Date   

Re: Request: Removal from KM Thought Leaders list #thought-leaders #standards #state-of-KM

Arthur Shelley
 

Boris,

 

I agree with Stephen - your experiences and contributions to this community over a long time have been of benefit to all.

Not everyone in any community always agrees with each other. The fact that there is a diverse range of perspectives about what KM is, what directions it is taking and how to optimise the benefits it offers to people and organisations is a good thing. The statement “for every PhD there is an equal and opposite PhD” stands in our paradoxical world- we CAN argue seemingly opposites and yet both be right. If we constructively and rigorously discuss differences, we are likely to evolve our collective and individual thinking. Your voice is an important part of this dialogue.

 

I know you were against the “standard” and that is a position help by a number of other experienced KMers. I don’t see the ISO3040 as a way to “standardise” what KMers do. I see it as foundation of important elements that every organisation will benefit from if they address these in a way that is aligned with their purpose and context. It helps those less experienced than us establish a stronger argument to implement knowledge initiatives and secure support from them, without prescribing details of what they do and how. Since the publication of the standard, there have been several books, guides and blogs written to assist people inside and outside the knowledge profession increase awareness of the importance of knowledge for sustainable success of people and organisations.

 

I certainly consider you a KM Thought Leader, whether you are on Stan’s list or not. The fact that you “speak your mind” publicly about how and why you see things differently is an important part of our collective learning and reflections. It helps every member to develop their knowledge maturity and highlights there are many views on what is best.  I hope you can find a way to see that your voice is respected in these exchanges of differences and is not being rejected. I hope you remain an active member of this forum and believe you have earnt your place in Stans List.

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Producer: Creative Melbourne

Author: KNOWledge SUCCESSion  Sustained performance and capability growth through knowledge projects

Earlier Books: The Organizational Zoo (2007) & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader (2009)

Principal: www.IntelligentAnswers.com.au 

Founder: Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/arthurshelley/

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

Creative-Melbourne-Banner_2018_Final_Smaller

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Stephen Bounds
Sent: Tuesday, 12 January 2021 8:39 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Request: Removal from KM Thought Leaders list

 

Hi Boris,

Do you have any written summary of your current concerns that I could look at? Or are you prepared to explain further on this list for our benefit?

I remember you were skeptical of some of the ISO 30401 developments a while back. However, I wasn't aware of the depth of your concerns and think it would be useful for the community to understand what has precipitated this position.

Thanks,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 12/01/2021 4:37 am, Boris Jaeger wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Dear Stan,

 

could you please do me a favor and remove me completely from your KM Thought Leaders list.

 

I make this request in public to show my protest against the current developments in the field of Knowledge Management.

 

That's it for now.

 

Thanks, keep safe & healthy,

Boris


Re: Academic theories related to adoption of ESNs #ESN #adoption

Murray Jennex
 

if you are looking at TRA and TAM then you should also look at the Perceived Benefit Model (Thompson, Higgins, and Howell, (Personal computing: toward a conceptual model of utilizationRL Thompson, CA Higgins, JM Howell - MIS quarterly, 1991 - JSTOR shows how it can be used).  The actual theory is from Triandis.  I used this theory in my PhD dissertation and actually ever since.  I find this theory does a better job for situations where you can't force adoption of something.

On another note, a lot of the base papers are actually available for free on Research Gate.  Use Google Scholar to google them and it will provide the link to the pdfs that are available....murray jennex


-----Original Message-----
From: Dennis Pearce <denpearce@...>
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Sent: Mon, Jan 11, 2021 5:27 pm
Subject: [SIKM] Academic theories related to adoption of ESNs

I've felt for a long time that when it comes to studying the factors that impact adoption of Enterprise Social Networks in organizations, there's a lot of good solid academic research that never makes the leap over to actual use because (1) academics are more motivated by publication and citation than they are by encouraging application and (2) practitioners usually don't go looking to academics for help because their information is often behind a journal paywall and incomprehensible to your average layperson even if they could get their hands on the paper.

So I've started a series of blog posts to discuss academic theories that might have some bearing on the adoption of ESNs. There are many many IT and psychology theories out there that try to model behavior change and what drives the adoption of new technologies. Here's a link to my introductory post: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/esn-adoption-introduction-dennis-pearce/

Links to my posts on the theories I've covered so far are at the bottom of that post and at the bottom of every post in the series. I've tried to keep the posts fairly short and easy to read. So far I've covered seven with more to come as I get time to write. The ones so far are:
  • Theory of Reasoned Action
  • Technology Acceptance Model
  • Diffusion of Innovations Theory
  • Task-Technology-Fit Model
  • Hedonic Motivation System Adoption Model
  • Representation Theory
  • Swift Trust Theory
I'd be interested to see what you think of the idea and if you have any of your favorite theories to offer. I'm looking for theories that have been published in peer-reviewed journals and have a decent number of citations (hundreds or thousands). Not really looking for any one-offs that haven't been replicated or extended. Also, I have a pretty niche focus limited to theories that can be applied to behavior change or technology adoption in the context of ESNs, not any old KM theory.

Thanks,
Dennis


Academic theories related to adoption of ESNs #ESN #adoption

Dennis Pearce
 

I've felt for a long time that when it comes to studying the factors that impact adoption of Enterprise Social Networks in organizations, there's a lot of good solid academic research that never makes the leap over to actual use because (1) academics are more motivated by publication and citation than they are by encouraging application and (2) practitioners usually don't go looking to academics for help because their information is often behind a journal paywall and incomprehensible to your average layperson even if they could get their hands on the paper.

So I've started a series of blog posts to discuss academic theories that might have some bearing on the adoption of ESNs. There are many many IT and psychology theories out there that try to model behavior change and what drives the adoption of new technologies. Here's a link to my introductory post: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/esn-adoption-introduction-dennis-pearce/

Links to my posts on the theories I've covered so far are at the bottom of that post and at the bottom of every post in the series. I've tried to keep the posts fairly short and easy to read. So far I've covered seven with more to come as I get time to write. The ones so far are:

  • Theory of Reasoned Action
  • Technology Acceptance Model
  • Diffusion of Innovations Theory
  • Task-Technology-Fit Model
  • Hedonic Motivation System Adoption Model
  • Representation Theory
  • Swift Trust Theory

I'd be interested to see what you think of the idea and if you have any of your favorite theories to offer. I'm looking for theories that have been published in peer-reviewed journals and have a decent number of citations (hundreds or thousands). Not really looking for any one-offs that haven't been replicated or extended. Also, I have a pretty niche focus limited to theories that can be applied to behavior change or technology adoption in the context of ESNs, not any old KM theory.

Thanks,
Dennis


Re: Request: Removal from KM Thought Leaders list #thought-leaders #standards #state-of-KM

Aprill Allen
 

Hi Boris,

I also went searching for signs and would like to understand your thoughts about direction. It may be we feel a similar way!
--

Aprill Allen
Founder and Managing Director | Knowledge Bird
KM Consulting & KCS Training
M: +61 (0)400 101 961
knowledgebird.com


Re: Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

Stephen Bounds
 

Hi David,

I would echo Barbara's sentiments and suggest that it would be very valuable to ensure that you understand the ROI (and/or relative ROI) of your work. For example, can you answer these questions:

  • What actions are going to yield the biggest results from a lessons learned exercise?
  • How often will this happen?
  • Are lessons mostly going to improve one team's work or lots of teams' work?

Knowing this will help you to frame how much effort you put into each of capture, categorisation, discovery, and application. Unfortunately too many KM efforts fail because they lack the sustainable returns to justify the effort involved, and having a clear sense of value is critical to overcoming this barrier.

Cheers,
Stephen.
====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 11/01/2021 9:13 pm, Barbara Fillip wrote:

Hello David,
Perhaps to complement the excellent answers already provided, I would ask a slightly provocative question.  Are you sure a lessons learned database is the right answer?  While it is satisfying to collect lessons, organize  them and do everything possible to make them accessible, I have become increasingly skeptical of the focus on collecting and storing,  which can become overwhelming when you arrive at a certain volume of lessons to process. Having worked with Excel-style lessons learned capture processes, I am wondering how much duplication and overlapping or related lessons you may be seeing? How are you validating the lessons? Do you have a process for reviewing and culling lessons? Sometimes lessons emerging from projects are full of useful cues for training departments about what to focus on in terms of training rather than truly original lessons.  In other words, while a majority of the focus of such efforts tends to be placed on collect and store for access, it is probably more effective to 1) identify critical knowledge gaps that can be addressed by learning from the project teams themselves; 2) collect lessons specifically around these knowledge gaps rather than a general appeal for lessons; 3) process the lessons for the purpose of embedding them in training, job aids, guidance documents, etc... and don't bother trying to get individual employees to access a general lessons learned repository. 
While a general lessons learned process might be beneficial for projects to go through, if the processing and repackaging is focused on priority themes (critical knowledge as previously mentioned) it should be both more manageable and more effective in terms of uptake.

So to go back to my original question, is a lessons learned database the right answer to your challenge? A lessons learned process might be part of the answer, but storing and making the lessons accessible to a broad audience may not be the optimal approach if you really want the lessons to be shared and utilized. 

Best,
Barbara Fillip


 

On Sun, Jan 10, 2021 at 8:35 PM Tom Barfield <thomas.m.barfield@...> wrote:
David - based on the many responses this sounds like a topic that would benefit from a live discussion.  Would you be interested in having the community host a live peer assist discussion to focus on your question?  If so, I will work with others in the community to set this up.

Tom


Re: Request: Removal from KM Thought Leaders list #thought-leaders #standards #state-of-KM

Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Boris,

Do you have any written summary of your current concerns that I could look at? Or are you prepared to explain further on this list for our benefit?

I remember you were skeptical of some of the ISO 30401 developments a while back. However, I wasn't aware of the depth of your concerns and think it would be useful for the community to understand what has precipitated this position.

Thanks,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 12/01/2021 4:37 am, Boris Jaeger wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Dear Stan,
 
could you please do me a favor and remove me completely from your KM Thought Leaders list.
 
I make this request in public to show my protest against the current developments in the field of Knowledge Management.
 
That's it for now.
 
Thanks, keep safe & healthy,
Boris


Request: Removal from KM Thought Leaders list #thought-leaders #standards #state-of-KM

Boris Jaeger
 
Edited

Dear Stan,
 
could you please do me a favor and remove me completely from your KM Thought Leaders list.
 
I make this request in public to show my protest against the current developments in the field of Knowledge Management.
 
That's it for now.
 
Thanks, keep safe & healthy,
Boris


Re: Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

Barbara Fillip
 

Hello David,
Perhaps to complement the excellent answers already provided, I would ask a slightly provocative question.  Are you sure a lessons learned database is the right answer?  While it is satisfying to collect lessons, organize  them and do everything possible to make them accessible, I have become increasingly skeptical of the focus on collecting and storing,  which can become overwhelming when you arrive at a certain volume of lessons to process. Having worked with Excel-style lessons learned capture processes, I am wondering how much duplication and overlapping or related lessons you may be seeing? How are you validating the lessons? Do you have a process for reviewing and culling lessons? Sometimes lessons emerging from projects are full of useful cues for training departments about what to focus on in terms of training rather than truly original lessons.  In other words, while a majority of the focus of such efforts tends to be placed on collect and store for access, it is probably more effective to 1) identify critical knowledge gaps that can be addressed by learning from the project teams themselves; 2) collect lessons specifically around these knowledge gaps rather than a general appeal for lessons; 3) process the lessons for the purpose of embedding them in training, job aids, guidance documents, etc... and don't bother trying to get individual employees to access a general lessons learned repository. 
While a general lessons learned process might be beneficial for projects to go through, if the processing and repackaging is focused on priority themes (critical knowledge as previously mentioned) it should be both more manageable and more effective in terms of uptake.

So to go back to my original question, is a lessons learned database the right answer to your challenge? A lessons learned process might be part of the answer, but storing and making the lessons accessible to a broad audience may not be the optimal approach if you really want the lessons to be shared and utilized. 

Best,
Barbara Fillip


 

On Sun, Jan 10, 2021 at 8:35 PM Tom Barfield <thomas.m.barfield@...> wrote:
David - based on the many responses this sounds like a topic that would benefit from a live discussion.  Would you be interested in having the community host a live peer assist discussion to focus on your question?  If so, I will work with others in the community to set this up.

Tom


Re: RealKM Magazine Award #awards

Richard Vines
 

Hi Arthur, 

As a commitment to professional mutual support I would be pleased to donate $100 per annum for this Arther. If OK wiht you, could you circulate where I / we can follow this through (or email me personally).  

By way of reflection, I now have carried the title of KM specialist in one governmental institution for over 10 years. To me, that seems extraordinary given the different discourses and narratives we now observe amongst ourselves, including with rise of the Real KM magazine.

Of course, my length of service does not necessarily equate to realising personal or professional ambitions. The rise of COVID related matters (and coincidently, my secondment into COVID work for one of our State Govt agencies) has been a sobering reminder to us all (and to me) that the world of phenological science knows no neat paradigmatic boundaries, in the same way as physics impacts bushfire behaviour. Whatever views we may or may not hold, we can but respect the impact of evolutionary science. I can but admire what our State Governments on the whole, here in Australia have done much to draw on subject matter experts to generate real-world policy responses in response to COVID in particular. And, I can but hugely emphathise with family and friends in the US and Britain in terms of what is happening there. 

Here's hoping a new era might unfold in Australia in regard to climate and adaptations and that the US and Australia can continue to be great friends and confidants in these types of demanding global agenda. 

All best for the new year.


Richard


On Mon, Jan 11, 2021 at 2:46 PM Arthur Shelley <arthur@...> wrote:

Happy New Year KMers,

 

I hope that your festive season was full of shared experiences and rekindled relationships (proving that KM is a real science that has practical application even in our personal lives).

 

You may be aware that in December (in that year we do not wish to mention), a GOOD thing happened…

Real KM Magazine received a well deserved Knowledge Award from the Australian Society for Knowledge Management.

I wanted to share a few reflections on this service here (which I also did on KM4Dev, so apologies for cross-posting).

 

I would appreciate your considering this post to ensure Real KM magazine can be sustainable in the excellent service it provides and is recognised for…

Thanks… (neither Stephen nor Bruce asked me to write this or knew it was coming before I posted it):

 

RealKM Magazine is a shining example of genuine knowledge sharing that adds value to all readers.

Everyone in this forum will benefit from being a regular reader (and potentially a contributor).

 

Stephen Bounds (Founder) & Bruce Boyes (Lead writer and editor – both contributors here in this forum as well) deserve all the accolades they have received for the very hard work they invest, and continue to invest. They publish a credible (evidence based) and insightful (full of useful ideas and examples of good KM Practice) publication that is superior to some high cost commercial/academic publications.

 

The reason we benefit from this quality publication is Stephen & Bruce invest many more hours than they get paid for and this is not a sustainable (or fair) model. 

If each reader became a subscriber, even if only donating $1 per week (a fraction of the cost of a cup of coffee), the magazine could generate an even more comprehensive sharing and the people creating the value for you, could be more appropriately compensated for their effort. I personally financially patronise the initiative because I believe in what the magazine achieves for many. I encourage all KMers to think about reciprocity, respect and mutual value relationships

 

Mostly, we get what we deserve in life ... but with the advent of internet an unreasonable expectation “free extraction” mentality is becoming more common in society.

Societies like SIKM Leaders are a terrific source of Knowledge, because of a few people like Stan and his contributing friends investing time to assist others. This is great thing. However, not everyone can do this, which should not limit the range of ways we can acquire knowledge.

 

Of course we can get "Free information" – but it is a gamble on what you receive in an internet search. 

However ...

invest significant time to critically analyse the search output content to make informed judgement to separate outright lies from promotional propaganda from (potential) "truths" (they are all out there).

Then ...

verify the evidence behind the potential "truths" to determine how credible they are what the knowledge gaps & limitations are...

 

At this stage, you are far better served to subscribe to RealKM Magazine as this is the investment they do for you...

Surely this is worth making a contribution to...?

 

I reflect on the thinking that expects high quality services to be available free! 

Ask your local shops if you can pop in and grab anything you want - for nothing ...

Unlike your shops, RealKM Magazine just want to cover their costs of being a KM Sharing Role Model, not make a profit.

Please think about this, as unsustainable models eventually expire. 

Can you spare the cost of a coffee each month?

How much value can you create when you apply the received knowledge?

Would you share all you insights with everyone for no return? 

How much can you expect others to simply give you fir nothing?

 

If we want a fair sharing world/community (effectively a foundation principle of KM), we need to balance our contributions and receiving actions!

We are the culmination of the decisions we make – individually and collectively.

 

 

 

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Producer: Creative Melbourne

Author: KNOWledge SUCCESSion  Sustained performance and capability growth through knowledge projects

Earlier Books: The Organizational Zoo (2007) & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader (2009)

Principal: www.IntelligentAnswers.com.au 

Founder: Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/arthurshelley/

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

Creative-Melbourne-Banner_2018_Final_Smaller

 

 



--
Richard Vines
Mob: 0467717431
Email address: richardvines1@...
Skype: projectlessons


RealKM Magazine Award #awards

Arthur Shelley
 

Happy New Year KMers,

 

I hope that your festive season was full of shared experiences and rekindled relationships (proving that KM is a real science that has practical application even in our personal lives).

 

You may be aware that in December (in that year we do not wish to mention), a GOOD thing happened…

Real KM Magazine received a well deserved Knowledge Award from the Australian Society for Knowledge Management.

I wanted to share a few reflections on this service here (which I also did on KM4Dev, so apologies for cross-posting).

 

I would appreciate your considering this post to ensure Real KM magazine can be sustainable in the excellent service it provides and is recognised for…

Thanks… (neither Stephen nor Bruce asked me to write this or knew it was coming before I posted it):

 

RealKM Magazine is a shining example of genuine knowledge sharing that adds value to all readers.

Everyone in this forum will benefit from being a regular reader (and potentially a contributor).

 

Stephen Bounds (Founder) & Bruce Boyes (Lead writer and editor – both contributors here in this forum as well) deserve all the accolades they have received for the very hard work they invest, and continue to invest. They publish a credible (evidence based) and insightful (full of useful ideas and examples of good KM Practice) publication that is superior to some high cost commercial/academic publications.

 

The reason we benefit from this quality publication is Stephen & Bruce invest many more hours than they get paid for and this is not a sustainable (or fair) model. 

If each reader became a subscriber, even if only donating $1 per week (a fraction of the cost of a cup of coffee), the magazine could generate an even more comprehensive sharing and the people creating the value for you, could be more appropriately compensated for their effort. I personally financially patronise the initiative because I believe in what the magazine achieves for many. I encourage all KMers to think about reciprocity, respect and mutual value relationships

 

Mostly, we get what we deserve in life ... but with the advent of internet an unreasonable expectation “free extraction” mentality is becoming more common in society.

Societies like SIKM Leaders are a terrific source of Knowledge, because of a few people like Stan and his contributing friends investing time to assist others. This is great thing. However, not everyone can do this, which should not limit the range of ways we can acquire knowledge.

 

Of course we can get "Free information" – but it is a gamble on what you receive in an internet search. 

However ...

invest significant time to critically analyse the search output content to make informed judgement to separate outright lies from promotional propaganda from (potential) "truths" (they are all out there).

Then ...

verify the evidence behind the potential "truths" to determine how credible they are what the knowledge gaps & limitations are...

 

At this stage, you are far better served to subscribe to RealKM Magazine as this is the investment they do for you...

Surely this is worth making a contribution to...?

 

I reflect on the thinking that expects high quality services to be available free! 

Ask your local shops if you can pop in and grab anything you want - for nothing ...

Unlike your shops, RealKM Magazine just want to cover their costs of being a KM Sharing Role Model, not make a profit.

Please think about this, as unsustainable models eventually expire. 

Can you spare the cost of a coffee each month?

How much value can you create when you apply the received knowledge?

Would you share all you insights with everyone for no return? 

How much can you expect others to simply give you fir nothing?

 

If we want a fair sharing world/community (effectively a foundation principle of KM), we need to balance our contributions and receiving actions!

We are the culmination of the decisions we make – individually and collectively.

 

 

 

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Producer: Creative Melbourne

Author: KNOWledge SUCCESSion  Sustained performance and capability growth through knowledge projects

Earlier Books: The Organizational Zoo (2007) & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader (2009)

Principal: www.IntelligentAnswers.com.au 

Founder: Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/arthurshelley/

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

Creative-Melbourne-Banner_2018_Final_Smaller

 

 


Re: Knowledge Management: Each man is my superior in that I may learn from him." #learning

Arthur Shelley
 

Thanks for the article share Bill.

The world improves when we see the learning as the key outcome rather than the physical outputs generated.

Whilst a project output (tangible deliverable) does have value, it is rarely more important than the learning, relationships and trust built (or destroyed if not well- led) by those involved.

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Producer: Creative Melbourne

Author: KNOWledge SUCCESSion  Sustained performance and capability growth through knowledge projects

Earlier Books: The Organizational Zoo (2007) & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader (2009)

Principal: www.IntelligentAnswers.com.au 

Founder: Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/arthurshelley/

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

Creative-Melbourne-Banner_2018_Final_Smaller

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of bill@...
Sent: Monday, 11 January 2021 7:08 AM
To: SIKM@groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] Knowledge Management: Each man is my superior in that I may learn from him.” https://linkedin.com/pulse/knowledge-management-each-man-my-superior-i-may-l

 

2021 provides an oppty to leverage what we can learn from others-better. Grateful if you would check out my latest article: Knowledge Management: Each man is my superior in that I may learn from him.” https://linkedin.com/pulse/knowledge-management-each-man-my-superior-i-may-learn-bill-kaplan

 

Watching CBS Sunday Morning today and it got me thinking about this through a KM lense.

 

Best

 

Bill

 

  

 

Learn more about the solutions and value we provide at www.workingknowledge-csp.com

 


Re: Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

Tom Barfield
 

David - based on the many responses this sounds like a topic that would benefit from a live discussion.  Would you be interested in having the community host a live peer assist discussion to focus on your question?  If so, I will work with others in the community to set this up.

Tom


Job Opening: Knowledge Manager in Mumbai #jobs

Stan Garfield
 

From Susan Inman, Global Director of Knowledge Management at L.E.K. Consulting: "We are looking for a Knowledge Manager in Mumbai to lead our Knowledge Management team for the Asia Pac region. If you have the necessary qualifications coupled with the drive to be part of a fast paced organization, apply here."


Knowledge Management: Each man is my superior in that I may learn from him." #learning

 

2021 provides an oppty to leverage what we can learn from others-better. Grateful if you would check out my latest article: Knowledge Management: Each man is my superior in that I may learn from him.” https://linkedin.com/pulse/knowledge-management-each-man-my-superior-i-may-learn-bill-kaplan

 

Watching CBS Sunday Morning today and it got me thinking about this through a KM lense.

 

Best

 

Bill

 

  

 

Learn more about the solutions and value we provide at www.workingknowledge-csp.com

 


Job Opening - Senior Knowledge Management Officer #jobs

Stan Garfield
 

Senior Knowledge Management Officer
AlignMNH
Baltimore, MD or Washington, DC
https://jobs-jhpiego.icims.com/jobs/4072/job


Re: Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

Nirmala Palaniappan
 

Hi David,

You’ve already received some excellent answers and pointers. Here are some insights and suggestions I am happy to share. Hope you find these to be useful and relevant to your business environment 

  1. As far as possible, it is a good idea to extend and enhance existing systems to capture lessons learned on the go as opposed to setting up a separate technology platform. For example, if you have a product management system or a CRM platform, it may be more effective to upgrade/customise them to include lessons learned 
  2. If you have no option to customise existing systems and are setting up a separate system, do integrate it with existing systems and bring it under a common search umbrella 
  3. Conduct brainstorming sessions with subject matter experts and key users to decide on the metadata for lessons learned. Map it to the processes, type of knowledge, expected benefits, whether it is conceptual or practical, time frame and so on
  4. To add to Nick’s excellent input regarding embedding lessons learned into procedures, processes, checklists etc, you could include a status box in the lessons learned platform and archive those that have been institutionalised and converted into a “habit”
  5. If your organisation enjoys video-based learning, do remember that it is not always necessary to document lessons learned in a conventional manner. Some lessons learned can be curated into an impactful video 
  6. If you can afford it, have content writers work on polishing and making the lessons learned consumable and enjoyable 
  7. Create and provide a lot of sample templates to bring in at least some amount of standardisation of content 
  8. Doing #7 might help you leverage on Machine Learning/NLP algorithms to discover patterns, analyse them and use them as inputs for decision-making/Management 
  9. If feasible, identify and employ champions and give them the responsibility of “managing” lessons learned in business critical and/or evolving areas. Engage them in curating and assisting in the application of lessons learned in the said areas 
  10. Get creative in the way you brand the initiative/programme and make it enjoyable and rewarding (though, it seems like your colleagues don’t particularly need encouragement in submitting lessons learned)

If you would like to discuss this or have further queries, please do not hesitate.

Regards
Nirmala 

On Fri, 8 Jan 2021 at 5:43 PM, Chris Collison <chris.collison@...> wrote:

Fully agree with you regarding the ‘clearing house’ concept Nick, and great chapter by the way.

  

The perfect lessons learned database is an empty one – and conversely, a library of lessons which are starting to gather dust is an indicator of a failure of organisational learning. 

 

I wonder if we need a metaphor with in which lessons have a shorter shelf-life and are a means to an end rather than an end in themselves…    A lessons learned larder perhaps?

 

Chris Collison

Knowledgeable Ltd

Author of the KM Cookbook

@chris_collison

 

 

 

From: <main@SIKM.groups.io> on behalf of Nick Milton <nick.milton@...>
Reply to: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Date: Friday, 8 January 2021 at 08:59
To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessonslearned

 

David, the best way to deal with massive numbers of lessons, is to embed them into guidance and best practice. You may have hundreds of lessons now, in a few years you will have thousands, and asking people to sift through these, resolving contradictions, sorting through repeat and duplicate lessons, becomes completely impractical.

 

If you look at organisations which are successful in lesson learning, such as NASA, the Oil Sector, the Military etc, you see that the lessons database (or lessons management system) is not the final repository of the lessons, but is a clearing house, directing the lessons to the subject matter experts who will embed them into procedure, process, guidance and doctrine. The lessons management system only holds those lessons which are still in process of being learned, and once that lesson is embedded into working practice it can be considered “learned” and removed from the system.

 

Project managers therefore only really need to follow the updated guidance, into which the lessons are embedded, rather than sifting through hundreds or thousands of entries.

 

You can find more details of this approach on my blog (here for example), and in my book “The Lesson Learned handbook”. The attached article may also be useful.

 

Nick Milton
Knoco Ltd
www.knoco.com

blog  www.nickmilton.com

twitter @nickknoco

Author of the recent book - "The Knowledge Manager’s Handbook"

 

"Ambition without knowledge is like a boat on dry land." 
--Mark Lee

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of David Graffagna
Sent: 07 January 2021 16:53
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessonslearned

 

Hello all,

 

As I have mentioned in previous messages, my KM Team has a number of work-in-progress efforts aimed at enhancing our overall knowledge sharing environment. One of our targets for this year is a focus on a more standard approach to soliciting, gathering, capturing and providing access to key lessons learned from variety of projects and initiatives.

 

My question to this group regards your knowledge and insight around the storage of those lessons learned and providing access to lessons learned/insights for a broad audience to tap into and consume. Let me set the context so you have a sense of where our challenges lie.

 

Our primary source for lessons learned typically comes from significant, cross-function, multi-year projects … so numerous people involved, a wide variety of functional areas participating, and broad range of potential knowledge areas for learning. Over the past months we have worked with a handful of project managers in soliciting lessons from their project team members as part of the project wrap-up/closeout; helping us get a sense of the breadth and depth of what those teams learned during their initiative.

 

Frankly, the volume and value of what we have received back is beyond our initial expectations. The team members, individually or in small functional groups, have been great in answering the standard set of questions we have crafted and capturing replies in the format we have provided (Excel for now). One team, for example, consisting of 15 individuals provided us with more than 70 individual “line items” of lessons learned on anything from budget/finance, communications, design & development, marketing/commercialization, production planning, risk mitigation … and on and on across a long list of knowledge areas and activities. Currently, from six projects we’ve ‘tested’ we have over 500 lessons learned, but grouped (and captured) specific to each particular project.

 

Here's one of my biggest challenges … if we have hundreds of lessons learned what’s the best way of capturing and sharing (e.g., making them accessible) those without overwhelming our audiences … while making it easy for them to find the right lesson in the right context?

 

So, bottom line … would love to know good, effective approaches you’ve seen around capturing and sharing those lessons. What have you seen around lessons learned from broad-ranging projects?

 

Looking forward to hearing your thoughts and insights!

 

Best regards,

 

David Graffagna

--
"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous


Re: Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

Chris Collison
 

Fully agree with you regarding the ‘clearing house’ concept Nick, and great chapter by the way.

  

The perfect lessons learned database is an empty one – and conversely, a library of lessons which are starting to gather dust is an indicator of a failure of organisational learning. 

 

I wonder if we need a metaphor with in which lessons have a shorter shelf-life and are a means to an end rather than an end in themselves…    A lessons learned larder perhaps?

 

Chris Collison

Knowledgeable Ltd

Author of the KM Cookbook

@chris_collison

 

 

 

From: <main@SIKM.groups.io> on behalf of Nick Milton <nick.milton@...>
Reply to: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Date: Friday, 8 January 2021 at 08:59
To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessonslearned

 

David, the best way to deal with massive numbers of lessons, is to embed them into guidance and best practice. You may have hundreds of lessons now, in a few years you will have thousands, and asking people to sift through these, resolving contradictions, sorting through repeat and duplicate lessons, becomes completely impractical.

 

If you look at organisations which are successful in lesson learning, such as NASA, the Oil Sector, the Military etc, you see that the lessons database (or lessons management system) is not the final repository of the lessons, but is a clearing house, directing the lessons to the subject matter experts who will embed them into procedure, process, guidance and doctrine. The lessons management system only holds those lessons which are still in process of being learned, and once that lesson is embedded into working practice it can be considered “learned” and removed from the system.

 

Project managers therefore only really need to follow the updated guidance, into which the lessons are embedded, rather than sifting through hundreds or thousands of entries.

 

You can find more details of this approach on my blog (here for example), and in my book “The Lesson Learned handbook”. The attached article may also be useful.

 

Nick Milton
Knoco Ltd
www.knoco.com

blog  www.nickmilton.com

twitter @nickknoco

Author of the recent book - "The Knowledge Manager’s Handbook"

 

"Ambition without knowledge is like a boat on dry land." 
--Mark Lee

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of David Graffagna
Sent: 07 January 2021 16:53
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessonslearned

 

Hello all,

 

As I have mentioned in previous messages, my KM Team has a number of work-in-progress efforts aimed at enhancing our overall knowledge sharing environment. One of our targets for this year is a focus on a more standard approach to soliciting, gathering, capturing and providing access to key lessons learned from variety of projects and initiatives.

 

My question to this group regards your knowledge and insight around the storage of those lessons learned and providing access to lessons learned/insights for a broad audience to tap into and consume. Let me set the context so you have a sense of where our challenges lie.

 

Our primary source for lessons learned typically comes from significant, cross-function, multi-year projects … so numerous people involved, a wide variety of functional areas participating, and broad range of potential knowledge areas for learning. Over the past months we have worked with a handful of project managers in soliciting lessons from their project team members as part of the project wrap-up/closeout; helping us get a sense of the breadth and depth of what those teams learned during their initiative.

 

Frankly, the volume and value of what we have received back is beyond our initial expectations. The team members, individually or in small functional groups, have been great in answering the standard set of questions we have crafted and capturing replies in the format we have provided (Excel for now). One team, for example, consisting of 15 individuals provided us with more than 70 individual “line items” of lessons learned on anything from budget/finance, communications, design & development, marketing/commercialization, production planning, risk mitigation … and on and on across a long list of knowledge areas and activities. Currently, from six projects we’ve ‘tested’ we have over 500 lessons learned, but grouped (and captured) specific to each particular project.

 

Here's one of my biggest challenges … if we have hundreds of lessons learned what’s the best way of capturing and sharing (e.g., making them accessible) those without overwhelming our audiences … while making it easy for them to find the right lesson in the right context?

 

So, bottom line … would love to know good, effective approaches you’ve seen around capturing and sharing those lessons. What have you seen around lessons learned from broad-ranging projects?

 

Looking forward to hearing your thoughts and insights!

 

Best regards,

 

David Graffagna


Re: Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

Moria Levy
 

David

I have developed and implemented, over a dozen of times, a methodology for managing lessons, dealing also with the storgae and accessibility issues.
In a few sentences:
a. The lessons are extracted from the document, and a process takes places generalizing them, writing them accoarding to some rules and merging them with existing lessons.
b. They are written into a knowledgebase of lessons, including the lessons with their rational, meta-data, links to the debriefing documents and supplemental info.
c. The lessons knowledgebase is designed to be integrated in the organizational environment in cultural, processes, computting and physical matters.
The full methodology can bre found in  a book descrining it: https://www.amazon.com/Holistic-Approach-Lessons-Learned-Organizations/dp/1138564761#ace-g9859629705
I got positice feedbacks form colleagues woldwide as to this methodology.
If you have any specific questions- please adress me here or directly (moria@...) and I will be happy to explain/answer any issue concerning.
Moria


Re: Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

Nick Milton
 

David, the best way to deal with massive numbers of lessons, is to embed them into guidance and best practice. You may have hundreds of lessons now, in a few years you will have thousands, and asking people to sift through these, resolving contradictions, sorting through repeat and duplicate lessons, becomes completely impractical.

 

If you look at organisations which are successful in lesson learning, such as NASA, the Oil Sector, the Military etc, you see that the lessons database (or lessons management system) is not the final repository of the lessons, but is a clearing house, directing the lessons to the subject matter experts who will embed them into procedure, process, guidance and doctrine. The lessons management system only holds those lessons which are still in process of being learned, and once that lesson is embedded into working practice it can be considered “learned” and removed from the system.

 

Project managers therefore only really need to follow the updated guidance, into which the lessons are embedded, rather than sifting through hundreds or thousands of entries.

 

You can find more details of this approach on my blog (here for example), and in my book “The Lesson Learned handbook”. The attached article may also be useful.

 

Nick Milton
Knoco Ltd
www.knoco.com

blog  www.nickmilton.com

twitter @nickknoco

Author of the recent book - "The Knowledge Manager’s Handbook"

 

"Ambition without knowledge is like a boat on dry land." 
--Mark Lee

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of David Graffagna
Sent: 07 January 2021 16:53
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessonslearned

 

Hello all,

 

As I have mentioned in previous messages, my KM Team has a number of work-in-progress efforts aimed at enhancing our overall knowledge sharing environment. One of our targets for this year is a focus on a more standard approach to soliciting, gathering, capturing and providing access to key lessons learned from variety of projects and initiatives.

 

My question to this group regards your knowledge and insight around the storage of those lessons learned and providing access to lessons learned/insights for a broad audience to tap into and consume. Let me set the context so you have a sense of where our challenges lie.

 

Our primary source for lessons learned typically comes from significant, cross-function, multi-year projects … so numerous people involved, a wide variety of functional areas participating, and broad range of potential knowledge areas for learning. Over the past months we have worked with a handful of project managers in soliciting lessons from their project team members as part of the project wrap-up/closeout; helping us get a sense of the breadth and depth of what those teams learned during their initiative.

 

Frankly, the volume and value of what we have received back is beyond our initial expectations. The team members, individually or in small functional groups, have been great in answering the standard set of questions we have crafted and capturing replies in the format we have provided (Excel for now). One team, for example, consisting of 15 individuals provided us with more than 70 individual “line items” of lessons learned on anything from budget/finance, communications, design & development, marketing/commercialization, production planning, risk mitigation … and on and on across a long list of knowledge areas and activities. Currently, from six projects we’ve ‘tested’ we have over 500 lessons learned, but grouped (and captured) specific to each particular project.

 

Here's one of my biggest challenges … if we have hundreds of lessons learned what’s the best way of capturing and sharing (e.g., making them accessible) those without overwhelming our audiences … while making it easy for them to find the right lesson in the right context?

 

So, bottom line … would love to know good, effective approaches you’ve seen around capturing and sharing those lessons. What have you seen around lessons learned from broad-ranging projects?

 

Looking forward to hearing your thoughts and insights!

 

Best regards,

 

David Graffagna


Re: Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

Joitske Hulsebosch
 

Hi David, I wonder if you know the 5 types of knowledge transfer of Nancy Dixon? she states that you need different things for different types of transfer. Here's summary on my blog: https://joitskehulsebosch.blogspot.com/2005/12/communities-of-practice-nancy-dixon-on.html

For instance when you want to transfer lesson om more complex project it is good to use an advisory approach where one team advises the other. 

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