ignoring the potentiality argument.

You mention the explicit/implicit conversion decision - one feature of that conversion is that in explicating implicit knowledge, you remove potentiality from it, you customise it towards specific applications. Max Boisot (Knowledge Assets) described the trade-off between the value of achieving scale and reach when you "explicitise" knowledge versus the loss of potentiality, adaptability and variety of application..

Now in terms of your specific question, whether or not to invest effort in converting something, I think the question should be less one of long term value/ potentiality, but more one of short term utility. Given our context now and the problems we have right now, how useful would it be to explicitise, versus the cost and foreseen volatility of this knowledge? This suggests being able to map the problem space, align with business needs and weigh up options and priorities. This is one of the things we do when we conduct knowledge audits. In that context, I guess the notion is closer to the IRM formula (value of problems solved). Except that I think “utility” is a better term to use than “value” (because “value” suggests the need/ability to put a number on something that can’t easily/accurately be numbered).

I hope that does not muddy the water over-much!

P

Patrick Lambe
Partner
+65 62210383



twitter: @plambesg

Knowledge mapping made easy: www.aithinsoftware.com

On 14 Aug 2019, at 11:06 PM, Robert Bogue rbogue@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:


Friends –
 
It was great seeing so many folks last week in Cincinnati.  
 
I’m pondering a problem for a whitepaper I’m writing and I’d love folks thoughts on it.  The short version of the question is “How do you assess the potential business value of an information asset?”
 
The longer form is in the context of how we need to help to separate the wheat from the chaff so that we can keep the information is the most valuable and discard (through retention schedules) the information that we no longer need.
 
I’m thinking about some interesting challenges.  Anything that has been converted from implicit knowledge to explicit should be elevated because of the investment that was made – in other words someone felt like this was important enough to convert it into an explicit piece.  I’m not entirely sure that I could separate the explicit from the implicit at scale and would love ideas on how to do this.
 
Similarly, I was pondering video interviews.  Last week we discussed that uploading a video to Microsoft Stream will automatically generate closed captioning which improves it’s findability.  Between that and the ubiquity of cell phones that can shoot video, it’s a great way to capture knowledge and to make it findable.  However, I began pondering whether we should retain the video file for the same length of time as the captions.  Do they have the same value?  If the information is high value one would expect that it might be converted into an explicit knowledge asset.  If it’s of lower value, then perhaps the best answer is to connect with the person who has the knowledge – which can be done with just the transcript.  Thoughts?
 
I’d love to hear folks thoughts along this line as I try to clarify my thinking.
 
Thanks.
 
Rob
 
-------------------
Robert L. Bogue
O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog
Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out it.
 





Re: Big news: a new KM community in the Netherlands - let's share knowledge #local

Carla Verwijs
 

Hi Jasper, count me in! 

Regards,  Carla

Verzonden vanaf mijn BlackBerry - het meest veilige mobiele toestel
Van: sikmleaders@...
Verzonden: 22 augustus 2019 11:06
Aan: sikmleaders@...
Beantwoorden: sikmleaders@...
Onderwerp: [sikmleaders] Big news: a new KM community in the Netherlands - let's share knowledge

 

Dear KM enthusiasts, attention everybody, big news…

 

Recently, in the Netherlands there is a new initiative to set up a KM community for KM professionals.

The aim of this community is to share knowledge between KM professionals of different organizations and backgrounds, to address new (scientific) developments and learn from each other and each other's thoughts. The intention is to create a community for/with both academics and practitioners and to create a balance between different sectors (professional services, government, manufacturing, health, logistics, etc.)

 

The format of the community is as follows:

  • 3 to 4 times a year an event (physical) for community members
  • An online resource portal (yet to be set up)
  • University of Amsterdam will be hosting the events of the community 

The following community activities will be organized:

  • Knowledge insights (presentations with discussions)
    • New academic insights with practical relevance
    • Interesting cases from ‘the trenches’ where (new) solutions are applied, and evaluated, to complex challenges
  • Poster sessions
    • Existing challenges of community members are presented on A3 posters and the community provides feedback
  • Roundtables
    • Discussions on specific topics. A common problem definition is formulated and solution directions or action plan will be drafted. A taskforce (which can consist out of community members) will work with it to identify solutions
  • Peer support
    • Feedback of the community on a specific challenge of one of the community members by community members

 

The very first event will take place on September 26 at the Amsterdam Business School (part of the University of Amsterdam). The program for the first event includes a problem-solving poster-session and a presentation of Dr. P van Neerijnen about Organizational Adaptiveness & Knowledge Management.

 

Are you interested in this community? That’s great! Just send me a message.


Many thanks.

Jasper


Jasper Lavertu

Knowledge Management Specialist, Knowledge & Innovation

________________________________________

 

De Voogt Naval Architects B.V.

Feadship

Leidsevaart 574

2014 HT Haarlem

The Netherlands

 

Phone. +31(0)23 5247000

E-mail: jasperl@...

Mobile: +31612848900

URL: www.feadship.nl

________________________________________


Re: Big news: a new KM community in the Netherlands - let's share knowledge #local

Sandra Lopez
 

Is a  great new. I want to share that in Columbia we have a similar community, we have been realized 3 big events, the next is August 30 in UPB Medellin. Is in Spanish, I invite too everyone to be part of the community, see in LinkedIn km Colombia
Best regards

Sandra López
 

De: sikmleaders@... en nombre de arno boersma arnovation@... [sikmleaders]
Enviado: jueves, agosto 22, 2019 10:52 p. m.
Para: sikmleaders@...
Asunto: Re: [sikmleaders] Big news: a new KM community in the Netherlands - let's share knowledge
 
 

Congrats, Jasper. Great initiative and I will be happy to help.
Cheers,
Arno 

On Aug 22, 2019, at 5:05 AM, jlavertu@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Dear KM enthusiasts, attention everybody, big news…

 

Recently, in the Netherlands there is a new initiative to set up a KM community for KM professionals.

The aim of this community is to share knowledge between KM professionals of different organizations and backgrounds, to address new (scientific) developments and learn from each other and each other's thoughts. The intention is to create a community for/with both academics and practitioners and to create a balance between different sectors (professional services, government, manufacturing, health, logistics, etc.)

 

The format of the community is as follows:

  • 3 to 4 times a year an event (physical) for community members
  • An online resource portal (yet to be set up)
  • University of Amsterdam will be hosting the events of the community 

The following community activities will be organized:

  • Knowledge insights (presentations with discussions)
    • New academic insights with practical relevance
    • Interesting cases from ‘the trenches’ where (new) solutions are applied, and evaluated, to complex challenges
  • Poster sessions
    • Existing challenges of community members are presented on A3 posters and the community provides feedback
  • Roundtables
    • Discussions on specific topics. A common problem definition is formulated and solution directions or action plan will be drafted. A taskforce (which can consist out of community members) will work with it to identify solutions
  • Peer support
    • Feedback of the community on a specific challenge of one of the community members by community members

 

The very first event will take place on September 26 at the Amsterdam Business School (part of the University of Amsterdam). The program for the first event includes a problem-solving poster-session and a presentation of Dr. P van Neerijnen about Organizational Adaptiveness & Knowledge Management.

 

Are you interested in this community? That’s great! Just send me a message.


Many thanks.

Jasper


Jasper Lavertu

Knowledge Management Specialist, Knowledge & Innovation

________________________________________

 

De Voogt Naval Architects B.V.

Feadship

Leidsevaart 574

2014 HT Haarlem

The Netherlands

 

Phone. +31(0)23 5247000

E-mail: jasperl@...

Mobile: +31612848900

URL: www.feadship.nl

________________________________________


Re: Big news: a new KM community in the Netherlands - let's share knowledge #local

arno boersma <arnovation@...>
 

Congrats, Jasper. Great initiative and I will be happy to help.
Cheers,
Arno 

On Aug 22, 2019, at 5:05 AM, jlavertu@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Dear KM enthusiasts, attention everybody, big news…

 

Recently, in the Netherlands there is a new initiative to set up a KM community for KM professionals.

The aim of this community is to share knowledge between KM professionals of different organizations and backgrounds, to address new (scientific) developments and learn from each other and each other's thoughts. The intention is to create a community for/with both academics and practitioners and to create a balance between different sectors (professional services, government, manufacturing, health, logistics, etc.)

 

The format of the community is as follows:

  • 3 to 4 times a year an event (physical) for community members
  • An online resource portal (yet to be set up)
  • University of Amsterdam will be hosting the events of the community 

The following community activities will be organized:

  • Knowledge insights (presentations with discussions)
    • New academic insights with practical relevance
    • Interesting cases from ‘the trenches’ where (new) solutions are applied, and evaluated, to complex challenges
  • Poster sessions
    • Existing challenges of community members are presented on A3 posters and the community provides feedback
  • Roundtables
    • Discussions on specific topics. A common problem definition is formulated and solution directions or action plan will be drafted. A taskforce (which can consist out of community members) will work with it to identify solutions
  • Peer support
    • Feedback of the community on a specific challenge of one of the community members by community members

 

The very first event will take place on September 26 at the Amsterdam Business School (part of the University of Amsterdam). The program for the first event includes a problem-solving poster-session and a presentation of Dr. P van Neerijnen about Organizational Adaptiveness & Knowledge Management.

 

Are you interested in this community? That’s great! Just send me a message.


Many thanks.

Jasper


Jasper Lavertu

Knowledge Management Specialist, Knowledge & Innovation

________________________________________

 

De Voogt Naval Architects B.V.

Feadship

Leidsevaart 574

2014 HT Haarlem

The Netherlands

 

Phone. +31(0)23 5247000

E-mail: jasperl@...

Mobile: +31612848900

URL: www.feadship.nl

________________________________________


Re: US Workforce by Age Category #HR-OD

 

Thanks for sharing. Do you have data on the job split?

Best,

Jean-Claude Monney


From: sikmleaders@... on behalf of Robert Bogue rbogue@... [sikmleaders]
Sent: Thursday, August 22, 2019 8:51:02 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] US Workforce by Age Category
 
 

Friends – I was putting this together for a project that I’m working on and thought that you might find it interesting.  It looks like the working population has shifted to higher age brackets in the last six years.

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out it.

 

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