Date   

Job Opening: Knowledge Manager in Mumbai #jobs

Stan Garfield
 

From Susan Inman, Global Director of Knowledge Management at L.E.K. Consulting: "We are looking for a Knowledge Manager in Mumbai to lead our Knowledge Management team for the Asia Pac region. If you have the necessary qualifications coupled with the drive to be part of a fast paced organization, apply here."


Knowledge Management: Each man is my superior in that I may learn from him." #learning

 

2021 provides an oppty to leverage what we can learn from others-better. Grateful if you would check out my latest article: Knowledge Management: Each man is my superior in that I may learn from him.” https://linkedin.com/pulse/knowledge-management-each-man-my-superior-i-may-learn-bill-kaplan

 

Watching CBS Sunday Morning today and it got me thinking about this through a KM lense.

 

Best

 

Bill

 

  

 

Learn more about the solutions and value we provide at www.workingknowledge-csp.com

 


Job Opening - Senior Knowledge Management Officer #jobs

Stan Garfield
 

Senior Knowledge Management Officer
AlignMNH
Baltimore, MD or Washington, DC
https://jobs-jhpiego.icims.com/jobs/4072/job


Re: Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

Nirmala Palaniappan
 

Hi David,

You’ve already received some excellent answers and pointers. Here are some insights and suggestions I am happy to share. Hope you find these to be useful and relevant to your business environment 

  1. As far as possible, it is a good idea to extend and enhance existing systems to capture lessons learned on the go as opposed to setting up a separate technology platform. For example, if you have a product management system or a CRM platform, it may be more effective to upgrade/customise them to include lessons learned 
  2. If you have no option to customise existing systems and are setting up a separate system, do integrate it with existing systems and bring it under a common search umbrella 
  3. Conduct brainstorming sessions with subject matter experts and key users to decide on the metadata for lessons learned. Map it to the processes, type of knowledge, expected benefits, whether it is conceptual or practical, time frame and so on
  4. To add to Nick’s excellent input regarding embedding lessons learned into procedures, processes, checklists etc, you could include a status box in the lessons learned platform and archive those that have been institutionalised and converted into a “habit”
  5. If your organisation enjoys video-based learning, do remember that it is not always necessary to document lessons learned in a conventional manner. Some lessons learned can be curated into an impactful video 
  6. If you can afford it, have content writers work on polishing and making the lessons learned consumable and enjoyable 
  7. Create and provide a lot of sample templates to bring in at least some amount of standardisation of content 
  8. Doing #7 might help you leverage on Machine Learning/NLP algorithms to discover patterns, analyse them and use them as inputs for decision-making/Management 
  9. If feasible, identify and employ champions and give them the responsibility of “managing” lessons learned in business critical and/or evolving areas. Engage them in curating and assisting in the application of lessons learned in the said areas 
  10. Get creative in the way you brand the initiative/programme and make it enjoyable and rewarding (though, it seems like your colleagues don’t particularly need encouragement in submitting lessons learned)

If you would like to discuss this or have further queries, please do not hesitate.

Regards
Nirmala 

On Fri, 8 Jan 2021 at 5:43 PM, Chris Collison <chris.collison@...> wrote:

Fully agree with you regarding the ‘clearing house’ concept Nick, and great chapter by the way.

  

The perfect lessons learned database is an empty one – and conversely, a library of lessons which are starting to gather dust is an indicator of a failure of organisational learning. 

 

I wonder if we need a metaphor with in which lessons have a shorter shelf-life and are a means to an end rather than an end in themselves…    A lessons learned larder perhaps?

 

Chris Collison

Knowledgeable Ltd

Author of the KM Cookbook

@chris_collison

 

 

 

From: <main@SIKM.groups.io> on behalf of Nick Milton <nick.milton@...>
Reply to: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Date: Friday, 8 January 2021 at 08:59
To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessonslearned

 

David, the best way to deal with massive numbers of lessons, is to embed them into guidance and best practice. You may have hundreds of lessons now, in a few years you will have thousands, and asking people to sift through these, resolving contradictions, sorting through repeat and duplicate lessons, becomes completely impractical.

 

If you look at organisations which are successful in lesson learning, such as NASA, the Oil Sector, the Military etc, you see that the lessons database (or lessons management system) is not the final repository of the lessons, but is a clearing house, directing the lessons to the subject matter experts who will embed them into procedure, process, guidance and doctrine. The lessons management system only holds those lessons which are still in process of being learned, and once that lesson is embedded into working practice it can be considered “learned” and removed from the system.

 

Project managers therefore only really need to follow the updated guidance, into which the lessons are embedded, rather than sifting through hundreds or thousands of entries.

 

You can find more details of this approach on my blog (here for example), and in my book “The Lesson Learned handbook”. The attached article may also be useful.

 

Nick Milton
Knoco Ltd
www.knoco.com

blog  www.nickmilton.com

twitter @nickknoco

Author of the recent book - "The Knowledge Manager’s Handbook"

 

"Ambition without knowledge is like a boat on dry land." 
--Mark Lee

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of David Graffagna
Sent: 07 January 2021 16:53
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessonslearned

 

Hello all,

 

As I have mentioned in previous messages, my KM Team has a number of work-in-progress efforts aimed at enhancing our overall knowledge sharing environment. One of our targets for this year is a focus on a more standard approach to soliciting, gathering, capturing and providing access to key lessons learned from variety of projects and initiatives.

 

My question to this group regards your knowledge and insight around the storage of those lessons learned and providing access to lessons learned/insights for a broad audience to tap into and consume. Let me set the context so you have a sense of where our challenges lie.

 

Our primary source for lessons learned typically comes from significant, cross-function, multi-year projects … so numerous people involved, a wide variety of functional areas participating, and broad range of potential knowledge areas for learning. Over the past months we have worked with a handful of project managers in soliciting lessons from their project team members as part of the project wrap-up/closeout; helping us get a sense of the breadth and depth of what those teams learned during their initiative.

 

Frankly, the volume and value of what we have received back is beyond our initial expectations. The team members, individually or in small functional groups, have been great in answering the standard set of questions we have crafted and capturing replies in the format we have provided (Excel for now). One team, for example, consisting of 15 individuals provided us with more than 70 individual “line items” of lessons learned on anything from budget/finance, communications, design & development, marketing/commercialization, production planning, risk mitigation … and on and on across a long list of knowledge areas and activities. Currently, from six projects we’ve ‘tested’ we have over 500 lessons learned, but grouped (and captured) specific to each particular project.

 

Here's one of my biggest challenges … if we have hundreds of lessons learned what’s the best way of capturing and sharing (e.g., making them accessible) those without overwhelming our audiences … while making it easy for them to find the right lesson in the right context?

 

So, bottom line … would love to know good, effective approaches you’ve seen around capturing and sharing those lessons. What have you seen around lessons learned from broad-ranging projects?

 

Looking forward to hearing your thoughts and insights!

 

Best regards,

 

David Graffagna

--
"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous


Re: Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

Chris Collison
 

Fully agree with you regarding the ‘clearing house’ concept Nick, and great chapter by the way.

  

The perfect lessons learned database is an empty one – and conversely, a library of lessons which are starting to gather dust is an indicator of a failure of organisational learning. 

 

I wonder if we need a metaphor with in which lessons have a shorter shelf-life and are a means to an end rather than an end in themselves…    A lessons learned larder perhaps?

 

Chris Collison

Knowledgeable Ltd

Author of the KM Cookbook

@chris_collison

 

 

 

From: <main@SIKM.groups.io> on behalf of Nick Milton <nick.milton@...>
Reply to: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Date: Friday, 8 January 2021 at 08:59
To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessonslearned

 

David, the best way to deal with massive numbers of lessons, is to embed them into guidance and best practice. You may have hundreds of lessons now, in a few years you will have thousands, and asking people to sift through these, resolving contradictions, sorting through repeat and duplicate lessons, becomes completely impractical.

 

If you look at organisations which are successful in lesson learning, such as NASA, the Oil Sector, the Military etc, you see that the lessons database (or lessons management system) is not the final repository of the lessons, but is a clearing house, directing the lessons to the subject matter experts who will embed them into procedure, process, guidance and doctrine. The lessons management system only holds those lessons which are still in process of being learned, and once that lesson is embedded into working practice it can be considered “learned” and removed from the system.

 

Project managers therefore only really need to follow the updated guidance, into which the lessons are embedded, rather than sifting through hundreds or thousands of entries.

 

You can find more details of this approach on my blog (here for example), and in my book “The Lesson Learned handbook”. The attached article may also be useful.

 

Nick Milton
Knoco Ltd
www.knoco.com

blog  www.nickmilton.com

twitter @nickknoco

Author of the recent book - "The Knowledge Manager’s Handbook"

 

"Ambition without knowledge is like a boat on dry land." 
--Mark Lee

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of David Graffagna
Sent: 07 January 2021 16:53
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessonslearned

 

Hello all,

 

As I have mentioned in previous messages, my KM Team has a number of work-in-progress efforts aimed at enhancing our overall knowledge sharing environment. One of our targets for this year is a focus on a more standard approach to soliciting, gathering, capturing and providing access to key lessons learned from variety of projects and initiatives.

 

My question to this group regards your knowledge and insight around the storage of those lessons learned and providing access to lessons learned/insights for a broad audience to tap into and consume. Let me set the context so you have a sense of where our challenges lie.

 

Our primary source for lessons learned typically comes from significant, cross-function, multi-year projects … so numerous people involved, a wide variety of functional areas participating, and broad range of potential knowledge areas for learning. Over the past months we have worked with a handful of project managers in soliciting lessons from their project team members as part of the project wrap-up/closeout; helping us get a sense of the breadth and depth of what those teams learned during their initiative.

 

Frankly, the volume and value of what we have received back is beyond our initial expectations. The team members, individually or in small functional groups, have been great in answering the standard set of questions we have crafted and capturing replies in the format we have provided (Excel for now). One team, for example, consisting of 15 individuals provided us with more than 70 individual “line items” of lessons learned on anything from budget/finance, communications, design & development, marketing/commercialization, production planning, risk mitigation … and on and on across a long list of knowledge areas and activities. Currently, from six projects we’ve ‘tested’ we have over 500 lessons learned, but grouped (and captured) specific to each particular project.

 

Here's one of my biggest challenges … if we have hundreds of lessons learned what’s the best way of capturing and sharing (e.g., making them accessible) those without overwhelming our audiences … while making it easy for them to find the right lesson in the right context?

 

So, bottom line … would love to know good, effective approaches you’ve seen around capturing and sharing those lessons. What have you seen around lessons learned from broad-ranging projects?

 

Looking forward to hearing your thoughts and insights!

 

Best regards,

 

David Graffagna


Re: Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

Moria Levy
 

David

I have developed and implemented, over a dozen of times, a methodology for managing lessons, dealing also with the storgae and accessibility issues.
In a few sentences:
a. The lessons are extracted from the document, and a process takes places generalizing them, writing them accoarding to some rules and merging them with existing lessons.
b. They are written into a knowledgebase of lessons, including the lessons with their rational, meta-data, links to the debriefing documents and supplemental info.
c. The lessons knowledgebase is designed to be integrated in the organizational environment in cultural, processes, computting and physical matters.
The full methodology can bre found in  a book descrining it: https://www.amazon.com/Holistic-Approach-Lessons-Learned-Organizations/dp/1138564761#ace-g9859629705
I got positice feedbacks form colleagues woldwide as to this methodology.
If you have any specific questions- please adress me here or directly (moria@...) and I will be happy to explain/answer any issue concerning.
Moria


Re: Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

Nick Milton
 

David, the best way to deal with massive numbers of lessons, is to embed them into guidance and best practice. You may have hundreds of lessons now, in a few years you will have thousands, and asking people to sift through these, resolving contradictions, sorting through repeat and duplicate lessons, becomes completely impractical.

 

If you look at organisations which are successful in lesson learning, such as NASA, the Oil Sector, the Military etc, you see that the lessons database (or lessons management system) is not the final repository of the lessons, but is a clearing house, directing the lessons to the subject matter experts who will embed them into procedure, process, guidance and doctrine. The lessons management system only holds those lessons which are still in process of being learned, and once that lesson is embedded into working practice it can be considered “learned” and removed from the system.

 

Project managers therefore only really need to follow the updated guidance, into which the lessons are embedded, rather than sifting through hundreds or thousands of entries.

 

You can find more details of this approach on my blog (here for example), and in my book “The Lesson Learned handbook”. The attached article may also be useful.

 

Nick Milton
Knoco Ltd
www.knoco.com

blog  www.nickmilton.com

twitter @nickknoco

Author of the recent book - "The Knowledge Manager’s Handbook"

 

"Ambition without knowledge is like a boat on dry land." 
--Mark Lee

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of David Graffagna
Sent: 07 January 2021 16:53
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessonslearned

 

Hello all,

 

As I have mentioned in previous messages, my KM Team has a number of work-in-progress efforts aimed at enhancing our overall knowledge sharing environment. One of our targets for this year is a focus on a more standard approach to soliciting, gathering, capturing and providing access to key lessons learned from variety of projects and initiatives.

 

My question to this group regards your knowledge and insight around the storage of those lessons learned and providing access to lessons learned/insights for a broad audience to tap into and consume. Let me set the context so you have a sense of where our challenges lie.

 

Our primary source for lessons learned typically comes from significant, cross-function, multi-year projects … so numerous people involved, a wide variety of functional areas participating, and broad range of potential knowledge areas for learning. Over the past months we have worked with a handful of project managers in soliciting lessons from their project team members as part of the project wrap-up/closeout; helping us get a sense of the breadth and depth of what those teams learned during their initiative.

 

Frankly, the volume and value of what we have received back is beyond our initial expectations. The team members, individually or in small functional groups, have been great in answering the standard set of questions we have crafted and capturing replies in the format we have provided (Excel for now). One team, for example, consisting of 15 individuals provided us with more than 70 individual “line items” of lessons learned on anything from budget/finance, communications, design & development, marketing/commercialization, production planning, risk mitigation … and on and on across a long list of knowledge areas and activities. Currently, from six projects we’ve ‘tested’ we have over 500 lessons learned, but grouped (and captured) specific to each particular project.

 

Here's one of my biggest challenges … if we have hundreds of lessons learned what’s the best way of capturing and sharing (e.g., making them accessible) those without overwhelming our audiences … while making it easy for them to find the right lesson in the right context?

 

So, bottom line … would love to know good, effective approaches you’ve seen around capturing and sharing those lessons. What have you seen around lessons learned from broad-ranging projects?

 

Looking forward to hearing your thoughts and insights!

 

Best regards,

 

David Graffagna


Re: Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

Joitske Hulsebosch
 

Hi David, I wonder if you know the 5 types of knowledge transfer of Nancy Dixon? she states that you need different things for different types of transfer. Here's summary on my blog: https://joitskehulsebosch.blogspot.com/2005/12/communities-of-practice-nancy-dixon-on.html

For instance when you want to transfer lesson om more complex project it is good to use an advisory approach where one team advises the other. 


Re: Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

Gabriela Fitz
 

Hi David:

I am wondering if you would be willing to share the standard set of questions you have been using to solicit the lessons learned? I would be super interested.

Best
Gabi

On Thu, Jan 7, 2021 at 1:56 PM Stan Garfield <stangarfield@...> wrote:
David, thanks for your post.  In addition to the excellent responses from Tom and Dennis, these resources may also be helpful:



--

Gabriela Fitz

Think Twice LLC

773.882.8250 | LinkedIn

www.thinktwicellc.com


Preferred Pronouns: she/her/hers





Re: Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

Stan Garfield
 

David, thanks for your post.  In addition to the excellent responses from Tom and Dennis, these resources may also be helpful:


Re: Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

Dennis Pearce
 

Hi David,

A while back I did a multi-part series of blog posts on Lessons Learned, based on some research I had done.  You might find some of them useful in what you're trying to do.  This is the initial post and then there are links to the successive ones within it.


Dennis Pearce


Re: Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

 
Edited

Hello David - it’s an interesting and fun KM challenge you have described. I’d start by figuring out some categories for the various lessons learned. One way to do this is affinity clustering - just grouping the LL’s like with like, without pre-defining any categories. 
Next, I’d look for a cluster of LL’s that have a focus on process or procedure, and start with those by reviewing how an existing process or procedure could be modified to incorporate the LL. (Last time I did this I used a Miro board - miro.com - and was able to upload a spreadsheet of ideas, which Miro turned into sticky notes - very cool. Free). 

Doing that is a way to get some “quick hits”, and may also lead to insights about other LL’s that were not initially considered to be related.

Next, I’d come up with category names for the other clusters (you could also do this before attacking P&P). I’d then look across clusters and prioritize LL’s that are critical (you’ll need to decide what constitutes “critical”!), and start working on what the best way is to incorporate those LL’s into the work they relate to. 

Doing this will likely give you insight into how to deal with many of the remaining LL’s, or if not that, then at least some idea about how to continue moving forward with your work. 

Good Luck! Let us know how you go with this - it’s an important KM area.
--
-Tom
--

Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts


Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

David Graffagna
 

Hello all,

 

As I have mentioned in previous messages, my KM Team has a number of work-in-progress efforts aimed at enhancing our overall knowledge sharing environment. One of our targets for this year is a focus on a more standard approach to soliciting, gathering, capturing and providing access to key lessons learned from variety of projects and initiatives.

 

My question to this group regards your knowledge and insight around the storage of those lessons learned and providing access to lessons learned/insights for a broad audience to tap into and consume. Let me set the context so you have a sense of where our challenges lie.

 

Our primary source for lessons learned typically comes from significant, cross-function, multi-year projects … so numerous people involved, a wide variety of functional areas participating, and broad range of potential knowledge areas for learning. Over the past months we have worked with a handful of project managers in soliciting lessons from their project team members as part of the project wrap-up/closeout; helping us get a sense of the breadth and depth of what those teams learned during their initiative.

 

Frankly, the volume and value of what we have received back is beyond our initial expectations. The team members, individually or in small functional groups, have been great in answering the standard set of questions we have crafted and capturing replies in the format we have provided (Excel for now). One team, for example, consisting of 15 individuals provided us with more than 70 individual “line items” of lessons learned on anything from budget/finance, communications, design & development, marketing/commercialization, production planning, risk mitigation … and on and on across a long list of knowledge areas and activities. Currently, from six projects we’ve ‘tested’ we have over 500 lessons learned, but grouped (and captured) specific to each particular project.

 

Here's one of my biggest challenges … if we have hundreds of lessons learned what’s the best way of capturing and sharing (e.g., making them accessible) those without overwhelming our audiences … while making it easy for them to find the right lesson in the right context?

 

So, bottom line … would love to know good, effective approaches you’ve seen around capturing and sharing those lessons. What have you seen around lessons learned from broad-ranging projects?

 

Looking forward to hearing your thoughts and insights!

 

Best regards,

 

David Graffagna


Re: KnowledgeWebcast - Dr. Rachad Najjar #video #CoP #standards

Martin Dugage
 

Wow! Thank you Santosh. Really interesting webcasts. 
Happy new year to all of you. May the new year bring you one vaccination and a lot of happiness. 
And let me take this opportunity to thank all of you, and especially Stan for setting up this group, which is really outstanding. When I raised a question here about business cases in KM, I got MANY extremely relevant and immediate answers to my question. And I could not keep up answering all of you and I felt a little guilty about it. 
This group reminds me of the early days of the internet back in 2000 when groups could form to help each other without fearing trolls. 
Let's keep it that way. 
Warmest Regards to all of you.
Martin


Re: KnowledgeWebcast - Dr. Rachad Najjar #video #CoP #standards

Santhosh Shekar
 

Dear All,

Belated wishes for Christmas and advance wishes for New year 2021 !! May the new year bring a great wave of healing and prosperity to the world !!
 
Please find the latest Knowledgewebcast  interview series with Dr. Rachad Najjar, Global Knowledge leader, GE Renewable, December Edition !! I have enjoyed talking to him on various KM topics, I want to thank him once again on behalf of the KM community for such amazing knowledge sharing !! 

 Please do watch and reach me out if you have any similar ISO KM Standard Case/story to share !!  

https://youtu.be/dFlF68CyQGk - part 1  - Journey of Rachad !!
https://youtu.be/xj5f6kUQhRM - part 2 - Practical case of ISO KM standard implementation !!! ( Must Watch - my recommendation)
https://youtu.be/BWnH4Uy_U44 - Part 3 - How to make Communities successful !!

Regards,
Santhosh Shekar


On Thu, Dec 3, 2020 at 8:13 AM Santhosh Shekar via groups.io <santhoshshekar=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Sorry for cross Posting ! 
Dear All, 
Episode 1 - Nov 2020
The below link provides sources to the first episode with three parts. In this webcast, I interviewed Ian Fry, Chair, Australia Standards Committee; Director, Knoco Australia. He talks about his KM journey, KM at times of Pandemic, Bush Fire Lessons learned by Australian Government, lesson learned systems, KM Governance framework and standard, Australia's Nationwide KM, Guerrilla KM and shares many more pearls of wisdom.

https://youtu.be/9wJ1I1nVeG8 - YouTube Ian Interview part 1
https://youtu.be/wRAhV-EQEPA - YouTube Ian Interview part 2
https://youtu.be/RHS52ssGk_o - Youtube Ian Interview part 3

https://knowledgewebcast.podbean.com/
https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-hjyf4-f33fce - Podcast Ian Interview part 1
https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-rjvgq-f38c6c - Podcast Ian Interview part 2
https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-kcxmy-f3c219 - Podcast Ian Interview Part 3

regards,
Santhosh Shekar 

On Wed, Nov 25, 2020 at 8:47 AM santhoshshekar <santhoshshekar@...> wrote:
Dear All,

I am delighted to share my first interview with Ian fry, who has 50 years of IT and KM experience combined. He speaks on various topics covering from Australian bush fire lessons, Lesson learned systems, KM standard 30401, his views and opinions on the same; KM challenges, Guariella KM etc in this part. 

Youtube Ian Fry Part-1  : https://youtu.be/9wJ1I1nVeG8

The single most purpose of creating this platform "knowledgewebcast" was to invite KM experts/executives and listen to them, on their KM journey, their views on KM standard (different school of thoughts), and also what they have to share as their learnings for the KM community !! 

Please do write to me with feedback and suggestions.

Regards,
Santhosh Shekar
twit @santhoshshekar 





Job Opening - Community Manager at Normal>Next #jobs

Stan Garfield
 

Scroll down past internship opening at https://normalnext.org/jobs/

Normal>Next is looking for a community manager for a client organization we are working with to create a remote-first approach to its health equity-focused leadership program. You will work alongside both the team at Normal>Next as well as the program’s participants and planning team. You will help set up the new community platform and train several part-time community managers who are alumni of the leadership program.

The ideal candidate will be an empathetic listener and graceful communicator, who can easily earn trust by being heartfelt, and who is comfortable both receiving and giving candid feedback.


Event: The Top 5 Lies We Tell Ourselves in Organizations - Wed, Jan 13 · 4:00 PM EST #webinar

Matt Moore
 

Hi,

This is an online facilitated session with John Hovell (a gentleman) and myself (a scoundrel). The time on the Meetup is EST (it’s Thursday morning in Eastern Australia).

More info here: https://www.meetup.com/Knowledge-Cafe/events/274768100/

Regards.

Matt Moore
+61 423 784 504


Re: Two Openings: Communications & Knowledge Management Officer and Knowledge Management Specialist #jobs

Douglas Weidner
 

It seems natural to me and probably to the many USAID CKMers.

We teach all our CKMers Transformational KM, which includes an Awareness Campaign -- both a Communications and a Learning Plan.

Best wishes,
Douglas Weidner
Chief CKM Instructor
KM Institute

On Fri, Dec 25, 2020 at 4:41 PM Barbara Fillip <barbara.fillip@...> wrote:
Tom,
It's not unusual for KM and communications to be packaged together in the USAID contractor world/international development. These are typically project-based positions and not KM at the corporate level. This is KM with a strong outward focus and often it's more about external communications for the project than anything else. 
Happy holidays!
Barbara Fillip
Senior Advisor for Knowledge Management
Chemonics International

On Wed, Dec 16, 2020 at 4:18 PM Tom Short <tshortconsulting@...> wrote:
Thanks, Stan!

Interesting that they’ve combined KM and Comms for the first role there. I had a quick look at the position description - looks great. If only I were in full-time work mode...

I really like the idea of combining these two the way they’re describing - makes all the sense in the world to me. Wonder whether this is an aberration, or a trend in KM work. Anyone know? 
--
-Tom
--

Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts


Re: Two Openings: Communications & Knowledge Management Officer and Knowledge Management Specialist #jobs

Barbara Fillip
 

Tom,
It's not unusual for KM and communications to be packaged together in the USAID contractor world/international development. These are typically project-based positions and not KM at the corporate level. This is KM with a strong outward focus and often it's more about external communications for the project than anything else. 
Happy holidays!
Barbara Fillip
Senior Advisor for Knowledge Management
Chemonics International

On Wed, Dec 16, 2020 at 4:18 PM Tom Short <tshortconsulting@...> wrote:
Thanks, Stan!

Interesting that they’ve combined KM and Comms for the first role there. I had a quick look at the position description - looks great. If only I were in full-time work mode...

I really like the idea of combining these two the way they’re describing - makes all the sense in the world to me. Wonder whether this is an aberration, or a trend in KM work. Anyone know? 
--
-Tom
--

Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts


Re: New ways to Measure Community #CoP #metrics

Arthur Shelley
 

Thank you April, Kate & Nancy, 
for sharing this research and encouraging/including collaboration to extend the insights. I will add some ideas over the year end break and look forward to the final version.

On the topic of sharing knowledge insights...
Last week AuSKM (Australian Society for KM) hosted their annual Knowledge Awards granting three platinum awards for collaborative initiatives generating/sharing knowledge for social benefits:

Real KM Magazine 
Fantastic KM resource founded by Stephen Bounds and curated my Bruce Boyes. Please support them if you can, so this resource remains for us all.

STACY 
A stay safe initiative addressing family violence challenges. This research is informing government policy and actions on family violence matters.

COVIDLive.com.au
A volunteer based service providing real time data on COVID statistics. The website is comprehensive for Australia, updated each morning and seen internationally as THE reference source for Australia (including by Johns Hopkins University in preference to Government sites).

As you can see, these are excellent examples of knowledge initiatives - in which the sharing of insights informs decisions and guides actions to generate value for many.

Best wishes to all SIKM Leaders members from the "Downunder KMers". I hope your year end break brings some relaxation with family & friends and 2021 opens up opportunities for your knowledge to be applied in creative ways to drive innovative projects and generate value.

Arthur Shelley
Founder, Intelligent Answers
Producer Creative Melbourne
www.OrganizationalZoo.com
@Metaphorage
+61 413 047 408
https://au.linkedin.com/pub/arthur-shelley/1/4bb/528 

On 23 Dec 2020, at 07:18, Katrina Pugh <katrinabpugh@...> wrote:


Hello, SIKM Leaders

At KM World last month, Aprill Allen, Nancy Dixon and I presented on the SIKM diversity project that over 30 SIKM’ers have been undertaking since last year. At KM World, we ended with a request (which I sent below): Share your measures for value, inclusivity, welcoming-ness, and appreciativeness of a community. 

Please would you share your ideas to add to the Blueprint? (Please just jot them down in this Google doc.):


For Reference...



Happy holidays, wherever you are!

Warmly, 

Aprill Allen, Nancy Dixon, Kate Pugh

Katrina Pugh
President | AlignConsulting | Collaboration, Analytics and Strategy
Faculty | Columbia University | Information and Knowledge Strategy Master of Science Program

On Nov 26, 2020, at 8:53 AM, Katrina Pugh via groups.io <katrinabpugh@...> wrote:


Hello, SIKM
Last week's KM World Connect was tremendously fun, with SIKM'ers from all over the globe. This was a reunion for which I am thankful on this day of thanksgiving. As Stan mentioned, Aprill Allen, Nancy Dixon and I shared SIKM's gender and diversity research. Over 30 SIKM'ers contributed over the last year, and many more have engaged in the Blueprint since May. 

After describing the data and insights on diversity and bias, we presenters shared three case studies of communities embracing difference: Company Command (Nancy), Intel Enterprise Architects (Kate), and Australian Center for Social Innovation (Aprill).

REQUEST FOR YOU:  
 Often we don't really measure what we think we are, and diversity and inclusion are no exceptions. Please share how you know if your CoP is inclusive, appreciative, welcoming and valuable. Please add your ideas to the open google doc. here:


Happy Thanksgiving, all!

Kate

Katrina Pugh
AlignConsulting | Collaboration AI and Strategy 
Columbia University | Info and Knowledge Strategy Master's Program Faculty


On Tue, Nov 24, 2020 at 10:06 AM Stan Garfield <stangarfield@...> wrote:
If you registered for last week's KMWorld Connect virtual conference, you can view the recordings of most sessions until March 1, 2021.

Here is the list of speakers.

Here are the sessions related to SIKM:
  1. SIKM Meetup
  2. C404 - Gender & Diversity in Communities - In November 2019 the SIKM Leaders Community of Practice (CoP) started on a self-study on gender and diversity. As a successful 20-year-old entity with more than 900 members worldwide, SIKM is the go-to community for anyone interested in the KM profession. Yet, in a series of posts, we uncovered fissures in the way women and newer members experienced the CoP. Preliminary diversity statistics were alarming, so action was taken: convening a series of focus groups to learn more about the members and their journeys, reading research on gender bias, studying CoP literature and defining an SIKM Blueprint that was not just inclusive, but intentional in the way it guided how we converse, share experiences, and innovate. The SIKM Blueprint, and the ongoing work led by the community champions, has broadened the SIKM Leaders' reach, engagement modalities, and impact.

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