Date   

Re: Powering into an active future? Or Slamming on the brakes? #COVID-19 #lean-six-sigma

 

Dennis - whew, that's quite a lot of detail you've unloaded there. Sounds like timing is everything, and the differences between cultures from one organization to another can be so radically different, can't they?

I'm working as part of a team for a startup (a social good corp) that's focused on upskilling and reskilling female leaders. Quite a different experience compared to heavily male-leaning environments.

Good points about the drivers behind the people within for-profits vs. non-profits. Perfect world, that drive and sense of a mission can certainly exist in a for-profit situation, although it does seem to be rarer for sure.

Sounds like you've been well positioned and set the stage for transformation to remote at just the right time most recently, that's fantastic to here.

And most importantly, attention to detail and willingness to get focused to professional tackle issues from PMO, Lean, etc. perspective sounds like a great foundation for your current work.

Thanks for your response, let's have a realtime chat sometime soon, eh?


Re: Powering into an active future? Or Slamming on the brakes? #COVID-19 #lean-six-sigma

 

Thanks Beth - apologies for delayed reaction here, my inbox runneth over lately! I'll circle back offline from here so we can have a chat.


Re: Powering into an active future? Or Slamming on the brakes? #COVID-19 #lean-six-sigma

Aprill Allen
 

Hi Dan,

Good to meet, and welcome to the group. I've noticed with the various businesses in my circle, that those with a remote-first approach to work are carrying on, business-as-usual. These are solely SaaS companies, and like you've said, startups or digital-native businesses. (Two examples: Buildkite - a continuous integration/cont dev platform; and Teamgage - an org change/employee engagement platform. For Teamgage, it's the current conditions that led to increased sales and growth.) It's not because of any kind of intentional KM that these examples are going well. It's purely the normalised WFH and the small number of employees compared to other orgs.

My enterprise clients are so-so. They've coped so far, but service desk volumes are high and with so much adjustment going on, I imagine they're stressful positions to be in.
--

Aprill Allen
Founder and Managing Director | Knowledge Bird
KM Consulting & KCS Training
M: +61 (0)400 101 961
knowledgebird.com


Re: Powering into an active future? Or Slamming on the brakes? #COVID-19 #lean-six-sigma

Dennis Pearce
 

Hi Dan, glad to see you here!

After spending most of a 40-year career at large global companies like IBM and Lexmark, I retired in 2017 and for the last year and a half have been working for a Chicago-based non-profit called the Ounce of Prevention Fund, which focuses on providing health and education to infants and preschool children of underprivileged families.  I think we have been very successful at transitioning to a post-pandemic work from home environment for a number of reasons.

I spent the last 6 years at Lexmark managing their internal enterprise social network, and am in the process of launching one now at the Ounce.  The difference in cultures is pretty dramatic, and not only because of the for-profit vs. non-profit perspective.  At Lexmark I was surrounded mostly by engineers, about 80% male.  At the Ounce I am surrounded by about 80% women, most of whom have Masters or PhDs in education or social science fields.  The organization has about 320 employees and most of them pre-COVID had worked in their Chicago headquarters, with probably 20 or so scattered around the rest of the country. 

I had spent the last year getting them used to working in Microsoft Teams as opposed to email, so the timing couldn't have been better when they were suddenly forced to work from home starting in March.  I have found the transformation work so far to be easier than I expected, which I think stems from several factors:

  • The timing, as I mentioned -- we had spent a year experimenting with MS Teams, so they were prepared to start using it "for real" when they suddenly all had to work remotely.

  • A 300-person organization is a pretty nice size for these kinds of experiments.  Not so small that everyone knows each other personally but not so big that it takes years to turn the ship around.

  • With so many employees having advanced degrees in education, they quickly get it when I talk about things like capturing lessons learned, building a learning organization, experimenting with new ways of working, working out loud, etc.  They are much more amenable to change and experimentation than the engineers I worked with.

  • Because of the nature of the organization's mission, there is a feeling that there are others depending on us which keeps everyone motivated.  For example, we were working on developing an online community for early childhood "system builders" (those folks in a community who pull together non-profits, government agencies, business leaders, etc.) to share tips and ideas.  When the pandemic hit, we had only just purchased the software and had planned for a roll-out several months out.  But we immediately were hit with requests from across the country asking if we had any information on managing day cares and pre-schools under these new conditions.  So we drastically condensed our timeline and launched it in a week instead of three months as planned, with a specific focus on COVID (see Early Childhood Connector).  I don't know if for-profits can generate that same feeling about their customers, but having a sense of mission or purpose goes a long way toward helping employees adjust and power through into a new way of working.
To your point about Lean, even though most of our employees come from the Education field, we have a Project Management Office with project managers who are pretty well versed in Lean, Six Sigma, Agile, etc. so that gets folded into our approach to how projects are delivered.  Much of the Ounce's activity over the years has been delivering training, which was of course done mostly in person in the past.  There were several project teams recently created to look at what we are now learning from having to deliver this training virtually and determine what aspects of this we might want to keep in the future even when in-person training becomes possible again.  We're also trying to design our internal processes in such a way that we can easily switch back and forth from in-person to remote work on the assumption that we might be fluctuating between the two modes for several years to come.


Re: Powering into an active future? Or Slamming on the brakes? #COVID-19 #lean-six-sigma

 

Hi Dan, Welcome to the community - your interest in proactively working through commonalities (or rarities) is a great topic for discussion. I'm finding that discussions on what's needed most to enable remote workers to work efficiently, effectively or just to work as their normal pace is impacted by ease of access to knowledge assets and the ability to create them in the context of their work/discussions. I'd welcome a discussion on the topic and would most likely bring in some points on the Knowledge-Centered Service (KCS) practice that is not necessarily common in this part of the world but fairly well known in Boston! (...spoken by a Bostonian living in New Zealand). 


Re: Job Alert - Lead Internal community developer at Ubisoft #jobs

 

Hi Marc
Thanks for sharing this new role opportunity of Lead Internal Community Developer at Ubisoft #jobs #CoP. Is this still an open position? I'd like to share it on LinkedIn and Twitter. #jobs #CoP
Kind regards,
Beth


Re: Powering into an active future? Or Slamming on the brakes? #COVID-19 #lean-six-sigma

Stan Garfield
 

Dan, welcome to the community!  Thanks for jumping right in to start this thread and to reply to several others.

SIKM Members, if you can respond to Dan's query, that would be great.  Thanks a lot.


Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Sreejith,

I agree. Broadly stated, the gap is that managers don't know how to construct hypotheses about systems change informed by the data available. The ability to identify and implement interventions based on sound systems theory is a key capability that knowledge managers should be filling.

What kinds of theories? Things like:

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 4/08/2020 6:49 pm, Sreejith Menath wrote:

Hello dear fellow members,
Happy to join this great community. In the past few months of my investigation with knowledge management business, including the market leading products and other state of art research trends, has led me to a few frontiers that has formidable gaps.Which are mainly-

  • Current market leading products focus mainly on data re-allocation/rearrangement and personalization mainly restricting to the domain of content intelligence or search intelligence
  • There is an increasing focus on data quality and integrity, but the SaaS market is still addressing the vastly focusing the advantage of the improved data on visualizations. Meaning they show you the metadata and qualitatively and quantitatively label them through a datahub middle layer, but there is still lack of clarity what to make use of those data dashboards.
  • Decision makers look for actionable intelligence, which is still actively missing from the data dashboards.For example how the various KPIs relate and do they converge or diverge from strategic organizational goals.

I would request you to please present your viewpoints or added inputs on these lines. Further if you have been an active user of current knowledge management SaaS/PaaS infrastructure, highlighting specific use-cases from your experience  where you think requires active resolution and intervention in terms improved clarity of problem definition or solution methodology would be highly appreciated.

Thanks!


Job Alert - Lead Internal community developer at Ubisoft #jobs

Marc Bramoulle
 
Edited

Hi everyone!

We are looking for a new Lead Internal Community Developer in Ubisoft's Knowledge management Team. This person will be responsible for the team that animates the internal Ubisoft community and accompanies communities of practice to reach maturity in terms of knowledge management, sharing and reuse. Apply here or reach out to me to know more about that opportunity: marc.bramoulle@... .

Location: Montréal

Company: Ubisoft Entertainement (Video game company)

Best,

Marc

KM Services Director


Re: Center of Excellence (CoE) for Subject Matter Expertise? #expertise

 

Hi Mirna,
After reading the many great comments here it occurred to me that it may be a good time to discuss here in the tread your discoveries and challenges. Have you made progress in understanding better how a CoE could be an approach to manage subject matter expertise? Also interested in whether the information has assisted in determining whether a CoE would assist in establishing governance, processes and best practices, and also with the implementation of content/assets lifecycle. Beth Coleman


Sreejith Menath
 
Edited

Hello dear fellow members,
Happy to join this great community. In the past few months of my investigation with knowledge management business, including the market leading products and other state of art research trends, has led me to a few areas which have formidable gaps in their representation.
These are mainly-

  • Current market leading products focus mainly on data re-allocation/rearrangement and personalization mainly restricting to the domain of content intelligence or search intelligence
  • There is an increasing focus on data quality and integrity, but the SaaS market is still vastly focusing the advantage of the improved data availability on visualizations. Meaning they show you the metadata or KPIs that represent data and qualitatively/quantitatively label them within a datahub middle layer, but there is still lack of clarity on how to make meaningful use of those data dashboards.
  • Decision makers look for actionable intelligence, which is still actively missing from the data dashboards.For example how the various KPIs relate and do they converge or diverge from strategic organizational goals.

I would request you to please present your viewpoints or added inputs on these lines. Further if you have been an active user of current knowledge management SaaS/PaaS infrastructure, highlighting specific use-cases from your experience  where you think requires active resolution and intervention in terms improved clarity of problem definition or solution methodology would be highly appreciated.

Thanks!


Re: The KM Collection - easier access to best content #resources #search #curation

 

Tom,
Thank you for the introduction and invitation.  I have just signed up for a Keeb account and am looking forward to exploring it more.
Catherine


The KM Collection - easier access to best content #resources #search #curation

Tom Barfield
 

Join many of us in the SIKM Forum and give the The KM Collection a try.  The collection makes it easier to find information on knowledge and collaboration.

If you have used the KM Collection and find it valuable please consider voting for the Keeeb Intelligence Platform in the KM World Readers' Choice Awards. We are listed in the Collaboration and Enterprise Search categories.  Wednesday, August 5th is the last day to vote.

Benefits of the KM Collection: 

  • Improved findability of knowledge resources.  When you search in Google, the Keeeb Discovery search will appear in the right pane performing your search in key knowledge sites. Sites currently in scope include the SIKM forum, APQC, Gurteen, Knoco, the KM Collection, and others.
  • Browse the curated folders of the best knowledge from across the Internet (I could use some help in improving the curation)
  • Create your own folders for your own research

Click here to learn more and decide if you would like to participate.

Thanks,

Tom


Re: Alternative open source to SharePoint Technology #tools

James Robertson
 

Hi Ankur,

On Fri, Jul 17, 2020 at 3:15 AM Ankur Gupta <mbaankur@...> wrote:
Hi James,

I am looking for capabilities primarily like:

1. Search Engine
2. Online collaboration platform 
3. Document Management (Libraries)
4. Tool for Expertise / Skills Locator

Let know your thoughts. 

Regards,
Ankur

Based on this, I'd suggest you look at one of the "intranet in a box" offerings. There are a heap that run as their own platform (without needing Office 365 for example), and most are cloud-based.

This would give you:

  • ability to manage content (both intranet pages & documents)
  • search engine
  • collaboration capabilities (varying in design between products)
  • staff directory

As others on this list can no doubt attest, expertise directories are incredibly hard to succeed at. I've only come across a handful over the last decade. (The challenges are people-related, rather than technology related, as it's very difficult to collect the right information and then keep it up to date).

There's a dauntingly long list of solutions here:
https://www.clearbox.co.uk/intranet-and-employee-app-directory/

In terms of open source, I'd suggest this is the "wrong question". Not to say that there aren't great open source solutions (there are), but that your decision should primarily be based on the functionality capabilities of the solution and the business model of the vendor.

You may benefit from getting expert help in selecting a product. There are a few folk who do this around the globe, including myself (based in Australia), Sam Marshall (ClearBox, UK) and Tony Byrne (Real Story Group, USA).

Sorry for the delayed response, hope this helps,

James

PS. thanks Stan for the nudge to respond, that's great community facilititation in action! :-)


--
Step Two James Robertson
Founder and Managing Director | Step Two
Ph: +61 2 9319 7901 | M: +61 416 054 213
www.steptwo.com.au


Re: Gritting Teeth and Raising Eyebrows with Johnnie Moore - 13 August #COVID-19 #webinar

Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Hello Dan!

We would love to have you altho I believe 6pm Syd time is 4am Boston time.

BTW this podcast cover Johnnie’s Unhurried work and also Rob Poynton’s book “Pause”: https://infoinnouts.podbean.com/e/unhurried-pauses-johnnie-moore-rob-poynton/

Regards,

Matt Moore
+61 423 784 504

On Jul 31, 2020, at 6:30 AM, Dan Keldsen <dan.keldsen@...> wrote:

Matt - ah, good to keep re-running into you lately. Hello from Boston!

I always enjoy the titles of your posts - more than half the battle is to get people to read more than just the title/subject, eh?

I'm planning on sitting in on this session.

It's interesting times for all of us, especially those of us (cursed?) who believe we should be learning things from our past lessons, to avoid repeating them moving forward! (sigh)

Sounds like Unhurried is a very different take on modern life - count me in! (slowly... ;) )

/Dan


Re: Knowledge Retention from Select 'At Risk' Employees #knowledge-retention #knowledge-transfer

Katrina Pugh
 

Hi, SIKM:  
I see Dan K just sent this note to the group :) Here’s the link to the book Sharing Hidden Know-how (Wiley, 2011), on using facilitation, conversation, and translation for getting out knowledge and putting it to work.  https://www.amazon.com/Sharing-Hidden-Know-How-Managers-Knowledge/dp/0470876816 
The knowledge jam, as we call it, is pretty efficient, and it‘s a short line to improved productivity, innovation, and societal impact. As with our Covid-19 period, a have a few great examples of upheavals after which we used the knowledge jam to make sense and put the insights into future processes. Knowledge Jam a lot like Knowledge Continuity and other dialogue-based practices. The key point is “get the seekers and/or brokers into the process.”

Also, here’s a short summary of Knowledge Jam that Nancy Settle-Murphy and I wrote.  http://www.ittoday.info/Articles/NS-Harnessing-Hidden-Know-How.htm 

Thanks
Kate

Katrina Pugh
AlignConsulting | Collaboration, Analytics and Strategy
Columbia University | Information and Knowledge Strategy Master of Science Program


On Jul 30, 2020, at 4:41 PM, Dan Keldsen <dan.keldsen@...> wrote:

Kate - ah, came to this thread late, and was reading backwards. I was wondering if your book was going to be mentioned!

Great resource to use to methodically, but not... dryly I suppose is the best word for it, exhume the valuable hard-won knowledge of practitioners!

/Dan


Powering into an active future? Or Slamming on the brakes? #COVID-19 #lean-six-sigma

 

Hello all - I see many familiar faces from the early (for me) KM days of the late 90s/early 2000s, the heady days of Enterprise 2.0 and through to... the current state of things. (whew)

I recently reconnected with Stan,who gracefully steered me here.

I'm on a bit of mission these days to demonstrate business, organizations and people who are actively SOARING in the last few months. They haven't stopped in their tracks, haven't retreated to safety in a hope that everything will go back to "normal" (a constant moving target).

I'm hunting those who are proactively working through their reaction to the pandemic to see what the commonalities (or rarities) are for this somewhat rare cohort.

Early hint, I'm finding that organizations that had almost any real experience with Lean (Thinking/Manufacturing/Startup) are generally in far better shape than others.

As a 60+ year old management and thinking practice, that gives me hope that there are OTHER common practices that that the assembled KMers here may be able to point me to.

I'd love to get additional interviews going to help expose what's possible and sew more seeds for others to reap.

Any people/organizations you'd like to nominate? (And that includes you and your organization)

Thanks in advance, and looking forward to rejoining in the KM camaraderie!

Dan


Re: Knowledge Retention from Select 'At Risk' Employees #knowledge-retention #knowledge-transfer

 

Kate - ah, came to this thread late, and was reading backwards. I was wondering if your book was going to be mentioned!

Great resource to use to methodically, but not... dryly I suppose is the best word for it, exhume the valuable hard-won knowledge of practitioners!

/Dan


Re: Alternative open source to SharePoint Technology #tools

 

Hi Ankur - James has far more up-to-date information than I do on this topic, but I'm curious...

Why opensource? No judgement, just curiosity. I'm wondering how attitudes/reasons for or against open source have changed since the early days of the intrusion of wikis and similar KM-ish started to intrude on the legacy KM tools world.

/Dan


Re: Gritting Teeth and Raising Eyebrows with Johnnie Moore - 13 August #COVID-19 #webinar

 

Matt - ah, good to keep re-running into you lately. Hello from Boston!

I always enjoy the titles of your posts - more than half the battle is to get people to read more than just the title/subject, eh?

I'm planning on sitting in on this session.

It's interesting times for all of us, especially those of us (cursed?) who believe we should be learning things from our past lessons, to avoid repeating them moving forward! (sigh)

Sounds like Unhurried is a very different take on modern life - count me in! (slowly... ;) )

/Dan

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