Date   

Re: How will conferences change post-COVID? #conferences #COVID-19

Matt Moore
 

Patrick,

As Peter Drucker so memorably opined: With the lights out, It’s less dangerous, Here we are now, Entertain us.

I suspect that post-COVID, trad conferences will return. I rarely go to those kinds of events but people seem to like them.

I hope that we get more purposeful and we think about what we are trying to achieve and what that means for format. 

While I love facilitatory formats, I’m also interested in borrowing from the performing arts. Marcus JH Brown’s work is wonderfully uncomfortable: https://www.marcusjohnhenrybrown.com/

Regards,

Matt Moore
+61 423 784 504

On Apr 26, 2021, at 1:16 PM, Patrick Lambe <plambe@...> wrote:

I’m posting the question in the subject line to both SIKM forum and KM4Dev, so apologies if you see it twice.

There was a question on KM4Dev about speakers for a conference. Bev Wenger-Traynor morphed it into a question about people with something to offer. Arthur Shelley distinguished between speaking and facilitating. Nancy Dixon has been speaking for a while about the importance of dialogue.

I am wondering how our conception of conferences (and other convening events where large audiences are expected to listen to/follow small elite cadres) will change post-COVID? I am wondering how the economics of such events might change. 

Let me give an example of post-COVID shifts in how we at ISKO Singapore are experiencing new ways of interacting. We are the Singapore chapter of an international organisation. Each country chapter runs its own programmes.

We used to have monthly in-person events. We would book a venue and refreshments, and get a speaker or a panel. We always tried to have networking and discussion, it wasn’t just listening. We got on the zoom wagon early, because we had attracted a couple of members from outside Singapore, so we would do live streaming for our overseas attendees, with them whatsapping questions or comments to be interposed. We started bringing in speakers/panellists by zoom as well to interact with the local panel. Our horizons broadened.

Since COVID all our events have gone online. We have become completely “leaky”. Our last event attracted folks from 12 countries. We have barely no costs. Our society’s members are essentially patrons, providing the volunteers and minimal funding to offer events to anyone who cares to attend (or see the materials afterwards) - very much on the SIKM Leader’s Forum model, but with a core group that has a shared Singapore identity and agenda. We are now starting to wonder what it means to be a country chapter. Old conceptions are starting to break down. 

Mainstream conferences, to survive, have started to experiment with new formats in a digital environment. I am wondering if we do have an in-person event this year or next year, how could it be different? How could we make better use of folks’ time being in the same space? Will conferences become “leaky” too, distributed over time, and with digital and physical components? How will the economics work? Or will (sponsoring) employer expectations force us back into our old passive habits?

I do think it’s worth bringing folks physically into a shared space in order to interact, ask questions, inquire, and share. I’m not convinced of the egocentric personality model where the “names” are the principal actors. Yes, names are good, as seeds for convening or to share experience or insight or to spark discussion (as Bev says, folks with some experience/skills to offer, and enough confidence to share). I would not even go so far as to recommend the use of the word “facilitator” because I think that has become contaminated with the notion of a special person (s/he who tells us - sorry suggests to us - what to do next). 

I prefer the terms convenors (to frame the invitation) and brokers (to help folks make connections with each other or in dialogue). The more convenors and brokers the better. In fact, we should all be convenors and brokers. We should all be pointing up other people’s good work so that they get curated into events.

So how will conferences change? Or will we slip back into dark-panelled ballrooms with no natural daylight watching large screens flicker expecting to be entertained and fed, and shuffling from session to session?

Bev, I would be fascinated to learn what your experiences with BEtreat might suggest.

By the way, if anyone is curious about our upcoming ISKO events check out www.iskosg.org - all welcome.

P

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com


How will conferences change post-COVID? #conferences #COVID-19

Patrick Lambe
 

I’m posting the question in the subject line to both SIKM forum and KM4Dev, so apologies if you see it twice.

There was a question on KM4Dev about speakers for a conference. Bev Wenger-Traynor morphed it into a question about people with something to offer. Arthur Shelley distinguished between speaking and facilitating. Nancy Dixon has been speaking for a while about the importance of dialogue.

I am wondering how our conception of conferences (and other convening events where large audiences are expected to listen to/follow small elite cadres) will change post-COVID? I am wondering how the economics of such events might change. 

Let me give an example of post-COVID shifts in how we at ISKO Singapore are experiencing new ways of interacting. We are the Singapore chapter of an international organisation. Each country chapter runs its own programmes.

We used to have monthly in-person events. We would book a venue and refreshments, and get a speaker or a panel. We always tried to have networking and discussion, it wasn’t just listening. We got on the zoom wagon early, because we had attracted a couple of members from outside Singapore, so we would do live streaming for our overseas attendees, with them whatsapping questions or comments to be interposed. We started bringing in speakers/panellists by zoom as well to interact with the local panel. Our horizons broadened.

Since COVID all our events have gone online. We have become completely “leaky”. Our last event attracted folks from 12 countries. We have barely no costs. Our society’s members are essentially patrons, providing the volunteers and minimal funding to offer events to anyone who cares to attend (or see the materials afterwards) - very much on the SIKM Leader’s Forum model, but with a core group that has a shared Singapore identity and agenda. We are now starting to wonder what it means to be a country chapter. Old conceptions are starting to break down. 

Mainstream conferences, to survive, have started to experiment with new formats in a digital environment. I am wondering if we do have an in-person event this year or next year, how could it be different? How could we make better use of folks’ time being in the same space? Will conferences become “leaky” too, distributed over time, and with digital and physical components? How will the economics work? Or will (sponsoring) employer expectations force us back into our old passive habits?

I do think it’s worth bringing folks physically into a shared space in order to interact, ask questions, inquire, and share. I’m not convinced of the egocentric personality model where the “names” are the principal actors. Yes, names are good, as seeds for convening or to share experience or insight or to spark discussion (as Bev says, folks with some experience/skills to offer, and enough confidence to share). I would not even go so far as to recommend the use of the word “facilitator” because I think that has become contaminated with the notion of a special person (s/he who tells us - sorry suggests to us - what to do next). 

I prefer the terms convenors (to frame the invitation) and brokers (to help folks make connections with each other or in dialogue). The more convenors and brokers the better. In fact, we should all be convenors and brokers. We should all be pointing up other people’s good work so that they get curated into events.

So how will conferences change? Or will we slip back into dark-panelled ballrooms with no natural daylight watching large screens flicker expecting to be entertained and fed, and shuffling from session to session?

Bev, I would be fascinated to learn what your experiences with BEtreat might suggest.

By the way, if anyone is curious about our upcoming ISKO events check out www.iskosg.org - all welcome.

P

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com


KM Job Opening at Resonance #jobs

Stan Garfield
 


KM Job Opening at Grant Thornton #jobs

Stan Garfield
 


Re: April 2021 SIKM Call: Kate Pugh - Translating Effective Sustainability Conversations into Network Design #monthly-call #conversation

Katrina Pugh
 

Thank you, Stan. This was a good discussion about sustainability conflict, conversation, and NLP.  

I think we knowledge practitioners have a lot to offer as we all grapple with these difficult tradeoffs among livelihoods, conservation, biodiversity, and cultures.

 We can learn a lot from each other!  I'd love to hear others' experiences of researching and building productive conversation for sustainability. 

Warmly,
Kate

Katrina Pugh
AlignConsulting | Collaboration AI and Strategy 
Columbia University | Info and Knowledge Strategy Master's Program Faculty


On Tue, Apr 20, 2021 at 12:13 PM Stan Garfield <stangarfield@...> wrote:
Today we held our 188th monthly call. Thanks to Kate for presenting, to those spoke up and posted in the group chat, and to all those who attended. Please continue the discussion here by replying to this thread. Here are the details of the call.
  • April 20, 2021 SIKM Call: Kate Pugh - Translating Effective Sustainability Conversations into Network Design
  • Slides
  • Recording
Group Chat

[4/20/2021 11:06:24 AM] Tim Powell: Hello Ruediger!  Long time, hope you are well!!!

[4/20/2021 11:17:22 AM] Andrew Trickett: Rashomon effect - it all depends on your perspectives

[4/20/2021 11:17:22 AM] Andrew Trickett: Can I recommend Nancy Klines Time to think around dialogue and Shelley Turkle arpound reclaiming conversations

[4/20/2021 11:47:07 AM] Tim Powell: Interesting research approach, Kate!  Good luck -- if your model works, I hope you'll move on to creating world peace at the UN!

[4/20/2021 11:50:14 AM] Andrew Trickett: Heard Rumi being spoken one night in Isfahan in the 1970's

[4/20/2021 11:50:45 AM] Stan Garfield: David Wilcox song: Out Beyond Ideas
[4/20/2021 11:52:37 AM] Tim Powell: Kate, is it possible that, if Integrity shows up too much, that it's actually more than one category?

 

[4/20/2021 11:52:37 AM] Tim Powell: I mean it, Kate!  This is cool stuff.

[4/20/2021 11:52:37 AM] Tim Powell: Rashomon - Kurosawa -- a must-see if you work with information and knowledge!

[4/20/2021 11:57:03 AM] John Lewis: Really Interesting Kate!! Can NLP determine questions from curiosity (integrity Q) versus questions from conviction? (Have you stopped beating your wife?)

[4/20/2021 11:57:44 AM] Ginetta Gueli from Italy: Not a question, but a hope. Great study/research Kate. I hope this model can help at global level especially in political environments, where money/selfish interests seems the driver to any action and there is no way to set a positive and productive dialogue for the benefit of everybody.

[4/20/2021 12:01:27 PM] John Lewis: This is super! Thanks Kate!

[4/20/2021 12:01:41 PM] Steve Hall: Thank you Kate - very interesting

[4/20/2021 12:02:01 PM] Adriaan Jooste: This was excellent - and most insightful - thanks Kate!

[4/20/2021 12:02:05 PM] Ginetta Gueli from Italy: Thanks Kate for sharing your knowledge with us!

[4/20/2021 12:02:05 PM] Tim Powell: Thanks, Kate, great stuff!

[4/20/2021 12:02:11 PM] Susan Genden: Excellent. Thank you!

[4/20/2021 12:02:14 PM] Christine Bond: Awesome presentation Kate.  Thanks!!

[4/20/2021 12:02:16 PM] Jamie: Thank you, Kate!

[4/20/2021 12:02:21 PM] Ninez Piezas-Jerbi: Thanks again as usual, Kate!

[4/20/2021 12:02:32 PM] Sukhdeep Wasu: awesome, thank you!

[4/20/2021 12:02:52 PM] Ruediger Suess: thank  you, Kate!


Re: April 2021 SIKM Call: Kate Pugh - Translating Effective Sustainability Conversations into Network Design #monthly-call #conversation

Stan Garfield
 
Edited

Today we held our 188th monthly call. Thanks to Kate for presenting, to those spoke up and posted in the group chat, and to all those who attended. Please continue the discussion here by replying to this thread. Here are the details of the call.
  • April 20, 2021 SIKM Call: Kate Pugh - Translating Effective Sustainability Conversations into Network Design
  • Slides
  • Recording
Group Chat

[4/20/2021 11:06:24 AM] Tim Powell: Hello Ruediger!  Long time, hope you are well!!!

[4/20/2021 11:17:22 AM] Andrew Trickett: Rashomon effect - it all depends on your perspectives

[4/20/2021 11:17:22 AM] Andrew Trickett: Can I recommend Nancy Klines Time to think around dialogue and Shelley Turkle arpound reclaiming conversations

[4/20/2021 11:47:07 AM] Tim Powell: Interesting research approach, Kate!  Good luck -- if your model works, I hope you'll move on to creating world peace at the UN!

[4/20/2021 11:50:14 AM] Andrew Trickett: Heard Rumi being spoken one night in Isfahan in the 1970's

[4/20/2021 11:50:45 AM] Stan Garfield: David Wilcox song: Out Beyond Ideas
[4/20/2021 11:52:37 AM] Tim Powell: Kate, is it possible that, if Integrity shows up too much, that it's actually more than one category?

[4/20/2021 11:52:37 AM] Tim Powell: I mean it, Kate!  This is cool stuff.

[4/20/2021 11:52:37 AM] Tim Powell: Rashomon - Kurosawa -- a must-see if you work with information and knowledge!

[4/20/2021 11:57:03 AM] John Lewis: Really Interesting Kate!! Can NLP determine questions from curiosity (integrity Q) versus questions from conviction? (Have you stopped beating your wife?)

[4/20/2021 11:57:44 AM] Ginetta Gueli from Italy: Not a question, but a hope. Great study/research Kate. I hope this model can help at global level especially in political environments, where money/selfish interests seems the driver to any action and there is no way to set a positive and productive dialogue for the benefit of everybody.

[4/20/2021 12:01:27 PM] John Lewis: This is super! Thanks Kate!

[4/20/2021 12:01:41 PM] Steve Hall: Thank you Kate - very interesting

[4/20/2021 12:02:01 PM] Adriaan Jooste: This was excellent - and most insightful - thanks Kate!

[4/20/2021 12:02:05 PM] Ginetta Gueli from Italy: Thanks Kate for sharing your knowledge with us!

[4/20/2021 12:02:05 PM] Tim Powell: Thanks, Kate, great stuff!

[4/20/2021 12:02:11 PM] Susan Genden: Excellent. Thank you!

[4/20/2021 12:02:14 PM] Christine Bond: Awesome presentation Kate.  Thanks!!

[4/20/2021 12:02:16 PM] Jamie: Thank you, Kate!

[4/20/2021 12:02:21 PM] Ninez Piezas-Jerbi: Thanks again as usual, Kate!

[4/20/2021 12:02:32 PM] Sukhdeep Wasu: awesome, thank you!

[4/20/2021 12:02:52 PM] Ruediger Suess: thank  you, Kate!


Re: April 2021 SIKM Call: Kate Pugh - Translating Effective Sustainability Conversations into Network Design #monthly-call #conversation

Katrina Pugh
 

Thank you, Stan! I’m looking forward to it. 

This is going to be a peek into research-in-progress, where we are using AI and machine learning (specifically: NLP) to study and improve conversation on sustainability topics. 

I’ll be starting with the marine aquaculture topic, and am hoping to discuss other sustainability conversation topics you all are all interested in.  

Warmly,
Kate

Katrina Pugh
President | AlignConsulting | Collaboration, Analytics and Strategy
Faculty | Columbia University | Information and Knowledge Strategy Master of Science Program
Mobile: 617-967-3910

On Apr 19, 2021, at 11:41 AM, Stan Garfield <stangarfield@...> wrote:



This is a reminder of tomorrow's monthly call from 11 am to 12 noon EDT. Note that the US is now on Daylight Savings Time.

  • April 20, 2021 SIKM Call: Kate Pugh - Translating Effective Sustainability Conversations into Network Design
  • Slides
  • For online chat, use the group chat in FreeConferenceCall.com.

SIKM Leaders Community Monthly Call

  • When: Tuesday, March 16, 2021, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time
  • Where: (712) 770-4035 (US and Canada) Passcode 178302
  • International Dial-in Numbers
  • You can join online using your computer’s speakers and microphone at http://join.freeconferencecall.com/stangarfield
    - Online Meeting ID: stangarfield
  • If you join online, be sure to click on the phone icon and then choose your audio preference.
  • If you have problems connecting, call customer service at 844-844-1322.
  • Occurs the third Tuesday of every month from 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM Eastern Time (USA)
  • Community Site 
  • Slides - There is no live screen sharing - you follow along by advancing the slides yourself.
  • Previous Calls
  • Future Calls
  • Calendar


April 2021 SIKM Call: Kate Pugh - Translating Effective Sustainability Conversations into Network Design #monthly-call #conversation

Stan Garfield
 
Edited

This is a reminder of tomorrow's monthly call from 11 am to 12 noon EDT. Note that the US is now on Daylight Savings Time.

  • April 20, 2021 SIKM Call: Kate Pugh - Translating Effective Sustainability Conversations into Network Design
  • Slides
  • For online chat, use the group chat in FreeConferenceCall.com.

SIKM Leaders Community Monthly Call

  • Where: (712) 770-4035 (US and Canada) Passcode 178302
  • International Dial-in Numbers
  • You can join online using your computer’s speakers and microphone at http://join.freeconferencecall.com/stangarfield
    - Online Meeting ID: stangarfield
  • If you join online, be sure to click on the phone icon and then choose your audio preference.
  • Please don't turn on video - this increases the size of the recording ten times.
  • If you have problems connecting, call customer service at 844-844-1322.
  • Occurs the third Tuesday of every month from 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM Eastern Time (USA)
  • Community Site 
  • Slides - There is no live screen sharing - you follow along by advancing the slides yourself.
  • Previous Calls
  • Future Calls
  • Calendar


Re: Knowledge Management Maturity Baseline #maturity #institutionalization

Jonathan Norman
 

No worries, Lizzi. Thanks for the help.

 

Jonathan

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Elizabeth Winter via groups.io
Sent: 13 April 2021 13:59
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Knowledge Management Maturity Baseline #guidelines #institutionalization #maturity

 

Sorry, Jonathan, not Gordon—you were the one who asked the question. Low caffeine here, too. 😊

 

LIZZI WINTER
Knowledge Management Program Manager


3333 Piedmont Road, NE | Suite 1000 | Atlanta, GA 30305
O: +1.404.975.6298
www.northhighland.com | Connect With Us

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Elizabeth Winter via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, April 13, 2021 8:58 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Knowledge Management Maturity Baseline #guidelines #institutionalization #maturity

 

Hi, Gordon—


And as others have mentioned, APQC is a great source for info. on KM best practices. They offer members a maturity assessment your organization can perform to benchmark and complete once a year to assess your KM maturity.
Knowledge Management Capability Assessment Tool | APQC

 

Also, this study just published by Spiceworks / Ziff Davis may be of use. It is the one I’ve been looking for, for years: RE4MDJC (microsoft.com) Commissioned by Microsoft (in service of promoting their new SharePoint Syntex and Viva Topics products), it contains this “killer stat” (p. 12) I’ve been using with my organization to promote the strategic importance and business value of Knowledge Management:

 

 

 

Hope this helps!

Lizzi

LIZZI WINTER
Knowledge Management Program Manager


3333 Piedmont Road, NE | Suite 1000 | Atlanta, GA 30305
O: +1.404.975.6298
www.northhighland.com | Connect With Us

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jonathan Norman via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, April 13, 2021 8:16 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] Knowledge Management Maturity Baseline #guidelines #institutionalization #maturity

 

I saw this intriguing piece of research - which was published a year or two ago: Inefficient Knowledge Sharing Costs Businesses $47 Million Annually (panopto.com) and I wondered whether anyone has come across any kind of KM maturity baseline for teams and organizations? Any advice or links gratefully received. Jonathan

 



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Webinar: Hashtag Activism - Wed 5 May 2021 #webinar #video

Matt Moore
 


#HashtagActivism is the use of social media by participants in contemporary social and political debates. In this seminar, researchers explore some of the fundamental questions around the use of these media in the contexts of gender and national identity.
- How do participants use these media?
- How do they allow new forms of political expression?
- What are their limitations as communications tools in the political domain?

Dr Natalie Krikowa is a media scholar and practice-led researcher at the University of Technology Sydney. Her research discusses issues surrounding media representation and identity politics in screen studies, popular culture, and transmedia, with a feminist, Queer, and gender studies focus. She works as the Creative Director of Zenowa Productions, writing and producing queer female focused works including The Newtown Girls (2012) and All Our Lesbians Are Dead! (2017).

Dr Tisha Dejmanee is a Lecturer in Digital and Social Media at the University of Technology Sydney. Her research is in the field of feminist media studies, with a focus on contemporary feminist theory, food studies and digital platforms. Her work has been published in Television and New Media, Feminist Media Studies and International Journal of Communication.

Pamela Fransen-Taylor is a doctoral candidate in the School of Communication at UTS. Her research interests include information behaviour, social media and utilising the Internet to support and build social capital.

Dr Bhuva Narayan is Associate Professor, Digital Social Media, and Graduate Research Coordinator for the School of Communication, UTS. Her teaching and research interests are in the field of Human Information Behaviour (how humans need, seek, find, organise, and use information, both online and in everyday life) including Digital Social Media.


Looking for a KM person for a new online community #jobs

Christopher Johannessen <christopher.johannessen@...>
 

Howdy all!

This is me on Linkedin https://www.linkedin.com/in/chrisjohannessen/ 

I have one of those unadvertised roles you hear about sometimes :)

I'm looking for someone, US based (or US time zone based), with practical KM experience such as:
- Community facilitation
- Community growth and adoption
- Driving engagement for communities, driving social sharing and knowledge sharing
- Community metrics (perhaps a touch, too, of workflow metrics, technology adoption or even process mining)
- Community, technology and data literacy skills (can create training, help keep an eye on a learning management system that is integrated with the community)
- Practical community management is key
- Bonus points: the ability to facilitate with developers, analysts and leaders who use data or analytics tools (this is for an analytics / data focused community that is used at a large organization)

Happy to make time to discuss, send me a note 1x1 (ideally with a LinkedIn link and perhaps even a resume) at:

christopher.johannessen@...

Thanks!!!

Chris Johannessen
Digital Transformation Strategist
Axis Group
https://www.axisgroup.com/ 


Re: Informal Virtual Activities During Conferences #conferences #remote-work

Bahar Salimova
 

Thanks a lot, Stan. Very helpful.

 

Best,

Bahar

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Stan Garfield
Sent: Friday, April 16, 2021 8:00 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Informal Virtual Activities During Conferences #conferences #remote-work

 

[External]


Re: World Bank examples? #case-studies

Laura Zorrilla Fernandez
 

Thanks a lot for these reports from the WB! Always nice to see examples from IOs.


Re: Informal Virtual Activities During Conferences #conferences #remote-work

Stan Garfield
 


Re: Working Out Loud - I can’t even hear myself think #information-overload #WOL

Stan Garfield
 
Edited


Re: World Bank examples? #case-studies

Ninez Piezas-Jerbi
 

Thank you, Gavin! Really helpful!

Best,
Ninez

On 16 Apr 2021, at 09:33, Gavin Chait <whythawk@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi Ninez

I wrote this for the Bank a few years ago: Technical assessment of open data
platforms for national statistical organisations
https://documents.worldbank.org/en/publication/documents-reports/documentdet
ail/744241468334210686/technical-assessment-of-open-data-platforms-for-natio
nal-statistical-organisations

The objective was to build out open data publication technical capacity, and
provide a standards benchmark. There's also the Open Data Readiness
Assessment initiative http://opendatatoolkit.worldbank.org/en/odra.html

The results from open data initiatives have been mixed (my own project
experiences ranging from the amazing, to the frustratingly hostile), but it
helps to remember where even the Bank was a decade ago. Data management has
gone from randomly-structured spreadsheets released at random intervals to
random schemas and metadata definitions, to a global movement for structure,
accessibility and consistency in a relatively short period of time, all
without it being in the least bit of a sexy subject.

Regards

Gavin

--------------------<
Gavin Chait is a data scientist and development economist at Whythawk.
uk.linkedin.com/in/gavinchait | twitter.com/GavinChait | gavinchait.com

-----Original Message-----
From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bahar Salimova
via groups.io
Sent: 14 April 2021 15:40
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] World Bank examples?

Hello Ninez,

Thank you for this question. I recommend looking at our report on World
Bank's Knowledge Flow published in 2019 -
https://ieg.worldbankgroup.org/sites/default/files/Data/reports/kfc.pdf

It has both the examples of what has operationally worked well and where we
recommended the World Bank to fine-tune its knowledge flow. A note that some
institutional changes has happened in the World Bank since the release of
this report, but I think it provide a good overview.

You may also look into our older report on Knowledge-Based Country Programs
-
https://ieg.worldbankgroup.org/sites/default/files/Data/Evaluation/files/kbc
p_eval.pdf It is a but older but still shares some examples.

Hope this helps.

Best,

Bahar
-----Original Message-----
From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ninez
Piezas-Jerbi
Sent: Saturday, April 10, 2021 2:28 AM
To: main@sikm.groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] World Bank examples?

[External]

Hello,

Was wondering if I could reach out to the experts in this community. Would
you know of specific examples of World Bank KM initiatives that have
directly and positively benefitted their Member States (and not just the
bank itself)? If there are links to them that would be helpful.

I'd be so grateful.

Many thanks,
Ninez
World Trade Organization















Re: World Bank examples? #case-studies

 

Hi Ninez

I wrote this for the Bank a few years ago: Technical assessment of open data
platforms for national statistical organisations
https://documents.worldbank.org/en/publication/documents-reports/documentdet
ail/744241468334210686/technical-assessment-of-open-data-platforms-for-natio
nal-statistical-organisations

The objective was to build out open data publication technical capacity, and
provide a standards benchmark. There's also the Open Data Readiness
Assessment initiative http://opendatatoolkit.worldbank.org/en/odra.html

The results from open data initiatives have been mixed (my own project
experiences ranging from the amazing, to the frustratingly hostile), but it
helps to remember where even the Bank was a decade ago. Data management has
gone from randomly-structured spreadsheets released at random intervals to
random schemas and metadata definitions, to a global movement for structure,
accessibility and consistency in a relatively short period of time, all
without it being in the least bit of a sexy subject.

Regards

Gavin

--------------------<
Gavin Chait is a data scientist and development economist at Whythawk.
uk.linkedin.com/in/gavinchait | twitter.com/GavinChait | gavinchait.com

-----Original Message-----
From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bahar Salimova
via groups.io
Sent: 14 April 2021 15:40
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] World Bank examples?

Hello Ninez,

Thank you for this question. I recommend looking at our report on World
Bank's Knowledge Flow published in 2019 -
https://ieg.worldbankgroup.org/sites/default/files/Data/reports/kfc.pdf

It has both the examples of what has operationally worked well and where we
recommended the World Bank to fine-tune its knowledge flow. A note that some
institutional changes has happened in the World Bank since the release of
this report, but I think it provide a good overview.

You may also look into our older report on Knowledge-Based Country Programs
-
https://ieg.worldbankgroup.org/sites/default/files/Data/Evaluation/files/kbc
p_eval.pdf It is a but older but still shares some examples.

Hope this helps.

Best,

Bahar
-----Original Message-----
From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ninez
Piezas-Jerbi
Sent: Saturday, April 10, 2021 2:28 AM
To: main@sikm.groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] World Bank examples?

[External]

Hello,

Was wondering if I could reach out to the experts in this community. Would
you know of specific examples of World Bank KM initiatives that have
directly and positively benefitted their Member States (and not just the
bank itself)? If there are links to them that would be helpful.

I'd be so grateful.

Many thanks,
Ninez
World Trade Organization


Re: Working Out Loud - I can’t even hear myself think #information-overload #WOL

 

On Thu, Apr 15, 2021 at 09:25 AM, Robert L. Bogue wrote:
Tom – Are you okay if I forward your message to John Stepper to see what his thoughts are?
Sure, Robert. Would be interested to hear what Mr. Stepper has to say, too, so please share back if you get a response. Thanks!

 
--
-Tom
--

Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts


Informal Virtual Activities During Conferences #conferences #remote-work

Bahar Salimova
 

Hi everyone,

 

I am looking for interesting informal activities to do during the upcoming conference that potentially can bring together about 250-300 people in a virtual setting. Have you done any activities that really worked with such a large crowd? Some activities will be only for 5-10 minutes (which I am thinking to do as a PollEv or bucket list inputs) and some could be 15-20 minutes.


Grateful for any suggestions you may have.

 

Best,

Bahar


UNICEF Consultancy opportunity (Content management and documentation) #jobs

Nima Fallah
 

Dear all,

We are looking to hire a documentation & content management consultant to join our team at UNICEF (Data Use Unit) for 6 months (May to Oct 2021).

Please find the details here.  
Deadline to apply: 29 April 2021

I would appreciate if you could share it with your networks or with someone who might be interested.

Very best,
n.


Nima Fallah, Ph.D. 

Programme Specialist – Data (Knowledge, Learning, Communities) 

DAPM, Data Use Unit

New York, United States

United Nations Children’s Fund

 

Email: nfallah@...

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