Date   

Re: What to call knowledge management? #knowledge-transfer #knowledge-flow #name

John Muz
 

Thank you, John. That sounds interesting :)    The scientific community we belong to is Knowledge Management.  Use whatever works to describe what you do. 


Re: What to call knowledge management? #knowledge-transfer #knowledge-flow #name

Stan Garfield
 


Re: What to call knowledge management? #knowledge-transfer #knowledge-flow #name

 
Edited

1. KFM is not “totally accepted in the KM community.” As a matter of fact, this is the first I’ve heard of it (granted, I’m not familiar with Leister’s work; and have not been actively researching the field in the last couple of years). 
2. KM as I understand it is a broad discipline, comprising dozens of areas of endeavor. Narrative design, communities of practice, best practice sharing, after action learning, taxonomy, portals...the list goes on and on (there’s a nice diagram or two  stashed in the file cabinet here somewhere). 
3. Along those lines, the F in KFM feels too limiting to me. At a minimum, regardless of terminology, I think everyone here would agree that “knowledge” can exist both as a stock and a flow. So why rename the KM so it focuses only on flow? Whither knowledge as a stock??
4. As others have already pointed out, it really doesn’t matter what you call it - the definitional battles have been fought more times than I can count, and further resolution of them is not likely forthcoming. Focus on a measurable business outcome and call it something that reflects the desired outcome and you’ll be fine. 
-- 
-Tom
-- 

Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts

 


Re: What to call knowledge management? #knowledge-transfer #knowledge-flow #name

Douglas Weidner
 

Good advice John,

Call it whatever works for you, but as you said...make it successful.

From what I've seen, being successful is much more the issue to be resolved, than the what to call it. Be successful and you can call it whatever you want.

Douglas Weidner
Chief CKM Instructor
KM Institute

On Sat, Feb 27, 2021 at 10:26 AM John Antill <jantill4@...> wrote:
First as long as you are doing it there is no right or wrong answer to this.It is the same as Knowledge Broker. The scientific community we belong to is Knowledge Management. Locally you can use whatever works to describe what you do. I prefer the term knowledge broker because I am selling information flow one way or the other to another party. Everything has a cost. The biggest problem we have right now is the ability to show management the actual cost per person metric on how we save money. You upgrade computers to faster computers/internet/communications to save money.  Same thing with transportation. Call yourself a Knowledge Flow manager if that helps. 
An organization's knowledge inherently needs to show the hard and soft costs. Show that.
It is a river. There are docks, eddies, boats, and a whole plethora of ways to get goods down it. You hire a river master to get it the fastest most efficient way possible. 
All KM is a guide to what you should be doing. 
I am getting a Master of Science in Knowledge Management hence a STEM degree. It is derived from the Library of Science and today librarians call themselves a plethora of titles. The point is to use what you feel comfortable with. Until the tangent intellect of a company (business intelligence) is traded on wall street, it is loaned against but not traded, I shall use the term KNowledge manager or Knowledge Specialist, or whatever the title the US Army gives me. Some are Knowledge Consultants. 
John Antill
MCKM, CKS IA KT
Kent State MS KM Advisory Board Member
MS KM Student at Kent State
256-541-1229


Re: What to call knowledge management? #knowledge-transfer #knowledge-flow #name

Douglas Weidner
 

John,


Welcome to the Knowledge Age!

 

The world has passed thru a number of fundamental episodic changes that have greatly affected human occupations—from hunter-gatherers, to the Agrarian, Industrial and more recent Info Ages. We are now entering the challenging Knowledge Age, where robots, drones and artificial intelligence will replace many existing occupations.

 

Knowledge Management (KM) is a transformational discipline. It optimizes evidence-based, human and organizational performance in the K Age as a ‘Learning Organization’. Learning Organizations are enabled by KM Systems (IT), but driven by substantially improved human aptitudes (skills and competencies) and especially by transformation of K Worker attitudes (personal purpose and passion).  K Workers have unique K-Age activities, which include trusted interpersonal collaborations, K sharing, and especially creativity.

 

We must act now to develop personal knowledge managers, the future workforce, who will have much increased engagement, personal performance and job satisfaction. The cumulative result will be substantially-improved, organizational performance, health and sustainment in the K Age.


At the KM Institute, we know that KM is much more than just increasing K flow. Besides, such definitional battles have been fought and settled in the past. In the early 2000s, many thought to call it K Sharing.


You can argue whether we are in the K Age/Economy/Society/Era, but the concept of KM, dating to mid-1990s, has been long settled. Further, you can argue that KM is about 'People, Process and Technology' which is true, but if it is the K Age, it is much more about K and that is about people, not technology which has become quite ubiquitous and commoditized.There are over 10,000 Certified K Managers (CKM) and many more KMers with a KM job title with $Billions spent by KM providers, from consultants to technologies.


Also, it might be helpful for you to at least read the ISO 30401:2018 Knowledge management systems - Requirements, but please don't confuse the word systems to think it means an IT system.


On Sat, Feb 27, 2021 at 9:12 AM John Muz <fatherjohnmuzam@...> wrote:

 

Hi KM Practitioners,


I am new in the KM world and this is my first post on this forum. Before posting, I searched for previous posts on this but could not any,

 

While reading "Mastering Organizational Knowledge Flow: How to Make Knowledge Sharing Work" - Frank Leistner . I was wondering what you think about the idea of Frank Leistner  calling a ‘stop’ to the word “Knowledge Management” (KM) to “Knowledge Flow Management (KFM)”. And, if his idea is totally accepted in the KM community then, why do we still have persistence use of KM instead of KFM.

 

Using the term 'Knowledge Management' instead of 'Knowledge Flow Management', he notes:

 

“it creates a wrong sense of understanding and people will use unsuitable approaches to solve issues connected with it’   ...First, there is a problem with those two words in combination…”

“After a long time of playing with alternative terms, the one that actually fits best with my understanding is knowledge flow management, because the thing that you can manage is the flow of knowledge. You can speed it up by providing tools and technology as a foundation.”

 

‘Along those same lines, it is not possible to “transfer knowledge,” at least not in the direct sense of transferring an entity from one person to another. What actually happens is that person A shares some information, which is then used by person B and combined with prior (tacit) knowledge and experiences to create new knowledge.’

 

Thanks in advance for your input.

 

Regards

John Muzam,

PhD – Candidate

Wroclaw- Poland


Re: What to call knowledge management? #knowledge-transfer #knowledge-flow #name

John Antill
 

First as long as you are doing it there is no right or wrong answer to this.It is the same as Knowledge Broker. The scientific community we belong to is Knowledge Management. Locally you can use whatever works to describe what you do. I prefer the term knowledge broker because I am selling information flow one way or the other to another party. Everything has a cost. The biggest problem we have right now is the ability to show management the actual cost per person metric on how we save money. You upgrade computers to faster computers/internet/communications to save money.  Same thing with transportation. Call yourself a Knowledge Flow manager if that helps. 
An organization's knowledge inherently needs to show the hard and soft costs. Show that.
It is a river. There are docks, eddies, boats, and a whole plethora of ways to get goods down it. You hire a river master to get it the fastest most efficient way possible. 
All KM is a guide to what you should be doing. 
I am getting a Master of Science in Knowledge Management hence a STEM degree. It is derived from the Library of Science and today librarians call themselves a plethora of titles. The point is to use what you feel comfortable with. Until the tangent intellect of a company (business intelligence) is traded on wall street, it is loaned against but not traded, I shall use the term KNowledge manager or Knowledge Specialist, or whatever the title the US Army gives me. Some are Knowledge Consultants. 
John Antill
MCKM, CKS IA KT
Kent State MS KM Advisory Board Member
MS KM Student at Kent State
256-541-1229


What to call knowledge management? #knowledge-transfer #knowledge-flow #name

John Muz
 

 

Hi KM Practitioners,


I am new in the KM world and this is my first post on this forum. Before posting, I searched for previous posts on this but could not any,

 

While reading "Mastering Organizational Knowledge Flow: How to Make Knowledge Sharing Work" - Frank Leistner . I was wondering what you think about the idea of Frank Leistner  calling a ‘stop’ to the word “Knowledge Management” (KM) to “Knowledge Flow Management (KFM)”. And, if his idea is totally accepted in the KM community then, why do we still have persistence use of KM instead of KFM.

 

Using the term 'Knowledge Management' instead of 'Knowledge Flow Management', he notes:

 

“it creates a wrong sense of understanding and people will use unsuitable approaches to solve issues connected with it’   ...First, there is a problem with those two words in combination…”

“After a long time of playing with alternative terms, the one that actually fits best with my understanding is knowledge flow management, because the thing that you can manage is the flow of knowledge. You can speed it up by providing tools and technology as a foundation.”

 

‘Along those same lines, it is not possible to “transfer knowledge,” at least not in the direct sense of transferring an entity from one person to another. What actually happens is that person A shares some information, which is then used by person B and combined with prior (tacit) knowledge and experiences to create new knowledge.’

 

Thanks in advance for your input.

 

Regards

John Muzam,

PhD – Candidate

Wroclaw- Poland


Re: Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #COVID-19 #discussion-starter #jobs #remote-work

Jaye Lapachet
 

Hello all,

I want to echo Abbe’s post below. I benefitted from her outreach as well. I was feeling sad and disheartened after a COVID layoff several months ago. Hearing your support for Abbe gave me the will and strength to redouble my job search efforts.

 

Thanks for being kind!

Jaye

 

 

Jaye

 

Jaye Lapachet

jlapac@...

 

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Abbe Wiesenthal
Sent: Friday, February 26, 2021 6:36 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #jobs #discussion-starter #remote-work

 

I just wanted to say how grateful I am for the generous outpouring of support, feedback, and inquiries about KM roles I received in response to my posting. I can't tell you how much I appreciate it! You have renewed and strengthened my job search efforts and I will keep you updated on my progress. If I can ever do anything in return, please let me know. I am a fast and meticulous copy editor/proofreader so if any of those skills might be of use to you...let me know as well. Heartfelt thanks, Abbe


Re: Co-authored published article on knowledge sharing #future-of-work #remote-work #knowledge-sharing

Cindy Young
 

Wow!  That's a lengthy article!  I have only skimmed it, but am going to read it over the weekend.  Thank you for sharing the work that you and your co-authors accomplished.  

Regards,

Cindy


Re: Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #COVID-19 #discussion-starter #jobs #remote-work

Abbe Wiesenthal
 

Does anyone have a contact at a company called rev.io? They have a position I'm interested in. https://rev.io/


Re: Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #COVID-19 #discussion-starter #jobs #remote-work

Abbe Wiesenthal
 

I just wanted to say how grateful I am for the generous outpouring of support, feedback, and inquiries about KM roles I received in response to my posting. I can't tell you how much I appreciate it! You have renewed and strengthened my job search efforts and I will keep you updated on my progress. If I can ever do anything in return, please let me know. I am a fast and meticulous copy editor/proofreader so if any of those skills might be of use to you...let me know as well. Heartfelt thanks, Abbe


Re: Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #COVID-19 #discussion-starter #jobs #remote-work

Seth Earley
 

Our firm is looking for potential contract resources for KM projects. We are looking for people who can be doers as well as managers. If you are interested or you know anyone who may be, you can send a note to jeremy.grubman@....

I’ve passed on a couple of the folks who indicated they were looking. It’s less about managing a team and more about owning the solution.  (understanding enough about the information and knowledge architecture to guide resources as well as be an individual contributor) 

Some of the work is in emerging areas such as conversational access and embedded knowledge within products. (One day a maintenance engineer will be able to walk up to a machine, ask it how it’s doing and the machine will tell the maintenance person what it needs and how to fix the problems using plain language- specific human friendly contextualized information. )

We are working on leveraging component content and ontologies to power virtual assistants.  

If you want to learn more about the line of thinking you can take a look at this webinar https://www.earley.com/training-webinars/complex-product-configuration-intersection-knowledge-management-and-product 

Feel free to reach out to me if you have any questions or would like to talk shop. Interested in how others have tackled those problems

Seth

781-820-8080


Seth Earley 

Author of The AI Powered Enterprise
https://www.amazon.com/AI-Powered-Enterprise-Ontologies-Business-Profitable/dp/1928055508 



On Feb 25, 2021, at 3:54 PM, Pavel Kraus via groups.io <p.kraus@...> wrote:

 Hi Abbe,

Just to emphasize what Tim has just said. Often it is the language one uses during the job interview that is decisive about the success or failure.

Yesterday, at our SKMF roundtable we had an extensive discussion about just this matter. Whatever your potential employer considers as value - this is what you can give him through KM. And this has to be communicated convincingly.

We are trying to do this by defining KM around the profitability for business orientated organizations:
https://skmf.net/en/

So by reversing the perspective from your skills to your future employer needs, is the only way to go. As a consultant I do the same for my clients.

Hope to find soon a good job.
Kind regards,
Pavel

-- 
Dr. Pavel Kraus
Präsident SKMF
SWISS KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT FORUM
www.skmf.net


Am 25.02.2021 um 16:40 schrieb Tim Powell:

I’m sorry to hear this, Abbe, but thanks for sharing your story — which I’m sure will benefit others who face similar circumstances.  The past two recessions (2000 and 2008) were brutal for knowledge professionals, and there’s little reason to think that this one — which in some industries is expected to last through 2024 — will be much different.

 

As with all job searches, the most important thing — and often the hardest to stay focused on — is that it’s not primarily about you, your needs and ambitions, and your skills and qualifications — but rather about your client, her needs, and her organization’s needs.  When I have searched for hires, it has often struck me how little effort they have put into researching my organization and envisioning my needs — and how they could help me. 

 

For me, this simple (but significant) extra effort – whether or not completely accurate -- typically made the difference between someone I would hire, and the others who “needed this job.”

 

Hope this helps,

 

Tim


TIM WOOD POWELL 
| President, The Knowledge Agency® Author, The Value of Knowledge |

New York City, USA | DIRECT/MOBILE +1.212.243.1200 |

SITE www.KnowledgeAgency.com | BLOG www.KnowledgeValueChain.com |

 

 

From: <main@SIKM.groups.io> on behalf of Abbe Wiesenthal <abbewiesenthal@...>
Reply-To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 at 9:31 AM
To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Subject: [SIKM] Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #jobs #discussion-starter #remote-work

 

Hello all, I'm reaching out to the group for advice and counsel. I've been looking for a Knowledge Manager position, either in Atlanta, GA or remote, for over a year now. I've had several interviews, culminating in my most recent two-week, six interview process that did not lead to an offer. Due to the potential legal risk (I believe) it's very difficult to get feedback from hiring organizations in seeking to make myself a better candidate.

I started the KM practice in an IT/Engineering division of WarnerMedia, and have created an online KM portfolio of articles and resources that I can share with recruiters and hiring managers.  So, I'm calling upon the collective wisdom of the SIKM group! Are you still finding the job market difficult to navigate, or are you finding that more and more companies are (at last) beginning to realize the need for KM as a "need to" rather than a "nice to" have?

I've also attached my resumé (it's one that I tweak depending on the job focus, but its basics remain the same) in the hope that other SIKM members can provide comments and suggestions. And if you hear of an open position, please feel free to connect with me on LinkedIn or at abbewiesenthal@....

Thanks in advance, Abbe





Re: Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #COVID-19 #discussion-starter #jobs #remote-work

Tim Powell
 

Well, said Pavel – and glad to hear your group is moving the needle on this timely existential topic.

 

And, to underscore what others have said, networks and “connections” are critically important.  Build them long before you need them!

 

tp


TIM WOOD POWELL 
| President, The Knowledge Agency® Author, The Value of Knowledge |

New York City, USA | DIRECT/MOBILE +1.212.243.1200 |

SITE www.KnowledgeAgency.com | BLOG www.KnowledgeValueChain.com |

 

 

From: <main@SIKM.groups.io> on behalf of Pavel Kraus <p.kraus@...>
Organization: SKMF.net
Reply-To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, February 25, 2021 at 3:54 PM
To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #jobs #discussion-starter #remote-work

 

Hi Abbe,

Just to emphasize what Tim has just said. Often it is the language one uses during the job interview that is decisive about the success or failure.

Yesterday, at our SKMF roundtable we had an extensive discussion about just this matter. Whatever your potential employer considers as value - this is what you can give him through KM. And this has to be communicated convincingly.

We are trying to do this by defining KM around the profitability for business orientated organizations:
https://skmf.net/en/

So by reversing the perspective from your skills to your future employer needs, is the only way to go. As a consultant I do the same for my clients.

Hope to find soon a good job.
Kind regards,
Pavel


-- 
Dr. Pavel Kraus
Präsident SKMF
SWISS KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT FORUM
www.skmf.net

 

Am 25.02.2021 um 16:40 schrieb Tim Powell:

I’m sorry to hear this, Abbe, but thanks for sharing your story — which I’m sure will benefit others who face similar circumstances.  The past two recessions (2000 and 2008) were brutal for knowledge professionals, and there’s little reason to think that this one — which in some industries is expected to last through 2024 — will be much different.

 

As with all job searches, the most important thing — and often the hardest to stay focused on — is that it’s not primarily about you, your needs and ambitions, and your skills and qualifications — but rather about your client, her needs, and her organization’s needs.  When I have searched for hires, it has often struck me how little effort they have put into researching my organization and envisioning my needs — and how they could help me. 

 

For me, this simple (but significant) extra effort – whether or not completely accurate -- typically made the difference between someone I would hire, and the others who “needed this job.”

 

Hope this helps,

 

Tim


TIM WOOD POWELL 
| 
President, The Knowledge Agency® Author, The Value of Knowledge |

New York City, USA | DIRECT/MOBILE +1.212.243.1200 |

SITE www.KnowledgeAgency.com | BLOG www.KnowledgeValueChain.com |

 

 

From: <main@SIKM.groups.io> on behalf of Abbe Wiesenthal <abbewiesenthal@...>
Reply-To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 at 9:31 AM
To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Subject: [SIKM] Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #jobs #discussion-starter #remote-work

 

Hello all, I'm reaching out to the group for advice and counsel. I've been looking for a Knowledge Manager position, either in Atlanta, GA or remote, for over a year now. I've had several interviews, culminating in my most recent two-week, six interview process that did not lead to an offer. Due to the potential legal risk (I believe) it's very difficult to get feedback from hiring organizations in seeking to make myself a better candidate.

I started the KM practice in an IT/Engineering division of WarnerMedia, and have created an online KM portfolio of articles and resources that I can share with recruiters and hiring managers.  So, I'm calling upon the collective wisdom of the SIKM group! Are you still finding the job market difficult to navigate, or are you finding that more and more companies are (at last) beginning to realize the need for KM as a "need to" rather than a "nice to" have?

I've also attached my resumé (it's one that I tweak depending on the job focus, but its basics remain the same) in the hope that other SIKM members can provide comments and suggestions. And if you hear of an open position, please feel free to connect with me on LinkedIn or at abbewiesenthal@....

Thanks in advance, Abbe




Co-authored published article on knowledge sharing #future-of-work #remote-work #knowledge-sharing

Heather Johnson
 

All
Sharing some excity news! I co-authored an article that I would like to share with the KM community. It is an interesting twist of 3 areas: Knowledge sharing; Virtual teams; and Human resource management. Timely discussion. Use the link below to read the article.

https://www.jhrm.eu/2021/02/54-how-hrm-and-knowledge-sharing-technologies-foster-virtual-team-productivity-for-globally-dispersed-workforces-a-systematic-review/


Thanks for your time. Feedback is always welcomed.

Heather


Re: Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #COVID-19 #discussion-starter #jobs #remote-work

Katherine Sandler
 

Hi Abbe,

If you're curious how an algorithm rates your resume when you submit it blind through one of the Applicant Tracking Systems (like iCIMS, Taleo, Workable, etc.), you can check out Jobscan.co or SkillSyncer. You copy and paste your resume as well as the job description and it reviews the keywords in the job description to what youve stated in the resume. Sometimes I use it to see if Ive missed a bigger concept in the role description.

In my current search for a job, I have moved away from blind applying and have just made it my goal to grow my network through casual conversation and informational interviews with others.

(If this suggestion is redundant, sorry, I missed some prior emails in this thread.)

-Katherine


On Thu, Feb 25, 2021 at 2:54 PM Pavel Kraus <p.kraus@...> wrote:
Hi Abbe,

Just to emphasize what Tim has just said. Often it is the language one uses during the job interview that is decisive about the success or failure.

Yesterday, at our SKMF roundtable we had an extensive discussion about just this matter. Whatever your potential employer considers as value - this is what you can give him through KM. And this has to be communicated convincingly.

We are trying to do this by defining KM around the profitability for business orientated organizations:
https://skmf.net/en/

So by reversing the perspective from your skills to your future employer needs, is the only way to go. As a consultant I do the same for my clients.

Hope to find soon a good job.
Kind regards,
Pavel

-- 
Dr. Pavel Kraus
Präsident SKMF
SWISS KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT FORUM
www.skmf.net


Am 25.02.2021 um 16:40 schrieb Tim Powell:

I’m sorry to hear this, Abbe, but thanks for sharing your story — which I’m sure will benefit others who face similar circumstances.  The past two recessions (2000 and 2008) were brutal for knowledge professionals, and there’s little reason to think that this one — which in some industries is expected to last through 2024 — will be much different.

 

As with all job searches, the most important thing — and often the hardest to stay focused on — is that it’s not primarily about you, your needs and ambitions, and your skills and qualifications — but rather about your client, her needs, and her organization’s needs.  When I have searched for hires, it has often struck me how little effort they have put into researching my organization and envisioning my needs — and how they could help me. 

 

For me, this simple (but significant) extra effort – whether or not completely accurate -- typically made the difference between someone I would hire, and the others who “needed this job.”

 

Hope this helps,

 

Tim


TIM WOOD POWELL 
| President, The Knowledge Agency® Author, The Value of Knowledge |

New York City, USA | DIRECT/MOBILE +1.212.243.1200 |

SITE www.KnowledgeAgency.com | BLOG www.KnowledgeValueChain.com |

 

 

From: <main@SIKM.groups.io> on behalf of Abbe Wiesenthal <abbewiesenthal@...>
Reply-To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 at 9:31 AM
To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Subject: [SIKM] Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #jobs #discussion-starter #remote-work

 

Hello all, I'm reaching out to the group for advice and counsel. I've been looking for a Knowledge Manager position, either in Atlanta, GA or remote, for over a year now. I've had several interviews, culminating in my most recent two-week, six interview process that did not lead to an offer. Due to the potential legal risk (I believe) it's very difficult to get feedback from hiring organizations in seeking to make myself a better candidate.

I started the KM practice in an IT/Engineering division of WarnerMedia, and have created an online KM portfolio of articles and resources that I can share with recruiters and hiring managers.  So, I'm calling upon the collective wisdom of the SIKM group! Are you still finding the job market difficult to navigate, or are you finding that more and more companies are (at last) beginning to realize the need for KM as a "need to" rather than a "nice to" have?

I've also attached my resumé (it's one that I tweak depending on the job focus, but its basics remain the same) in the hope that other SIKM members can provide comments and suggestions. And if you hear of an open position, please feel free to connect with me on LinkedIn or at abbewiesenthal@....

Thanks in advance, Abbe



  


Re: Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #COVID-19 #discussion-starter #jobs #remote-work

 

Hi Abbe,

Just to emphasize what Tim has just said. Often it is the language one uses during the job interview that is decisive about the success or failure.

Yesterday, at our SKMF roundtable we had an extensive discussion about just this matter. Whatever your potential employer considers as value - this is what you can give him through KM. And this has to be communicated convincingly.

We are trying to do this by defining KM around the profitability for business orientated organizations:
https://skmf.net/en/

So by reversing the perspective from your skills to your future employer needs, is the only way to go. As a consultant I do the same for my clients.

Hope to find soon a good job.
Kind regards,
Pavel

-- 
Dr. Pavel Kraus
Präsident SKMF
SWISS KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT FORUM
www.skmf.net


Am 25.02.2021 um 16:40 schrieb Tim Powell:

I’m sorry to hear this, Abbe, but thanks for sharing your story — which I’m sure will benefit others who face similar circumstances.  The past two recessions (2000 and 2008) were brutal for knowledge professionals, and there’s little reason to think that this one — which in some industries is expected to last through 2024 — will be much different.

 

As with all job searches, the most important thing — and often the hardest to stay focused on — is that it’s not primarily about you, your needs and ambitions, and your skills and qualifications — but rather about your client, her needs, and her organization’s needs.  When I have searched for hires, it has often struck me how little effort they have put into researching my organization and envisioning my needs — and how they could help me. 

 

For me, this simple (but significant) extra effort – whether or not completely accurate -- typically made the difference between someone I would hire, and the others who “needed this job.”

 

Hope this helps,

 

Tim


TIM WOOD POWELL 
| President, The Knowledge Agency® Author, The Value of Knowledge |

New York City, USA | DIRECT/MOBILE +1.212.243.1200 |

SITE www.KnowledgeAgency.com | BLOG www.KnowledgeValueChain.com |

 

 

From: <main@SIKM.groups.io> on behalf of Abbe Wiesenthal <abbewiesenthal@...>
Reply-To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 at 9:31 AM
To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Subject: [SIKM] Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #jobs #discussion-starter #remote-work

 

Hello all, I'm reaching out to the group for advice and counsel. I've been looking for a Knowledge Manager position, either in Atlanta, GA or remote, for over a year now. I've had several interviews, culminating in my most recent two-week, six interview process that did not lead to an offer. Due to the potential legal risk (I believe) it's very difficult to get feedback from hiring organizations in seeking to make myself a better candidate.

I started the KM practice in an IT/Engineering division of WarnerMedia, and have created an online KM portfolio of articles and resources that I can share with recruiters and hiring managers.  So, I'm calling upon the collective wisdom of the SIKM group! Are you still finding the job market difficult to navigate, or are you finding that more and more companies are (at last) beginning to realize the need for KM as a "need to" rather than a "nice to" have?

I've also attached my resumé (it's one that I tweak depending on the job focus, but its basics remain the same) in the hope that other SIKM members can provide comments and suggestions. And if you hear of an open position, please feel free to connect with me on LinkedIn or at abbewiesenthal@....

Thanks in advance, Abbe



  


Re: Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #COVID-19 #discussion-starter #jobs #remote-work

Abbe Wiesenthal
 

Great examples, Stephen, thanks.


Re: Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #COVID-19 #discussion-starter #jobs #remote-work

Abbe Wiesenthal
 

Matt, everything you said rang so true to me. I too have gotten contradictory feedback on my CV from different people; I take what makes sense for the role I'm applying for and tweak my resume as needed.

I don't really have a "blog" per se so maybe I used the wrong word. I have a Confluence Space in which I've created a centralized source for my KM articles, case studies, other publications, and resources. I use it as a portfolio that expands upon my resume, rather than a traditional blog. It's a showcase for my experience with creating, curating, centralizing, indexing/tagging and sharing knowledge in a highly technical, global, IT/Engineering division within WarnerMedia.

Technology moves at the speed of light in the media/entertainment industry. We who provided the technology infrastructure for the network brands had to keep abreast of these developments in order to remain competitive as new distribution platforms and video formats come online. This use case was the primary one I used to propose, and then move into, the KM role at WarnerMedia.

Of course, once I took the job, the role of the KM Center expanded beyond its original purview, and several sections of it became useful to departments outside of our division. I also added video content which is much "stickier" and attracted more users to the site; I believe a multi-media approach to KM is a great strategy to implement.

Thanks for responding; I'm overwhelmed by the generosity of the forum members who have reached out!


Re: Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #COVID-19 #discussion-starter #jobs #remote-work

Tim Powell
 

I’m sorry to hear this, Abbe, but thanks for sharing your story — which I’m sure will benefit others who face similar circumstances.  The past two recessions (2000 and 2008) were brutal for knowledge professionals, and there’s little reason to think that this one — which in some industries is expected to last through 2024 — will be much different.

 

As with all job searches, the most important thing — and often the hardest to stay focused on — is that it’s not primarily about you, your needs and ambitions, and your skills and qualifications — but rather about your client, her needs, and her organization’s needs.  When I have searched for hires, it has often struck me how little effort they have put into researching my organization and envisioning my needs — and how they could help me. 

 

For me, this simple (but significant) extra effort – whether or not completely accurate -- typically made the difference between someone I would hire, and the others who “needed this job.”

 

Hope this helps,

 

Tim


TIM WOOD POWELL 
| President, The Knowledge Agency® Author, The Value of Knowledge |

New York City, USA | DIRECT/MOBILE +1.212.243.1200 |

SITE www.KnowledgeAgency.com | BLOG www.KnowledgeValueChain.com |

 

 

From: <main@SIKM.groups.io> on behalf of Abbe Wiesenthal <abbewiesenthal@...>
Reply-To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 at 9:31 AM
To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Subject: [SIKM] Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #jobs #discussion-starter #remote-work

 

Hello all, I'm reaching out to the group for advice and counsel. I've been looking for a Knowledge Manager position, either in Atlanta, GA or remote, for over a year now. I've had several interviews, culminating in my most recent two-week, six interview process that did not lead to an offer. Due to the potential legal risk (I believe) it's very difficult to get feedback from hiring organizations in seeking to make myself a better candidate.

I started the KM practice in an IT/Engineering division of WarnerMedia, and have created an online KM portfolio of articles and resources that I can share with recruiters and hiring managers.  So, I'm calling upon the collective wisdom of the SIKM group! Are you still finding the job market difficult to navigate, or are you finding that more and more companies are (at last) beginning to realize the need for KM as a "need to" rather than a "nice to" have?

I've also attached my resumé (it's one that I tweak depending on the job focus, but its basics remain the same) in the hope that other SIKM members can provide comments and suggestions. And if you hear of an open position, please feel free to connect with me on LinkedIn or at abbewiesenthal@....

Thanks in advance, Abbe


Re: Knowledge Manager Position—Job Search in the time of COVID #COVID-19 #discussion-starter #jobs #remote-work

Nirmala Palaniappan
 

Abbé,

I think you have received some fantastic inputs from the others here. I am inclined to agree with Dennis; I believe knowing someone in an organisation does make all the difference (though, ideally, that shouldn’t be the deciding factor). I see so many KM job openings every week but each position (as Matt pointed out) seems to be different from the rest and each organisation seems to want their respective KM managers to do drastically different things. 

I am, sometimes, worried about these idiosyncratic perceptions and wonder if organisations will only look for someone who has carried out projects of a certain kind. To cut my rambling short, I am in a situation similar to yours and am trying to up-skill as well as pick up projects that are not particularly related to KM. One of the things I am placing a bet on is that things will get better once economies start recovering (which is only a matter of time).

I think it is a good idea to take up probono projects for startups and NGOs, if that makes sense. Another idea is to create inexpensive service-oriented packages as an independent consultant. Do feel free to connect with me in case you want to discuss more. All the very best and stay positive. :)

Regards
N


On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 at 8:01 PM, Abbe Wiesenthal <abbewiesenthal@...> wrote:
Hello all, I'm reaching out to the group for advice and counsel. I've been looking for a Knowledge Manager position, either in Atlanta, GA or remote, for over a year now. I've had several interviews, culminating in my most recent two-week, six interview process that did not lead to an offer. Due to the potential legal risk (I believe) it's very difficult to get feedback from hiring organizations in seeking to make myself a better candidate.

I started the KM practice in an IT/Engineering division of WarnerMedia, and have created an online KM portfolio of articles and resources that I can share with recruiters and hiring managers.  So, I'm calling upon the collective wisdom of the SIKM group! Are you still finding the job market difficult to navigate, or are you finding that more and more companies are (at last) beginning to realize the need for KM as a "need to" rather than a "nice to" have?

I've also attached my resumé (it's one that I tweak depending on the job focus, but its basics remain the same) in the hope that other SIKM members can provide comments and suggestions. And if you hear of an open position, please feel free to connect with me on LinkedIn or at abbewiesenthal@....

Thanks in advance, Abbe

--
"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous

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