Date   

Re: Emotions & KM #emotions

 
Edited

On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 12:45 AM, Matt Moore wrote:
However, if creating a psychologically safe organisation was the most important thing for organisational success, there would be more of them.
Maybe. OTOH, most organizations - the miracle of organizations, actually - can get by on mediocrity. Pull employees from the middle of the bell curve, put them into pre-configured jobs, give them a bit a training, and voila - cars get designed and built. So use a bit of stick as needed - can’t hurt anything.

But not all organizations can get away with that. Some need truly high-performing individuals who work on high-performing teams. For these teams, psychological safety is central, as Google discovered in their research on high performing teams.
https://hbr.org/2017/08/high-performing-teams-need-psychological-safety-heres-how-to-create-it 

This is, in an odd sort of way, analogous to why most organizations don’t do After Action Learning, even though the military has shown it to be very effective in improving processes and reducing risk. If it’s so effective, why don’t all companies use it? Simple: no one dies in companies in the course of doing their jobs (well, usually). That, coupled with the political risk/fear of calling out your superior for a bad plan of action - which is a central aspect of AAL work - means that the cultural toll of doing it is greater than the perceived potential benefit (incremental process improvement). Just sayin’.
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All of my previous SIKM Posts


Call for Chapters: Book about KM & Organizational Culture #books #call-for #culture

Dana Tessier
 

Hello, I'm new to this group and excited to get to know more of you! 
I’m putting together an edited collection about knowledge management and organizational culture that will explore how these two areas intersect, and ultimately how more KM implementations can be successful by understanding and leveraging components of organizational culture. 

As more organizations go through digital transformations brought on by remote working, changes in strategy, and technological advances, the need for digital collaboration as a key competency becomes increasingly important. An effective knowledge management strategy can power these digital collaborations but in reality, how do you get your workers to change their behaviours? How to encourage people to share what they learned, especially when it was by failing? It’s clear that organizational culture plays a big part in the success or failure of a knowledge management strategy.  ‘Organizational Culture Strategies for Effective Knowledge Management and Performance’ will be published in 2022. The Call for Chapters is open! If you are interested in getting involved in this project, please do not hesitate to reach out. 
https://www.igi-global.com/publish/call-for-papers/call-details/4896 

My hopes for this book are that both academics and practitioners can learn more about how culture and knowledge management intersect so that more knowledge management strategies and implementations can be successful. 


Re: Emotions & KM #emotions

Robert L. Bogue
 

Matt –

 

In my review of The Fearless Organization (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2019/06/24/book-review-the-fearless-organization-creating-psychological-safety-in-the-workplace-for-learning-innovation-and-growth/, for those not tracking the other thread), I basically mentioned that fear is an inherent part of being human.  It’s not possible for an organization to remove all fear from the equation – nor is it their role.  It is, however, in their best interests to find a place where fear is minimized and productivity is maximized.

 

With regard to organizational structure and the systemic use of fear, Fredrick LaLoux’s work in Reinventing Organizations (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2017/06/19/book-review-reinventing-organizations-guide-creating-organizations-inspired-next-stage-human-consciousness/) is good at showing this as an evolution.  Observationally and through my other research, I’d support that we’re evolving our management style and that while fear was often used as a mechanism for motivation, it’s a bit unstable and because we’re recognizing that more-and-more it seems to be falling out of favor.  Reinforcing this point is the work of Chuck Underwood in America’s Generations (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2016/09/19/book-review-americas-generations-in-the-workplace-marketplace-and-living-room/).  While Chuck and I have vastly different styles, his observation of generations across time is intriguing.  (As he points out generations are largely based on the country that people live so the applicability across the globe may be limited – but understanding the shift across generations is interesting to me.)

 

So, I think organizations are changing to use less fear based motivations – and that’s a good thing.

 

As for fear of reprimands, I think this where we look at how to help/support people into being more wholly human filled with self-efficacy and resilience.  When we do this they have a greater capacity for courage.  (Courage is not the absence of fear but moving forward in it’s presence.)  This greater capacity for courage decreases the need for the organization to be focused on reducing fear.

 

All this being said, the transition isn’t done.  Terri (my wife and partner) and I wrote Extinguish Burnout: A Practical Guide to Prevention and Recovery for The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) last year.  As we’ve tried to engage others to partner with on the materials we’ve run into two key problems.  First, the organizations we’re working with are selling that there’s something broken in the organization that they know how to fix.  Second, that burnout is exclusively associated with work.  Despite the WHO’s inclusion of burnout as an ICD-10 code which lists it as an occupational phenomenon, it’s not.  This is evident even in Frudenberger’s early work on the topic.  The problem is a political one between the WHO and the APA and is negatively influenced by Maslach.  (I’ll stop there.)

 

We believe we’re largely unsuccessful in getting employee engagement-type companies to leverage our materials because we don’t blame the company and we’re concerned about helping the person learn about their own self efficacy.  For what it’s worth all the materials – including the course – are free until at least December 20th as our gift to the world.

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Matt Moore via groups.io
Sent: Friday, October 16, 2020 3:45 AM
To: main@sikm.groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] Emotions & KM - Fear

 

So lets talk about fear.

 

I've just had a skim thru "The Fearless Organization" - and I don't hate it. I think creating psychological safety is important. I read Edmondson's advice and I'm like: sure.

 

However, if creating a psychologically safe organisation was the most important thing for organisational success, there would be more of them.

 

Our societies and our organisations are full of fear. We punish those who fail or are simply unlucky. We casually discriminate against or enact pain on others because, well, because it's easy and it gets us what we want. Management books such as "The Fearless Organization" make the removal of fear about acts of individual virtue rather acts of structural change.

 

For example (and I am about to say something political here), lots of people are afraid to criticise their boss because they are afraid of losing their job because there is no financial safety net for them to do so if they do. So don't say that you are in favor of "fearless organisations" if you are not in favour of structural change that makes this possible. If we see emotions as the products of individual biology rather than structures and systems that go beyond the individual then we will always have an impoverished view of them.

 

Also - people being "afraid to share their knowledge or that KM activity might lead to reprimands". Often, such fears *are* rational. Because people have seen what happens to those who do. Many managers will trade the long term benefit of trust for the short term kick of a business outcome. And they are rewarded for doing so. We talk about "technical debt" (the present cost of past technical decisions). Perhaps we should also talk about incurring "trust debt" or "fear debt".

 

Now it's not all doom and gloom. There are places where trust and honesty and caring happen.

 

But I get a cognitive dissonance verging on whiplash when we move from reading the management literature about what we should do and then seeing (and feeling) what we actually do.


Re: Emotions & KM #emotions

Robert L. Bogue
 

Matt –

 

Please don’t get me wrong, no one is perfect, Ekman’s got opportunities to expand his thinking as well.  Once you’ve seen Emotion and Adaption let me know what you think.  I think another good resources is The Tell-Tale Brain (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2018/08/27/book-review-the-tell-tale-brain-a-neuroscientists-quest-for-what-makes-us-human/)

 

Re: Motivators – Agreed.  What I like about Reiss’ work is it gives us a context for discussing what the motivators are.  It’s balanced between too many and too few – for this purpose.  As for the different suggestions, I’d use Hertzberg to talk about the things that are the most valuable and Deci to caution about extrinsic rewards where intrinsic are ultimately desired.  I agree when people enter into these heated discussions it’s because they’re expressing their beliefs.  Most of those are desires but some are likely not.  Money for instance… most people believe they’re not motivated by money but others are.  So while I realize that people were revealing their beliefs, I’m not sure I’d say all of them were desires.

 

Re: Holistic view of mind and body – There are many to choose from here.  I’ve just finished reading (but haven’t written my notes up yet) Trying Not to Try.  It’s a very interesting work tying together various forms of Confucius and his disciples work.  Not a bad choice as options go 😉

 

It sounds like a fun talk.

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Matt Moore via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2020 8:49 PM
To: main@sikm.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Emotions & KM

 

Hello Robert,

 

I am more persuaded by Barrett's arguments (and less by Ekman's) than you are. I probably have a bias towards contextualist and constructivist arguments so I doubt we are going to agree on that. Not that I agree with everything in Barrett's book (esp. the later chapters where she applied her research). I will check out Emotion and Adaption so thanks for the pointer.

 

BTW I am not going to stop other people from using terms like "affect" - although I may change my mind on that if it winds Patrick up enough.

 

My main experience with motivators is that different people are motivated by different things (be they 16 motivators or not). I remember being in a meeting years ago where the KM team were discussing rewards for a knowledge sharing program. And every one came up with a reward that they thought would be motivating to other people (money, recognition, time off, promotion, etc). And they were all different. Big argument. Of course, what everybody was actually revealing was what was motivating to them.

 

I could write a lot about fear and fearlessness. And I may do - in a future post.

 

I am also a fan of Damasio (and Andy Clark) and the research that takes a holistic view of mind and body. It is not Descartes who I will be referencing in my talk - but another early modern philosopher. Who? Well, you'll have to turn up and see...

 

Regards,

 

Matt

 

On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 1:41 AM Robert L. Bogue <rbogue@...> wrote:

Trying to catch up on the whole thread at one time…

 

First, my review of How Emotions are Made is at https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2018/10/29/book-review-how-emotions-are-made-the-secret-life-of-the-brain/  You’ll likely note that I’ mot entirely positive about it because I think Barrett interprets things in ways that are contrary to the data at times.  However, I have that same problem with other folks too.  Most notably Charles Duhig (See https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2018/08/06/book-review-the-power-of-habit-why-we-do-what-we-do-in-life-and-business/)  In my opinion Emotion and Adaptation (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2019/04/01/book-review-emotion-and-adaptation/) is a much better book about the relationship between reason and emotion – but it’s a bit more obscure.

 

As for motivators, certainly the carrot and the stick is overdone.  You can see that in Deci’s work on intrinsic motivation (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2020/05/04/book-review-why-we-do-what-we-do/ ) and Pink’s interpretation of it in Drive (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2011/07/11/book-review-drive/) More than that Reiss’ work gives us reason to believe that there are 16 basic motivators for people (See https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2013/03/29/book-review-who-am-i/)  Of course, there’s also Fredrick Hertzberg work from 1968 that explains how motivators work (Hygiene vs. Motivators and the importance of Achievement, Recognition, etc.)

 

I also would say that fear is a powerful and often hidden motivator.  Here I’d look at Amy Edmonson’s work in The Fearless Organization (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2019/06/24/book-review-the-fearless-organization-creating-psychological-safety-in-the-workplace-for-learning-innovation-and-growth/)

 

Patrick, with all that said, I’d argue that the etymology of the word emotion is about movement.  While our current thinking is that emotion means inaction the roots of the word are about creating motion.  I personally like affect but do find it less universally understood.  It gets even more difficult to address conceptualize if you think about negative and positive affect occurring simultaneously.  See this figure from Emotion and Adaptation (referenced earlier) as it refers to Watson and Tellegen’s two-factor structure of affect.

 

 

Matt, I think that there’s been a division for a long time between reason and emotion – one that started with Descartes (See https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2020/06/22/book-review-descartes-error-emotion-reason-and-the-human-brain/) but I think the intersection is around how we motivate change in people to be more open (and trusting) of sharing what they know in organizations.  (See also https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2019/07/03/trust-vulnerability-intimacy-revisited/ for more about the role of trust.)

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Patrick Lambe via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2020 4:32 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Emotions & KM

 

Thanks Nimmy. I was thinking some more about the “mobility” that emotions give us, and went back to a term that is often used in the learning domain instead of emotion, and that’s “affect” - Matt is not enthusiastic about the term because he thinks it too technical to be widely understood, but I like it because it implies a disposition toward action that I think is important, and this is not always very clear when we use the language of emotion. We often talk about emotion as something separate from action but which conditions it - like reasoning. We can stew in our emotions and not do anything. “Affect” on the other hand, pretty much demands a course of action.

 

And if Matt can have “valence”, surely I’m allowed “affect”?

 

P

 

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:                                                    +65 98528511

web:                                                       www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:                                             www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:           www.aithinsoftware.com

 

On 15 Oct 2020, at 4:17 PM, Nirmala Palaniappan <Nirmala.pal@...> wrote:

 

That’s a very useful example, Patrick.

Shifting the emotional frame can shift the interpretive frame and help us reconsider the emotion or even dissolve it. Been there! 

Someone who can quell the fear (or gradients of the emotion ;-)) in the atmosphere (oh, that rhymes!) is an invaluable asset to have in collective discussions.  

 

On Thu, 15 Oct 2020 at 1:24 PM, Patrick Lambe <plambe@...> wrote:

Conjoining the protean nature of emotions with classification schemes is an interesting twist.

 

It implies that shifting the emotional frame can very quickly shift the interpretive frame and that feels absolutely right. I have been in conflict situations where somebody stepped in with humour and grace and calmed everybody down, and it helped us all to see new ways of acting that had appeared closed off while in anger.

 

P

 

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com

<SK18th_Anniv2020_emailfooter (2).jpg>

 

On 15 Oct 2020, at 3:40 PM, Matt Moore <matt@...> wrote:

 

Patrick,

 

"I suppose what I’m saying is that emotions are tangled up with all sorts of other aspects of our personalities and so while this is a fascinating discussion to start, it may not be very simple to bring to a swift close."

 

Absolutely. The book "How Emotions Are Made" (thank you, Stephen) goes into the protean nature of emotion (how they shift based on culture or context) in a lot of detail.

 

And the problem with classification schemes is that they are often good places to start but poor places to end. They can help you make sense of an environment that appears chaotic but in doing so they close off other possibilities and subtleties.

 

Regards,

 

Matt

 

On Thu, Oct 15, 2020 at 5:48 PM Patrick Lambe <plambe@...> wrote:

Hi Matt

 

When I was reading your list of motivators I wondered to what extent a sense of ethics or how we frame and feel about virtues/vices (I’m not entirely sure they are the same things but they seem connected) come into play in evoking emotional responses. 

 

For example, pride is (in my case) a frequent precursor of annoyance. It also helps to diminish the influence of fear. Ethical frames can also condition what patterns of behaviour count as desirable/undesirable. 

 

Playfulness is a good one and has indeed been harnessed in the service of KM (e.g. in gamification), although I fear it is sometimes trivialised as an entertainment layer on top of “serious" tasks. I am absolutely sure you’re familiar with the work of Huizinga. There are strong hints of annoyance in the interactions that Diane Vaughan records in the Challenger launch decision, particularly in relation to the way that the engineer Roger Boisjoly issued his warnings… he had a reputation for being “difficult”.

 

I suppose what I’m saying is that emotions are tangled up with all sorts of other aspects of our personalities and so while this is a fascinating discussion to start, it may not be very simple to bring to a swift close.

 

P

 

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com

<SK18th_Anniv2020_emailfooter (2).jpg>

 

On 15 Oct 2020, at 2:17 PM, Matt Moore <matt@...> wrote:

 

Hi Nimmy,

I am going to agree and disagree.

I absolutely agree that fear and desire are powerful motivators and
that they play roles in knowledge sharing (there's actually a fair bit
of academic writing on this that I really should read properly over
the weekend).

Where I would disagree is that human beings only act from fear or
desire. That sounds like we need to reduce the world to carrots and
sticks. When I look at my own behaviour, I can be motivated by a
frisson of playfulness, a slick of disgust, a pinprick of annoyance, a
hurricane of rage, a pool of boredom, a shock of surprise.

How do we as knowledge managers harness the full range of emotions in
the people that we work with? Or is it all just carrots and sticks?

Regards,

Matt

On Thu, Oct 15, 2020 at 2:43 AM Nirmala Palaniappan
<Nirmala.pal@...> wrote:


Matt,

Glad to be catching up with this discussion.
- I did a session on the Psychology of Knowledge Sharing for the KM Society of Singapore last month and what I covered may be of interest to you and relevant to the topic of discussion
- I began with the assumption that human beings act out of either desire or fear, almost always. I then went on to map these two emotions to three key behaviours - These could be action based on values, action based on convenience or profit-motive and action based on ego/pride
- Values may arise from passion or fear (conditioning). A profit-motive is likely to be driven by desire and ego stems from fear (of losing something or being hurt in some way)
- People who share knowledge or hoard knowledge are likely to be driven by one or more of these three factors (imo)

Hope this helps!
Regards
Nimmy

On Sat, 26 Sep 2020 at 5:04 AM, Matt Moore <matt@...> wrote:


Hi,

So as you will have seen from Stan's email, I will be doing a session
on emotions and KM in later October.

I have started work on the presentation but I'd be interested to hear
thoughts from the community on this topic.

- How do KM and emotion inter-relate?
- What role do emotions (of ourselves, of others) play in the work that we do?
- How are different emotions bound up with knowledge and how do the
impact knowledge creation, knowledge dissemination, and knowledge use?

BTW emotions are a big part of being human but a literature search
reveals only about 10-20 articles on emotion and KM over the last 20
years.

Regards,
--
Matt Moore
M. +61 (0) 423 784 504
matt@...



--
"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous




-- 
Matt Moore
M. +61 (0) 423 784 504
matt@...



 

 

 


 

-- 

Matt Moore
M. +61 (0) 423 784 504
matt@...

 

 

 

--

"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous

 


 

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M. +61 (0) 423 784 504
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Re: Emotions & KM #emotions

Nirmala Palaniappan
 

Lovely post, Matt.
Straight from the heart and incisive. 

This particular statement will remain with me for a long time to come "If we see emotions as the products of individual biology rather than structures and systems that go beyond the individual then we will always have an impoverished view of them."

I think this is an aspect that calls for a lot of introspection

Regards
N

On Fri, 16 Oct 2020, 13:15 Matt Moore, <matt@...> wrote:
So lets talk about fear.

I've just had a skim thru "The Fearless Organization" - and I don't hate it. I think creating psychological safety is important. I read Edmondson's advice and I'm like: sure.

However, if creating a psychologically safe organisation was the most important thing for organisational success, there would be more of them.

Our societies and our organisations are full of fear. We punish those who fail or are simply unlucky. We casually discriminate against or enact pain on others because, well, because it's easy and it gets us what we want. Management books such as "The Fearless Organization" make the removal of fear about acts of individual virtue rather acts of structural change.

For example (and I am about to say something political here), lots of people are afraid to criticise their boss because they are afraid of losing their job because there is no financial safety net for them to do so if they do. So don't say that you are in favor of "fearless organisations" if you are not in favour of structural change that makes this possible. If we see emotions as the products of individual biology rather than structures and systems that go beyond the individual then we will always have an impoverished view of them.

Also - people being "afraid to share their knowledge or that KM activity might lead to reprimands". Often, such fears *are* rational. Because people have seen what happens to those who do. Many managers will trade the long term benefit of trust for the short term kick of a business outcome. And they are rewarded for doing so. We talk about "technical debt" (the present cost of past technical decisions). Perhaps we should also talk about incurring "trust debt" or "fear debt".

Now it's not all doom and gloom. There are places where trust and honesty and caring happen.

But I get a cognitive dissonance verging on whiplash when we move from reading the management literature about what we should do and then seeing (and feeling) what we actually do.


Re: Emotions & KM #emotions

Aprill Allen
 

Matt,

Nailed it. 

On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 at 6:45 pm, Matt Moore <matt@...> wrote:
So lets talk about fear.

I've just had a skim thru "The Fearless Organization" - and I don't hate it. I think creating psychological safety is important. I read Edmondson's advice and I'm like: sure.

However, if creating a psychologically safe organisation was the most important thing for organisational success, there would be more of them.

Our societies and our organisations are full of fear. We punish those who fail or are simply unlucky. We casually discriminate against or enact pain on others because, well, because it's easy and it gets us what we want. Management books such as "The Fearless Organization" make the removal of fear about acts of individual virtue rather acts of structural change.

For example (and I am about to say something political here), lots of people are afraid to criticise their boss because they are afraid of losing their job because there is no financial safety net for them to do so if they do. So don't say that you are in favor of "fearless organisations" if you are not in favour of structural change that makes this possible. If we see emotions as the products of individual biology rather than structures and systems that go beyond the individual then we will always have an impoverished view of them.

Also - people being "afraid to share their knowledge or that KM activity might lead to reprimands". Often, such fears *are* rational. Because people have seen what happens to those who do. Many managers will trade the long term benefit of trust for the short term kick of a business outcome. And they are rewarded for doing so. We talk about "technical debt" (the present cost of past technical decisions). Perhaps we should also talk about incurring "trust debt" or "fear debt".

Now it's not all doom and gloom. There are places where trust and honesty and caring happen.

But I get a cognitive dissonance verging on whiplash when we move from reading the management literature about what we should do and then seeing (and feeling) what we actually do.

--
--

Aprill Allen
Founder and Managing Director | Knowledge Bird
Knowledge management consulting & KCS Trainer
M: +61 400 101 961
knowledgebird.com


Emotions & KM #emotions

Matt Moore
 

So lets talk about fear.

I've just had a skim thru "The Fearless Organization" - and I don't hate it. I think creating psychological safety is important. I read Edmondson's advice and I'm like: sure.

However, if creating a psychologically safe organisation was the most important thing for organisational success, there would be more of them.

Our societies and our organisations are full of fear. We punish those who fail or are simply unlucky. We casually discriminate against or enact pain on others because, well, because it's easy and it gets us what we want. Management books such as "The Fearless Organization" make the removal of fear about acts of individual virtue rather acts of structural change.

For example (and I am about to say something political here), lots of people are afraid to criticise their boss because they are afraid of losing their job because there is no financial safety net for them to do so if they do. So don't say that you are in favor of "fearless organisations" if you are not in favour of structural change that makes this possible. If we see emotions as the products of individual biology rather than structures and systems that go beyond the individual then we will always have an impoverished view of them.

Also - people being "afraid to share their knowledge or that KM activity might lead to reprimands". Often, such fears *are* rational. Because people have seen what happens to those who do. Many managers will trade the long term benefit of trust for the short term kick of a business outcome. And they are rewarded for doing so. We talk about "technical debt" (the present cost of past technical decisions). Perhaps we should also talk about incurring "trust debt" or "fear debt".

Now it's not all doom and gloom. There are places where trust and honesty and caring happen.

But I get a cognitive dissonance verging on whiplash when we move from reading the management literature about what we should do and then seeing (and feeling) what we actually do.


Re: Emotions & KM #emotions

Matt Moore
 

Hello Robert,

I am more persuaded by Barrett's arguments (and less by Ekman's) than you are. I probably have a bias towards contextualist and constructivist arguments so I doubt we are going to agree on that. Not that I agree with everything in Barrett's book (esp. the later chapters where she applied her research). I will check out Emotion and Adaption so thanks for the pointer.

BTW I am not going to stop other people from using terms like "affect" - although I may change my mind on that if it winds Patrick up enough.

My main experience with motivators is that different people are motivated by different things (be they 16 motivators or not). I remember being in a meeting years ago where the KM team were discussing rewards for a knowledge sharing program. And every one came up with a reward that they thought would be motivating to other people (money, recognition, time off, promotion, etc). And they were all different. Big argument. Of course, what everybody was actually revealing was what was motivating to them.

I could write a lot about fear and fearlessness. And I may do - in a future post.

I am also a fan of Damasio (and Andy Clark) and the research that takes a holistic view of mind and body. It is not Descartes who I will be referencing in my talk - but another early modern philosopher. Who? Well, you'll have to turn up and see...

Regards,

Matt

On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 1:41 AM Robert L. Bogue <rbogue@...> wrote:

Trying to catch up on the whole thread at one time…

 

First, my review of How Emotions are Made is at https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2018/10/29/book-review-how-emotions-are-made-the-secret-life-of-the-brain/  You’ll likely note that I’ mot entirely positive about it because I think Barrett interprets things in ways that are contrary to the data at times.  However, I have that same problem with other folks too.  Most notably Charles Duhig (See https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2018/08/06/book-review-the-power-of-habit-why-we-do-what-we-do-in-life-and-business/)  In my opinion Emotion and Adaptation (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2019/04/01/book-review-emotion-and-adaptation/) is a much better book about the relationship between reason and emotion – but it’s a bit more obscure.

 

As for motivators, certainly the carrot and the stick is overdone.  You can see that in Deci’s work on intrinsic motivation (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2020/05/04/book-review-why-we-do-what-we-do/ ) and Pink’s interpretation of it in Drive (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2011/07/11/book-review-drive/) More than that Reiss’ work gives us reason to believe that there are 16 basic motivators for people (See https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2013/03/29/book-review-who-am-i/)  Of course, there’s also Fredrick Hertzberg work from 1968 that explains how motivators work (Hygiene vs. Motivators and the importance of Achievement, Recognition, etc.)

 

I also would say that fear is a powerful and often hidden motivator.  Here I’d look at Amy Edmonson’s work in The Fearless Organization (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2019/06/24/book-review-the-fearless-organization-creating-psychological-safety-in-the-workplace-for-learning-innovation-and-growth/)

 

Patrick, with all that said, I’d argue that the etymology of the word emotion is about movement.  While our current thinking is that emotion means inaction the roots of the word are about creating motion.  I personally like affect but do find it less universally understood.  It gets even more difficult to address conceptualize if you think about negative and positive affect occurring simultaneously.  See this figure from Emotion and Adaptation (referenced earlier) as it refers to Watson and Tellegen’s two-factor structure of affect.

 

 

Matt, I think that there’s been a division for a long time between reason and emotion – one that started with Descartes (See https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2020/06/22/book-review-descartes-error-emotion-reason-and-the-human-brain/) but I think the intersection is around how we motivate change in people to be more open (and trusting) of sharing what they know in organizations.  (See also https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2019/07/03/trust-vulnerability-intimacy-revisited/ for more about the role of trust.)

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Patrick Lambe via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2020 4:32 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Emotions & KM

 

Thanks Nimmy. I was thinking some more about the “mobility” that emotions give us, and went back to a term that is often used in the learning domain instead of emotion, and that’s “affect” - Matt is not enthusiastic about the term because he thinks it too technical to be widely understood, but I like it because it implies a disposition toward action that I think is important, and this is not always very clear when we use the language of emotion. We often talk about emotion as something separate from action but which conditions it - like reasoning. We can stew in our emotions and not do anything. “Affect” on the other hand, pretty much demands a course of action.

 

And if Matt can have “valence”, surely I’m allowed “affect”?

 

P

 

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:                                                    +65 98528511

web:                                                       www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:                                             www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:           www.aithinsoftware.com

 

On 15 Oct 2020, at 4:17 PM, Nirmala Palaniappan <Nirmala.pal@...> wrote:

 

That’s a very useful example, Patrick.

Shifting the emotional frame can shift the interpretive frame and help us reconsider the emotion or even dissolve it. Been there! 

Someone who can quell the fear (or gradients of the emotion ;-)) in the atmosphere (oh, that rhymes!) is an invaluable asset to have in collective discussions.  

 

On Thu, 15 Oct 2020 at 1:24 PM, Patrick Lambe <plambe@...> wrote:

Conjoining the protean nature of emotions with classification schemes is an interesting twist.

 

It implies that shifting the emotional frame can very quickly shift the interpretive frame and that feels absolutely right. I have been in conflict situations where somebody stepped in with humour and grace and calmed everybody down, and it helped us all to see new ways of acting that had appeared closed off while in anger.

 

P

 

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com

<SK18th_Anniv2020_emailfooter (2).jpg>

 

On 15 Oct 2020, at 3:40 PM, Matt Moore <matt@...> wrote:

 

Patrick,

 

"I suppose what I’m saying is that emotions are tangled up with all sorts of other aspects of our personalities and so while this is a fascinating discussion to start, it may not be very simple to bring to a swift close."

 

Absolutely. The book "How Emotions Are Made" (thank you, Stephen) goes into the protean nature of emotion (how they shift based on culture or context) in a lot of detail.

 

And the problem with classification schemes is that they are often good places to start but poor places to end. They can help you make sense of an environment that appears chaotic but in doing so they close off other possibilities and subtleties.

 

Regards,

 

Matt

 

On Thu, Oct 15, 2020 at 5:48 PM Patrick Lambe <plambe@...> wrote:

Hi Matt

 

When I was reading your list of motivators I wondered to what extent a sense of ethics or how we frame and feel about virtues/vices (I’m not entirely sure they are the same things but they seem connected) come into play in evoking emotional responses. 

 

For example, pride is (in my case) a frequent precursor of annoyance. It also helps to diminish the influence of fear. Ethical frames can also condition what patterns of behaviour count as desirable/undesirable. 

 

Playfulness is a good one and has indeed been harnessed in the service of KM (e.g. in gamification), although I fear it is sometimes trivialised as an entertainment layer on top of “serious" tasks. I am absolutely sure you’re familiar with the work of Huizinga. There are strong hints of annoyance in the interactions that Diane Vaughan records in the Challenger launch decision, particularly in relation to the way that the engineer Roger Boisjoly issued his warnings… he had a reputation for being “difficult”.

 

I suppose what I’m saying is that emotions are tangled up with all sorts of other aspects of our personalities and so while this is a fascinating discussion to start, it may not be very simple to bring to a swift close.

 

P

 

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com

<SK18th_Anniv2020_emailfooter (2).jpg>

 

On 15 Oct 2020, at 2:17 PM, Matt Moore <matt@...> wrote:

 

Hi Nimmy,

I am going to agree and disagree.

I absolutely agree that fear and desire are powerful motivators and
that they play roles in knowledge sharing (there's actually a fair bit
of academic writing on this that I really should read properly over
the weekend).

Where I would disagree is that human beings only act from fear or
desire. That sounds like we need to reduce the world to carrots and
sticks. When I look at my own behaviour, I can be motivated by a
frisson of playfulness, a slick of disgust, a pinprick of annoyance, a
hurricane of rage, a pool of boredom, a shock of surprise.

How do we as knowledge managers harness the full range of emotions in
the people that we work with? Or is it all just carrots and sticks?

Regards,

Matt

On Thu, Oct 15, 2020 at 2:43 AM Nirmala Palaniappan
<Nirmala.pal@...> wrote:


Matt,

Glad to be catching up with this discussion.
- I did a session on the Psychology of Knowledge Sharing for the KM Society of Singapore last month and what I covered may be of interest to you and relevant to the topic of discussion
- I began with the assumption that human beings act out of either desire or fear, almost always. I then went on to map these two emotions to three key behaviours - These could be action based on values, action based on convenience or profit-motive and action based on ego/pride
- Values may arise from passion or fear (conditioning). A profit-motive is likely to be driven by desire and ego stems from fear (of losing something or being hurt in some way)
- People who share knowledge or hoard knowledge are likely to be driven by one or more of these three factors (imo)

Hope this helps!
Regards
Nimmy

On Sat, 26 Sep 2020 at 5:04 AM, Matt Moore <matt@...> wrote:


Hi,

So as you will have seen from Stan's email, I will be doing a session
on emotions and KM in later October.

I have started work on the presentation but I'd be interested to hear
thoughts from the community on this topic.

- How do KM and emotion inter-relate?
- What role do emotions (of ourselves, of others) play in the work that we do?
- How are different emotions bound up with knowledge and how do the
impact knowledge creation, knowledge dissemination, and knowledge use?

BTW emotions are a big part of being human but a literature search
reveals only about 10-20 articles on emotion and KM over the last 20
years.

Regards,
--
Matt Moore
M. +61 (0) 423 784 504
matt@...




--
"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous




-- 
Matt Moore
M. +61 (0) 423 784 504
matt@...




 

 

 


 

-- 

Matt Moore
M. +61 (0) 423 784 504
matt@...

 

 

 

--

"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous

 



--
Matt Moore
M. +61 (0) 423 784 504
matt@...


Re: Emotions & KM #emotions

Matt Moore
 

Tom,

"I’m not clear that emotions are what you’re after here, Matt. To what
end does exploring that add to our understanding as practitioners?"

So the high-level answer is: as practitioners we are human beings and
we deal with human beings and emotions shape (and are shaped by) human
behaviour. And you might reply, "well, you could say the same things
about digestion or quantum physics - should practitioners know about
those?" And I would reply: "Probably, but the impact of emotions on
organisational behaviour and interactions are more real and immediate
than that of digestion or quantum physics".

The research on emotions and organisations is now getting quite
extensive: https://oxfordre.com/business/view/10.1093/acrefore/9780190224851.001.0001/acrefore-9780190224851-e-160
And this summary is pretty good on KM and emotions from an academic
perspective: https://scholarspace.manoa.hawaii.edu/bitstream/10125/50401/1/paper0514.pdf

Or to put it another way, the very fact that you have to ask that
question indicates why the session that I am running next week is so
vital (and why you should invite all your colleagues, friends, and
family to attend).

"Seems to me motivation might be a more useful vector, no,
particularly when considering creation, dissemination and reuse."

Motivation is an interesting domain in its own right. And it overlaps
with emotion. But it is separate to it.

Regards,

Matt

On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 11:00 AM Tom Short <tshortconsulting@...> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Matt wrote:

How are different emotions bound up with knowledge and how do they impact knowledge creation, knowledge dissemination, and knowledge use?

I’m not clear that emotions are what you’re after here, Matt. To what end does exploring that add to our understanding as practitioners?

Seems to me motivation might be a more useful vector, no, particularly when considering creation, dissemination and reuse. Each of these presents it’s own challenges for KMers in an enterprise, and I’d posit that each has its own set of levers one can pull to mediate it, particularly when it comes to codifying, sharing and reuse.

--
-Tom
--

Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts

--
Matt Moore
M. +61 (0) 423 784 504
matt@...


Re: Emotions & KM #emotions

Patrick Lambe
 

Lovely, Rob, thank you.

I wouldn't argue for substituting “affect” for “emotion” - in fact, when a field is ripe for discovery and exploration, it’s generally a good idea I think to expand the vocabulary until perceptions settle, and the more ambiguity in the language the better, strangely enough… It forces us to explain and think. So the more language we have, the more expressive we can be, and the more interesting distinctions we can make… ultimately. That’s why I think Matt’s endeavour is quixotic, provocative and worth bouncing around in. 

As for competing affects, well I think we all experience competing bundles of affect/emotion at any given moment. Am I going to laugh or cry? Bristle or brush it off?

P

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com


On 15 Oct 2020, at 10:40 PM, Robert L. Bogue <rbogue@...> wrote:

Trying to catch up on the whole thread at one time…
 
First, my review of How Emotions are Made is at https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2018/10/29/book-review-how-emotions-are-made-the-secret-life-of-the-brain/  You’ll likely note that I’ mot entirely positive about it because I think Barrett interprets things in ways that are contrary to the data at times.  However, I have that same problem with other folks too.  Most notably Charles Duhig (See https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2018/08/06/book-review-the-power-of-habit-why-we-do-what-we-do-in-life-and-business/)  In my opinion Emotion and Adaptation (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2019/04/01/book-review-emotion-and-adaptation/) is a much better book about the relationship between reason and emotion – but it’s a bit more obscure.
 
As for motivators, certainly the carrot and the stick is overdone.  You can see that in Deci’s work on intrinsic motivation (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2020/05/04/book-review-why-we-do-what-we-do/ ) and Pink’s interpretation of it in Drive (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2011/07/11/book-review-drive/) More than that Reiss’ work gives us reason to believe that there are 16 basic motivators for people (See https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2013/03/29/book-review-who-am-i/)  Of course, there’s also Fredrick Hertzberg work from 1968 that explains how motivators work (Hygiene vs. Motivators and the importance of Achievement, Recognition, etc.)
 
I also would say that fear is a powerful and often hidden motivator.  Here I’d look at Amy Edmonson’s work in The Fearless Organization (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2019/06/24/book-review-the-fearless-organization-creating-psychological-safety-in-the-workplace-for-learning-innovation-and-growth/)
 
Patrick, with all that said, I’d argue that the etymology of the word emotion is about movement.  While our current thinking is that emotion means inaction the roots of the word are about creating motion.  I personally like affect but do find it less universally understood.  It gets even more difficult to address conceptualize if you think about negative and positive affect occurring simultaneously.  See this figure from Emotion and Adaptation (referenced earlier) as it refers to Watson and Tellegen’s two-factor structure of affect.
 
<image002.png>
 
Matt, I think that there’s been a division for a long time between reason and emotion – one that started with Descartes (See https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2020/06/22/book-review-descartes-error-emotion-reason-and-the-human-brain/) but I think the intersection is around how we motivate change in people to be more open (and trusting) of sharing what they know in organizations.  (See also https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2019/07/03/trust-vulnerability-intimacy-revisited/ for more about the role of trust.)
 
Rob
 
-------------------
Robert L. Bogue
O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog
Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com
Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)
 
From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Patrick Lambe via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2020 4:32 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Emotions & KM
 
Thanks Nimmy. I was thinking some more about the “mobility” that emotions give us, and went back to a term that is often used in the learning domain instead of emotion, and that’s “affect” - Matt is not enthusiastic about the term because he thinks it too technical to be widely understood, but I like it because it implies a disposition toward action that I think is important, and this is not always very clear when we use the language of emotion. We often talk about emotion as something separate from action but which conditions it - like reasoning. We can stew in our emotions and not do anything. “Affect” on the other hand, pretty much demands a course of action.
 
And if Matt can have “valence”, surely I’m allowed “affect”?
 
P
 
Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:                                                    +65 98528511

web:                                                       www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:                                             www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:           www.aithinsoftware.com

<image001.jpg>
 
On 15 Oct 2020, at 4:17 PM, Nirmala Palaniappan <Nirmala.pal@...> wrote:
 
That’s a very useful example, Patrick.
Shifting the emotional frame can shift the interpretive frame and help us reconsider the emotion or even dissolve it. Been there! 
Someone who can quell the fear (or gradients of the emotion ;-)) in the atmosphere (oh, that rhymes!) is an invaluable asset to have in collective discussions.  
 
On Thu, 15 Oct 2020 at 1:24 PM, Patrick Lambe <plambe@...> wrote:
Conjoining the protean nature of emotions with classification schemes is an interesting twist.
 
It implies that shifting the emotional frame can very quickly shift the interpretive frame and that feels absolutely right. I have been in conflict situations where somebody stepped in with humour and grace and calmed everybody down, and it helped us all to see new ways of acting that had appeared closed off while in anger.
 
P
 
Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com

<SK18th_Anniv2020_emailfooter (2).jpg> 
 
On 15 Oct 2020, at 3:40 PM, Matt Moore <matt@...> wrote:
 
Patrick,
 
"I suppose what I’m saying is that emotions are tangled up with all sorts of other aspects of our personalities and so while this is a fascinating discussion to start, it may not be very simple to bring to a swift close."
 
Absolutely. The book "How Emotions Are Made" (thank you, Stephen) goes into the protean nature of emotion (how they shift based on culture or context) in a lot of detail.
 
And the problem with classification schemes is that they are often good places to start but poor places to end. They can help you make sense of an environment that appears chaotic but in doing so they close off other possibilities and subtleties.
 
Regards,
 
Matt
 
On Thu, Oct 15, 2020 at 5:48 PM Patrick Lambe <plambe@...> wrote:
Hi Matt
 
When I was reading your list of motivators I wondered to what extent a sense of ethics or how we frame and feel about virtues/vices (I’m not entirely sure they are the same things but they seem connected) come into play in evoking emotional responses. 
 
For example, pride is (in my case) a frequent precursor of annoyance. It also helps to diminish the influence of fear. Ethical frames can also condition what patterns of behaviour count as desirable/undesirable. 
 
Playfulness is a good one and has indeed been harnessed in the service of KM (e.g. in gamification), although I fear it is sometimes trivialised as an entertainment layer on top of “serious" tasks. I am absolutely sure you’re familiar with the work of Huizinga. There are strong hints of annoyance in the interactions that Diane Vaughan records in the Challenger launch decision, particularly in relation to the way that the engineer Roger Boisjoly issued his warnings… he had a reputation for being “difficult”.
 
I suppose what I’m saying is that emotions are tangled up with all sorts of other aspects of our personalities and so while this is a fascinating discussion to start, it may not be very simple to bring to a swift close.
 
P
 
Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com

<SK18th_Anniv2020_emailfooter (2).jpg>
 
On 15 Oct 2020, at 2:17 PM, Matt Moore <matt@...> wrote:
 
Hi Nimmy,

I am going to agree and disagree.

I absolutely agree that fear and desire are powerful motivators and
that they play roles in knowledge sharing (there's actually a fair bit
of academic writing on this that I really should read properly over
the weekend).

Where I would disagree is that human beings only act from fear or
desire. That sounds like we need to reduce the world to carrots and
sticks. When I look at my own behaviour, I can be motivated by a
frisson of playfulness, a slick of disgust, a pinprick of annoyance, a
hurricane of rage, a pool of boredom, a shock of surprise.

How do we as knowledge managers harness the full range of emotions in
the people that we work with? Or is it all just carrots and sticks?

Regards,

Matt

On Thu, Oct 15, 2020 at 2:43 AM Nirmala Palaniappan
<Nirmala.pal@...> wrote:


Matt,

Glad to be catching up with this discussion.
- I did a session on the Psychology of Knowledge Sharing for the KM Society of Singapore last month and what I covered may be of interest to you and relevant to the topic of discussion
- I began with the assumption that human beings act out of either desire or fear, almost always. I then went on to map these two emotions to three key behaviours - These could be action based on values, action based on convenience or profit-motive and action based on ego/pride
- Values may arise from passion or fear (conditioning). A profit-motive is likely to be driven by desire and ego stems from fear (of losing something or being hurt in some way)
- People who share knowledge or hoard knowledge are likely to be driven by one or more of these three factors (imo)

Hope this helps!
Regards
Nimmy

On Sat, 26 Sep 2020 at 5:04 AM, Matt Moore <matt@...> wrote:


Hi,

So as you will have seen from Stan's email, I will be doing a session
on emotions and KM in later October.

I have started work on the presentation but I'd be interested to hear
thoughts from the community on this topic.

- How do KM and emotion inter-relate?
- What role do emotions (of ourselves, of others) play in the work that we do?
- How are different emotions bound up with knowledge and how do the
impact knowledge creation, knowledge dissemination, and knowledge use?

BTW emotions are a big part of being human but a literature search
reveals only about 10-20 articles on emotion and KM over the last 20
years.

Regards,
--
Matt Moore
M. +61 (0) 423 784 504
matt@...




--
"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous




-- 
Matt Moore
M. +61 (0) 423 784 504
matt@...




 
 
 

 
-- 
Matt Moore
M. +61 (0) 423 784 504
matt@...
 
 
 
-- 
"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous
 



Re: Emotions & KM #emotions

 
Edited

Matt wrote: 

How are different emotions bound up with knowledge and how do they impact knowledge creation, knowledge dissemination, and knowledge use?
I’m not clear that emotions are what you’re after here, Matt. To what end does exploring that add to our understanding as practitioners?

Seems to me motivation might be a more useful vector, no, particularly when considering creation, dissemination and reuse. Each of these presents it’s own challenges for KMers in an enterprise, and I’d posit that each has its own set of levers one can pull to mediate it, particularly when it comes to codifying, sharing and reuse.

--
-Tom
--

Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts


Re: KM ROI #value #question

Murray Jennex
 

we statistically validated the following set of KM success measures:

Impact on business processes (6 measures):
1.         Improved the efficiency of the supported processes
2.         Reduced costs for the supported business process
3.         Positive return on investment for the supported processes
4.         Improved the effectiveness of the supported processes
5.         Improved decision making in the supported processes
6.         Improved resource allocation in the supported process
Impact on KM Strategy (4 measures):
1.         Changes to the organization’s KM goals
2.         Creation or modification of knowledge related key performance indicators (KPIs)
3.         Changes to the way the organization assessed knowledge use in the organization
4.         Changes in the organization’s incentives for using and sharing knowledge
Leadership/Management Support (4 measures):
1.         Increased verbal/political support for KM by top management
2.         Increased financial support for KM by top management
3.         Increased awareness of KM by top management
4.         Increased use/reliance on KM by top management
Knowledge Content (3 measures)
1.         Increased use or intention to use of knowledge content
2.         Increased identification of needed knowledge content and knowledge content sources
3.         Increased demand and/or searching for knowledge content

thanks....murray jennex, 

-----Original Message-----
From: Sachin Joshi <sachinjoshi.a@...>
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Oct 15, 2020 7:08 am
Subject: [SIKM] KM ROI #question

Hello all, this is my first post on this very insightful forum/group.

I am KM consultant in IT organization. We implement and monitor lot of good KM practices in our teams. We also see good benefits of all these, unfortunately showcasing them as quantitative benefits is always a challenge (I am talking about benefits such as reduction in xxxx, improvement in xxxx and so on... not about quantitative KM dashboard data such as no. of SMEs, no. of posts, no. of assets, no. of sessions, etc.).

The question which is always asked on KM performance is, what is the benefit. Change in culture, improvement in collaborating, creation of assets, etc. is not an answer to this. since this is just an output but not measure of benefit/success. Can someone share, how we can correlate KM with business benefits OR how can we show return on investment in KM. Thank you.


Re: How are we managing the knowledge shared in this group? #curation #expertise-location #profiles

Stan Garfield
 

Chuck, thanks for your post. Here are my thoughts. What do you and the other community members think?

>How are we managing the knowledge shared in this group?

There are three main ways of making discussions more findable in our community:
  1. Maintain separate threads for separate discussions. That is why I moved your query to a separate topic. You can start a new thread by clicking "New Topic" in the left menu.
  2. Use understandable and easily-searched-for topics when starting new threads. In other words, avoid topics such as "Question" or other generic or ambiguous language.
  3. Apply unique hashtags to threads. Reuse existing hashtags as much as possible. Carefully and thoughtfully create new ones when needed.
There is a searchable database containing a list of previous monthly calls with links to the summaries of each call. Most slide decks are in SlideShare or in the files of this group. Recordings since 2016 are in FreeConferenceCall.com. Twitter chat transcripts are in Wakelet. All of these are linked to in the call summaries. There are other files, photos, and a wiki that also contain content.

>Have we given any thought to cataloging it, applying any tools to make it more useful and easy to navigate?

As community manager I do the following:
  1. Maintain the monthly call database.
  2. Add hashtags to threads as needed.
  3. Merge threads as needed.
All members are welcome to help catalog and curate the content in our community. If you know of tools that can help with this, feel free to try applying them to the threaded discussions. I have exported the conversations at the request of the community champions, and I am glad to do this for others. Lee Romero has worked with the exported data, so it would be good to connect with him to learn about his experience.

Specific suggestions for helping with curation include:
  1. Search the archive of messages for important keywords and apply hashtags to make the content easier to discover.
  2. Create wiki pages for key topics with annotated lists of links to relevant threads.
  3. Publish blog posts, presentations, and articles summarizing important discussions in our community.
>There’s a lot of experience and advice buried in the thousands of emails in groups.io

There a several ways to access the knowledge stored in this community:
  1. Search messages, files, photos, databases, and the wiki.
  2. Curate content by linking to it from blogs, articles, and other sites. I do this regularly in my blog posts.
  3. Add hashtags to previous threads. I did this today with the #value hashtag by searching messages for value, ROI, impact, and "business case" and tagging the threads I found.
>Not sure if we still also have access to the Yahoo group that preceded it.

All of the content from the Yahoo group was migrated to this group and is available and searchable. I manually updated all of the links to the monthly call summaries, files, photos, and attachments. Since our community was started in 2005, the only content that is unavailable are some of the recordings for past calls that were uploaded to DivShare and lost when that service ceased operations.


How are we managing the knowledge shared in this group? #curation #expertise-location #profiles

Stan Garfield
 
Edited

I moved this out of the Emotions & KM thread so that it can have its own separate topic.


---------- Original message ---------
From: Chuck Georgo <chuck@...>
Date: Thu, Oct 15, 2020 at 11:06 AM

So here’s an interesting question...how are we “managing” the knowledge shared in this group? (other than hashtags)

 Have we given any thought to cataloging it, applying any tools to make it more useful and easy to navigate? There’s a lot of experience and advice buried in the thousands of emails in groups.io (not sure if we still also have access to the yahoo group that preceded it). 

Just wondering...thanks 

  Chuck Georgo, CKM, CPT, CCRO
  Executive Director
 
 515 Camp Meade Rd #556
 Linthicum, MD 21090

 Website:
www.nowheretohide.org


Re: KM ROI #value #question

Stan Garfield
 

Sachin, welcome to the community!  And thanks for posting here.

For previous discussions on this topic, see the threads with the #value hashtag.

See also:


Re: KM ROI #value #question

Nirmala Palaniappan
 

Hi Sachin,

There are, as Tom indicates, many ways of approaching this. Here is a fundamental list of business parameters that KM can be mapped to. 

1. Productivity improvement - Is there a business area where productivity is a concern? If so, is it because of something related to how new knowledge is created, transferred, applied or reused? 
2. Competency improvement - Is there a business area where there is a significant percentage of new hires who need to go through an exhaustive induction and competency building activities? How can collective knowledge be leveraged to achieve this, in addition to conventional training?
3. Cycle time reduction - Are there processes that are taking too long and is it because of a gap in how knowledge associated with it is created, consolidated, transferred or applied? 
4. Response time reduction - Is there a customer-facing process that can be improved by reducing the time it takes to resolve a problem that is reported? How can knowledge be better captured, shared and reused to contribute to this objective? 
5. Cost reduction - Are there business areas where we are reinventing the wheel and therefore unwittingly increasing the expenses? Can we leverage on best practices, knowledge sharing and communities to reuse knowledge and save money?
6. Innovation - How can we create teams and communities to create a new revenue-generating opportunity for the business or adopt radically different ways of solving nagging problems? 

Hope this helps! 

Regards
Nirmala 

On Thu, 15 Oct 2020 at 7:38 PM, Sachin Joshi <sachinjoshi.a@...> wrote:
Hello all, this is my first post on this very insightful forum/group.

I am KM consultant in IT organization. We implement and monitor lot of good KM practices in our teams. We also see good benefits of all these, unfortunately showcasing them as quantitative benefits is always a challenge (I am talking about benefits such as reduction in xxxx, improvement in xxxx and so on... not about quantitative KM dashboard data such as no. of SMEs, no. of posts, no. of assets, no. of sessions, etc.).

The question which is always asked on KM performance is, what is the benefit. Change in culture, improvement in collaborating, creation of assets, etc. is not an answer to this. since this is just an output but not measure of benefit/success. Can someone share, how we can correlate KM with business benefits OR how can we show return on investment in KM. Thank you.

--
"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous


Re: KM ROI #value #question

Nick Milton
 

Hi Sachin

 

You can find some survey data about KM benefits in the following blog post

http://www.nickmilton.com/2020/03/what-measurable-benefits-can-you-get.html

 

The blog also contains 140 case histories of quantified KM value

http://www.nickmilton.com/search/label/quantified

 

We wrote a newsletter on the topic of KM ROI back in 2012 on KM and ROI which you can find here, and which explains ways in which KM ROI can be calculated

https://www.knoco.com/Knoco%20newsletter%20october%202012.pdf

 

Hope these resources help

 

Nick Milton

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sachin Joshi
Sent: 15 October 2020 15:08
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] KM ROI #question

 

Hello all, this is my first post on this very insightful forum/group.

I am KM consultant in IT organization. We implement and monitor lot of good KM practices in our teams. We also see good benefits of all these, unfortunately showcasing them as quantitative benefits is always a challenge (I am talking about benefits such as reduction in xxxx, improvement in xxxx and so on... not about quantitative KM dashboard data such as no. of SMEs, no. of posts, no. of assets, no. of sessions, etc.).

The question which is always asked on KM performance is, what is the benefit. Change in culture, improvement in collaborating, creation of assets, etc. is not an answer to this. since this is just an output but not measure of benefit/success. Can someone share, how we can correlate KM with business benefits OR how can we show return on investment in KM. Thank you.


Re: KM ROI #value #question

Carol H. Tucker
 

One thing that I have always noted is that it is a harder sell to implement a dedicated KM program to small business owners as opposed to larger organizations.  I have always espoused, therefore, "stealth KM" where you incorporate good practices into everyday processes and procedures rather than try to pitch a new program with a dedicated staff.

-- 
Carol H. Tucker

"I only care about the words that flutter from your mind. They are the only thing you truly own. The only thing I will remember you by. I will not fall in love with your bones and skin. I will not fall in love with the places you have been. I will not fall in love with anything but the words that flutter from your Extraordinary Mind."
~ Andre Jordan


Re: KM ROI #value #question

 

Hello Sachin, 

At GE Renewable Energy, we come up with the following business metric to justify the investment for the KM program which is "Cost avoidance in productivity in terms of saved engineering hours and mitigated risks" when reusing solutions to previously solved problems or issues (non-conformance, poor quality,...) 

The key elements to enable the calculation are:

1- solve problems.
2- retain your solutions with proper taxonomy,
3- Make the solutions discoverable and searchable (we call it 'critical knowledge finder')
4- measure the reuse or application of these solutions.
5- Recognize and reward the contributors. 

Thank you

Rachad 
 


Re: KM ROI #value #question

Tim Powell
 

Hi Joshi,

 

This is my first post here too.  Excellent and timely question, one that I’m sure will come up often now that (from what I hear) major cutbacks are underway in some IT/KM shops.  This happens during every recession – and bothered me so much that I wrote a new book The Value of Knowledge to address it:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A791Ujybg5Y&t=5s

 

In that 10-minute video, there are listed some initial ideas, as well as several free resources that may help you.  If you already have the book, it’s all in Chapter 5.  Sorry for the commercial pitch but this is honestly the best answer I can give you.

 

I draw on Drucker and lots of others – but Nick Milton and Patrick Lambe’s Knowledge Manager’s Handbook was especially helpful to me, particularly Chapter 9.  Their simple but effective “benefits mapping” technique (which I cite in my own work) is a way to ensure what I call “strategic impact” for knowledge initiatives – i.e., making sure that you measure not only the OUTPUTS of your work, but also the results, OUTCOMES, and impact (as you mention.) 

 

My experience has been that, in general, knowledge professionals are far more comfortable and competent at doing their work than in explaining it to their CFO and CEO at budget cut time.  (Or, ideally, long before that.)  As an MBA by training, my personal mission is to help them do just that.

 

I also generally agree with Tom Short’s comments in this thread.

 

Hope this helps, and good luck,

 

Tim

 

TIM WOOD POWELL | President, The Knowledge Agency® | Author, The Value of Knowledge

DIRECT/MOBILE +1.212.243.1200 | ZOOM 212-243-1200

SITE www.KnowledgeAgency.com | BLOG www.KnowledgeValueChain.com

 

 

From: <main@SIKM.groups.io> on behalf of Sachin Joshi <sachinjoshi.a@...>
Reply-To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, October 15, 2020 at 10:09 AM
To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Subject: [SIKM] KM ROI #question

 

Hello all, this is my first post on this very insightful forum/group.

I am KM consultant in IT organization. We implement and monitor lot of good KM practices in our teams. We also see good benefits of all these, unfortunately showcasing them as quantitative benefits is always a challenge (I am talking about benefits such as reduction in xxxx, improvement in xxxx and so on... not about quantitative KM dashboard data such as no. of SMEs, no. of posts, no. of assets, no. of sessions, etc.).

The question which is always asked on KM performance is, what is the benefit. Change in culture, improvement in collaborating, creation of assets, etc. is not an answer to this. since this is just an output but not measure of benefit/success. Can someone share, how we can correlate KM with business benefits OR how can we show return on investment in KM. Thank you.

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