Date   

Re: Should we stay or should we go?

Karla Phlypo
 

While I am pretty quiet these days I do follow the discussions and would hate to see them go away.  I will follow were ever you take us Stan.  I am still connected though my context has shifted greatly.  KM is never far from what I focus on within my educational institutional.  Please let us know what we must do to continue supporting the sikmleaders group. 
Kind regards,

Karla Phlypo-Price Ph.D.
Knowledge and Innovation Sciences Inc.
Walden University Faculty
Midwest KM Community Leader
248.394.0510


On Wed, Oct 16, 2019 at 2:06 PM Lee Romero pekadad@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Wow - so it seems that they are just shutting down the product - if I'm reading it correctly, they will let you mail to the group but there will no longer be archives of the conversations - is that how you read it?

On Wed, Oct 16, 2019 at 8:46 AM stangarfield@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:


This was posted by Yahoo today:

Understand what's changing in Yahoo Groups

Yahoo has made the decision to no longer allow users to upload content to the Yahoo Groups site. Beginning October 21, you won't be able to upload any more content to the site, and as of December 14 all previously posted content on the site will be permanently removed. You'll have until that date to save anything you've uploaded.


Thus, I will be migrating our content from Yahoo to Groups.io.



Re: Should we stay or should we go?

Stan Garfield
 

That's how it appears.  I will migrate all of our community's content to Groups.io and hope that it will be able to live on there.  Other Yahoo groups can do the same, but I expect that the rich discussions from groups that are no longer active such as AOK will be lost forever.  This is very unfortunate.


Job Opening: Knowledge Management Content Development Specialist

Stan Garfield
 

If you are interested, please contact Swati Tiwari of ACS (American Cyber Systems) Group at 

Swati.Tiwari@...


Role: Knowledge Management Content Development Specialist

Location: Princeton, NJ

Duration: 6 Months

 

Must haves:

  • Direct experience in content development, communications and/or technology marketing or other related positions in a B2B environment.
  • Solid understanding of enterprise knowledge management and support portal (e.g., ServiceNow), information architecture and taxonomies.

 

Overview

Manager is looking for knowledge management experience, excellent content writing and editorial skills. This is not a technical writer position but experience with writing end user content for IT applications and services is desired.

 

The “Content Development Writer” for the 411 content transformation initiative will partner with key stakeholders to assist in the evolution/transformation of existing knowledge articles within the 411 Portal (IT self-help portal) to meet the specifications of the new platform.

 

Primary Responsibilities

  • Partners with workstream lead to perform analysis of existing materials
  • Serves as Project Coordinator for a team of content writers working on the 411 content transformation initiative, keeping track of project status and activities
  • Completes content development project deliverables, stays attuned to current activities, and makes course corrections in the content development process to address emerging issues.
  • Completes finalization (polishing) of content and submits to stakeholders for approval
  • Follows content development plan as part of the broader project plan
  • Executes some content development/authoring in support of other content writers
  • Applies templates and manages quality review; follows BMS content style guides, and processes and procedures.

 

Requirements

  • Strong attention to detail
  • Excellent writing and editorial skills
  • Basic HTML knowledge
  • 5+ years of direct experience in content development, communications and/or technology marketing or other related positions in a B2B environment.
  • Solid understanding of enterprise knowledge management and support portal (e.g., ServiceNow), information architecture and taxonomies.
  • Ability to translate complex ideas and information into organized, guided resources to enhance end-user, self-service experience.
  • Understanding of knowledge creation best practices (capture, authoring and organization of information across multiple channels.)
  • Strong interpersonal skills.
  • Ability to stay on schedule under tight, frequently changing, client-driven deadlines.
  • Experience in working directly with key stakeholders, team members, technical experts, and professional staff.
  • Expert experience with Microsoft suite to include Office [Word, PowerPoint, Excel], Outlook,
  • Ability to work under minimal supervision.



Re: Should we stay or should we go?

Lee Romero
 

Wow - so it seems that they are just shutting down the product - if I'm reading it correctly, they will let you mail to the group but there will no longer be archives of the conversations - is that how you read it?


On Wed, Oct 16, 2019 at 8:46 AM stangarfield@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:


This was posted by Yahoo today:

Understand what's changing in Yahoo Groups

Yahoo has made the decision to no longer allow users to upload content to the Yahoo Groups site. Beginning October 21, you won't be able to upload any more content to the site, and as of December 14 all previously posted content on the site will be permanently removed. You'll have until that date to save anything you've uploaded.


Thus, I will be migrating our content from Yahoo to Groups.io.



Re: Should we stay or should we go?

Stan Garfield
 

This was posted by Yahoo today:

Understand what's changing in Yahoo Groups

Yahoo has made the decision to no longer allow users to upload content to the Yahoo Groups site. Beginning October 21, you won't be able to upload any more content to the site, and as of December 14 all previously posted content on the site will be permanently removed. You'll have until that date to save anything you've uploaded.


Thus, I will be migrating our content from Yahoo to Groups.io.


A reflection on the value of the ISO KM Standard #ISO-KM-Standard

Arthur Shelley
 

Stan and Knowledge Professionals,

 

Thanks for sharing insights from your ISO 3040 call. I am pleased that there is growing constructive conversation about the importance of the ISO KM standard. Despite a diverse set of reactions to the release of ISO30401, the standard is recognition of the importance of Knowledge Management as a support to individual, team, organisation (and Global) performance. The whole KM community will benefit from the independent acknowledgement that knowledge IS a critical factor across management systems (and becoming more so as we are now well into the “Knowledge Economy”). ISO do not release standards randomly – they ONLY develop standards that they know will make a difference for industry, based on solid research across many countries. This is a VERY solid argument for proposing KM initiatives into senior management (I.E. not just the knowledge professional arguing for their job preferences  and opinions – ISO30401 is formal international demonstration that knowledge initiatives are a critical element of high performance).

 

The standard provides guidance on WHAT should be done to secure the benefits of better management of knowledge assets, but not the specific way in which to achieve this (because this will vary with each organisation, situation and desired priority outcomes). However, the two books mentioned in your links provide useful guidance for practitioners on HOW to achieve best outcomes. The authors have all been around for a long time and share insights and practical experiences on how it works best.

 

I am very confident that wide adoption of the standard will elevate the performance expectations of whole industries - just as the ISO 9000 Quality standard did in 1990’s (after the initial troublesome period where some organisations tried to inappropriately leverage it for short term gain by “getting certification” for marketing purposes, but not actually making the changes for longer term strategic performance improvement). Just as applying the principles of quality management changed everything, so too will adoption of ISO 30401 (along with integration of other Management Systems Standards like ISO 44001 Collaboration and ISO 56000 Innovation).

 

Like any useful knowledge asset - do it for the right reasons and there will be sustained benefits, including both tangible outputs and intangible outcomes. Try to pretend that the organisation is “certified” for “market image” without the elevated mindset and commitment to the principles of the standard and there will be no real value. Paying a Gym membership and documenting an exercise plan is not where the benefits come from - it is doing the exercise that generates the value!

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Producer: Creative Melbourne

Author: KNOWledge SUCCESSion  Sustained performance and capability growth through knowledge projects

Earlier Books: The Organizational Zoo (2007) & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader (2009)

Principal: www.IntelligentAnswers.com.au 

Founder: Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/arthurshelley/

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

 

 

From: sikmleaders@...
Sent: Wednesday, 16 October 2019 3:39 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Oct 15 SIKM Call: Nick Milton on the ISO KM Standard

 

 

TO: SIKM Leaders Community

Today we held our 170th monthly call. Here are the details:

  • October 15, 2019 SIKM Call: Nick Milton on ISO 30401:2018 - The Management System Standard for KM and what it might do for you

·                  ISO 30401:2018 Knowledge management systems - Requirements  https://www.iso.org/standard/68683.html

·                  The Knowledge Manager's Handbook: A Step-by-Step Guide to Embedding Effective Knowledge Management in your Organization, 2nd Edition by Nick Milton and Patrick Lambe https://www.koganpage.com/product/the-knowledge-manager-s-handbook-9780749484606

·                  The KM Cookbook: Stories and strategies for organisations exploring Knowledge Management Standard ISO30401 by Chris Collison, Paul Corney, and Patricia Lee Eng https://www.iso30401.com/

Thanks to Nick for presenting, to Paul Corney for the update on certification, to Linda Hummel for her questions, and to those who attended. Please continue the discussion in the Yahoo! Group by replying to this thread.


Oct 15 SIKM Call: Nick Milton on the ISO KM Standard #monthly-call #ISO-KM-Standard

Stan Garfield
 
Edited

TO: SIKM Leaders Community

Today we held our 170th monthly call. Here are the details:

Thanks to Nick for presenting, to Paul Corney for the update on certification, to Linda Hummel for her questions, and to those who attended. Please continue the discussion by replying to this thread.


Oct 15 SIKM Call: Nick Milton on the ISO KM Standard #monthly-call #ISO-KM-Standard

Stan Garfield
 

This is a reminder of tomorrow's monthly call from 11 am to 12 noon EDT.

SIKM Leaders Community Monthly Call



Re: Seeking employment or consulting opportunities

Stan Garfield
 

For more about Nirmala's experience, see Nirmala Palaniappan: Profiles in Knowledge.


Seeking employment or consulting opportunities

nimmipal@...
 

Seeking employment or KM Consulting assignments

Hi
I am a KM professional with over 20 years of experience in KM, Innovation, business analysis, branding and learning. I'm looking for employment opportunities or consulting assignments in India or other countries with work permit support. I have conceived of various KM methodologies, frameworks and tools and also have exposure to creating cultural change. I can help formulate KM
Strategies or plan initiatives or suggest improvements to existing initiatives. Looking forward to the responses.
Regards
Nirmala


Re: Formalizing an SME Network #expertise-location

Arthur Shelley
 

Hello David,

Creating knowledge networks is a terrific way to stimulate knowledge flows and create value. We set up a three tier structure of “Networks”, Communities and Projects in the early 2000’s at Cadbury and much of this is still running today, despite several mergers and significant changeover of community manages and employees.

There are many different ways of achieving these, but the culture of the organisation and the passion of the community facilitators/leaders are in my experience the most significant success factor for sustainability of value creation. The key thing is to facilitate vibrant engagement between the members around real initiatives that add value and are directly relevant to the members work.

I can provide more details if you would like to discuss further, but it is great that others are also providing examples as there is no one right way forward.

Arthur Shelley
Founder, Intelligent Answers
Producer Creative Melbourne
www.OrganizationalZoo.com
@Metaphorage
+61 413 047 408
https://au.linkedin.com/pub/arthur-shelley/1/4bb/528 

On 10 Oct 2019, at 04:04, davidgraffagna@... [sikmleaders] wrote:

  

Hello All,


I would be very interested in hearing this group's insight, perspective and suggestions around effective ways to develop and establish a formalized SME network in an environment of disparate and informal expertise identification and networking. 


In my current (and evolving) new role, my organization has many long-tenured employees with deep knowledge and expertise. Some of the challenges are: not everyone knows who those experts are or how to connect with them (it's all about who you know); specific, critical topics/areas for expertise are not identified; relating specific, key skills and competencies to individual SMEs is not part of broader development plan; and acting/contributing as an SME is not a formally acknowledged or encouraged activity. 


I'm in the very early stages of this process, and in the current environment even a small win would demonstrate real value.


Would love to hear your thoughts! 


Best,


David


Re: Formalizing an SME Network #expertise-location

Valdis Krebs
 

Here is an article on IBM discovering a CoP that “survived” re-orgs and re-engineering.  They then map and measure the network of knowledge exchange.

http://orgnet.com/IBMCOPSNA.pdf

Enjoy!

Valdis

Valdis Krebs
valdis@...
http://orgnet.com/about.html


Re: Formalizing an SME Network #expertise-location

Miguel Cornejo
 

I agree with Katrina. While other initiatives may generate more work than impact in the short term, getting some practice-centered conversations started would be useful to visibilize the network and its value for members.


El mié., 9 oct. 2019 a las 21:12, Katrina Pugh katrinabpugh@... [sikmleaders] (<sikmleaders@...>) escribió:
 

Hello, David et al
I think you have heard some great suggestions. To take it from a different angle, the tacit or emergent knowledge comes out best when you form a knowledge network(s) (or Community of Practice). This is an area of research for me, most recently looking at knowledge networks/CoPs of project managers. The trick is to have a specific goal for the network (e.g., members’ learning with each other’s help, or co-creating of usable references/methodologies, or pooling funds or power). Then, design the operating model, tone, participation, etc., accordingly. 

Larry Prusak and I published our findings from some Gates Foundation-funded work on this topic in the MIT Sloan Management Review. MIT SMR conveniently, is free today through tomorrow. “Designing Effective Knowledge Networks” https://sloanreview.mit.edu/article/designing-effective-knowledge-networks/ You can also always get this free article from Huffington Post. “How to create social impact through thoughtful networks.” https://www.huffpost..com/entry/how-to-create-social-impa_b_4986848

Kate

Katrina Pugh
AlignConsulting | Collaboration, Analytics and Strategy
Columbia University | Information and Knowledge Strategy Master of Science Program
Mobile: 617-967-3910

On Oct 9, 2019, at 1:10 PM, 'Fred Nickols' fred@nickols..us [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

David:

 

I would reframe the effort.  Position it as an exercise in mapping the expertise of the organization.  Take it function by function.  The SMEs you want to identify will surface in that effort but without them being the focal point.  For the execs, the aim of expertise mapping is to first of all identify the key/core expertise of the organization and its functions so as to be able to ensure its continuation, further development and transfer.  An expertise map of the organization is a key element in ensuring the organization’s sustainability.  That’s what I would do.

 

Regards,

 

Fred Nickols

Managing Partner

Distance Consulting LLC

“My Objective is to Help You Achieve Yours”

 

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... <sikmleaders@...>
Sent: Wednesday, October 9, 2019 12:44 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Formalizing an SME Network

 

 

Hello All,

 

I would be very interested in hearing this group's insight, perspective and suggestions around effective ways to develop and establish a formalized SME network in an environment of disparate and informal expertise identification and networking. 

 

In my current (and evolving) new role, my organization has many long-tenured employees with deep knowledge and expertise. Some of the challenges are: not everyone knows who those experts are or how to connect with them (it's all about who you know); specific, critical topics/areas for expertise are not identified; relating specific, key skills and competencies to individual SMEs is not part of broader development plan; and acting/contributing as an SME is not a formally acknowledged or encouraged activity. 

 

I'm in the very early stages of this process, and in the current environment even a small win would demonstrate real value.

 

Would love to hear your thoughts! 

 

Best,

 

David



--
Un saludo / Best regards / 敬具

Miguel


Re: Join Knowledge on a Mission event in DC on Nov 8

Arno Boersma <arnovation@...>
 

Hi all,

Look forward to catching up with many of you at Stan’s dinner. Please do sign up in time if you’re in DC.

Also, you may have heard through the KM grapevine, there will be another edition of the Knowledge on a Mission event at the World Bank Group on November 8th. Neesham Spitzberg of IFC is leading this event; and Kate Pugh will coordinate the knowledge jam with many familiar faces facilitating. Great if you can join, sign up here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/knowledge-on-a-mission-2019-tickets-71572442101 And feel free to spread the news to other KM leaders and practitioners.

Cheers,
Arno

On Sep 9, 2019, at 12:41 PM, stangarfield@... [sikmleaders] wrote:

  

Please join us for the 11th Annual SIKM Leaders Community Dinner at KMWorld 2019

  • When: Wednesday, November 6 at 6:30 PM
  • Where: Pi Pizzeria, 3761 Chesapeake St NW, Washington, DC


RSVP to let us know you will be attending and follow up by pre-paying to confirm your seat by October 26, 2019.


Thanks to Sue Hanley for arranging the dinner and to Arno Boersma and Neesham Spitzberg for handling the logistics. Sue won't be able to attend, but she scheduled it for us. Arno and Neesham once again offered to fill in for Sue in the important role of dinner coordinators, as they did in 2015.


Last year’s dinner sold out, so please sign up early! We can only accommodate 40 people as part of our group reservation. You can forward the invitation link to colleagues, but each person will need to RSVP and pre-pay individually.

 

There are two steps to register:

  1. RSVP using Evite. You only need to RSVP if you are coming.
  2. Confirm your seat by pre-paying using PayPal. Send the payment to the account arnovation@... and include “SIKM Dinner” and your name so we can keep track. It won't be possible to pay at the restaurant.


The price varies depending on how you choose to pay. It includes dinner, dessert, non-alcoholic beverages, tax, and tip.

  • If you are paying from inside the US via your bank account, the price is $37.00.
  • If you are paying via credit card inside the US, the price is $38.37 (to account for the PayPal credit card processing fee).
  • If you are paying from outside the US in foreign currency or via credit card, the price is $39.50 USD (to cover the added PayPal fees).

A cash bar is available. The meal will be served buffet style and includes garlic bread, a vegetable appetizer, two types of hearty salads, six varieties of pizza, and an assortment of desserts.


To send your payment via PayPal, under "Send Money," choose the second option: "Send to friends and family in the US."  There will be a small fee added to your charge if you use a credit card or if you are paying from outside the US. If you pay using your PayPal balance or US bank account, there is no fee.


If you have questions, send email to Arno Boersma at arnovation@...



Re: Formalizing an SME Network #expertise-location

 

Hi,

My suggestion is much more complex, but has the benefit of being more organic in identifying SMEs within an overall KM system. I led the implementation of this at GE Healthcare during our KMS redevelopment.

I called the approach "pollen", because knowledge sticks. The idea is that a KM portal should return search results at three levels:

1. Appropriate people based on search terms
2. Appropriate projects
3. Source data / reports, etc

The idea being that most people would rather talk to another human being first, then find a project doing the thing of interest, before only as a last resort turning to the source material to figure it out themselves. The way you organically derive this is as follows:

- Search history within your KM portal sticks to a user; i.e. the terms/metadata of what they regularly search for and download builds up;
- If there are projects, i.e. if your KM system supports aggregation of information and primary research into a project, then the project derives metadata from the information associated with it, and users associated with a project build up metadata terms derived from that project.

Essentially, this means that no user needs to manage their own knowledge profile, and it can be assumed that the metadata is self-reinforcing. It also means that, as people and projects change over time, the metadata can change as well (deliberately deprioritising / prioritising metadata based on date/age).

This has to be built into the knowledge management system. It is not particularly complex from a software perspective, but it does require buy-in of the entire organisation, and - obviously - a budget to implement it.

If anyone is interested, I'm happy to discuss further how this is done and how you apply it to your specific software stack.

Regards

Gavin



On Fri, Oct 11, 2019 at 3:53 PM paul_mcdowall@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Hi David,
I'm a bit confused, do you have CoPs running or are you thinking of starting some?  The feedback you mentioned should not be taken lightly.  If you want a 'win' from the CoPs then you must focus them on a specific business issue.  That does not have to entail a full charter or business plan or anything else that's terribly official.  Mangers get a bit antsy when their experienced people are involved in activities that are ill-focused, and a full-blown charter can be off-putting when they have to commit their senior people to an ongoing involvement.  My advice is to keep it simple and clear at this early stage with one clear objective.  The key is focus - focus the dialogue of the group, focus the efforts and activities, focus the result and outcome - and show a concrete result early.  Success will breed more commitment from both the organization and the SME's managers. 
Best
Paul


Re: Formalizing an SME Network #expertise-location

Paul McDowall
 

Hi David,
I'm a bit confused, do you have CoPs running or are you thinking of starting some?  The feedback you mentioned should not be taken lightly.  If you want a 'win' from the CoPs then you must focus them on a specific business issue.  That does not have to entail a full charter or business plan or anything else that's terribly official.  Mangers get a bit antsy when their experienced people are involved in activities that are ill-focused, and a full-blown charter can be off-putting when they have to commit their senior people to an ongoing involvement.  My advice is to keep it simple and clear at this early stage with one clear objective.  The key is focus - focus the dialogue of the group, focus the efforts and activities, focus the result and outcome - and show a concrete result early.  Success will breed more commitment from both the organization and the SME's managers. 
Best
Paul


Re: Formalizing an SME Network #expertise-location

Jeff Stemke
 

Dave

I had a similar challenge at Chevron, especially during several mergers. In 2000 we merged with Texaco. They had developed a People directory and had begun to ask employees to fill out profiles. While our SME disciplines were identical (engineering, drilling, marketing, IT, etc.), we struggled to agree on a taxonomy of competencies.

We liked the concept but there were two fatal flaws. We never did agree on skills at a corporate level. But the biggest problem was we could not get people to keep their profiles up-to-date.

What worked better for us was to create a set of knowledge networks each focused on one of our SME disciplines. We had created similar best practice networks in our refining organization about a decade earlier. They were a terrific success. A core set of 10 networks grew to almost 50 in a short time. Everyone wanted to participate (even managers). We had to cut way back, but the core group delivered extraordinary value.

By the time I retired we had over 200 active knowledge networks. Each developed their own skills taxonomy. It is much easier to get a set of practitioners to agree on what is most important to them.

The networks did exactly what we needed -- developing a meaningful body of documented practices as well as a robust Q&A feature that helped people quickly solve problems. This enabled us to capture critical expertise quickly and helped new practitioners reduce time to competency by 50%.

I have incorporated many of these successful practices into a next-gen SharePoint Knowledge Network template. Each network defines their own taxonomy, which is organized as an expert’s mental model and displayed as a clickable knowledge map. Each member has a profile with selected skills that define their expertise. This automatically links them to the knowledge map so colleagues can quickly find someone to call for help.

These skills are also automatically updated in their “About Me” profile so they can be also found at a global level with a People search by folks outside their network. This helps solve the problem of keeping skill profiles updated.

The network also provides a way for members to recognize peers who have helped them. Reciprocity is a powerful motivator. Good Knowledge Managers can publicize the success stories with management as well.

Best,

 

Jeff Stemke

Transferknowhow.com


Re: Formalizing an SME Network #expertise-location

 

David

 

Yes—this will align with the charter for your CoP that you also need.

 

From: sikmleaders@... <sikmleaders@...>
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2019 07:30
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Formalizing an SME Network

 

 

Thanks to all of you who continue to provide your thoughts. There are some valuable insights here that reflect some of the challenges (and opportunities) in our environment. 

 

While we have just begun the process of mapping expertise, skills and critical knowledge, we have already identified a few specific business needs we can target with SME Networking / Communities of Practice (CoP). And I can use a lot of the advise and experience shared here to get us off on the right foot.

 

For those of you still following along, I have a related question on setting goals for CoP ... should a CoP have a stated goal (or goals)?  In my KM experience I have seen CoP success with clearly defined goals and I have seen CoP success where goals were specifically not established (e.g., to allow a free-flow and diversity of thinking). 

 

In my current environment I've heard some very frank feedback that the existing CoPs are not valuable because they don't have goals or stated purpose so the conversations meander too much and don't keep the discussions focused.

 

So what do you think ... set clear goals or not?

 

Best,

 

David Graffagna

 


Re: Formalizing an SME Network #expertise-location

Fred Nickols
 

David: 

 

The answer to your question is “It depends.”  I’m not being facetious.  There are different kinds of CoPs and if what you are talking about is a sponsored or engineered CoP, one set up at the organization’s initiative, clear goals are probably in order.  On the other hand, if the CoP is a natural or emergent CoP, started at the members’ initiative, stay away from imposing goals and objectives.

 

Regards,

 

Fred Nickols

Managing Partner

Distance Consulting LLC

“My Objective is to Help You Achieve Yours”

 

 

 

From: sikmleaders@...
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2019 10:30 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Formalizing an SME Network

 

 

Thanks to all of you who continue to provide your thoughts. There are some valuable insights here that reflect some of the challenges (and opportunities) in our environment. 

 

While we have just begun the process of mapping expertise, skills and critical knowledge, we have already identified a few specific business needs we can target with SME Networking / Communities of Practice (CoP). And I can use a lot of the advise and experience shared here to get us off on the right foot.

 

For those of you still following along, I have a related question on setting goals for CoP ... should a CoP have a stated goal (or goals)?  In my KM experience I have seen CoP success with clearly defined goals and I have seen CoP success where goals were specifically not established (e.g., to allow a free-flow and diversity of thinking). 

 

In my current environment I've heard some very frank feedback that the existing CoPs are not valuable because they don't have goals or stated purpose so the conversations meander too much and don't keep the discussions focused.

 

So what do you think ... set clear goals or not?

 

Best,

 

David Graffagna

 


Re: Formalizing an SME Network #expertise-location

Chris Riemer
 

I think setting some expectations is always better than not doing so. But those expectations could be somewhat amorphous. We were charged with building CoPs in several areas, and started by appointing someone to lead each one who had acknowledged expertise in that area. One of them asked me what the heck this new responsibility involved, and I gave him some ideas. I saw it as a matter of identifying possible members, helping them to connect to each other and acting as a cheerleader for the process. Like being the host at a party, it’s a function of both what you do and how you do it.

 

Chris

 

From: sikmleaders@...
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2019 10:30 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Formalizing an SME Network

 

 

Thanks to all of you who continue to provide your thoughts. There are some valuable insights here that reflect some of the challenges (and opportunities) in our environment. 

 

While we have just begun the process of mapping expertise, skills and critical knowledge, we have already identified a few specific business needs we can target with SME Networking / Communities of Practice (CoP). And I can use a lot of the advise and experience shared here to get us off on the right foot.

 

For those of you still following along, I have a related question on setting goals for CoP ... should a CoP have a stated goal (or goals)?  In my KM experience I have seen CoP success with clearly defined goals and I have seen CoP success where goals were specifically not established (e.g., to allow a free-flow and diversity of thinking). 

 

In my current environment I've heard some very frank feedback that the existing CoPs are not valuable because they don't have goals or stated purpose so the conversations meander too much and don't keep the discussions focused.

 

So what do you think ... set clear goals or not?

 

Best,

 

David Graffagna

 

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