Date   

Re: Model of an intelligent knowledge extraction in organizations #extraction #definition

Douglas Weidner
 

Mila,

I am unaware of a technology or even multiple technologies that can 'extract automatically all types of knowledge in an organization,' especially if you mean both tacit and explicit.

At the KM Institute, we fundamentally handle each K mode differently. I'm not an expert on the tech side, since any day you turn your head you can miss a new startup, or the demise of what seemed to be a winner.

On the tacit mode side, where many proven processes exist, techniques have more stability and actually benefit from continuous improvement. Some ignore such techniques, that have been around since the early 2000s or even late 1990s, on the illogical basis that if it is that old, it can't be any good any more.

I have to remind them that the Greeks discovered geometry about 2,500 years ago. Algebra has been known since 3,500 years ago, and popularized by Muslim mathematicians in A.D. 820, who gave Algebra its common name: Al-jabr. 

Back to modern times: The clincher is both that the process/technique (not an IT technology) has been implemented and continuously improved; and that it has been scientifically researched as to its efficacy. It is not just based on ad hoc recommendations, as is often the case with an emerging discipline. 

One of the evidence-based techniques with the highest level of capturing/transferring the most critical K (among many such as exit interviews and mentoring), is a technique we call K Transfer & Retention.

We have a two-day Master class that gives full disclosure and surety of ability to perform by graduation. If an attendee desires certification, they must combine the Master Class as Phase II, along with our robust KM Essentials as Phase I. This results in a Certified K Specialist (CKS) - K Transfer & Retention. 

Contrary to concerns in this forum, the CKS doesn't claim mastery of everything KM, but rather just mastery of a specific technique, which can then be implemented by the certificant.

Douglas.Weidner@...
Chief CKM Instructor
Exec Chairman

On Wed, Jan 13, 2021 at 5:19 PM Mila Malekolkalami via groups.io <Mila_malek_1365=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Thank you Stan,
There are different techniques to capture and extract knowledge. I mean tacit and explicit knowledge.
With the development of IT, there are new ways to capture and share knowledge such as data mining that is a technique to extract and discover knowledge from databases.
In the model which I am talking about I don’t want to limit the model to one technique.
I want to know if there is any way to extract automatically all types of knowledge in an organization. Of course supervised by human.



On Thu, Jan 14, 2021 at 1:18 AM, Stan Garfield
Mila, thanks for your post. I moved it to start a new topic.

Please provide some additional details on what you mean by "a model of an intelligent knowledge extraction in organizations" so that we can better respond.


Re: Model of an intelligent knowledge extraction in organizations #extraction #definition

Mila Malekolkalami
 

Thank you Murray
It was helpful.


On Thu, Jan 14, 2021 at 2:15 AM, Murray Jennex via groups.io
<murphjen@...> wrote:
My journal, International Journal of Knowledge Management, has published several articles on how to use intelligent technologies to do knowledge extraction.  the home page for IJKM is: https://www.igi-global.com/journal/international-journal-knowledge-management/1083,,,,,murray jennex, editor in chief, IJKM


-----Original Message-----
From: Stan Garfield <stangarfield@...>
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Jan 13, 2021 1:04 pm
Subject: [SIKM] Model of an intelligent knowledge extraction in organizations

From: Mila Malekolkalami
Date: Wed, Jan 13, 2021 at 3:58 PM

Hello everyone. Hope you are safe and fine!

I have read all your valuable points in this topic.
Actually, I need some help and hints.
I am working on presenting a model of an intelligent knowledge extraction in organizations.
I don't want to work on the complicated topics such as engineering topics.
What are the main steps to start this task?
What do I have to know?
Can you help me and tell me how I have to start it? I can't find a source that can give me the instructions.
I would be really thankful if you can make it clear for me!
 
Best regards,
Mila


Re: Knowledge Management: Each man is my superior in that I may learn from him." #learning

Arthur Shelley
 

Apologies Bill - and perhaps others I may have unconsciously ignored.

 

In this era of information overload, we all struggle to cover everything that is worth doing. I wish I oud read every post on this forum and answer every email, but…

 

I am writing a new book which has consumed my time. I am very excited about the contribution I will make for society.

In this focus, one of my 5 email addresses (my main one) advises me I have a backlog of 32646 unread emails! The other email addresses have a miserly couple of thousand each. I guess yours got mixed up in this - sorry.

On top of this we get daily pings across the social media channels of LinkedIn, FB Messenger, WhatsApp, Telegram, WeChat, Line and of course good old SMS.

 

I am glad I decided to retire! ( I will take a look using search).

 

Maybe I need to priorities a little better, but everything is so interesting it is hard to jettison any activities.

That’s life!

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Producer: Creative Melbourne

Author: KNOWledge SUCCESSion  Sustained performance and capability growth through knowledge projects

Earlier Books: The Organizational Zoo (2007) & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader (2009)

Principal: www.IntelligentAnswers.com.au 

Founder: Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/arthurshelley/

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

Creative-Melbourne-Banner_2018_Final_Smaller

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of bill@...
Sent: Thursday, 14 January 2021 10:54 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Knowledge Management: Each man is my superior in that I may learn from him."

 

Thank you Arthur!  Good to hear from you. Reached out on email in 2020 a few times but did not hear back.

 

Stay safe!

 

Bill

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Arthur Shelley via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, January 10, 2021 19:15
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Knowledge Management: Each man is my superior in that I may learn from him."

 

Thanks for the article share Bill.

The world improves when we see the learning as the key outcome rather than the physical outputs generated.

Whilst a project output (tangible deliverable) does have value, it is rarely more important than the learning, relationships and trust built (or destroyed if not well- led) by those involved.

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Producer: Creative Melbourne

Author: KNOWledge SUCCESSion  Sustained performance and capability growth through knowledge projects

Earlier Books: The Organizational Zoo (2007) & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader (2009)

Principal: www.IntelligentAnswers.com.au 

Founder: Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/arthurshelley/

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

Creative-Melbourne-Banner_2018_Final_Smaller

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of bill@...
Sent: Monday, 11 January 2021 7:08 AM
To: SIKM@groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] Knowledge Management: Each man is my superior in that I may learn from him.” https://linkedin.com/pulse/knowledge-management-each-man-my-superior-i-may-l

 

2021 provides an oppty to leverage what we can learn from others-better. Grateful if you would check out my latest article: Knowledge Management: Each man is my superior in that I may learn from him.” https://linkedin.com/pulse/knowledge-management-each-man-my-superior-i-may-learn-bill-kaplan

 

Watching CBS Sunday Morning today and it got me thinking about this through a KM lense.

 

Best

 

Bill

 

  

 

Learn more about the solutions and value we provide at www.workingknowledge-csp.com

 


Re: Knowledge Management: Each man is my superior in that I may learn from him." #learning

 

Thank you Arthur!  Good to hear from you. Reached out on email in 2020 a few times but did not hear back.

 

Stay safe!

 

Bill

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Arthur Shelley via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, January 10, 2021 19:15
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Knowledge Management: Each man is my superior in that I may learn from him."

 

Thanks for the article share Bill.

The world improves when we see the learning as the key outcome rather than the physical outputs generated.

Whilst a project output (tangible deliverable) does have value, it is rarely more important than the learning, relationships and trust built (or destroyed if not well- led) by those involved.

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Producer: Creative Melbourne

Author: KNOWledge SUCCESSion  Sustained performance and capability growth through knowledge projects

Earlier Books: The Organizational Zoo (2007) & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader (2009)

Principal: www.IntelligentAnswers.com.au 

Founder: Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/arthurshelley/

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

Creative-Melbourne-Banner_2018_Final_Smaller

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of bill@...
Sent: Monday, 11 January 2021 7:08 AM
To: SIKM@groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] Knowledge Management: Each man is my superior in that I may learn from him.” https://linkedin.com/pulse/knowledge-management-each-man-my-superior-i-may-l

 

2021 provides an oppty to leverage what we can learn from others-better. Grateful if you would check out my latest article: Knowledge Management: Each man is my superior in that I may learn from him.” https://linkedin.com/pulse/knowledge-management-each-man-my-superior-i-may-learn-bill-kaplan

 

Watching CBS Sunday Morning today and it got me thinking about this through a KM lense.

 

Best

 

Bill

 

  

 

Learn more about the solutions and value we provide at www.workingknowledge-csp.com

 


Re: Model of an intelligent knowledge extraction in organizations #extraction #definition

Murray Jennex
 
Edited

My journal, International Journal of Knowledge Management, has published several articles on how to use intelligent technologies to do knowledge extraction.  the home page for IJKM is: https://www.igi-global.com/journal/international-journal-knowledge-management/1083

murray jennex, editor in chief, IJKM


-----Original Message-----
From: Stan Garfield <stangarfield@...>
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Jan 13, 2021 1:04 pm
Subject: [SIKM] Model of an intelligent knowledge extraction in organizations

From: Mila Malekolkalami
Date: Wed, Jan 13, 2021 at 3:58 PM

Hello everyone. Hope you are safe and fine!

I have read all your valuable points in this topic.
Actually, I need some help and hints.
I am working on presenting a model of an intelligent knowledge extraction in organizations.
I don't want to work on the complicated topics such as engineering topics.
What are the main steps to start this task?
What do I have to know?
Can you help me and tell me how I have to start it? I can't find a source that can give me the instructions.
I would be really thankful if you can make it clear for me!
 
Best regards,
Mila


Re: Model of an intelligent knowledge extraction in organizations #extraction #definition

Mila Malekolkalami
 

Thank you Stan,
There are different techniques to capture and extract knowledge. I mean tacit and explicit knowledge.
With the development of IT, there are new ways to capture and share knowledge such as data mining that is a technique to extract and discover knowledge from databases.
In the model which I am talking about I don’t want to limit the model to one technique.
I want to know if there is any way to extract automatically all types of knowledge in an organization. Of course supervised by human.



On Thu, Jan 14, 2021 at 1:18 AM, Stan Garfield
<stangarfield@...> wrote:
Mila, thanks for your post. I moved it to start a new topic.

Please provide some additional details on what you mean by "a model of an intelligent knowledge extraction in organizations" so that we can better respond.


Re: Model of an intelligent knowledge extraction in organizations #extraction #definition

Stan Garfield
 

Mila, thanks for your post. I moved it to start a new topic.

Please provide some additional details on what you mean by "a model of an intelligent knowledge extraction in organizations" so that we can better respond.


Model of an intelligent knowledge extraction in organizations #extraction #definition

Stan Garfield
 

From: Mila Malekolkalami
Date: Wed, Jan 13, 2021 at 3:58 PM

Hello everyone. Hope you are safe and fine!

I have read all your valuable points in this topic.
Actually, I need some help and hints.
I am working on presenting a model of an intelligent knowledge extraction in organizations.
I don't want to work on the complicated topics such as engineering topics.
What are the main steps to start this task?
What do I have to know?
Can you help me and tell me how I have to start it? I can't find a source that can give me the instructions.
I would be really thankful if you can make it clear for me!
 
Best regards,
Mila


Re: Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

Andrew Trickett
 

Hi David,

I think that the breadth of this topic might benefit from a live discussion as suggested earlier.

I'd be happy to participate in this as I would imagine would others to help you out, or give you some areas for consideration.

I've been posting on Linked in some of my thoughts on lessons learned which engendered some good dialogue, as has Nirmalla who has also responded to this thread.

Maybe if we record it this can be shared with other members of SIKM. 


Re: Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

Gabriela Fitz
 

Terrific, thanks! I have been designing some reflection practices (for social sector orgs) and am looking for additional ideas about questions that could serve teams working within quite different issue areas.


On Tue, Jan 12, 2021 at 3:13 PM David Graffagna <davidgraffagna@...> wrote:
Gabi ... I'll be happy to share our working set of questions we use to help project leads tackle gathering lessons learned their teams. I will clean them up (e.g., remove any corporate-specific references) and share a copy in this forum. 

Frankly, I have borrowed liberally from other resources to frame how we ask for lessons learned so these may be similar to things you have seen elsewhere, but as I said I'm happy to share ours!

Best,
David

--

Gabriela Fitz

Think Twice LLC

773.882.8250 | LinkedIn

www.thinktwicellc.com


Preferred Pronouns: she/her/hers





Re: Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

Matt Moore
 

Unless a lessons learned database is an element within an ongoing continuous improvement program, it will not yield value by itself.

Unless you can define who needs to learn a particular lesson and how you can identify when they have learned it, you have not adequately identified the lesson.

If your organisation is fat and happy then people will view learning lessons as an annoying waste of time.


Re: Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

David Graffagna
 

Gabi ... I'll be happy to share our working set of questions we use to help project leads tackle gathering lessons learned their teams. I will clean them up (e.g., remove any corporate-specific references) and share a copy in this forum. 

Frankly, I have borrowed liberally from other resources to frame how we ask for lessons learned so these may be similar to things you have seen elsewhere, but as I said I'm happy to share ours!

Best,
David


Re: Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

David Graffagna
 

Thanks Dennis ... I actually have your series of LinkedIn posts about lessons learned bookmarked and have used the series in the past for reference. Great stuff, very valuable. I appreciate you reminding me about that set of resources.

Best,

David


Re: Academic theories related to adoption of ESNs #ESN #adoption

Murray Jennex
 

TPB works best when you can push the adoption, I really recommend looking at the Perceived Benefit Model (from Triandis, applied by Thompson, Higgins, and Howell to IS and by me to KM) as it is designed for adoptions where adoption is voluntary.  In my mind all KM is voluntary, you can lead users to knowledge but you can't make them use it......murray jennex


-----Original Message-----
From: Rachad Najjar <rachadbn@...>
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Sent: Tue, Jan 12, 2021 4:17 am
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Academic theories related to adoption of ESNs

Hi Dennis, 
Technology adoption of corporate or enterprise social networks is an area that I have closely researched during my academic work and applied in the professional context in my current job (The Case of GE Renewable Energy). 
TLDR; 
Based on my experience and observations, I have formulated an initial conviction that a combination of UGT, TTF, TPB can mostly explain the adoption process and the post-adaptation behavior of individuals to continue to use a given technology (ESN). Consequently, my favorite theories are:
*UGT: Uses and Gratification Theory
*TTF: Task-Technology fit 
*TPB: Theory of planned behavior 
Detailed answer – 
Technology adoption models prove useful in understanding the user behavior and his acceptance of a technology, some other theories introduce characteristics that explain the organization decision to acquire the technology. Despite the importance of both aspects, technology adoption by an organization is actually influenced by the two aspects and thus they could not be addressed separately. Actually, the adoption of a technology inside an organization starts with the organization considering adopting it, collecting information about it and then deciding to acquire it (or not). But that is not enough, for a technology to be adopted inside the organization, users should also accept it for a long period of time. Only then a technology could be considered as successfully adopted inside the organization and it can start to produce business value. However, investigating the literature shows that existing theories and most of the new emerging models lack that holistic view. In fact, by combining existing models with existing constructs, researches succeed to enrich the technology adoption theories but still do not take into consideration simultaneously the two aspects that are: the determinants impacting each adoption process phase (pre-adoption, adoption, post-adoption) and the level of analysis (individual or organizational). 
In her recent research work, Dr. Sarah Beyrouthy has presented a very comprehensive literature study on the determinants of a successful technology adoption at both a) the level of analysis and b) each adoption process phase. I have attached an extract of the determinants influencing the technology adoption at each phase (pre-adoption, adoption-implementation, post-adoption). 

You may find her work at this link https://tel.archives-ouvertes.fr/tel-01736322 


Thank you
Rachad 


Re: Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

Tim Powell
 
Edited

Hi all,

 

I second Stephen’s comments below about the relative ROI of lessons learned databases (LLDs).  The big challenges in my experience are (1) INPUT – that there may not be consensus on what issues to cover and/or what the resolutions were -- especially where non-optimal results occurred; and (2) OUTPUT, the applicability of any given “lesson” to any novel situation.  Relevance and timeliness may both be at issue. 

 

Though appealing in theory, I have yet to see a LLD provide user value on a sustained basis.  I would be glad to hear of examples where they did.

 

Regards, 

Tim

TIM WOOD POWELL | President, The Knowledge Agency® Author, The Value of Knowledge

New York City, USA | DIRECT/MOBILE +1.212.243.1200 | ZOOM 212-243-1200

SITE www.KnowledgeAgency.com | BLOG www.KnowledgeValueChain.com

 

 

From: <main@SIKM.groups.io> on behalf of Stephen Bounds <km@...>
Reply-To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Date: Monday, January 11, 2021 at 4:45 PM
To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessonslearned

 

Hi David,

I would echo Barbara's sentiments and suggest that it would be very valuable to ensure that you understand the ROI (and/or relative ROI) of your work. For example, can you answer these questions:

  • What actions are going to yield the biggest results from a lessons learned exercise?
  • How often will this happen?
  • Are lessons mostly going to improve one team's work or lots of teams' work?

Knowing this will help you to frame how much effort you put into each of capture, categorisation, discovery, and application. Unfortunately too many KM efforts fail because they lack the sustainable returns to justify the effort involved, and having a clear sense of value is critical to overcoming this barrier.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 11/01/2021 9:13 pm, Barbara Fillip wrote:

Hello David,

Perhaps to complement the excellent answers already provided, I would ask a slightly provocative question.  Are you sure a lessons learned database is the right answer?  While it is satisfying to collect lessons, organize  them and do everything possible to make them accessible, I have become increasingly skeptical of the focus on collecting and storing,  which can become overwhelming when you arrive at a certain volume of lessons to process. Having worked with Excel-style lessons learned capture processes, I am wondering how much duplication and overlapping or related lessons you may be seeing? How are you validating the lessons? Do you have a process for reviewing and culling lessons? Sometimes lessons emerging from projects are full of useful cues for training departments about what to focus on in terms of training rather than truly original lessons.  In other words, while a majority of the focus of such efforts tends to be placed on collect and store for access, it is probably more effective to 1) identify critical knowledge gaps that can be addressed by learning from the project teams themselves; 2) collect lessons specifically around these knowledge gaps rather than a general appeal for lessons; 3) process the lessons for the purpose of embedding them in training, job aids, guidance documents, etc... and don't bother trying to get individual employees to access a general lessons learned repository. 
While a general lessons learned process might be beneficial for projects to go through, if the processing and repackaging is focused on priority themes (critical knowledge as previously mentioned) it should be both more manageable and more effective in terms of uptake.

So to go back to my original question, is a lessons learned database the right answer to your challenge? A lessons learned process might be part of the answer, but storing and making the lessons accessible to a broad audience may not be the optimal approach if you really want the lessons to be shared and utilized. 

 

Best,

Barbara Fillip



 

 

On Sun, Jan 10, 2021 at 8:35 PM Tom Barfield <thomas.m.barfield@...> wrote:

David - based on the many responses this sounds like a topic that would benefit from a live discussion.  Would you be interested in having the community host a live peer assist discussion to focus on your question?  If so, I will work with others in the community to set this up.

Tom

 


Re: RealKM Magazine Award #awards

Arthur Shelley
 

Richard,

 

Thank you for your patronage of RealKM Magazine and for your insights on the shift in awareness of knowledge over time.

Every contribution makes a difference – in both areas.

 

I agree that COVID has highlighted/reinforced the need for real time knowledge and open conversations about the actions to be taken as this knowledge emerges. This is what one of the AusKM awards went to Anthony Macali for his voluntary COVIDlive.com.au initiative to collate real time statistics and insights in COVID and share them quickly. This helped decisionmakers to be more informed when determining actions and strategy.

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Producer: Creative Melbourne

Author: KNOWledge SUCCESSion  Sustained performance and capability growth through knowledge projects

Earlier Books: The Organizational Zoo (2007) & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader (2009)

Principal: www.IntelligentAnswers.com.au 

Founder: Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/arthurshelley/

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

Creative-Melbourne-Banner_2018_Final_Smaller

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Richard Vines
Sent: Monday, 11 January 2021 3:27 PM
To: main@sikm.groups.io
Cc: SIKM@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] RealKM Magazine Award

 

Hi Arthur, 

 

As a commitment to professional mutual support I would be pleased to donate $100 per annum for this Arther. If OK wiht you, could you circulate where I / we can follow this through (or email me personally).  

 

By way of reflection, I now have carried the title of KM specialist in one governmental institution for over 10 years. To me, that seems extraordinary given the different discourses and narratives we now observe amongst ourselves, including with rise of the Real KM magazine.

 

Of course, my length of service does not necessarily equate to realising personal or professional ambitions. The rise of COVID related matters (and coincidently, my secondment into COVID work for one of our State Govt agencies) has been a sobering reminder to us all (and to me) that the world of phenological science knows no neat paradigmatic boundaries, in the same way as physics impacts bushfire behaviour. Whatever views we may or may not hold, we can but respect the impact of evolutionary science. I can but admire what our State Governments on the whole, here in Australia have done much to draw on subject matter experts to generate real-world policy responses in response to COVID in particular. And, I can but hugely emphathise with family and friends in the US and Britain in terms of what is happening there. 

 

Here's hoping a new era might unfold in Australia in regard to climate and adaptations and that the US and Australia can continue to be great friends and confidants in these types of demanding global agenda. 

 

All best for the new year.

 

 

Richard

 

 

On Mon, Jan 11, 2021 at 2:46 PM Arthur Shelley <arthur@...> wrote:

Happy New Year KMers,

 

I hope that your festive season was full of shared experiences and rekindled relationships (proving that KM is a real science that has practical application even in our personal lives).

 

You may be aware that in December (in that year we do not wish to mention), a GOOD thing happened…

Real KM Magazine received a well deserved Knowledge Award from the Australian Society for Knowledge Management.

I wanted to share a few reflections on this service here (which I also did on KM4Dev, so apologies for cross-posting).

 

I would appreciate your considering this post to ensure Real KM magazine can be sustainable in the excellent service it provides and is recognised for…

Thanks… (neither Stephen nor Bruce asked me to write this or knew it was coming before I posted it):

 

RealKM Magazine is a shining example of genuine knowledge sharing that adds value to all readers.

Everyone in this forum will benefit from being a regular reader (and potentially a contributor).

 

Stephen Bounds (Founder) & Bruce Boyes (Lead writer and editor – both contributors here in this forum as well) deserve all the accolades they have received for the very hard work they invest, and continue to invest. They publish a credible (evidence based) and insightful (full of useful ideas and examples of good KM Practice) publication that is superior to some high cost commercial/academic publications.

 

The reason we benefit from this quality publication is Stephen & Bruce invest many more hours than they get paid for and this is not a sustainable (or fair) model. 

If each reader became a subscriber, even if only donating $1 per week (a fraction of the cost of a cup of coffee), the magazine could generate an even more comprehensive sharing and the people creating the value for you, could be more appropriately compensated for their effort. I personally financially patronise the initiative because I believe in what the magazine achieves for many. I encourage all KMers to think about reciprocity, respect and mutual value relationships

 

Mostly, we get what we deserve in life ... but with the advent of internet an unreasonable expectation “free extraction” mentality is becoming more common in society.

Societies like SIKM Leaders are a terrific source of Knowledge, because of a few people like Stan and his contributing friends investing time to assist others. This is great thing. However, not everyone can do this, which should not limit the range of ways we can acquire knowledge.

 

Of course we can get "Free information" – but it is a gamble on what you receive in an internet search. 

However ...

invest significant time to critically analyse the search output content to make informed judgement to separate outright lies from promotional propaganda from (potential) "truths" (they are all out there).

Then ...

verify the evidence behind the potential "truths" to determine how credible they are what the knowledge gaps & limitations are...

 

At this stage, you are far better served to subscribe to RealKM Magazine as this is the investment they do for you...

Surely this is worth making a contribution to...?

 

I reflect on the thinking that expects high quality services to be available free! 

Ask your local shops if you can pop in and grab anything you want - for nothing ...

Unlike your shops, RealKM Magazine just want to cover their costs of being a KM Sharing Role Model, not make a profit.

Please think about this, as unsustainable models eventually expire. 

Can you spare the cost of a coffee each month?

How much value can you create when you apply the received knowledge?

Would you share all you insights with everyone for no return? 

How much can you expect others to simply give you fir nothing?

 

If we want a fair sharing world/community (effectively a foundation principle of KM), we need to balance our contributions and receiving actions!

We are the culmination of the decisions we make – individually and collectively.

 

 

 

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Producer: Creative Melbourne

Author: KNOWledge SUCCESSion  Sustained performance and capability growth through knowledge projects

Earlier Books: The Organizational Zoo (2007) & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader (2009)

Principal: www.IntelligentAnswers.com.au 

Founder: Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/arthurshelley/

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

Creative-Melbourne-Banner_2018_Final_Smaller

 

 


 

--

Richard Vines

Mob: 0467717431

Email address: richardvines1@...

Skype: projectlessons


Re: Academic theories related to adoption of ESNs #ESN #adoption

 

Hi Dennis, 

Technology adoption of corporate or enterprise social networks is an area that I have closely researched during my academic work and applied in the professional context in my current job (The Case of GE Renewable Energy). 

TLDR; 

Based on my experience and observations, I have formulated an initial conviction that a combination of UGT, TTF, TPB can mostly explain the adoption process and the post-adaptation behavior of individuals to continue to use a given technology (ESN). Consequently, my favorite theories are:

*UGT: Uses and Gratification Theory

*TTF: Task-Technology fit 

*TPB: Theory of planned behavior 

Detailed answer – 

Technology adoption models prove useful in understanding the user behavior and his acceptance of a technology, some other theories introduce characteristics that explain the organization decision to acquire the technology. Despite the importance of both aspects, technology adoption by an organization is actually influenced by the two aspects and thus they could not be addressed separately. Actually, the adoption of a technology inside an organization starts with the organization considering adopting it, collecting information about it and then deciding to acquire it (or not). But that is not enough, for a technology to be adopted inside the organization, users should also accept it for a long period of time. Only then a technology could be considered as successfully adopted inside the organization and it can start to produce business value. However, investigating the literature shows that existing theories and most of the new emerging models lack that holistic view. In fact, by combining existing models with existing constructs, researches succeed to enrich the technology adoption theories but still do not take into consideration simultaneously the two aspects that are: the determinants impacting each adoption process phase (pre-adoption, adoption, post-adoption) and the level of analysis (individual or organizational). 

In her recent research work, Dr. Sarah Beyrouthy has presented a very comprehensive literature study on the determinants of a successful technology adoption at both a) the level of analysis and b) each adoption process phase. I have attached an extract of the determinants influencing the technology adoption at each phase (pre-adoption, adoption-implementation, post-adoption). 

You may find her work at this link https://tel.archives-ouvertes.fr/tel-01736322 


Thank you
Rachad 


Re: Request: Removal from KM Thought Leaders list #thought-leaders #standards #state-of-KM

Boris Jaeger
 

Thanks, Stan!


Re: Academic theories related to adoption of ESNs #ESN #adoption

Matt Moore
 

Hi Dennis,

Not sure if you’ve come across the work of Kai Riemer and his colleagues - they did a lot of work with Yammer (back when they were still Yammer) - e.g.
https://byresearch.wordpress.com/2012/01/30/snep/

The term "ESN" feels a bit 2010ish to me - associated with the likes of Yammer and Jive (back when Facebook was kinda cool and fun rather than where your dodgy uncle posts conspiracy theories). I would say that Teams and Slack are not really “enterprise-wide” - they tend to silo groups into, er, teams. And the discourse around them is very different to narrative that the likes of Adam Pisoni were trying to craft around Yammer.

BTW I actually work in an organisation that uses Slack very heavily. I get maybe 1-2 emails a day - but probably upwards of 100 Slack messages. However it's not necessarily a collaborative nirvana. So if the definition of "ESN adoption" is "everyone using Slack" then  I can tell you how we did that.

Matt Moore
+61 423 784 504

On Jan 12, 2021, at 1:20 PM, Murray Jennex via groups.io <murphjen=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
if you are looking at TRA and TAM then you should also look at the Perceived Benefit Model (Thompson, Higgins, and Howell, (Personal computing: toward a conceptual model of utilizationRL Thompson, CA Higgins, JM Howell - MIS quarterly, 1991 - JSTOR shows how it can be used).  The actual theory is from Triandis.  I used this theory in my PhD dissertation and actually ever since.  I find this theory does a better job for situations where you can't force adoption of something.

On another note, a lot of the base papers are actually available for free on Research Gate.  Use Google Scholar to google them and it will provide the link to the pdfs that are available....murray jennex


-----Original Message-----
From: Dennis Pearce <denpearce@...>
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Sent: Mon, Jan 11, 2021 5:27 pm
Subject: [SIKM] Academic theories related to adoption of ESNs

I've felt for a long time that when it comes to studying the factors that impact adoption of Enterprise Social Networks in organizations, there's a lot of good solid academic research that never makes the leap over to actual use because (1) academics are more motivated by publication and citation than they are by encouraging application and (2) practitioners usually don't go looking to academics for help because their information is often behind a journal paywall and incomprehensible to your average layperson even if they could get their hands on the paper.
So I've started a series of blog posts to discuss academic theories that might have some bearing on the adoption of ESNs. There are many many IT and psychology theories out there that try to model behavior change and what drives the adoption of new technologies. Here's a link to my introductory post: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/esn-adoption-introduction-dennis-pearce/
Links to my posts on the theories I've covered so far are at the bottom of that post and at the bottom of every post in the series. I've tried to keep the posts fairly short and easy to read. So far I've covered seven with more to come as I get time to write. The ones so far are:
  • Theory of Reasoned Action
  • Technology Acceptance Model
  • Diffusion of Innovations Theory
  • Task-Technology-Fit Model
  • Hedonic Motivation System Adoption Model
  • Representation Theory
  • Swift Trust Theory
I'd be interested to see what you think of the idea and if you have any of your favorite theories to offer. I'm looking for theories that have been published in peer-reviewed journals and have a decent number of citations (hundreds or thousands). Not really looking for any one-offs that haven't been replicated or extended. Also, I have a pretty niche focus limited to theories that can be applied to behavior change or technology adoption in the context of ESNs, not any old KM theory.
Thanks, Dennis


Re: Request: Removal from KM Thought Leaders list #thought-leaders #standards #state-of-KM

Arthur Shelley
 

Boris,

 

I agree with Stephen - your experiences and contributions to this community over a long time have been of benefit to all.

Not everyone in any community always agrees with each other. The fact that there is a diverse range of perspectives about what KM is, what directions it is taking and how to optimise the benefits it offers to people and organisations is a good thing. The statement “for every PhD there is an equal and opposite PhD” stands in our paradoxical world- we CAN argue seemingly opposites and yet both be right. If we constructively and rigorously discuss differences, we are likely to evolve our collective and individual thinking. Your voice is an important part of this dialogue.

 

I know you were against the “standard” and that is a position help by a number of other experienced KMers. I don’t see the ISO3040 as a way to “standardise” what KMers do. I see it as foundation of important elements that every organisation will benefit from if they address these in a way that is aligned with their purpose and context. It helps those less experienced than us establish a stronger argument to implement knowledge initiatives and secure support from them, without prescribing details of what they do and how. Since the publication of the standard, there have been several books, guides and blogs written to assist people inside and outside the knowledge profession increase awareness of the importance of knowledge for sustainable success of people and organisations.

 

I certainly consider you a KM Thought Leader, whether you are on Stan’s list or not. The fact that you “speak your mind” publicly about how and why you see things differently is an important part of our collective learning and reflections. It helps every member to develop their knowledge maturity and highlights there are many views on what is best.  I hope you can find a way to see that your voice is respected in these exchanges of differences and is not being rejected. I hope you remain an active member of this forum and believe you have earnt your place in Stans List.

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Producer: Creative Melbourne

Author: KNOWledge SUCCESSion  Sustained performance and capability growth through knowledge projects

Earlier Books: The Organizational Zoo (2007) & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader (2009)

Principal: www.IntelligentAnswers.com.au 

Founder: Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/arthurshelley/

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

Creative-Melbourne-Banner_2018_Final_Smaller

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Stephen Bounds
Sent: Tuesday, 12 January 2021 8:39 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Request: Removal from KM Thought Leaders list

 

Hi Boris,

Do you have any written summary of your current concerns that I could look at? Or are you prepared to explain further on this list for our benefit?

I remember you were skeptical of some of the ISO 30401 developments a while back. However, I wasn't aware of the depth of your concerns and think it would be useful for the community to understand what has precipitated this position.

Thanks,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 12/01/2021 4:37 am, Boris Jaeger wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Dear Stan,

 

could you please do me a favor and remove me completely from your KM Thought Leaders list.

 

I make this request in public to show my protest against the current developments in the field of Knowledge Management.

 

That's it for now.

 

Thanks, keep safe & healthy,

Boris

1141 - 1160 of 9605