Date   

Re: Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #COVID-19 #discussion-starter #jobs #remote-work

Abbe Wiesenthal
 

I just wanted to say how grateful I am for the generous outpouring of support, feedback, and inquiries about KM roles I received in response to my posting. I can't tell you how much I appreciate it! You have renewed and strengthened my job search efforts and I will keep you updated on my progress. If I can ever do anything in return, please let me know. I am a fast and meticulous copy editor/proofreader so if any of those skills might be of use to you...let me know as well. Heartfelt thanks, Abbe


Re: Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #COVID-19 #discussion-starter #jobs #remote-work

Seth Earley
 

Our firm is looking for potential contract resources for KM projects. We are looking for people who can be doers as well as managers. If you are interested or you know anyone who may be, you can send a note to jeremy.grubman@....

I’ve passed on a couple of the folks who indicated they were looking. It’s less about managing a team and more about owning the solution.  (understanding enough about the information and knowledge architecture to guide resources as well as be an individual contributor) 

Some of the work is in emerging areas such as conversational access and embedded knowledge within products. (One day a maintenance engineer will be able to walk up to a machine, ask it how it’s doing and the machine will tell the maintenance person what it needs and how to fix the problems using plain language- specific human friendly contextualized information. )

We are working on leveraging component content and ontologies to power virtual assistants.  

If you want to learn more about the line of thinking you can take a look at this webinar https://www.earley.com/training-webinars/complex-product-configuration-intersection-knowledge-management-and-product 

Feel free to reach out to me if you have any questions or would like to talk shop. Interested in how others have tackled those problems

Seth

781-820-8080


Seth Earley 

Author of The AI Powered Enterprise
https://www.amazon.com/AI-Powered-Enterprise-Ontologies-Business-Profitable/dp/1928055508 



On Feb 25, 2021, at 3:54 PM, Pavel Kraus via groups.io <p.kraus@...> wrote:

 Hi Abbe,

Just to emphasize what Tim has just said. Often it is the language one uses during the job interview that is decisive about the success or failure.

Yesterday, at our SKMF roundtable we had an extensive discussion about just this matter. Whatever your potential employer considers as value - this is what you can give him through KM. And this has to be communicated convincingly.

We are trying to do this by defining KM around the profitability for business orientated organizations:
https://skmf.net/en/

So by reversing the perspective from your skills to your future employer needs, is the only way to go. As a consultant I do the same for my clients.

Hope to find soon a good job.
Kind regards,
Pavel

-- 
Dr. Pavel Kraus
Präsident SKMF
SWISS KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT FORUM
www.skmf.net


Am 25.02.2021 um 16:40 schrieb Tim Powell:

I’m sorry to hear this, Abbe, but thanks for sharing your story — which I’m sure will benefit others who face similar circumstances.  The past two recessions (2000 and 2008) were brutal for knowledge professionals, and there’s little reason to think that this one — which in some industries is expected to last through 2024 — will be much different.

 

As with all job searches, the most important thing — and often the hardest to stay focused on — is that it’s not primarily about you, your needs and ambitions, and your skills and qualifications — but rather about your client, her needs, and her organization’s needs.  When I have searched for hires, it has often struck me how little effort they have put into researching my organization and envisioning my needs — and how they could help me. 

 

For me, this simple (but significant) extra effort – whether or not completely accurate -- typically made the difference between someone I would hire, and the others who “needed this job.”

 

Hope this helps,

 

Tim


TIM WOOD POWELL 
| President, The Knowledge Agency® Author, The Value of Knowledge |

New York City, USA | DIRECT/MOBILE +1.212.243.1200 |

SITE www.KnowledgeAgency.com | BLOG www.KnowledgeValueChain.com |

 

 

From: <main@SIKM.groups.io> on behalf of Abbe Wiesenthal <abbewiesenthal@...>
Reply-To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 at 9:31 AM
To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Subject: [SIKM] Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #jobs #discussion-starter #remote-work

 

Hello all, I'm reaching out to the group for advice and counsel. I've been looking for a Knowledge Manager position, either in Atlanta, GA or remote, for over a year now. I've had several interviews, culminating in my most recent two-week, six interview process that did not lead to an offer. Due to the potential legal risk (I believe) it's very difficult to get feedback from hiring organizations in seeking to make myself a better candidate.

I started the KM practice in an IT/Engineering division of WarnerMedia, and have created an online KM portfolio of articles and resources that I can share with recruiters and hiring managers.  So, I'm calling upon the collective wisdom of the SIKM group! Are you still finding the job market difficult to navigate, or are you finding that more and more companies are (at last) beginning to realize the need for KM as a "need to" rather than a "nice to" have?

I've also attached my resumé (it's one that I tweak depending on the job focus, but its basics remain the same) in the hope that other SIKM members can provide comments and suggestions. And if you hear of an open position, please feel free to connect with me on LinkedIn or at abbewiesenthal@....

Thanks in advance, Abbe





Re: Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #COVID-19 #discussion-starter #jobs #remote-work

Tim Powell
 

Well, said Pavel – and glad to hear your group is moving the needle on this timely existential topic.

 

And, to underscore what others have said, networks and “connections” are critically important.  Build them long before you need them!

 

tp


TIM WOOD POWELL 
| President, The Knowledge Agency® Author, The Value of Knowledge |

New York City, USA | DIRECT/MOBILE +1.212.243.1200 |

SITE www.KnowledgeAgency.com | BLOG www.KnowledgeValueChain.com |

 

 

From: <main@SIKM.groups.io> on behalf of Pavel Kraus <p.kraus@...>
Organization: SKMF.net
Reply-To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, February 25, 2021 at 3:54 PM
To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #jobs #discussion-starter #remote-work

 

Hi Abbe,

Just to emphasize what Tim has just said. Often it is the language one uses during the job interview that is decisive about the success or failure.

Yesterday, at our SKMF roundtable we had an extensive discussion about just this matter. Whatever your potential employer considers as value - this is what you can give him through KM. And this has to be communicated convincingly.

We are trying to do this by defining KM around the profitability for business orientated organizations:
https://skmf.net/en/

So by reversing the perspective from your skills to your future employer needs, is the only way to go. As a consultant I do the same for my clients.

Hope to find soon a good job.
Kind regards,
Pavel


-- 
Dr. Pavel Kraus
Präsident SKMF
SWISS KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT FORUM
www.skmf.net

 

Am 25.02.2021 um 16:40 schrieb Tim Powell:

I’m sorry to hear this, Abbe, but thanks for sharing your story — which I’m sure will benefit others who face similar circumstances.  The past two recessions (2000 and 2008) were brutal for knowledge professionals, and there’s little reason to think that this one — which in some industries is expected to last through 2024 — will be much different.

 

As with all job searches, the most important thing — and often the hardest to stay focused on — is that it’s not primarily about you, your needs and ambitions, and your skills and qualifications — but rather about your client, her needs, and her organization’s needs.  When I have searched for hires, it has often struck me how little effort they have put into researching my organization and envisioning my needs — and how they could help me. 

 

For me, this simple (but significant) extra effort – whether or not completely accurate -- typically made the difference between someone I would hire, and the others who “needed this job.”

 

Hope this helps,

 

Tim


TIM WOOD POWELL 
| 
President, The Knowledge Agency® Author, The Value of Knowledge |

New York City, USA | DIRECT/MOBILE +1.212.243.1200 |

SITE www.KnowledgeAgency.com | BLOG www.KnowledgeValueChain.com |

 

 

From: <main@SIKM.groups.io> on behalf of Abbe Wiesenthal <abbewiesenthal@...>
Reply-To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 at 9:31 AM
To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Subject: [SIKM] Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #jobs #discussion-starter #remote-work

 

Hello all, I'm reaching out to the group for advice and counsel. I've been looking for a Knowledge Manager position, either in Atlanta, GA or remote, for over a year now. I've had several interviews, culminating in my most recent two-week, six interview process that did not lead to an offer. Due to the potential legal risk (I believe) it's very difficult to get feedback from hiring organizations in seeking to make myself a better candidate.

I started the KM practice in an IT/Engineering division of WarnerMedia, and have created an online KM portfolio of articles and resources that I can share with recruiters and hiring managers.  So, I'm calling upon the collective wisdom of the SIKM group! Are you still finding the job market difficult to navigate, or are you finding that more and more companies are (at last) beginning to realize the need for KM as a "need to" rather than a "nice to" have?

I've also attached my resumé (it's one that I tweak depending on the job focus, but its basics remain the same) in the hope that other SIKM members can provide comments and suggestions. And if you hear of an open position, please feel free to connect with me on LinkedIn or at abbewiesenthal@....

Thanks in advance, Abbe




Co-authored published article on knowledge sharing #CoP #KMers #future-of-work #COVID-19

Heather Johnson
 

All
Sharing some excity news! I co-authored an article that I would like to share with the KM community. It is an interesting twist of 3 areas: Knowledge sharing; Virtual teams; and Human resource management. Timely discussion. Use the link below to read the article.

https://www.jhrm.eu/2021/02/54-how-hrm-and-knowledge-sharing-technologies-foster-virtual-team-productivity-for-globally-dispersed-workforces-a-systematic-review/


Thanks for your time. Feedback is always welcomed.

Heather


Re: Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #COVID-19 #discussion-starter #jobs #remote-work

Katherine Sandler
 

Hi Abbe,

If you're curious how an algorithm rates your resume when you submit it blind through one of the Applicant Tracking Systems (like iCIMS, Taleo, Workable, etc.), you can check out Jobscan.co or SkillSyncer. You copy and paste your resume as well as the job description and it reviews the keywords in the job description to what youve stated in the resume. Sometimes I use it to see if Ive missed a bigger concept in the role description.

In my current search for a job, I have moved away from blind applying and have just made it my goal to grow my network through casual conversation and informational interviews with others.

(If this suggestion is redundant, sorry, I missed some prior emails in this thread.)

-Katherine


On Thu, Feb 25, 2021 at 2:54 PM Pavel Kraus <p.kraus@...> wrote:
Hi Abbe,

Just to emphasize what Tim has just said. Often it is the language one uses during the job interview that is decisive about the success or failure.

Yesterday, at our SKMF roundtable we had an extensive discussion about just this matter. Whatever your potential employer considers as value - this is what you can give him through KM. And this has to be communicated convincingly.

We are trying to do this by defining KM around the profitability for business orientated organizations:
https://skmf.net/en/

So by reversing the perspective from your skills to your future employer needs, is the only way to go. As a consultant I do the same for my clients.

Hope to find soon a good job.
Kind regards,
Pavel

-- 
Dr. Pavel Kraus
Präsident SKMF
SWISS KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT FORUM
www.skmf.net


Am 25.02.2021 um 16:40 schrieb Tim Powell:

I’m sorry to hear this, Abbe, but thanks for sharing your story — which I’m sure will benefit others who face similar circumstances.  The past two recessions (2000 and 2008) were brutal for knowledge professionals, and there’s little reason to think that this one — which in some industries is expected to last through 2024 — will be much different.

 

As with all job searches, the most important thing — and often the hardest to stay focused on — is that it’s not primarily about you, your needs and ambitions, and your skills and qualifications — but rather about your client, her needs, and her organization’s needs.  When I have searched for hires, it has often struck me how little effort they have put into researching my organization and envisioning my needs — and how they could help me. 

 

For me, this simple (but significant) extra effort – whether or not completely accurate -- typically made the difference between someone I would hire, and the others who “needed this job.”

 

Hope this helps,

 

Tim


TIM WOOD POWELL 
| President, The Knowledge Agency® Author, The Value of Knowledge |

New York City, USA | DIRECT/MOBILE +1.212.243.1200 |

SITE www.KnowledgeAgency.com | BLOG www.KnowledgeValueChain.com |

 

 

From: <main@SIKM.groups.io> on behalf of Abbe Wiesenthal <abbewiesenthal@...>
Reply-To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 at 9:31 AM
To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Subject: [SIKM] Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #jobs #discussion-starter #remote-work

 

Hello all, I'm reaching out to the group for advice and counsel. I've been looking for a Knowledge Manager position, either in Atlanta, GA or remote, for over a year now. I've had several interviews, culminating in my most recent two-week, six interview process that did not lead to an offer. Due to the potential legal risk (I believe) it's very difficult to get feedback from hiring organizations in seeking to make myself a better candidate.

I started the KM practice in an IT/Engineering division of WarnerMedia, and have created an online KM portfolio of articles and resources that I can share with recruiters and hiring managers.  So, I'm calling upon the collective wisdom of the SIKM group! Are you still finding the job market difficult to navigate, or are you finding that more and more companies are (at last) beginning to realize the need for KM as a "need to" rather than a "nice to" have?

I've also attached my resumé (it's one that I tweak depending on the job focus, but its basics remain the same) in the hope that other SIKM members can provide comments and suggestions. And if you hear of an open position, please feel free to connect with me on LinkedIn or at abbewiesenthal@....

Thanks in advance, Abbe



  


Re: Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #COVID-19 #discussion-starter #jobs #remote-work

 

Hi Abbe,

Just to emphasize what Tim has just said. Often it is the language one uses during the job interview that is decisive about the success or failure.

Yesterday, at our SKMF roundtable we had an extensive discussion about just this matter. Whatever your potential employer considers as value - this is what you can give him through KM. And this has to be communicated convincingly.

We are trying to do this by defining KM around the profitability for business orientated organizations:
https://skmf.net/en/

So by reversing the perspective from your skills to your future employer needs, is the only way to go. As a consultant I do the same for my clients.

Hope to find soon a good job.
Kind regards,
Pavel

-- 
Dr. Pavel Kraus
Präsident SKMF
SWISS KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT FORUM
www.skmf.net


Am 25.02.2021 um 16:40 schrieb Tim Powell:

I’m sorry to hear this, Abbe, but thanks for sharing your story — which I’m sure will benefit others who face similar circumstances.  The past two recessions (2000 and 2008) were brutal for knowledge professionals, and there’s little reason to think that this one — which in some industries is expected to last through 2024 — will be much different.

 

As with all job searches, the most important thing — and often the hardest to stay focused on — is that it’s not primarily about you, your needs and ambitions, and your skills and qualifications — but rather about your client, her needs, and her organization’s needs.  When I have searched for hires, it has often struck me how little effort they have put into researching my organization and envisioning my needs — and how they could help me. 

 

For me, this simple (but significant) extra effort – whether or not completely accurate -- typically made the difference between someone I would hire, and the others who “needed this job.”

 

Hope this helps,

 

Tim


TIM WOOD POWELL 
| President, The Knowledge Agency® Author, The Value of Knowledge |

New York City, USA | DIRECT/MOBILE +1.212.243.1200 |

SITE www.KnowledgeAgency.com | BLOG www.KnowledgeValueChain.com |

 

 

From: <main@SIKM.groups.io> on behalf of Abbe Wiesenthal <abbewiesenthal@...>
Reply-To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 at 9:31 AM
To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Subject: [SIKM] Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #jobs #discussion-starter #remote-work

 

Hello all, I'm reaching out to the group for advice and counsel. I've been looking for a Knowledge Manager position, either in Atlanta, GA or remote, for over a year now. I've had several interviews, culminating in my most recent two-week, six interview process that did not lead to an offer. Due to the potential legal risk (I believe) it's very difficult to get feedback from hiring organizations in seeking to make myself a better candidate.

I started the KM practice in an IT/Engineering division of WarnerMedia, and have created an online KM portfolio of articles and resources that I can share with recruiters and hiring managers.  So, I'm calling upon the collective wisdom of the SIKM group! Are you still finding the job market difficult to navigate, or are you finding that more and more companies are (at last) beginning to realize the need for KM as a "need to" rather than a "nice to" have?

I've also attached my resumé (it's one that I tweak depending on the job focus, but its basics remain the same) in the hope that other SIKM members can provide comments and suggestions. And if you hear of an open position, please feel free to connect with me on LinkedIn or at abbewiesenthal@....

Thanks in advance, Abbe



  


Re: Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #COVID-19 #discussion-starter #jobs #remote-work

Abbe Wiesenthal
 

Great examples, Stephen, thanks.


Re: Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #COVID-19 #discussion-starter #jobs #remote-work

Abbe Wiesenthal
 

Matt, everything you said rang so true to me. I too have gotten contradictory feedback on my CV from different people; I take what makes sense for the role I'm applying for and tweak my resume as needed.

I don't really have a "blog" per se so maybe I used the wrong word. I have a Confluence Space in which I've created a centralized source for my KM articles, case studies, other publications, and resources. I use it as a portfolio that expands upon my resume, rather than a traditional blog. It's a showcase for my experience with creating, curating, centralizing, indexing/tagging and sharing knowledge in a highly technical, global, IT/Engineering division within WarnerMedia.

Technology moves at the speed of light in the media/entertainment industry. We who provided the technology infrastructure for the network brands had to keep abreast of these developments in order to remain competitive as new distribution platforms and video formats come online. This use case was the primary one I used to propose, and then move into, the KM role at WarnerMedia.

Of course, once I took the job, the role of the KM Center expanded beyond its original purview, and several sections of it became useful to departments outside of our division. I also added video content which is much "stickier" and attracted more users to the site; I believe a multi-media approach to KM is a great strategy to implement.

Thanks for responding; I'm overwhelmed by the generosity of the forum members who have reached out!


Re: Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #COVID-19 #discussion-starter #jobs #remote-work

Tim Powell
 

I’m sorry to hear this, Abbe, but thanks for sharing your story — which I’m sure will benefit others who face similar circumstances.  The past two recessions (2000 and 2008) were brutal for knowledge professionals, and there’s little reason to think that this one — which in some industries is expected to last through 2024 — will be much different.

 

As with all job searches, the most important thing — and often the hardest to stay focused on — is that it’s not primarily about you, your needs and ambitions, and your skills and qualifications — but rather about your client, her needs, and her organization’s needs.  When I have searched for hires, it has often struck me how little effort they have put into researching my organization and envisioning my needs — and how they could help me. 

 

For me, this simple (but significant) extra effort – whether or not completely accurate -- typically made the difference between someone I would hire, and the others who “needed this job.”

 

Hope this helps,

 

Tim


TIM WOOD POWELL 
| President, The Knowledge Agency® Author, The Value of Knowledge |

New York City, USA | DIRECT/MOBILE +1.212.243.1200 |

SITE www.KnowledgeAgency.com | BLOG www.KnowledgeValueChain.com |

 

 

From: <main@SIKM.groups.io> on behalf of Abbe Wiesenthal <abbewiesenthal@...>
Reply-To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 at 9:31 AM
To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Subject: [SIKM] Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #jobs #discussion-starter #remote-work

 

Hello all, I'm reaching out to the group for advice and counsel. I've been looking for a Knowledge Manager position, either in Atlanta, GA or remote, for over a year now. I've had several interviews, culminating in my most recent two-week, six interview process that did not lead to an offer. Due to the potential legal risk (I believe) it's very difficult to get feedback from hiring organizations in seeking to make myself a better candidate.

I started the KM practice in an IT/Engineering division of WarnerMedia, and have created an online KM portfolio of articles and resources that I can share with recruiters and hiring managers.  So, I'm calling upon the collective wisdom of the SIKM group! Are you still finding the job market difficult to navigate, or are you finding that more and more companies are (at last) beginning to realize the need for KM as a "need to" rather than a "nice to" have?

I've also attached my resumé (it's one that I tweak depending on the job focus, but its basics remain the same) in the hope that other SIKM members can provide comments and suggestions. And if you hear of an open position, please feel free to connect with me on LinkedIn or at abbewiesenthal@....

Thanks in advance, Abbe


Re: Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #COVID-19 #discussion-starter #jobs #remote-work

Nirmala Palaniappan
 

Abbé,

I think you have received some fantastic inputs from the others here. I am inclined to agree with Dennis; I believe knowing someone in an organisation does make all the difference (though, ideally, that shouldn’t be the deciding factor). I see so many KM job openings every week but each position (as Matt pointed out) seems to be different from the rest and each organisation seems to want their respective KM managers to do drastically different things. 

I am, sometimes, worried about these idiosyncratic perceptions and wonder if organisations will only look for someone who has carried out projects of a certain kind. To cut my rambling short, I am in a situation similar to yours and am trying to up-skill as well as pick up projects that are not particularly related to KM. One of the things I am placing a bet on is that things will get better once economies start recovering (which is only a matter of time).

I think it is a good idea to take up probono projects for startups and NGOs, if that makes sense. Another idea is to create inexpensive service-oriented packages as an independent consultant. Do feel free to connect with me in case you want to discuss more. All the very best and stay positive. :)

Regards
N


On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 at 8:01 PM, Abbe Wiesenthal <abbewiesenthal@...> wrote:
Hello all, I'm reaching out to the group for advice and counsel. I've been looking for a Knowledge Manager position, either in Atlanta, GA or remote, for over a year now. I've had several interviews, culminating in my most recent two-week, six interview process that did not lead to an offer. Due to the potential legal risk (I believe) it's very difficult to get feedback from hiring organizations in seeking to make myself a better candidate.

I started the KM practice in an IT/Engineering division of WarnerMedia, and have created an online KM portfolio of articles and resources that I can share with recruiters and hiring managers.  So, I'm calling upon the collective wisdom of the SIKM group! Are you still finding the job market difficult to navigate, or are you finding that more and more companies are (at last) beginning to realize the need for KM as a "need to" rather than a "nice to" have?

I've also attached my resumé (it's one that I tweak depending on the job focus, but its basics remain the same) in the hope that other SIKM members can provide comments and suggestions. And if you hear of an open position, please feel free to connect with me on LinkedIn or at abbewiesenthal@....

Thanks in advance, Abbe

--
"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous


Re: Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #COVID-19 #discussion-starter #jobs #remote-work

Ginetta Gueli
 

Dear Abbe,
I am in your same situation and I fully understand your worries and concerns. I also think that Dennis and Matt hit the point, completely: 100%.

What I can add here is:
- try to be an active member in several CoPs;
- probable you are already doing this, but try to stay as much busy as possible, even if the results are not coming or are not what you deserve, but
- not too much busy because as Matt said, and using other words, "sometimes is just a matter of being luck!".

I know that what I will tell you might not be of such great help, but I want to let you know that US labour market is more active (or less inactive) than the European one. In particularly South European countries are suffering a lot and there are no sign of recovery, still (Z-E-R-O). Pure KM jobs are a mirage, especially in some countries (but this is not different from the past) and we, KMers, need to recycle our background even more due to Covid-19. So stay positive, because as some Italians used to say (and most of the time it is true), when US economy will recover, you will be the first ones to get a job :-).

Hope that this email can cheer you up a bit.

Stray strong and all the best,
Ginetta

--
Ginetta Gueli
Information & Knowledge Manager | Project Manager


Re: Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #COVID-19 #discussion-starter #jobs #remote-work

Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Abbe,

I echo everything Matt has said and would add: Make it as easy as possible for people to match up the value they are looking for with what you are offering. This can be tricky and sometimes involves a degree of mind-reading but there are some strategies which can help.

  • Sell a story of what people can expect to get if they hire you. The goal is to get them on the "hook" from your first words.

  • Back your story up with examples

  • Reflect their terminology in your claims, or at least make it compatible (eg I tend to talk about "information and knowledge management" to avoid demarcation arguments)

As an example, this is a framing statement I used for one of my CVs (this was for an organisational change role):

Stephen Bounds offers strategic thinking and insight into the improvement of organizational capability and effectiveness from 20 years of experience in management and project delivery, with a particular focus on Knowledge Management, Information Management, and Information Technology solutions across the public and private sector.

Recent projects include leading change workshops for ACT Health, consultation and development of an information governance framework to drive systemic improvements at the Australian Maritime and Safety Authority (AMSA), and developing a knowledge management strategy at the Grains Research & Development Corporation (GRDC) to transform how they approached practice change uptake.

Stephen has a keen awareness of how to work within an organisation’s culture, manage its process maturity, and leverage informal knowledge networks. Through active questioning, deep technical knowledge, a hands-on approach and a minimum of preconceived ideas for solutions, Stephen has successfully worked with small, medium and large organisations to build consensus and collaborate on implementing solutions that meet their values and desired outcomes.

A good general rule for this kind of statement is no more than 3 paragraphs. To be honest, this is probably at the upper end of what's reasonable.

Best of luck!

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 25/02/2021 4:08 am, Matt Moore wrote:
 Abbe,

1. A willingness to invite feedback on your CV in a public forum requires a fair degree of courage - so good on you.
2. Dennis’s comments are spot on - with one exception - I don’t think there’s much value in starting a blog anymore (2006 would have been a different story).
3. With my CV and the advice I got from professional recruiters aligned, some of it was contradictory. My key takeaway was less content but focused on what the organization said they were asking for and using terms the hiring manager would care about (e.g. $ value delivered, $ budget).
4. Many economies are depressed right now which makes finding a job hard. Not impossible but hard.
5. You can look at 5 different KM job ads with the same title and see 5 completely different activities being undertaken - from what is effectively programming to what is effectively human change management. There are also jobs out there that are effectively KM roles but do not mention KM at all.
6. I have had to do this 3 times in the last 2 years. It is brutal. And luck plays its part. You may go for 4 months without getting anything and then get 2 job offers at once.
7. The biggest thing for me during the job hunting process was maintaining a sense of agency. Putting yourself out there and getting continuously rejected is not fun. So it’s important to be doing things that remind you that you do have something going on, even when the world may not agree. That may be family or community work. I tried to have 4 conversations a week with interesting people. These were not about begging for a job (I would start the conversation off by categorically saying I would not ask them for a job and you could see the person relax). But about learning something and offering something. “Is there something I can do for you?” Again this is just my experience and it may vary for others.

Good luck,

Matt Moore
+61 423 784 504

On Feb 25, 2021, at 4:11 AM, Abbe Wiesenthal <abbewiesenthal@...> wrote:

Dear Dennis, thanks so much for your thoughtful response. I think many people in addition to me will find this advice helpful.

My voluntary severance package came with 90 days of outplacement services which I took full advantage of. I have indeed been working my network as much as possible but it's funny: my experience seems to be bucking the trend! That is to say, I've not gotten interviews for jobs for which I had an internal referral (either formal or informal) but have gotten interviews for resumés sent as what I call "cold uploads". I know that's not the norm. I have around 1,300 LI connections but am always expanding the list and looking for connections to a particular company when appropriate.

I agree with you 100% about the resume software; one of the members of this forum has kindly offered their feedback already. I have a "base" resume that I tweak for each job application; this also makes it easy to track which jobs I've applied for and when by filename.

Re: your comment about a blog: I have created a Confluence Space in which I've published my articles and experience around KM. If you like I can send you an invite since I cannot make the site public under an individual license agreement.

On a side note, I have a blog where I promote independent bookstores, books and authors around the world at www.angryalgonquin.com.

I would like to extend my thanks to everyone who has reached out to me on gmail or Linkedin. So generous and so welcome!


Re: Identify subject matter experts by information consumption? #expertise-location

Murray Jennex
 

totally agree Matt....murray


-----Original Message-----
From: Matt Moore <matt@...>
To: main@sikm.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Feb 24, 2021 2:18 am
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Identify subject matter experts by information consumption?

Sam,

What problem are you solving?

Typically I do not find an expert for the sake of finding an expert. I find them because their expertise will help me solve a problem.

The kind of a expert that I need to find depends on the problem I am trying to solve.

Otherwise you find yourself in this situation.

“I’m not sure what to do with these answers”


Regards,

Matt Moore
+61 423 784 504

On Feb 24, 2021, at 1:11 AM, Sam Yip <sam@...> wrote:

Hi all - I am curious to understand the process by which you would identify a subject matter expert within your organization. I am working on a computer science research on identifying experts by reference to their information consumption pattern -- essentially looking at the topics of what one would read/write, and use that as a proxy to determine if he is an expert**. For example, if someone keeps reading and writing about "5G automation" and "carrier aggregation" (from his emails, blogs, documents, presentations etc.) then he is potentially an expert on these topics. Is this a simplistic way to approach a nuanced task? Do you have other processes to determine if someone is an expert? 

Looking forward to your thoughts

**the research methodology here is to apply algorithms to retrieve information from different channels (along with who writes/reads what), and detect pre-defined topics from the body of information.


Re: Identify subject matter experts by information consumption? #expertise-location

Murray Jennex
 

I still like using social network analysis over self reporting.  Its better to see who people actually talk to than to map those who say they are experts


-----Original Message-----
From: Tim Powell <tim.powell@...>
To: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Feb 24, 2021 5:36 am
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Identify subject matter experts by information consumption?

The range of experience thoughtfully represented in this discussion is impressive!
 
Expertise Mapping and Location (EML) is a huge untapped resource in many organizations — true low-hanging fruit. As reflected in the comments here, it’s typically easier to envision than it is to execute.  There’s an ROI-focused EML case experience described in my new book, which is summarized in the attached article from Baseline magazine.  The payouts can be substantial.
 
The three main approaches being discussed here are:
(1) deducing expertise through scans of documents produced and/or sought;
(2) building databases/repositories of self-reported and/or assigned expertise/SME status; and
(3) building networks/CoPs that are largely self-defined and transactional (“Who knows about X?”).
 
In my experience, these as listed are in ascending order of effectiveness.  (2) and (3) can be combined, and this hybrid approach is probably the most powerful.
 
At best, this results in a sustainable internal “knowledge market” characterized by a vibrant ongoing exchange between knowledge users (i.e., seekers, “buyers”) and knowledge producers (i.e., providers, “sellers”).
 
The paradox I have observed is that whereas in most (non-knowledge) markets, the buyer pays — in knowledge markets, the seller too often “pays” through giving up his or her time/attention to provide the expertise.  The institutional challenge of providing sufficient rewards and/or recognition to render the effort self-sustaining is the hill that many of these effort stall on, in my experience.
 
Best,
 
Tim

TIM WOOD POWELL 
| President, The Knowledge Agency® Author, The Value of Knowledge
New York City, USA | DIRECT/MOBILE +1.212.243.1200 | ZOOM 212-243-1200
 
 
From: <main@SIKM.groups.io> on behalf of "Robert L. Bogue" <rbogue@...>
Reply-To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 at 8:15 AM
To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Identify subject matter experts by information consumption?
 
Wow, those are big topics.
 
With regard to granularity the problem is a set of conflicting requirements.  If you make things too fine grained the complexity increases and the number of items per category drops – sometimes to irrelevance (one item.)  On the opposite side, if the taxonomy isn’t granular enough then you’ll end up with too many items in a single category and retrieval becomes difficult.  So the answer to your question is fundamentally about finding the balance between the opposing forces.
 
Experience / Expertise is illusive.  I wouldn’t try to capture except in the broadest scales (1-5) and then assume that it’s mostly wrong.   (ala Dunning Kruger Effect)  I’ve seen lots of attempts to capture experience/expertise and misses the point.  I don’t care how much you know about a topic if you have the answer that solves my problem.
 
For SME networks the balance is between power gradient and expertise.  Senior people will likely contact senior people first and the second person will do a referral to more specific experience.  Junior people will generally contact other juniors and mid-level people rarely reaching out to senior people because of the power gradient.  Of course culture has a strong impact on this.
 
Rob
 
-------------------
Robert L. Bogue
O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog
Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com
Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)
 
From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sam Yip via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 10:02 PM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Identify subject matter experts by information consumption?
 
Thank you all for the great comments and insights. A lot of valuable insights and there are a few points I’d love to learn more about:  
 
  • How do you determine the granularity of the taxonomy, which will be used as topics? In general is it always better to have fine-grained terms for taxonomy e.g. “SharePoint data migration” (fine-grained) vs “Information management” (very broad).  Also how do you strike the balance of letting taxonomy evolve on its own (which may be pulled in different directions by different offices across different regions) vs having a closely monitored and centralised taxonomy (at the risk of not keeping up with evolution of expertise/knowledge)?
  • it makes a lot of sense to differentiate experts - expertise - experience. How do you capture experience, or even just familiarity of a process, short of having a full-blown CoP or Q&A forum which requires a coordinated effort? To illustrate by way of example, say I am a project manager at a healthcare corporation at its Chicago office, and have previously looked into the process of applying for patents in Norway. I have spent 40 hours gathering information & requirements before the project was put on hold, but my effort will still be useful for for someone in say London office who is looking to apply for patents in Norway. How do you transfer that? 
  • In your SME networks, is there usually an inherent bias for senior staff, because they have built up sufficient expertise on topics? 


Re: Identify subject matter experts by information consumption? #expertise-location

Murray Jennex
 

an example of the below and the event that actually got me into KM: I had a problem at my nuclear plant with one of my heat exchangers.  The taxonomy used to classify equipment did it by material type or by system the component was in.  I searched and found no like issues so I spent 4 months doing a special engineering study in order to come up with a solution.  When I was done and rightfully proud of my work I was sharing with the engineer a row away in our cubicled room and it turns out he had solved the same problem on a heat exchanger in a different system with a slightly different material composition a year earlier that would have saved me a few months of time.  The problem was the taxonomy didn't see the relationships between the two components but when I talked engineer to engineer it was obvious.  Hence I think any taxonomy based system also needs a link system to expertise based on social network analysis or even self identified expertise.  Engineers don't have a problem with self identified expertise, if the self that identifies themselves as an expert doesn't match up we quickly move to the next expertise and the word goes out about the first person.....murray jennex


-----Original Message-----
From: Murray Jennex via groups.io <murphjen@...>
To: rbogue@... <rbogue@...>; main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Feb 24, 2021 2:52 pm
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Identify subject matter experts by information consumption?

My problem with a taxonomy for this is that taxonomies do not do a good job of relating like things.  They define a thing but not the things that are somewhat related.  Most of my issues with expertise is in the like things.  Searches show those that match the taxonomy but not those that are related and in engineering being too fine of a taxonomy makes it difficult to find the expertise you need.  This is why I tend to go more with the social network analysis approach to find those that people go to with questions.  Human minds and to some degree AI are much better at seeing the subtle relationships between topics than any taxonomy is at setting up a system to categorize expertise...murray jennex


-----Original Message-----
From: Robert L. Bogue <rbogue@...>
To: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Feb 24, 2021 5:14 am
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Identify subject matter experts by information consumption?

Wow, those are big topics.
 
With regard to granularity the problem is a set of conflicting requirements.  If you make things too fine grained the complexity increases and the number of items per category drops – sometimes to irrelevance (one item.)  On the opposite side, if the taxonomy isn’t granular enough then you’ll end up with too many items in a single category and retrieval becomes difficult.  So the answer to your question is fundamentally about finding the balance between the opposing forces.
 
Experience / Expertise is illusive.  I wouldn’t try to capture except in the broadest scales (1-5) and then assume that it’s mostly wrong.   (ala Dunning Kruger Effect)  I’ve seen lots of attempts to capture experience/expertise and misses the point.  I don’t care how much you know about a topic if you have the answer that solves my problem.
 
For SME networks the balance is between power gradient and expertise.  Senior people will likely contact senior people first and the second person will do a referral to more specific experience.  Junior people will generally contact other juniors and mid-level people rarely reaching out to senior people because of the power gradient.  Of course culture has a strong impact on this.
 
Rob
 
-------------------
Robert L. Bogue
O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog
Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com
Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)
 
From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sam Yip via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 10:02 PM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Identify subject matter experts by information consumption?
 
Thank you all for the great comments and insights. A lot of valuable insights and there are a few points I’d love to learn more about:  
 
  • How do you determine the granularity of the taxonomy, which will be used as topics? In general is it always better to have fine-grained terms for taxonomy e.g. “SharePoint data migration” (fine-grained) vs “Information management” (very broad).  Also how do you strike the balance of letting taxonomy evolve on its own (which may be pulled in different directions by different offices across different regions) vs having a closely monitored and centralised taxonomy (at the risk of not keeping up with evolution of expertise/knowledge)?
  • it makes a lot of sense to differentiate experts - expertise - experience. How do you capture experience, or even just familiarity of a process, short of having a full-blown CoP or Q&A forum which requires a coordinated effort? To illustrate by way of example, say I am a project manager at a healthcare corporation at its Chicago office, and have previously looked into the process of applying for patents in Norway. I have spent 40 hours gathering information & requirements before the project was put on hold, but my effort will still be useful for for someone in say London office who is looking to apply for patents in Norway. How do you transfer that? 
  • In your SME networks, is there usually an inherent bias for senior staff, because they have built up sufficient expertise on topics? 


Re: Identify subject matter experts by information consumption? #expertise-location

Murray Jennex
 

My problem with a taxonomy for this is that taxonomies do not do a good job of relating like things.  They define a thing but not the things that are somewhat related.  Most of my issues with expertise is in the like things.  Searches show those that match the taxonomy but not those that are related and in engineering being too fine of a taxonomy makes it difficult to find the expertise you need.  This is why I tend to go more with the social network analysis approach to find those that people go to with questions.  Human minds and to some degree AI are much better at seeing the subtle relationships between topics than any taxonomy is at setting up a system to categorize expertise...murray jennex


-----Original Message-----
From: Robert L. Bogue <rbogue@...>
To: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Feb 24, 2021 5:14 am
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Identify subject matter experts by information consumption?

Wow, those are big topics.
 
With regard to granularity the problem is a set of conflicting requirements.  If you make things too fine grained the complexity increases and the number of items per category drops – sometimes to irrelevance (one item.)  On the opposite side, if the taxonomy isn’t granular enough then you’ll end up with too many items in a single category and retrieval becomes difficult.  So the answer to your question is fundamentally about finding the balance between the opposing forces.
 
Experience / Expertise is illusive.  I wouldn’t try to capture except in the broadest scales (1-5) and then assume that it’s mostly wrong.   (ala Dunning Kruger Effect)  I’ve seen lots of attempts to capture experience/expertise and misses the point.  I don’t care how much you know about a topic if you have the answer that solves my problem.
 
For SME networks the balance is between power gradient and expertise.  Senior people will likely contact senior people first and the second person will do a referral to more specific experience.  Junior people will generally contact other juniors and mid-level people rarely reaching out to senior people because of the power gradient.  Of course culture has a strong impact on this.
 
Rob
 
-------------------
Robert L. Bogue
O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog
Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com
Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)
 
From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sam Yip via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 10:02 PM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Identify subject matter experts by information consumption?
 
Thank you all for the great comments and insights. A lot of valuable insights and there are a few points I’d love to learn more about:  
 
  • How do you determine the granularity of the taxonomy, which will be used as topics? In general is it always better to have fine-grained terms for taxonomy e.g. “SharePoint data migration” (fine-grained) vs “Information management” (very broad).  Also how do you strike the balance of letting taxonomy evolve on its own (which may be pulled in different directions by different offices across different regions) vs having a closely monitored and centralised taxonomy (at the risk of not keeping up with evolution of expertise/knowledge)?
  • it makes a lot of sense to differentiate experts - expertise - experience. How do you capture experience, or even just familiarity of a process, short of having a full-blown CoP or Q&A forum which requires a coordinated effort? To illustrate by way of example, say I am a project manager at a healthcare corporation at its Chicago office, and have previously looked into the process of applying for patents in Norway. I have spent 40 hours gathering information & requirements before the project was put on hold, but my effort will still be useful for for someone in say London office who is looking to apply for patents in Norway. How do you transfer that? 
  • In your SME networks, is there usually an inherent bias for senior staff, because they have built up sufficient expertise on topics? 


Job Opening: Knowledge Curator #jobs

Simon Denton
 

We are recruiting a Knowledge Curator

We use a range of solutions to open opportunities through connected thinking. The advert mentions Concept Search. Concept Search is our internal process for unlocking knowledge from information silos. 

I am not part of the recruiting team but I am Product Manager for a number of the IT solutions you will be working with. Happy to have a quick chat if you need to know more about our business and technology. 



Stan Garfield session at KMLF on Community Principles #CoP #video

Arthur Shelley
 

Hello SIKM Leaders,

 

I wanted to share with you all the link to Stan’s session with Melbourne KMLF yesterday.

It was a great example of how to facilitate virtual learning – brief intro, ask questions and facilitate the conversation.

Perfectly executed for an excellent engaging experience for all on the call.

 

Stan covered 4 of the principles from his book Handbook of Community Management:

  1. Communities should span boundaries.
    2. Minimize redundancy in communities.
    3. The 90-9-1 rule of thumb is undefeated.
    4. Communities need to be actively nurtured.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PTFRNo5q8Q4

The recording is one hour, so make a cuppa (whatever your favourite beverage is) , settle in and enjoy the conversation.

We can all benefit from listening and reflecting more. It’s time invested - not spent - and rather like a guided meditation 😊

 

Kind regards to all

Arthur Shelley

Principal: www.IntelligentAnswers.com.au 

Founder: Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/arthurshelley/

Author: KNOWledge SUCCESSion  Sustained performance and capability growth through knowledge projects

Earlier Books: The Organizational Zoo (2007) & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader (2009)

 

 


Re: Identify subject matter experts by information consumption? #expertise-location

 

Agree…ONA/SNA concepts and practice still valuable over the years Valdis..

 

Thanks

 

Bill

 

 

 

  

 

Learn more about the solutions and value we provide at www.workingknowledge-csp.com

 

 

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Valdis Krebs via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 09:44
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Identify subject matter experts by information consumption? #expertise-location

 

Hi Sam,

Rather than looking at what an individual is doing, it is often more accurate to find out how others respond to the person. A true expert is someone who other's actually turn to for advice/expertise -- real behavior.  Not only do you want a real expert, but an expert who is willing to share his/her knowledge.  The best way to see all of this is via Organizational (Social) Network Analysis (ONA/SNA).  We can see who actually goes to whom for what expertise.  

Attached is a network map from an old client showing the organizations's expertise around the Java programming language.  Each node represents an employee (real names are hidden), a directed link ( ----> ) shows who goes to whom for expertise/advice on the Java programming language.  We can also measure such a network (see far right column of screenshot) so you get a map and a metric.

Valdis

Valdis Krebs

Orgnet, LLC

http://orgnet.com/about.html

 


Re: Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #COVID-19 #discussion-starter #jobs #remote-work

Matt Moore
 

Abbe,

1. A willingness to invite feedback on your CV in a public forum requires a fair degree of courage - so good on you.
2. Dennis’s comments are spot on - with one exception - I don’t think there’s much value in starting a blog anymore (2006 would have been a different story).
3. With my CV and the advice I got from professional recruiters aligned, some of it was contradictory. My key takeaway was less content but focused on what the organization said they were asking for and using terms the hiring manager would care about (e.g. $ value delivered, $ budget).
4. Many economies are depressed right now which makes finding a job hard. Not impossible but hard.
5. You can look at 5 different KM job ads with the same title and see 5 completely different activities being undertaken - from what is effectively programming to what is effectively human change management. There are also jobs out there that are effectively KM roles but do not mention KM at all.
6. I have had to do this 3 times in the last 2 years. It is brutal. And luck plays its part. You may go for 4 months without getting anything and then get 2 job offers at once.
7. The biggest thing for me during the job hunting process was maintaining a sense of agency. Putting yourself out there and getting continuously rejected is not fun. So it’s important to be doing things that remind you that you do have something going on, even when the world may not agree. That may be family or community work. I tried to have 4 conversations a week with interesting people. These were not about begging for a job (I would start the conversation off by categorically saying I would not ask them for a job and you could see the person relax). But about learning something and offering something. “Is there something I can do for you?” Again this is just my experience and it may vary for others.

Good luck,

Matt Moore
+61 423 784 504

On Feb 25, 2021, at 4:11 AM, Abbe Wiesenthal <abbewiesenthal@...> wrote:

Dear Dennis, thanks so much for your thoughtful response. I think many people in addition to me will find this advice helpful.

My voluntary severance package came with 90 days of outplacement services which I took full advantage of. I have indeed been working my network as much as possible but it's funny: my experience seems to be bucking the trend! That is to say, I've not gotten interviews for jobs for which I had an internal referral (either formal or informal) but have gotten interviews for resumés sent as what I call "cold uploads". I know that's not the norm. I have around 1,300 LI connections but am always expanding the list and looking for connections to a particular company when appropriate.

I agree with you 100% about the resume software; one of the members of this forum has kindly offered their feedback already. I have a "base" resume that I tweak for each job application; this also makes it easy to track which jobs I've applied for and when by filename.

Re: your comment about a blog: I have created a Confluence Space in which I've published my articles and experience around KM. If you like I can send you an invite since I cannot make the site public under an individual license agreement.

On a side note, I have a blog where I promote independent bookstores, books and authors around the world at www.angryalgonquin.com.

I would like to extend my thanks to everyone who has reached out to me on gmail or Linkedin. So generous and so welcome!

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