Date   

Re: SIKM Peer Assist - Lessons Learned Delivery - January 25, 2021 #lessons-learned #peer-assist

Arthur Shelley
 

Tom,

 

This is a great initiative and I wish I could have joined you (apologies for not being part of it).

I am sure that you will create value for David and all involved in the session.

 

The experience of sharing knowledge to help others (through activities like Peer Assist) is a great demonstration of what can be achieved when people openly share knowledge. It not only brings tangible actions for the beneficiary, it bring a range of intangible benefits like connection, relationship, trust and a sense of contribution.

 

These cannot be bought, only given and received by people in mutually beneficial trusted relationships.

Enjoy!

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Principal: www.IntelligentAnswers.com.au 

Founder: Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/arthurshelley/

Author: KNOWledge SUCCESSion  Sustained performance and capability growth through knowledge projects

Earlier Books: The Organizational Zoo (2007) & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader (2009)

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Barfield
Sent: Sunday, 24 January 2021 4:16 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] INVITATION: SIKM Peer Assist - Lessons Learned Delivery, Mon, January 25, 3-4:30 CST #peer-assist #lessonslearned

 

There has been a great response to the invitation to this Monday's mini-peer assist for David Graffagna.  We currently have about 30 people who have accepted the invitation - with a nice mix of people interested to listen and learn and some who plan to actively contribute.  

Here are the logistics for the call that starts at 3 PM CST:

Microsoft Teams meeting

Join on your computer or mobile app

Click here to join the meeting

Or call in (audio only)

+1 312-319-1370,,237678926#   United States, Chicago

Phone Conference ID: 237 678 926#

Find a local number | Reset PIN


Re: Teaching knowledge management as a discipline in schools #schools

Dennis Thomas
 

Hello one and all,

Attached are two documents:

(1) A Syllabus for our Certified Knowledge Specialist Course I 
(2) And an article I wrote called "Knowledge Science: The Great Big Beautiful Puzzle.”

They are self-explanatory, however, I will say this.  My 13 year old nephew is patiently waiting (as am I) for our IQxCloud v3.0 rational reasoning KMS to be released (soon).  He already knows about sex (previous mention), so he is ready to move on.  It works the way people naturally think, so he will learn to model most any knowledge domain quickly - he already gets the idea, he just needs the tool to make it happen. His first project will be to model the organizational structure, sub-substructures, and relevant content of the State University (Public Information) that he wants to attend.  My plan is for him to then call the President of the University to make a presentation and earn a scholarship.  There may be a car involved in this as an incentive - not sure yet.  

The entire course, and two more, are organized in an ISO 9001 QMS format.  The plan is to roll the 3-series plan out.  

Let me know what you think?  


Dennis L. Thomas
IQStrategix
(810) 662-5199

Leveraging Organizational Knowledge 


On January 23, 2021 at 12:06:20 PM, Moria Levy (moria@...) wrote:

thank you all for your answers. Of course additional replies are welcomed.
When teaching high school students:
a. There is a great emphasize on skills, approaches and tools.
b. The examples and iseas are translated to their world- teaching presonal KM, knowledge retention of the their grandparents and family traditions, social media and knowledge sharing among youngsters, etc.
c. To those interested, details can be found at: info-data-knowledge and Curriculum. They learn about 1000 hours in the first two years around KM and at the last year run a major research/project on one of the three disciplines. Of course if there are any further questions- you can address me.
I am writing a case study research on the program to be published next year, but my interest on simlar programs is not limited to this research. So if you hear about some such program in the future- posting will be appreciated, and if one is starting to push a KM/Data Analysis/Information program in his or her country and want to consult... do not hesitate and be in touch.
Moria


Re: SIKM Peer Assist - Lessons Learned Delivery - January 25, 2021 #lessons-learned #peer-assist

Tom Barfield
 

There has been a great response to the invitation to this Monday's mini-peer assist for David Graffagna.  We currently have about 30 people who have accepted the invitation - with a nice mix of people interested to listen and learn and some who plan to actively contribute.  

Here are the logistics for the call that starts at 3 PM CST:

Microsoft Teams meeting

Join on your computer or mobile app

Click here to join the meeting

Or call in (audio only)

+1 312-319-1370,,237678926#   United States, Chicago

Phone Conference ID: 237 678 926#

Find a local number | Reset PIN


Re: Teaching knowledge management as a discipline in schools #schools

Moria Levy
 

thank you all for your answers. Of course additional replies are welcomed.
When teaching high school students:
a. There is a great emphasize on skills, approaches and tools.
b. The examples and iseas are translated to their world- teaching presonal KM, knowledge retention of the their grandparents and family traditions, social media and knowledge sharing among youngsters, etc.
c. To those interested, details can be found at: info-data-knowledge and Curriculum. They learn about 1000 hours in the first two years around KM and at the last year run a major research/project on one of the three disciplines. Of course if there are any further questions- you can address me.
I am writing a case study research on the program to be published next year, but my interest on simlar programs is not limited to this research. So if you hear about some such program in the future- posting will be appreciated, and if one is starting to push a KM/Data Analysis/Information program in his or her country and want to consult... do not hesitate and be in touch.
Moria


Re: Teaching knowledge management as a discipline in schools #schools

Tim Powell
 

I’m sure that all of us here are troubled by the fact that our world is awash in tidal waves of misinformation, disinformation, malinformation, propaganda, “sponsored content,” and the like — often with catastrophic results.  Many of the solutions currently being proposed for this global “infodemic” are supply-side focused — like regulating and/or moderating social media. But I feel that in addition, and perhaps ultimately to greater effect, we need to focus on the demand side — the consumers/users of information.

 

Basic training in digital media and information literacy is urgently needed at all age/expertise levels.  With ongoing updates, as the situation morphs.  I work with senior organizational leaders and university graduate students on this — but it needs to begin much earlier than that.  I’d propose that even age 15 is too late, and that it should begin around the same time as “adult topics” like sex education — 12 or so (which is typically the seventh grade here in the US.)

 

There is some of this already happening here and in Europe, but I don’t have details.  And as I understand it, it’s neither systemic nor sustained.  Any insights those of you here can offer will be most appreciated.

 

tp


TIM WOOD POWELL 
| President, The Knowledge Agency® Author, The Value of Knowledge

New York City, USA | DIRECT/MOBILE +1.212.243.1200 | ZOOM 212-243-1200

SITE www.KnowledgeAgency.com | BLOG www.KnowledgeValueChain.com

 

 

From: <main@SIKM.groups.io> on behalf of Eli Miron <emiron@...>
Reply-To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, January 23, 2021 at 9:59 AM
To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Teaching knowledge management as a discipline in schools

 

Moria meant ages   15 - 18

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Stephen Bounds
Sent: Saturday, January 23, 2021 6:48 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Teaching knowledge management as a discipline in schools

 

Hi Moria,

That's really interesting. Do you know if there is any publicly available information on the curriculum covered? (It's not a problem if it is not in English.)

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 22/01/2021 10:05 pm, Moria Levy wrote:

Hello all
In Israel we have a special program in highschools teaching data, information and knowledge studies, as an expertise (learning 3 years from ages 15-180.
I am curious to know if any other country/state has similar programs.
Thank you,
Moria 


Re: Teaching knowledge management as a discipline in schools #schools

Eli Miron
 

Moria meant ages   15 - 18

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Stephen Bounds
Sent: Saturday, January 23, 2021 6:48 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Teaching knowledge management as a discipline in schools

 

Hi Moria,

That's really interesting. Do you know if there is any publicly available information on the curriculum covered? (It's not a problem if it is not in English.)

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 22/01/2021 10:05 pm, Moria Levy wrote:

Hello all
In Israel we have a special program in highschools teaching data, information and knowledge studies, as an expertise (learning 3 years from ages 15-180.
I am curious to know if any other country/state has similar programs.
Thank you,
Moria 


Re: Teaching knowledge management as a discipline in schools #schools

Ginetta Gueli
 

Hello Moria!
I do not think this is happening in Italy. You can find specific KM semesters in some university, for example at Roma 3 University there is a semester on KM, but it is part of the full study cycle in Business Administration. It is an optional semester not a mandatory one, by the way.
 
For your information, in Italy KM is not well known and finding a pure KM job is almost utopia.
 
All the best,
Ginetta

--
Ginetta Gueli
Information & Knowledge Manager | Project Manager


Re: Teaching knowledge management as a discipline in schools #schools

Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Moria,

That's really interesting. Do you know if there is any publicly available information on the curriculum covered? (It's not a problem if it is not in English.)

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 22/01/2021 10:05 pm, Moria Levy wrote:

Hello all
In Israel we have a special program in highschools teaching data, information and knowledge studies, as an expertise (learning 3 years from ages 15-180.
I am curious to know if any other country/state has similar programs.
Thank you,
Moria 


Re: Teaching knowledge management as a discipline in schools #schools

Brett Patron
 

I think it is a mistake to teach "knowledge management".  Sure, introduce the ideas, discuss the various definitions and the ways it is employed.

I think it is more important to teach skills, like mapping processes, understanding collaboration, how groups decide.

These skills will frame the conditions for discovery of KM as a discipline. 

 

Brett Patron
KM Strategist
US DOD/Joint Enabling Capabilities Command
Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia

www.twitter.com/kmfordecision


Re: Knowledge & Evidence in Decision making - What does the literature say? #research

John Antill
 

For the Fire Department there is a lot of information on the https://www.fireengineering.com/ https://www.firehouse.com/  https://www.firechief.com/ https://www.iawfonline.org/wildfire-magazine/ https://www.iaff.org/magazine/ 
Previous knowledge came from there. I was a firefighter, engineer, and lieutenant from 1998 to 2008
You could also look at how the militaries do this type of crisis management when they make operational decisions.  
John Antill
MCKM, CKS IA KT
MS KM Student
256-541-1229


On Thu, Jan 21, 2021 at 6:25 PM Richard Vines via groups.io <richardvines1=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
In the spirit of Stephen's suggestion, and to analyse your key point ...

We were wondering if you were aware of any research or data that allows us to understand how operational decisions are made and the types of response activities that are undertaken during an incident response by operational staff? 

 An interesting context is a challenge of introducing Integrated Primary Mental Health Care in Rural and Regional contexts. The history of this goes back to the introduction of Medicare rebates for psychological services in primary care via general practitioners/family physical referrals (introduced in Australia in 2007). When this policy change was enacted, there was not a commitment to the sort of system-based and operational reflexivity you are referring to Stuart. IN many ways, this lack of attention to system-based reflexivity is common across a lot of knowledge intensive industry networks and perhaps is an area that the domain of KM could have advocated for, supported and enabled over long periods of time. Arguing for both empirical and intuitive responses to system pertubations. 

Many psychologists have been arguing and promoting such system-based reflexivity - an example of a recently released publication is this https://link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1007%2F978-981-10-5012-1_9-1 (declaring my sister is the author of this article), published in this book Handbook of Rural, Remote, and very Remote Mental Health.

Noting that the language of practitioner decision-based reflexivity as we would use this in KM does not permeate other knowledge-intensive industry networks such as those that make up any integrated health care service systems. 

I am aware that the Vic Govt emergency service networks have done some very good work over a period of time in emergency management along the lines you are describing, but I cannot for the life of me remember the context in which I heard about this. But given your networks, I am sure you are right on to this. 

For the moment, 


Richard 


On Fri, Jan 22, 2021 at 9:53 AM Stephen Bounds <km@...> wrote:

Hi Stu,

I don't have any specific research, but I think you might find some productive starting points in clinical practice. For example the document below has an extensive section on the process of evaluation and revision of clinical practice guidelines:

https://www.health.qld.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0029/143696/nhmrc_clinprgde.pdf

Specifically I thought this might be helpful as an overarching approach for your work:

Among possible methods for evaluation of guidelines are the following:

• comparing changes in clinical practice or health outcomes, or both, in areas of exceptionally high guideline promotion with changes in areas of exceptionally low guideline promotion;

• comparing health outcomes in areas of exceptionally high guideline uptake with outcomes in areas of exceptionally low guideline uptake—focus group testing can be useful to elucidate factors that have influenced this uptake.

When evaluating the guidelines it is important to focus on the guidelines themselves, rather than on the clinicians or other service providers. If there is little change in practice, or little adherence to the guidelines, this may be a consequence of a wide range of factors, among them the guideline development, dissemination and implementation process.

This would map nicely to a SenseMaker approach if you were so inclined and wanted to drill down into specific clusters.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 20/01/2021 9:22 am, Stuart French wrote:
Hi all,

The CFA R&D team are currently developing the "Our Operations" section of the 10-year Research Implementation Plan. 

 

We were wondering if you were aware of any research or data that allows us to understand how operational decisions are made and the types of response activities that are undertaken during an incident response by operational staff? Links to the broader decision making field would be appreciated, but anything specific to emergency services is what we are after.

 

We were hoping to design some research which captures the current baseline of response decisions and actions, evaluates their outcomes, and provide recommendations for improvements. This includes the difference between actual decision making and the official planned and reasoned decisions that are often talked about in retrospect once the outcome is known. 

 

It would be wonderful if you could point us in the direction of any people, existing resources, or data that would help us to better understand this space.

Cheers,

Stuart French
Program Mgr, Knowledge, Country Fire Authority (Australia)



--
Richard Vines
Mob: 0467717431
Email address: richardvines1@...
Skype: projectlessons


Re: Teaching knowledge management as a discipline in schools #schools

Cindy Young
 

Hello, Moria,

I don't know of any high schools that do this, but that's not to say it's not happening. It's something that I am looking at incorporating since my interest in teaching KM is getting to the people when they are starting their careers. I have already started looking at high school programs/electives and am reaching out to local colleges in their business programs to provide them with an elective in KM. I would be interested in hearing how your students like KM in high school and if they are more open to it in high school as opposed to those who "have to do it" in their daily professional lives.

Regards,

Cindy


Teaching knowledge management as a discipline in schools #schools

Moria Levy
 

Hello all
In Israel we have a special program in highschools teaching data, information and knowledge studies, as an expertise (learning 3 years from ages 15-180.
I am curious to know if any other country/state has similar programs.
Thank you,
Moria 


Re: Knowledge & Evidence in Decision making - What does the literature say? #research

Richard Vines
 

In the spirit of Stephen's suggestion, and to analyse your key point ...

We were wondering if you were aware of any research or data that allows us to understand how operational decisions are made and the types of response activities that are undertaken during an incident response by operational staff? 

 An interesting context is a challenge of introducing Integrated Primary Mental Health Care in Rural and Regional contexts. The history of this goes back to the introduction of Medicare rebates for psychological services in primary care via general practitioners/family physical referrals (introduced in Australia in 2007). When this policy change was enacted, there was not a commitment to the sort of system-based and operational reflexivity you are referring to Stuart. IN many ways, this lack of attention to system-based reflexivity is common across a lot of knowledge intensive industry networks and perhaps is an area that the domain of KM could have advocated for, supported and enabled over long periods of time. Arguing for both empirical and intuitive responses to system pertubations. 

Many psychologists have been arguing and promoting such system-based reflexivity - an example of a recently released publication is this https://link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1007%2F978-981-10-5012-1_9-1 (declaring my sister is the author of this article), published in this book Handbook of Rural, Remote, and very Remote Mental Health.

Noting that the language of practitioner decision-based reflexivity as we would use this in KM does not permeate other knowledge-intensive industry networks such as those that make up any integrated health care service systems. 

I am aware that the Vic Govt emergency service networks have done some very good work over a period of time in emergency management along the lines you are describing, but I cannot for the life of me remember the context in which I heard about this. But given your networks, I am sure you are right on to this. 

For the moment, 


Richard 


On Fri, Jan 22, 2021 at 9:53 AM Stephen Bounds <km@...> wrote:

Hi Stu,

I don't have any specific research, but I think you might find some productive starting points in clinical practice. For example the document below has an extensive section on the process of evaluation and revision of clinical practice guidelines:

https://www.health.qld.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0029/143696/nhmrc_clinprgde.pdf

Specifically I thought this might be helpful as an overarching approach for your work:

Among possible methods for evaluation of guidelines are the following:

• comparing changes in clinical practice or health outcomes, or both, in areas of exceptionally high guideline promotion with changes in areas of exceptionally low guideline promotion;

• comparing health outcomes in areas of exceptionally high guideline uptake with outcomes in areas of exceptionally low guideline uptake—focus group testing can be useful to elucidate factors that have influenced this uptake.

When evaluating the guidelines it is important to focus on the guidelines themselves, rather than on the clinicians or other service providers. If there is little change in practice, or little adherence to the guidelines, this may be a consequence of a wide range of factors, among them the guideline development, dissemination and implementation process.

This would map nicely to a SenseMaker approach if you were so inclined and wanted to drill down into specific clusters.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 20/01/2021 9:22 am, Stuart French wrote:
Hi all,

The CFA R&D team are currently developing the "Our Operations" section of the 10-year Research Implementation Plan. 

 

We were wondering if you were aware of any research or data that allows us to understand how operational decisions are made and the types of response activities that are undertaken during an incident response by operational staff? Links to the broader decision making field would be appreciated, but anything specific to emergency services is what we are after.

 

We were hoping to design some research which captures the current baseline of response decisions and actions, evaluates their outcomes, and provide recommendations for improvements. This includes the difference between actual decision making and the official planned and reasoned decisions that are often talked about in retrospect once the outcome is known. 

 

It would be wonderful if you could point us in the direction of any people, existing resources, or data that would help us to better understand this space.

Cheers,

Stuart French
Program Mgr, Knowledge, Country Fire Authority (Australia)



--
Richard Vines
Mob: 0467717431
Email address: richardvines1@...
Skype: projectlessons


Re: Knowledge & Evidence in Decision making - What does the literature say? #research

Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Stu,

I don't have any specific research, but I think you might find some productive starting points in clinical practice. For example the document below has an extensive section on the process of evaluation and revision of clinical practice guidelines:

https://www.health.qld.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0029/143696/nhmrc_clinprgde.pdf

Specifically I thought this might be helpful as an overarching approach for your work:

Among possible methods for evaluation of guidelines are the following:

• comparing changes in clinical practice or health outcomes, or both, in areas of exceptionally high guideline promotion with changes in areas of exceptionally low guideline promotion;

• comparing health outcomes in areas of exceptionally high guideline uptake with outcomes in areas of exceptionally low guideline uptake—focus group testing can be useful to elucidate factors that have influenced this uptake.

When evaluating the guidelines it is important to focus on the guidelines themselves, rather than on the clinicians or other service providers. If there is little change in practice, or little adherence to the guidelines, this may be a consequence of a wide range of factors, among them the guideline development, dissemination and implementation process.

This would map nicely to a SenseMaker approach if you were so inclined and wanted to drill down into specific clusters.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 20/01/2021 9:22 am, Stuart French wrote:
Hi all,

The CFA R&D team are currently developing the "Our Operations" section of the 10-year Research Implementation Plan. 

 

We were wondering if you were aware of any research or data that allows us to understand how operational decisions are made and the types of response activities that are undertaken during an incident response by operational staff? Links to the broader decision making field would be appreciated, but anything specific to emergency services is what we are after.

 

We were hoping to design some research which captures the current baseline of response decisions and actions, evaluates their outcomes, and provide recommendations for improvements. This includes the difference between actual decision making and the official planned and reasoned decisions that are often talked about in retrospect once the outcome is known. 

 

It would be wonderful if you could point us in the direction of any people, existing resources, or data that would help us to better understand this space.

Cheers,

Stuart French
Program Mgr, Knowledge, Country Fire Authority (Australia)


Re: Knowledge & Evidence in Decision making - What does the literature say? #research

 

Hi Stu

 

I believe we discussed these guys in the past.  Please check out the Wildland Fire Lessons Learned Center website.  They were a client in the mid 00’s. You will find extraordinary examples of lessons learned and the logic behind some of the decisions made by incident teams fighting fires as well as effective practices for capturing, documenting, and sharing the effective practices based on these decisions.

 

Best

 

Bill

 

 

  

 

Learn more about the solutions and value we provide at www.workingknowledge-csp.com

 

 

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Stan Garfield via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2021 09:08
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Knowledge & Evidence in Decision making - What does the literature say? #kmresearch

 

On Tue, Jan 19, 2021 at 06:22 PM, Stuart French wrote:

Please help Stuart by replying with any research or data to help him:

  1. Understand how operational decisions are made
  2. Define the types of response activities undertaken during an incident response by operational staff

Thanks for your help.


Re: Knowledge & Evidence in Decision making - What does the literature say? #research

Stan Garfield
 

On Tue, Jan 19, 2021 at 06:22 PM, Stuart French wrote:

Please help Stuart by replying with any research or data to help him:
  1. Understand how operational decisions are made
  2. Define the types of response activities undertaken during an incident response by operational staff
Thanks for your help.


Re: Information Needed: KM Contacts in US Federal Agencies #question

Douglas Weidner
 

John,
There is one lady in gov that seems to know all.

She is a past CKMer. I'll get her contact info for you.

Douglas Weidner
Chief CKM Instructor 
Exec Chairman, KM Institute

On Wed, Jan 20, 2021 at 11:22 AM John Antill <jantill4@...> wrote:
What I am needing is if anyone knows the responsible party for Knowledge management in those agencies. I am trying to get a list together for OPM that identifies who is the knowledge management responsible party. Hope that clarifies this post. 
John Antill
MCKM CKS IA KT
MLS KM Student
256-541-1229


Re: Information Needed: KM Contacts in US Federal Agencies #question

John Antill
 

What I am needing is if anyone knows the responsible party for Knowledge management in those agencies. I am trying to get a list together for OPM that identifies who is the knowledge management responsible party. Hope that clarifies this post. 
John Antill
MCKM CKS IA KT
MLS KM Student
256-541-1229


Information Needed: KM Contacts in US Federal Agencies #question

John Antill
 

Team OPM is trying to get a Federal KM series going. It still needs to identify who is doing the role of  KM representatives AND KM hiring managers or supervisors in the following Cabinet Level Agencies.

Agriculture

Commerce

Energy

Justice

Labor

Homeland Security and sub-agencies

 

Independent Agencies

EPA

EEOC

FCC

GSA

NARA

NSF

NRC

OPM

SEC

SBA

Smithsonian

Social Security

IRS

NSA is Kimberly Keys


John Antill
MCKM CKS IA KT
MLS KM Student
256-541-1229


Re: Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessons-learned

Murray Jennex
 

I spent 20 years in the Nuclear Navy and Commercial Nuclear Industry and lessons learned were a vital part of these groups.  However, it wasn't the formation of a lessons learned database that made this work, it was the assessment and implementation process.  Lessons learned were assessed when they were identified for application to existing processes and personnel and if changes were identified then they were implemented immediately.  The point is, lessons learned were not gathered and left in a database, they were identified, assessed and remedial actions (including training, process, and procedure changes) implemented as it was somewhat okay to make a mistake once, but never okay to make the same mistake twice.  It hadn't really occurred to me till this discussion that lessons learned were treated any other way by other industries.  As KM'ers we should be pushing for a learning organization (a KM critical success factor identified years ago by me and many others and put into the academic literature) and the tenants of a learning organization is to learn from mistakes or lessons learned and change the organization's processes and culture as a way of showing that learning from the mistake and lesson learned.  Again, it just didn't occur to me that many industries thought this meant that you collect lessons learned and stored them.  In many ways this discussion has been enlightening for me with perhaps the best lesson being that the general world can learn much by listening to engineers and military people!!.....murray jennex


-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Short <tshortconsulting@...>
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Sent: Tue, Jan 19, 2021 10:29 
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Lessons Learned Storage & Access #lessonslearned

Mark wrote: I passionately believe that this is an area that one has to concentrate on people, rather than process and technology.  There are so many traps to avoid!

You make some excellent points, Mark, including your suggestion to concentrate on people. The same could be said across all of KM. I’ve observed throughout my work in KM that one of KM’s main challenges is that KM solutions are often so intuitively appealing - they just make sense to do them. And so we create these elegant, logical solutions that look absolutely perfect on paper or the whiteboard, only to see them fail completely upon implementation.
 
Behavior and culture are often the culprits. But do not forget politics either. The US Army was a leader in the successful use of After Action Learning and lessons learned, as was the Wildland FIre Service, which patterned their approach closely on the Army’s methodology. Any guesses as to why these two organizations were so successful? Because failure to learn meant more people would die!
 
That is not the case in 99.9% of the client situations a KM practitioner will encounter. Instead, we run into situations where there might be some incremental efficiency improvement, but to get there a leader will have to accept that something they created or ordered needed improving. And politically that is often not expedient. Or an underling will be required to highlight a shortcoming to someone senior to themselves, and that is not politically expedient. Etc. Etc. 

So one must be sensitive to not only how they are going to “keep the LL database empty”, but also, more important, how they are going to roll out a process that is culturally compatible with the mindsets and behavior norms that will continue to hold sway over this new process. 
 

-Tom
--
Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

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