Date   

UTS webinar - Remembering the Pandemic #COVID-19 #webinar

Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

More Info & RSVP: https://www.meetup.com/Information-Innovation-UTS/events/271090445/

The COVID-19 pandemic is an unprecedented situation that states, organisations, and individuals have responded to in very different ways. In this session, we want to explore different initiatives that try to either make sense of or memorialise the pandemic:
- How can mass journaling techniques provide insight into the collective experience now?
- How can libraries use online tools and social media to capture experiences for future research?
- How are governments responding in terms of recordkeeping?

Dave Snowden is creator of the Cynefin Framework and is developing a fieldbook on crisis management with the European Union Policy Lab which will be available by the date of the seminar. He has been working extensively on the COVID emergency in a range of fields. His expertise lies in decision support, distributed ethnography and weak signal detection

Paula Bray is the DX Lab Leader at the State Library of NSW in Sydney, Australia. Paula develops, manages and promotes an award-winning team that uses existing and emerging technologies to build experiences and exhibitions online and onsite, using the Library’s collection. The DX Lab, Australia's first cultural heritage innovation lab, is a place where ideas and collaborations are explored.

Irene Chymyn is the Senior Project Officer for Government Recordkeeping at State Archives and Records Authority. She has been a records and information professional for over 20 years. She has worked in various industries – government, higher education, oil and gas, and not-for-profit organisations. She is very interested in learning about new technologies and their impact to the community.


Re: Use of videos in KM programs #question #video

Nirmala Palaniappan
 

Thanks Nick!
Will take a look 


On Fri, 5 Jun 2020, 13:03 Nick Milton, <nick.milton@...> wrote:

Following Tom’s lead, you can find a collection of KM videos here – mostly talking heads

 

https://www.youtube.com/user/miltonnick/videos

 

Nick Milton
Knoco Ltd
www.knoco.com

www.facebook.com/knoco.ltd

www.linkedin.com/company/knoco-ltd
mobile +44 (0)7803 592947

email nick.milton@...

blog  www.nickmilton.com

twitter @nickknoco

Author of the recent book - "The Knowledge Manager’s Handbook"

 

"Ambition without knowledge is like a boat on dry land." 
--Mark Lee

 

 

From: SIKM@groups.io <SIKM@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Barfield
Sent: 04 June 2020 17:38
To: SIKM@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Use of videos in KM programs #question

 

Hello Nirmala - when at Accenture we utilized videos to help build awareness of the vision and at times to introduce capabilities.  One challenge was creating a video that would stand the test of time.  Here is an example of a set of videos that I have stood the test of time - I think they were produced in 2011.
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2LXy5kM-2Xksob9BF5zyH-pfj1D4Gy89

I have created a folder in the KM 101 topic of the KM Collection for us to share links to orientation videos.  The KM Collection is open to everyone - though it requires a login.  Create a login by visiting https://kminvite.keeeb.com

We could use the KM Collection to collect links to other types of KM orientation materials.

Tom 

Tom


Re: Use of videos in KM programs #question #video

Nick Milton
 

Following Tom’s lead, you can find a collection of KM videos here – mostly talking heads

 

https://www.youtube.com/user/miltonnick/videos

 

Nick Milton
Knoco Ltd
www.knoco.com

www.facebook.com/knoco.ltd

www.linkedin.com/company/knoco-ltd
mobile +44 (0)7803 592947

email nick.milton@...

blog  www.nickmilton.com

twitter @nickknoco

Author of the recent book - "The Knowledge Manager’s Handbook"

 

"Ambition without knowledge is like a boat on dry land." 
--Mark Lee

 

 

From: SIKM@groups.io <SIKM@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Barfield
Sent: 04 June 2020 17:38
To: SIKM@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Use of videos in KM programs #question

 

Hello Nirmala - when at Accenture we utilized videos to help build awareness of the vision and at times to introduce capabilities.  One challenge was creating a video that would stand the test of time.  Here is an example of a set of videos that I have stood the test of time - I think they were produced in 2011.
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2LXy5kM-2Xksob9BF5zyH-pfj1D4Gy89

I have created a folder in the KM 101 topic of the KM Collection for us to share links to orientation videos.  The KM Collection is open to everyone - though it requires a login.  Create a login by visiting https://kminvite.keeeb.com

We could use the KM Collection to collect links to other types of KM orientation materials.

Tom 

Tom


Re: Use of videos in KM programs #question #video

Aprill Allen
 

Thanks for resurfacing the questions, Stan!

Hi Rahul,

I have found the book Learning to Fly by Chris Collison, to be a great resource for some of what you are looking for. 

To locate expertise, it's a good idea to do some social network mapping. Ask people who they go to when they have questions about x, y, z. You will find out who the hubs are.

If those hubs are out in the field, look at your available content storage platforms - Sharepoint etc? - and look at how you can make a mobile-first knowledge capture page that can be quickly filled out and a video/recording attached. 

You'll find more useful tips in Chris's book.

cheers,


--

Aprill Allen
Founder and Managing Director | Knowledge Bird
M: +61 400 101 961
knowledgebird.com


Re: Use of videos in KM programs #question #video

Nirmala Palaniappan
 

Thank you for sharing, Tom.
These videos are well-made, short and effective! Do you make these videos in-house? I presume they are shared on the intranet rather than on YouTube, when it comes to employee orientation ? 

Regards 
N


On Thu, 4 Jun 2020, 22:08 Tom Barfield, <thomas.m.barfield@...> wrote:
Hello Nirmala - when at Accenture we utilized videos to help build awareness of the vision and at times to introduce capabilities.  One challenge was creating a video that would stand the test of time.  Here is an example of a set of videos that I have stood the test of time - I think they were produced in 2011.
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2LXy5kM-2Xksob9BF5zyH-pfj1D4Gy89

I have created a folder in the KM 101 topic of the KM Collection for us to share links to orientation videos.  The KM Collection is open to everyone - though it requires a login.  Create a login by visiting https://kminvite.keeeb.com

We could use the KM Collection to collect links to other types of KM orientation materials.

Tom 

Tom


Re: Use of videos in KM programs #question #video

Tom Barfield
 

Hello Nirmala - when at Accenture we utilized videos to help build awareness of the vision and at times to introduce capabilities.  One challenge was creating a video that would stand the test of time.  Here is an example of a set of videos that I have stood the test of time - I think they were produced in 2011.
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2LXy5kM-2Xksob9BF5zyH-pfj1D4Gy89

I have created a folder in the KM 101 topic of the KM Collection for us to share links to orientation videos.  The KM Collection is open to everyone - though it requires a login.  Create a login by visiting https://kminvite.keeeb.com

We could use the KM Collection to collect links to other types of KM orientation materials.

Tom 

Tom


Re: Data Journalism videos #data-journalism #video

Murray Jennex
 

Can you give an example Matt?  Your definition basically uses the same words that are being defined as the definition which doesn't really help....murray


-----Original Message-----
From: Matt Moore via groups.io <innotecture@...>
To: sikm@groups.io
Sent: Wed, Jun 3, 2020 2:56 pm
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Data Journalism videos

Christopher,

Data journalism is specifically the use of the data for journalism purposes. It definitely overlaps with Data Storytelling. But it's also means of finding insights in the first place (e.g. Hamish's presentation).

Regards,

Matt

On Thursday, 4 June 2020, 01:17:52 am AEST, Christopher Johannessen <christopher.johannessen@...> wrote:





Hello all - happy to re-engage in SIKM once again!

By "data journalism" do you mean something similar to "data storytelling" - there is quite a bit of material out there on the topic of "data storytelling" (data anything, along with analytics, is my core area of focus lately).

Just seeking brief clarification here. Happy to help! 

Chris J.





Re: Data Journalism videos #data-journalism #video

Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Christopher,

Data journalism is specifically the use of the data for journalism purposes. It definitely overlaps with Data Storytelling. But it's also means of finding insights in the first place (e.g. Hamish's presentation).

Regards,

Matt

On Thursday, 4 June 2020, 01:17:52 am AEST, Christopher Johannessen <christopher.johannessen@...> wrote:





Hello all - happy to re-engage in SIKM once again!

By "data journalism" do you mean something similar to "data storytelling" - there is quite a bit of material out there on the topic of "data storytelling" (data anything, along with analytics, is my core area of focus lately).

Just seeking brief clarification here. Happy to help! 

Chris J.


Re: Data Journalism videos #data-journalism #video

Christopher Johannessen <christopher.johannessen@...>
 

Hello all - happy to re-engage in SIKM once again!

By "data journalism" do you mean something similar to "data storytelling" - there is quite a bit of material out there on the topic of "data storytelling" (data anything, along with analytics, is my core area of focus lately).

Just seeking brief clarification here. Happy to help! 

Chris J.


Re: Data Journalism videos #data-journalism #video

Nirmala Palaniappan
 

Fascinating, Matt
I need to spend more time watching the third one from Inga. It's got some really creative data visuals!
Thanks for sharing. And I can't help but wonder how useful it would be to combine the power of videos with that of data visualization.

Thanks
N

On Wed, 3 Jun 2020 at 16:10, Matt Moore via groups.io <innotecture=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Juliette: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9K-s4q10aZI
Felippe: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DRG20uVRXks
Inga: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJa7rXh9oJc
Hamish: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qCvrfE4BxIk

At the heart of journalism is the ability to find and tell important stories in a compelling way. In a world where data makes up an ever more important part of our lives, this session explores how journalists are using data to:
- uncover and explore stories of international importance,
- analyse the behaviour of important institutions in new ways,
- explain complex events to the general public.

Juliette O’Brien is a free-lance digital journalist and communications consultant. She produces and manages the covid19data.com.au site. She is the author of a best-selling memoir, This Is Gail.

Felippe Rodrigues is a data reporter at Stuff focusing on data visualization and content automation. Most of his days are spent looking at JavaScript or Python code. Felippe has come to New Zealand from Brazil through the way of Boston, Massachusetts.

Inga Ting is a data journalist with ABC News, specialising in data-driven investigations and visual storytelling with numbers. She has been shortlisted twice for Best Portfolio at the international Data Journalism Awards and recently picked up two prizes at the London-based Information is Beautiful Awards. Locally, her work has been recognised at the Citi Journalism Awards, the Quills, the Kennedy awards and the Human Rights Media Awards. Before joining Australia's public broadcaster she was a data journalist at The Sydney Morning Herald.

Hamish Boland-Rudder is the Online Editor for the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists. During his time with ICIJ working both from Washington, D.C. and Sydney, he has worked on all ICIJ’s major data-driven projects, including the Pulitzer Prize-winning Panama Papers, as well as recent investigations including Luanda Leaks, China Cables and the Implant Files. He was previously a reporter and online producer with The Canberra Times, and has reported for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Korea Herald and more.





--
"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous


Re: Data Journalism videos #data-journalism #video

T J Elliott
 
Edited

Data visualizations formed an essential part of our knowledge management activities at ETS. We started out with sending people to Tufte and supported a community of practice of data visualizers. I have followed Flowing Data  https://flowingdata.com/
for years and one of the advantages of that site is the ability to receive more specialized instruction if desired.

Peace,
T.J

"Truth may be crucified and justice buried, but one day they will rise again. We must live and face death if necessary with that hope.”

Reverend Martin Luther King Jr.




   


Re: Data Journalism videos #data-journalism #video

 
Edited

I subscribe to a couple of sites/e-newsletters that regularly publish interesting data visualizations, which is a close relative of data journalism. Check em out:
https://www.visualcapitalist.com/
https://pudding.cool/

--
-Tom
--

Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts


Re: Use of videos in KM programs #question #video

Raymond Olayinka
 

Questions are loaded. 

Rahul,
I think its best to have a quick chat
+447947331982

Cheers
Ray

On ‎Wednesday‎, ‎3‎ ‎June‎ ‎2020‎ ‎13‎:‎29‎:‎10‎ ‎BST, Stan Garfield <stangarfield@...> wrote:


Rahul's questions may have gotten lost in this thread. If you can respond to him, please do.

He is trying to make short videos to capture the expertise of experts in each department. He faces these challenges:
  1. How to design the whole program?
  2. How to identify experts?
  3. What knowledge to capture?
  4. How to capture knowledge when working from home and not meeting in person?
  5. How to engage with the experts to distill their knowledge and make videos?
He asked for samples of:
  1. Videos
  2. Templates
  3. Proven practices
  4. Websites
  5. Books
He requested thoughts on this from the standpoints of:
  1. Project management
  2. Content creation
  3. Knowledge capture


Re: Use of videos in KM programs #question #video

Stan Garfield
 

Rahul's questions may have gotten lost in this thread. If you can respond to him, please do.

He is trying to make short videos to capture the expertise of experts in each department. He faces these challenges:
  1. How to design the whole program?
  2. How to identify experts?
  3. What knowledge to capture?
  4. How to capture knowledge when working from home and not meeting in person?
  5. How to engage with the experts to distill their knowledge and make videos?
He asked for samples of:
  1. Videos
  2. Templates
  3. Proven practices
  4. Websites
  5. Books
He requested thoughts on this from the standpoints of:
  1. Project management
  2. Content creation
  3. Knowledge capture


Data Journalism videos #data-journalism #video

Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Juliette: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9K-s4q10aZI
Felippe: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DRG20uVRXks
Inga: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJa7rXh9oJc
Hamish: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qCvrfE4BxIk

At the heart of journalism is the ability to find and tell important stories in a compelling way. In a world where data makes up an ever more important part of our lives, this session explores how journalists are using data to:
- uncover and explore stories of international importance,
- analyse the behaviour of important institutions in new ways,
- explain complex events to the general public.

Juliette O’Brien is a free-lance digital journalist and communications consultant. She produces and manages the covid19data.com.au site. She is the author of a best-selling memoir, This Is Gail.

Felippe Rodrigues is a data reporter at Stuff focusing on data visualization and content automation. Most of his days are spent looking at JavaScript or Python code. Felippe has come to New Zealand from Brazil through the way of Boston, Massachusetts.

Inga Ting is a data journalist with ABC News, specialising in data-driven investigations and visual storytelling with numbers. She has been shortlisted twice for Best Portfolio at the international Data Journalism Awards and recently picked up two prizes at the London-based Information is Beautiful Awards. Locally, her work has been recognised at the Citi Journalism Awards, the Quills, the Kennedy awards and the Human Rights Media Awards. Before joining Australia's public broadcaster she was a data journalist at The Sydney Morning Herald.

Hamish Boland-Rudder is the Online Editor for the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists. During his time with ICIJ working both from Washington, D.C. and Sydney, he has worked on all ICIJ’s major data-driven projects, including the Pulitzer Prize-winning Panama Papers, as well as recent investigations including Luanda Leaks, China Cables and the Implant Files. He was previously a reporter and online producer with The Canberra Times, and has reported for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Korea Herald and more.


Re: KM best practice in professional services #case-studies #consulting

Cristina Whelan
 

Thank you all for your suggestions. All very helpful.

If you work in professional services, what you think is the KM programme that worked best in your organisation?

I feel like there is so much that can be done if you look at KM holistically, but funnily enough, in a knowledge organisation there seems to be a reticence in documenting and sharing knowledge for fear of discouraging people from listening to the client and advising a bespoke solution to their needs
.

Has anyone else faced the same challenge before?

Cristina.

Cristina Whelan

M&BD Special Projects Senior Manager, Marketing and Business Development

Grant Thornton UK LLP


Re: Use of videos in KM programs #question #video

Nirmala Palaniappan
 

Brilliant, Ray. Thank you so much. 
Very useful list of things to remember in the process of video-making! 

Regards 
N


On Wed, 3 Jun 2020, 11:26 Raymond Olayinka via groups.io, <raymond.olayinka=yahoo.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:
Nirmala,

Regarding 
B) Subject matter expertise converted into short but effective videos...

I've used videos to capture some of the knowledge of SMEs particularly those that are retiring. Its great for capturing the 'know what' and 'know why' of say particular facilities or projects. Can also capture the 'know how' to an extent. 

Videos can be great if:

- the audio visuals are great. You'll need a studio with good acoustics and green screen background to enable you super-impose props and slide decks. you'll need a good camera (or two) to record. Or you can get a self-recording camera equipment like the Rapdmooc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h9AlawUjS9I or any other ones you can find out there
-the interviewer and interviewee are well prepared. You'll need good quality content, not hours of rambling
-videos are subtitled so people can watch at their desks without disturbing colleagues
-videos are edited and chopped into bitesize themes, say 5 minutes each. this can be painstaking. employ someone to do this!
-videos are well indexed, tagged, uploaded and assessable by simple search. Dont label/tag your interview by the interviewees name, label it by topics/themes
-your organisation has a media library compatible with their systems. e.g. MS O365 Videos (now MS Stream) that is if you use the MS O365 portfolio. There are many other non MS products out there

So to answer your question in a long-winded way, videos can be effective. And in a world where children are born with media devices in their hands, taught in school with videos, engage with the world through videos not to mention the spike in video use due to lock-down, videos and media libraries seem a good investment for knowledge capture and sharing

Hope this helps

Ray Olayinka






On ‎Tuesday‎, ‎2‎ ‎June‎ ‎2020‎ ‎16‎:‎14‎:‎53‎ ‎BST, Bill Kaplan <bill@...> wrote:


Here is another example.

 

I was the PM of a KM project focused on LL from Iraq reconstruction following the war that leveraged Army lessons learned videos about topics such as IEDs. This is an excerpt of a larger piece which was connected to soldiers explaining the learnings, what happened, and putting context into the learning.

 

Best

 

Bill

 

From: SIKM@groups.io <SIKM@groups.io> On Behalf Of Nirmala Palaniappan via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, June 2, 2020 04:49
To: SIKM@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Question

 

This is an amazing case in point, Murray.

Thank you for sharing. 

 

Regards 

N

 

On Tue, 2 Jun 2020, 13:26 Murray Jennex via groups.io, <murphjen=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

My favorite video KM system was developed in the mid 2000s for the military.  It was a IED deactivation knowledge system.  since the effective life of a bomb tech is about 2 years (mostly due to stress and rotation of duties) a lot of bomb disposal knowledge was being lost and it took too long to train the new bomb techs.  The system worked by creating a knowledge base of knowledge nuggets, short videos that described how to deactivate a specific IED and was a few to several minutes long.  the system was searched using visual description of the ied found in the field.  The most important lesson learned from this system was to keep the videos short and to the point.  I think many have already said this so this isn't new, but it is an incredibly fascinating case of KM being used to save lives.....murray jennex

-----Original Message-----
From: Nick Milton <nick.milton@...>
To: SIKM@groups.io
Sent: Tue, Jun 2, 2020 12:43 am
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Question

I have a personal collection of several hundred short videos – 2 or 3 minutes – of KM success stories in various organisations I have worked with.  I tend to use them mostly in training or presentations, embedded in PowerPoint. They really enliven a presentation, and enable you to bring “the voice of the user” into the room.

 

I have also used Video embedded in wikis to illuminate specific points that are hard to put into diagrams or words, or to emphasise specific stories. Again, no more than 2 or 3 minutes.

 

Nick Milton

 

 

From: SIKM@groups.io <SIKM@groups.io> On Behalf Of Nirmala Palaniappan
Sent: 02 June 2020 06:03
To: SIKM@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Question

 

This is brilliant, Mark.

Thank you!

I believe you hit the nail on the head when you say videos could be a great way to share success stories.

It is likely to remain in the memories of viewers and influence them - and can potentially be a viral share that reaches everyone that matters.

 

Is there a magic number as far as the duration of the video goes? Maybe not more than 3 minutes?

 

Regards

Nirmala

 

 

On Tue, 2 Jun 2020 at 10:19, Mark Bennett <mark.bennett@...> wrote:

Hi Nirmala

 

In general, I believe videos provide a very powerful way to communicate various aspects of a KM programme.  Videos certainly can be expensive, but they don't have to be given the availability of both mobile phones to record people / practices and desktop tools to create screencasts and edit the final product.

 

I would like to pick up on your third point:

 

C) Videos on KM practices and platforms that improve traction  

 

To my mind, nothing improves traction better than success stories, and video is a wonderful mechanism to celebrate success.  I can provide a public domain example from Rio Tinto (one of the world's largest mining companies), where I worked for 10 years and was responsible for the creation of a portfolio of Communities of Practice with some 15,000 members across the world.

 

To provide a little context, I became aware of the power of written success stories from companies such as Shell, and I wanted to push the boundaries by moving success stories from print to video media.  In 2007 I managed to convince the corporate communications team to include our CoP story in its quarterly showcase, and you can see the result on YouTube here.

 

Interestingly the video created its own snowball, in that large media organisations in Australia picked up the story.  The wonderful thing about videos is that they provide a way of connecting the audience to the actual people involved and the context that they are working in.  Video also provides a great mechanism to educate and train people in topics such as how to use online tools and the best way to get benefits from them.

 

Best wishes

 

Mark


Dr Mark Bennett

LearningCollaboration

82 Richmond St

Leederville

WA 6007

Australia

 

Phone: +61 419 903 859

 

 

On Tue, 2 Jun 2020 at 02:12, Dan Ranta <danieleranta@...> wrote:

Hi Nimala.  Good points / questions.  World class KM programs have videos - IMHO.  Like you said - short and effective.  Short videos help a small team play big since it's a great way to quickly share content when folks have questions -- better yet, you can position them alongside your KM governance materials (ideally in a wiki environment) for greater context.  

 

Rachad is a video-making machine.  He's really good at them...even in his third language (english)!

 

Dan

 

On Mon, Jun 1, 2020 at 11:15 AM Nirmala Palaniappan <Nirmala.pal@...> wrote:

Hi All,

 

Got a quick question for all of you. Please spare a few minutes to let me know your thoughts.

 

How many of you are a part of KM programmes that use videos to communicate one or more of the following aspects: 

 

A) Vision and Purpose of the KM programme

B) Subject matter expertise converted into short but effective videos

C) Videos on KM practices and platforms that improve traction 

 

If yes, what is your experience in terms of its effectiveness? If not, any reasons why you haven’t made videos (apart from lack of budgets)? 

 

Thanks a lot for your time

Regards

Nirmala 

--

"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous


 

--

"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous


Re: Use of videos in KM programs #question #video

Raymond Olayinka
 

Nirmala,

Regarding 
B) Subject matter expertise converted into short but effective videos...

I've used videos to capture some of the knowledge of SMEs particularly those that are retiring. Its great for capturing the 'know what' and 'know why' of say particular facilities or projects. Can also capture the 'know how' to an extent. 

Videos can be great if:

- the audio visuals are great. You'll need a studio with good acoustics and green screen background to enable you super-impose props and slide decks. you'll need a good camera (or two) to record. Or you can get a self-recording camera equipment like the Rapdmooc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h9AlawUjS9I or any other ones you can find out there
-the interviewer and interviewee are well prepared. You'll need good quality content, not hours of rambling
-videos are subtitled so people can watch at their desks without disturbing colleagues
-videos are edited and chopped into bitesize themes, say 5 minutes each. this can be painstaking. employ someone to do this!
-videos are well indexed, tagged, uploaded and assessable by simple search. Dont label/tag your interview by the interviewees name, label it by topics/themes
-your organisation has a media library compatible with their systems. e.g. MS O365 Videos (now MS Stream) that is if you use the MS O365 portfolio. There are many other non MS products out there

So to answer your question in a long-winded way, videos can be effective. And in a world where children are born with media devices in their hands, taught in school with videos, engage with the world through videos not to mention the spike in video use due to lock-down, videos and media libraries seem a good investment for knowledge capture and sharing

Hope this helps

Ray Olayinka
https://www.linkedin.com/in/raymond-olayinka-3466137/






On ‎Tuesday‎, ‎2‎ ‎June‎ ‎2020‎ ‎16‎:‎14‎:‎53‎ ‎BST, Bill Kaplan <bill@...> wrote:


Here is another example.

 

I was the PM of a KM project focused on LL from Iraq reconstruction following the war that leveraged Army lessons learned videos about topics such as IEDs. This is an excerpt of a larger piece which was connected to soldiers explaining the learnings, what happened, and putting context into the learning.

 

Best

 

Bill

 

From: SIKM@groups.io <SIKM@groups.io> On Behalf Of Nirmala Palaniappan via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, June 2, 2020 04:49
To: SIKM@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Question

 

This is an amazing case in point, Murray.

Thank you for sharing. 

 

Regards 

N

 

On Tue, 2 Jun 2020, 13:26 Murray Jennex via groups.io, <murphjen=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

My favorite video KM system was developed in the mid 2000s for the military.  It was a IED deactivation knowledge system.  since the effective life of a bomb tech is about 2 years (mostly due to stress and rotation of duties) a lot of bomb disposal knowledge was being lost and it took too long to train the new bomb techs.  The system worked by creating a knowledge base of knowledge nuggets, short videos that described how to deactivate a specific IED and was a few to several minutes long.  the system was searched using visual description of the ied found in the field.  The most important lesson learned from this system was to keep the videos short and to the point.  I think many have already said this so this isn't new, but it is an incredibly fascinating case of KM being used to save lives.....murray jennex

-----Original Message-----
From: Nick Milton <nick.milton@...>
To: SIKM@groups.io
Sent: Tue, Jun 2, 2020 12:43 am
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Question

I have a personal collection of several hundred short videos – 2 or 3 minutes – of KM success stories in various organisations I have worked with.  I tend to use them mostly in training or presentations, embedded in PowerPoint. They really enliven a presentation, and enable you to bring “the voice of the user” into the room.

 

I have also used Video embedded in wikis to illuminate specific points that are hard to put into diagrams or words, or to emphasise specific stories. Again, no more than 2 or 3 minutes.

 

Nick Milton

 

 

From: SIKM@groups.io <SIKM@groups.io> On Behalf Of Nirmala Palaniappan
Sent: 02 June 2020 06:03
To: SIKM@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Question

 

This is brilliant, Mark.

Thank you!

I believe you hit the nail on the head when you say videos could be a great way to share success stories.

It is likely to remain in the memories of viewers and influence them - and can potentially be a viral share that reaches everyone that matters.

 

Is there a magic number as far as the duration of the video goes? Maybe not more than 3 minutes?

 

Regards

Nirmala

 

 

On Tue, 2 Jun 2020 at 10:19, Mark Bennett <mark.bennett@...> wrote:

Hi Nirmala

 

In general, I believe videos provide a very powerful way to communicate various aspects of a KM programme.  Videos certainly can be expensive, but they don't have to be given the availability of both mobile phones to record people / practices and desktop tools to create screencasts and edit the final product.

 

I would like to pick up on your third point:

 

C) Videos on KM practices and platforms that improve traction  

 

To my mind, nothing improves traction better than success stories, and video is a wonderful mechanism to celebrate success.  I can provide a public domain example from Rio Tinto (one of the world's largest mining companies), where I worked for 10 years and was responsible for the creation of a portfolio of Communities of Practice with some 15,000 members across the world.

 

To provide a little context, I became aware of the power of written success stories from companies such as Shell, and I wanted to push the boundaries by moving success stories from print to video media.  In 2007 I managed to convince the corporate communications team to include our CoP story in its quarterly showcase, and you can see the result on YouTube here.

 

Interestingly the video created its own snowball, in that large media organisations in Australia picked up the story.  The wonderful thing about videos is that they provide a way of connecting the audience to the actual people involved and the context that they are working in.  Video also provides a great mechanism to educate and train people in topics such as how to use online tools and the best way to get benefits from them.

 

Best wishes

 

Mark


Dr Mark Bennett

LearningCollaboration

82 Richmond St

Leederville

WA 6007

Australia

 

Phone: +61 419 903 859

 

 

On Tue, 2 Jun 2020 at 02:12, Dan Ranta <danieleranta@...> wrote:

Hi Nimala.  Good points / questions.  World class KM programs have videos - IMHO.  Like you said - short and effective.  Short videos help a small team play big since it's a great way to quickly share content when folks have questions -- better yet, you can position them alongside your KM governance materials (ideally in a wiki environment) for greater context.  

 

Rachad is a video-making machine.  He's really good at them...even in his third language (english)!

 

Dan

 

On Mon, Jun 1, 2020 at 11:15 AM Nirmala Palaniappan <Nirmala.pal@...> wrote:

Hi All,

 

Got a quick question for all of you. Please spare a few minutes to let me know your thoughts.

 

How many of you are a part of KM programmes that use videos to communicate one or more of the following aspects: 

 

A) Vision and Purpose of the KM programme

B) Subject matter expertise converted into short but effective videos

C) Videos on KM practices and platforms that improve traction 

 

If yes, what is your experience in terms of its effectiveness? If not, any reasons why you haven’t made videos (apart from lack of budgets)? 

 

Thanks a lot for your time

Regards

Nirmala 

--

"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous


 

--

"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous


Re: Knowledge mapping #mapping

Dennis Thomas
 

Hello John,

Example #1 is a standard linear representation of an n-dimensional knowledge base.  It works for small analytic processes.  From a coaching point-of-view, page two will probably include lists.  The Template example, however, is an n-dimensional, interactive environment which this linear example does not fully represent.  It only shows top categories with sub-category content. (not shown).  

Example #2 is a full-on n-dimensional representation of the interplay of the knowledge represented within the science and engineering documents and manuals.  The lines with arrows show how the knowledge flows through these organizations.  N-dimensional, in this sense, means dependencies, contingencies, cross-references, cross-functional relationships to include causal relationships.  

BTW n-dimensional refers to multiple dimensions.  We live in a three dimensional world.  The forth dimension includes time.  Our rational minds, however, are n-dimensional and consider every possible variable related to a situation or circumstance before surfacing declarative thoughts. 

Dennis 

On June 2, 2020 at 8:53:59 AM, John Kirk Browning (jkirkb@...) wrote:

It looks like this could be applied in two ways. 
1. Mid-career person has been laid off. Needs to promptly come up with a plan for 
how what they already know can be mapped to a new in-demand career. What are 
the characteristics of what I know, what I have done, who I have been? What are the 
characteristics of who I am becoming, what it looks like I could do, what will I need to 
know? How do I traverse the journey of the gaps? 

2. Person(s) not necessarily possessing all the skills of a creator/inventor/engineer 
perceives a need, problem to solve. Perceives that the next new thing can require 
knowledge not necessarily possessed by anyone so creativity often involves learning. 
They do a similar mapping as in #1. 

Comments?

On Fri, May 29, 2020 at 8:03 AM Mila Malekolkalami via groups.io <Mila_malek_1365=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Dennis,
Thank you for your help and advice 
It was really helpful. Thank you a million.🌷


On Fri, May 29, 2020 at 6:28 PM, Dennis Thomas
<dlthomas@...> wrote:
Hello Mila,

The solution to your challenge might be a simple as a PowerPoint Knowledge Project Overview Map.  We call them Modeler’s Maps because our domain modelers first identify where the knowledge is, then how it flows through the organization, then how that knowledge is aligned (before and after, if required) so that your organization's goals and objectives are met. 

The one page example will get you started.  In this case, you are looking at (1) a Fortune 100 Performance-based Training and Development system that is based on a planning, analysis, assessment, design, development, implementation, and continuous improvement system.  Credit goes to Guy Wallace, Eppic, Inc.  We developed the following TEMPLATE on our IQxCloud knowledge system with Guy.  Since you have access to the real-world model, you should be able to piece together the rest.  Small companies can implement this system early-on and grow with it

(2) Depending on your design & drawing expertise, attached is a far more sophisticated example of a Modeler’s Map.  This particular project included the development of a Knowledge EcoSystem that included 78 US Science and Technology Laboratories (1990s).  Most now shutdown.  It use to be that governments and large organizes stored their knowledge in Science and Technology Labs, i.e. in the brains of scientists and engineers.  As technology advanced, the human brain library system evolved into our current technologies, most of which are sorely lacking from a highly contextualized knowledge ecosystem point-of-view.  

I hope this helps?



Dennis L. Thomas
IQStrategix
(810) 662-5199

Leveraging Organizational Knowledge 


On May 29, 2020 at 8:22:24 AM, Mila Malekolkalami via groups.io (mila_malek_1365@...) wrote:


Hi everyone
Hope you are fine and safe.
I hope you can help me with knowledge mapping.
I have to make a knowledge map for the petrol organization in my country. But unfortunately there aren't any good and complete examples that can help me. There aren't many companies or organizations which have provided their knowledge maps. So to prepare a perfect K map I need a real sample and then I need to show all possible information on my K map.
I have searched on the Net but I couldn't find what I need. Will you please guide me or if it is possible, send me a real knowledge map with necessary information on it?
I would really appreciate.

Thanks
Mila



--
John Kirk Browning
720-254-5732
Redeemed-Strategies.com
Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/kirkbrowning


Re: KM best practice in professional services #case-studies #consulting

Christopher Parsons
 
Edited

Hi Cristina,

One of the book I would recommend is "The Art of Managing Professional Services" by Maureen Broderick. There are dedicated sections on KM in there, including some stories about Grant Thornton. While it is from 2010, I still that that the main points advanced by the author about both Professional Services and KM in Professional Services are true.

Our company is 100% focused on KM in Architecture and Engineering firms. While the terminology and business is different, I think there is enough similarity between Professional Services that you might enjoy the content on our site. We have a talk archive from our annual KM conference, a book list, and a periodic table of common KM program elements for Architecture, Engineering, and Construction (AEC)  that breaks down the way we look at KM our the industry. I have attached the periodic table. You can watch a short talk explaining it here

I hope that helps.

Best,
Chris

2441 - 2460 of 10148