Date   

SharePoint/KM Consultancy with ADRA International #jobs

Yemisi Songo-Williams
 

Dear Colleagues,

ADRA International is looking for a consultant to lead the update of our SharePoint-based intranet. The consultant will also ensure that relevant policies, standards and guidance around content management and site use are developed and in place.


More details on the assignment and application process are available here: adra.org/consultancy

The deadline for applying is May 28th 2021.


I’d truly appreciate your support in circulating this across your networks, and many thanks for your help. 

Yemisi

----

Yemisi Songo-Williams
Senior Advisor for Knowledge Management

ADRA International

Yemisi.Songo-Williams@...

Skype: yemisi.songowilliams.adra

www.ADRA.org


Re: Working Out Loud Discussion / Peer Assist #peer-assist #webinar #WOL

Dan Ranta
 

Hi Dennis - can you confirm you will be recording this session for folks who cannot make this time?

Thanks, Dan

On Thu, Apr 29, 2021 at 9:10 AM Stan Garfield <stangarfield@...> wrote:
Thanks to Dennis for hosting this session. John Stepper, Howie Cohen, and Bryce Williams will join Dennis as special guests, and I encourage everyone else who is interested in WOL to join the discussion on May 7.
 
Here is the thread that led to this event being scheduled.  See also other SIKM threads on WOL and other references to Working Out Loud.



--
Daniel Ranta
Mobile:  603 384 3308


Re: Working Out Loud Discussion / Peer Assist #peer-assist #webinar #WOL

Stan Garfield
 

Thanks to Dennis for hosting this session. John Stepper, Howie Cohen, and Bryce Williams will join Dennis as special guests, and I encourage everyone else who is interested in WOL to join the discussion on May 7.
 
Here is the thread that led to this event being scheduled.  See also other SIKM threads on WOL and other references to Working Out Loud.


Re: How will conferences change post-COVID? #conferences #COVID-19

Stan Garfield
 
Edited

Thanks to Patrick for starting this thread, to those who replied, and to Susan for leading the SIKM Symposium. Here is the parallel thread in KM4Dev.

Here are four conferences to consider attending and presenting at this year:
  1. SLA 2021 Annual Conference will be held virtually August 4-31.
  2. 2021 APQC Conference will be held in Houston October 4-8.
  3. 2021 SIKM Symposium will be held virtually during the week of October 18.  Susan will provide the exact dates later.
  4. KMWorld 2021 and its associated conferences will be held in Washington, DC November 15-18.


Re: How will conferences change post-COVID? #conferences #COVID-19

Susan Ostreicher
 

Patrick (and all who replied), thank you for this thread. 

First - this seems like a good place to mention there will be a free, virtual SIKM Symposium for this community in mid-October. Starting in 2009, this event was held locally in the US as the Midwest KM Symposium. It shifted online last May, and drew a much broader range of participants from all over the world. 

Staying online for at least another year will allow more people to join again. It also makes the "Midwest" title a bit meaningless, so we'll retire that name and instead use it as an opportunity to bring SIKM members together and perhaps also bring others into the community. I'll share more details and a save the date in this forum shortly. 

You talk about featured speakers vs. convenors and brokers. I love the idea of having more dialogue, and we hope to offer some different formats in the Symposium to encourage this. 

You also raise a lot of good points about the advantages of being online vs. in person. I agree there's still something about being physically present together that's hard to replicate online, and I think a lot of it is about attention and distraction. Yes, it's easy to drift off in a dark-paneled ballroom with a flickering screen. On the other hand, in a virtual meeting it's even easier to reply to email in another window, or even leave the meeting entirely to avoid joining a breakout room. There's something about sleeping in a different city for two days that makes it easier to disconnect and re-focus. I suppose I hope those opportunities come back, but that in between, we can also make better use of low-cost, tech-enabled ways to come together. 


Re: Network Mapping - Good practice & lessons learnt #mapping

Priyadarshini Banati
 

Thank you Ginetta. I look forward to listening to what you've shared.
warmly,
Priya

On Wed, Apr 28, 2021 at 10:46 AM Ginetta Gueli via groups.io <ginetta.gueli=libero.it@groups.io> wrote:
Hello Priya,
I have experience in Knowledge Mapping which, from my point of view, is the first step to do network mapping, even if many times I think they are the same thing or one is inside the other one. Anyway, I just made a public presentation on how I map knowledge in an unconventional way. Here you are if you want to listen it: https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6782214712839962625/

I am interested in the topic, a lot! And happy to be part of a "Peer Assist" event about it.

Looking forward to hearing from you and all.

Thank you and all the best,
Ginetta
--
Ginetta Gueli
Information & Knowledge Manager | Project Manager


Re: Define an engagement goal and success for a Knowledge Base #metrics #engagement

Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Vandana,

Thanks for that detail, that's really helpful. I know it would be lovely to give you a standard benchmark, but you really will do better if we can find a metric that drives the kinds of behaviours you want.

For any system or process, there are six basic things you can try to optimse:

  • fixed costs (ie baseline costs of staff, buildings, software platforms, etc)
  • incremental costs (ie cost per additional product)
  • cycle time (ie how long one item takes to produce)
  • throughput (ie how many products are being produced)
  • quality (ie accuracy, integrity, value)
  • excellence (ie delivering over and above expectations)

I'm guessing that cost isn't the primary driver, so let's focus on the other aspects. Will your Knowledge Base be successful merely if there are knowledge assets published? What if those assets were really poor quality? Or they weren't of interest to anyone?

Here are some ways to think about metrics within the constraints of the available data. To support optimisation for:

  • cycle time, you might seek a high number of downloads on the presumption that users who download data are doing so in order to support timely completion of their work
  • throughput, you might seek a high number of uploads as confirmation that the data scientists are productive in creating assets for the organisation to reuse
  • quality, you might examine the ratio of views to downloads on the basic assumption that data which is perceived as useful will get downloaded more often
  • excellence, you might simply monitor view number trends as a proxy for demonstrating that the KB is providing ongoing value to its audience

I'll be honest though; none of these are great metrics. They are pretty easily game-able so you'll need to trust that your teams genuinely want to succeed on their merits rather than by seeking to artificially inflate numbers. Of these, I'm most inclined to:

  • Monitor throughput trends (uploads) and aim for a steady-state target.
    What's reasonable will be context specific; how big is the team and do these knowledge assets take days or weeks to produce? Are they responding to specific client requests or just producing whatever research they feel is interesting?).

  • Seek a stable or upwards trend in view traffic every quarter as a proxy for excellence.
    This is pretty straightforward - if the system isn't delivering value to users overall, they'll stop using it.

You might also want to periodically examine quality of the various uploads to determine if there are products being created which aren't adding value and if so, engaging in a conversation about if they should be stopped or adapted to be more relevant. This would be more of a diagnostic than a metric though.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 28/04/2021 9:54 pm, Vandana Wadhawan via groups.io wrote:

Hi Stephen, 
The aforementioned team is research heavy. They engage in data modelling activities, and performs drug-specific researches and are qualified data scientists. The KB is intended as a storefront to store all their knowledge assets. 

While I'm able to find out their monthly engagement (it's been only a month), I'm also supposed to propose an engagement goal to the team (a realistic percentage) that they could aspire to achieve in 2-4-6 months. 

Is there a standard benchmark that anyone has come across? i could workaround that benchmark and come up with something. 
--
VW


Call for speakers at 2021 SLA Virtual Conference #call-for #conferences

Liz Fite
 

Hello all!

The Special Libraries Association's (SLA) KM Community (aka the KMunity) is currently putting together a roster of speakers for the 2021 SLA Virtual Conference. We're hoping to add 2 more speakers to our live Interactive Education session, which will be held between Aug 11-13. Currently, the session is scheduled for 60 minutes-15 minutes per speaker with a q&a session at the end. The sessions are created with all levels of attendees in mind-from students to KM experts.  I've included a session description below:

Implementing a KM Strategy in a Time of Uncertainty

Implementing a KM strategy is already a feat in itself, so having to plan a KM strategy during a pandemic is a challenge that many of us are not prepared to tackle. Join us and hear from a panel of information professionals who will share their journey in developing their KM strategy, the challenges they have faced and any changes they had to make due to the pandemic, and their best practices and lessons learned that can help you develop an effective strategy.

We'd love to hear from the SIKM community on this panel! If this sounds like something you'd like to be a part of, have questions, or would like some more information before committing, please reach out to our session organizer Thérèse Mainville via email at therese.mainville@....

Thanks!


Re: Define an engagement goal and success for a Knowledge Base #metrics #engagement

Vandana Wadhawan
 
Edited

Hi Stephen, 
The aforementioned team is research heavy. They engage in data modelling activities, and performs drug-specific researches and are qualified data scientists. The KB is intended as a storefront for all of their knowledge assets. 

While I'm able to find out their monthly engagement (it's been only a month), I'm also supposed to propose an engagement goal to the team (a realistic percentage) that they could aspire to achieve in 2-4-6 months. 

Is there a standard benchmark that anyone has come across? i could workaround that benchmark and come up with something. 
--
VW


Re: Network Mapping - Good practice & lessons learnt #mapping

Ginetta Gueli
 
Edited

Hello Priya,
I have experience in Knowledge Mapping which, from my point of view, is the first step to do network mapping, even if many times I think they are the same thing or one is inside the other one. Anyway, I just made a public presentation on how I mapped knowledge in an unconventional way. Here you are if you want to listen it: https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6782214712839962625/

I am interested in the topic, a lot! And happy to be part of a "Peer Assist" event about it.

Looking forward to hearing from you and all.

Thank you and all the best,
Ginetta
--
Ginetta Gueli
Information & Knowledge Manager | Project Manager


Re: How will conferences change post-COVID? #conferences #COVID-19

Gloria Burke
 

Great questions and insights. I realize that I’ve had a quiet voice in our community for a while, but Patrick and Jane’s dialogue resonates and deserves our attention and interaction. More to come...
Gloria 


On Apr 27, 2021, at 8:34 PM, Patrick Lambe <plambe@...> wrote:

Thank you Jane!

To my mind (I know you won’t mind me speaking frankly) the pre-COVID KM World and its associated events represented both the best and the worst of the “old” conference model.

The best: It is an incredible attractor. There is no other event that compares for bringing together such a wonderful mix of speakers and participants, and for having participants across the entire spectrum from folks who are grappling with the most basic challenges in KM, to folks with more practical experience on a fingernail than I have in my head. The quality of the participants is a better mark of a great conference to my mind than the quality of the speakers. Of course the speakers matter, but without active and varied participants the event is just an empty shell (and I have suffered through a few of those). The questions in workshops and plenaries and breakouts and especially the conversations around the programmed sessions, the informal gatherings, and the experimental fringe events you curated, are wonderful and exhausting in a very good way. 

The worst: the size of the event and especially its economics conspire to relegate us into basement convention halls and breakout rooms, with no natural light, sitting en masse and watching the flickering screens as I mentioned. Some people love and expect that, they are there to soak up as much as they can. Others get more out of the spaces between programmed sessions. You had managed to curate much more interactivity within those sessions in the years since you moved to DC, and the exhibition area and handling of sponsors also provides economic constraints, but I think you had managed to blend the social interactions within that space really well.

I know that you curate other conferences. What did you learn about the shift to digital last year that you would like to experiment with, in a new in-person event? How will the new KM World be different from the old?

You mentioned how the shift to digital last year positively impacted the accessibility and breadth of speakers. Do you have a sense of how it impacted the breadth and quality of participants?

P

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com

<SK18th_Anniv2020_emailfooter (2).jpg>

On 28 Apr 2021, at 1:27 AM, Jane Dysart <jane@...> wrote:

Thanks for this timely thread, Patrick!  I am the program director for KMWorld and our call for speakers for 2021 is now live and we hope to host the event once again in DC – but who knows?
the theme, Impacting The Future: New Models & Tech For Knowledge Sharing
Our 2020 event was the first virtual experience for the KMWorld community, was definitely a success in the producers eyes, and I believe in the attendees as well. It did allow for speakers who were in different countries to share more easily and if allowed for a larger universe of speakers!
 
I have always thought of KMWorld as a meeting place for the sharing ideas, insights, experiences, processes, tools and technologies for knowledge sharing in communities, governments and organizations, etc. That includes speakers who make us think in different ways, diversity of thinking; speakers who have tried a technique or tool and were successful or not & want to share their lessons learned – one of the best ways IMHO to learn; speakers who have engaged their communities to participate in building knowledge sharing intranets, or other platforms, especially on a global or remote basis; basically the building of learning environments/ecologies that can problem-solve, crunch data & analyze it for good decision making (perhaps using AI & machine learning), organize & find information, experts & knowledge (taxonomies, etc) 
 
I believe in practical experiences that can be shared, or ideas that spark innovation/change, and lots more…. But you get the idea.  I want conferences that make me think, try something new, connect me with others who are doing similar things or trying something different that I can learn more about.  Not every session is going to be appropriate for everyone but if you can learn a few new things, make some new connections, find sone new avenues to pursue, I think that’s a win.
 
Interaction is so much easier and wonderfully serendipitous in person, but we are (after a year and a half) learning new ways to do so online. Certainly some advantages to meeting online, but I do no think that will totally replace in person events, enhance them maybe, but not replace.
My opinion & I looks forward to your thoughts!
Thanks
Jane
 
Jane Dysart, Program Director
KMWorld 2021
Nov 15-18
 
KMworld Connect 2020
 
<image001.jpg>
Curator of Curiosity
Twitter & Skype: jdysart
 
 
 
 
From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Matt Moore
Sent: April 26, 2021 4:59 AM
To: main@sikm.groups.io
Cc: km4dev@...
Subject: Re: [SIKM] How will conferences change post-COVID?
 
Patrick,
 
As Peter Drucker so memorably opined: With the lights out, It’s less dangerous, Here we are now, Entertain us.
 
I suspect that post-COVID, trad conferences will return. I rarely go to those kinds of events but people seem to like them.
 
I hope that we get more purposeful and we think about what we are trying to achieve and what that means for format. 
 
While I love facilitatory formats, I’m also interested in borrowing from the performing arts. Marcus JH Brown’s work is wonderfully uncomfortable: https://www.marcusjohnhenrybrown.com/
 
Regards,
 
Matt Moore
+61 423 784 504


On Apr 26, 2021, at 1:16 PM, Patrick Lambe <plambe@...> wrote:

I’m posting the question in the subject line to both SIKM forum and KM4Dev, so apologies if you see it twice.
 
There was a question on KM4Dev about speakers for a conference. Bev Wenger-Traynor morphed it into a question about people with something to offer. Arthur Shelley distinguished between speaking and facilitating. Nancy Dixon has been speaking for a while about the importance of dialogue.
 
I am wondering how our conception of conferences (and other convening events where large audiences are expected to listen to/follow small elite cadres) will change post-COVID? I am wondering how the economics of such events might change. 
 
Let me give an example of post-COVID shifts in how we at ISKO Singapore are experiencing new ways of interacting. We are the Singapore chapter of an international organisation. Each country chapter runs its own programmes.
 
We used to have monthly in-person events. We would book a venue and refreshments, and get a speaker or a panel. We always tried to have networking and discussion, it wasn’t just listening. We got on the zoom wagon early, because we had attracted a couple of members from outside Singapore, so we would do live streaming for our overseas attendees, with them whatsapping questions or comments to be interposed. We started bringing in speakers/panellists by zoom as well to interact with the local panel. Our horizons broadened.
 
Since COVID all our events have gone online. We have become completely “leaky”. Our last event attracted folks from 12 countries. We have barely no costs. Our society’s members are essentially patrons, providing the volunteers and minimal funding to offer events to anyone who cares to attend (or see the materials afterwards) - very much on the SIKM Leader’s Forum model, but with a core group that has a shared Singapore identity and agenda. We are now starting to wonder what it means to be a country chapter. Old conceptions are starting to break down. 
 
Mainstream conferences, to survive, have started to experiment with new formats in a digital environment. I am wondering if we do have an in-person event this year or next year, how could it be different? How could we make better use of folks’ time being in the same space? Will conferences become “leaky” too, distributed over time, and with digital and physical components? How will the economics work? Or will (sponsoring) employer expectations force us back into our old passive habits?
 
I do think it’s worth bringing folks physically into a shared space in order to interact, ask questions, inquire, and share. I’m not convinced of the egocentric personality model where the “names” are the principal actors. Yes, names are good, as seeds for convening or to share experience or insight or to spark discussion (as Bev says, folks with some experience/skills to offer, and enough confidence to share). I would not even go so far as to recommend the use of the word “facilitator” because I think that has become contaminated with the notion of a special person (s/he who tells us - sorry suggests to us - what to do next). 
 
I prefer the terms convenors (to frame the invitation) and brokers (to help folks make connections with each other or in dialogue). The more convenors and brokers the better. In fact, we should all be convenors and brokers. We should all be pointing up other people’s good work so that they get curated into events.
 
So how will conferences change? Or will we slip back into dark-panelled ballrooms with no natural daylight watching large screens flicker expecting to be entertained and fed, and shuffling from session to session?
 
Bev, I would be fascinated to learn what your experiences with BEtreat might suggest.
 
By the way, if anyone is curious about our upcoming ISKO events check out www.iskosg.org - all welcome.
 
P
 
Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:                                             +65 98528511

web:                                                www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:                                       www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:      www.aithinsoftware.com


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: How will conferences change post-COVID? #conferences #COVID-19

Patrick Lambe
 

Thank you Jane!

To my mind (I know you won’t mind me speaking frankly) the pre-COVID KM World and its associated events represented both the best and the worst of the “old” conference model.

The best: It is an incredible attractor. There is no other event that compares for bringing together such a wonderful mix of speakers and participants, and for having participants across the entire spectrum from folks who are grappling with the most basic challenges in KM, to folks with more practical experience on a fingernail than I have in my head. The quality of the participants is a better mark of a great conference to my mind than the quality of the speakers. Of course the speakers matter, but without active and varied participants the event is just an empty shell (and I have suffered through a few of those). The questions in workshops and plenaries and breakouts and especially the conversations around the programmed sessions, the informal gatherings, and the experimental fringe events you curated, are wonderful and exhausting in a very good way. 

The worst: the size of the event and especially its economics conspire to relegate us into basement convention halls and breakout rooms, with no natural light, sitting en masse and watching the flickering screens as I mentioned. Some people love and expect that, they are there to soak up as much as they can. Others get more out of the spaces between programmed sessions. You had managed to curate much more interactivity within those sessions in the years since you moved to DC, and the exhibition area and handling of sponsors also provides economic constraints, but I think you had managed to blend the social interactions within that space really well.

I know that you curate other conferences. What did you learn about the shift to digital last year that you would like to experiment with, in a new in-person event? How will the new KM World be different from the old?

You mentioned how the shift to digital last year positively impacted the accessibility and breadth of speakers. Do you have a sense of how it impacted the breadth and quality of participants?

P

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com


On 28 Apr 2021, at 1:27 AM, Jane Dysart <jane@...> wrote:

Thanks for this timely thread, Patrick!  I am the program director for KMWorld and our call for speakers for 2021 is now live and we hope to host the event once again in DC – but who knows?
the theme, Impacting The Future: New Models & Tech For Knowledge Sharing
Our 2020 event was the first virtual experience for the KMWorld community, was definitely a success in the producers eyes, and I believe in the attendees as well. It did allow for speakers who were in different countries to share more easily and if allowed for a larger universe of speakers!
 
I have always thought of KMWorld as a meeting place for the sharing ideas, insights, experiences, processes, tools and technologies for knowledge sharing in communities, governments and organizations, etc. That includes speakers who make us think in different ways, diversity of thinking; speakers who have tried a technique or tool and were successful or not & want to share their lessons learned – one of the best ways IMHO to learn; speakers who have engaged their communities to participate in building knowledge sharing intranets, or other platforms, especially on a global or remote basis; basically the building of learning environments/ecologies that can problem-solve, crunch data & analyze it for good decision making (perhaps using AI & machine learning), organize & find information, experts & knowledge (taxonomies, etc) 
 
I believe in practical experiences that can be shared, or ideas that spark innovation/change, and lots more…. But you get the idea.  I want conferences that make me think, try something new, connect me with others who are doing similar things or trying something different that I can learn more about.  Not every session is going to be appropriate for everyone but if you can learn a few new things, make some new connections, find sone new avenues to pursue, I think that’s a win.
 
Interaction is so much easier and wonderfully serendipitous in person, but we are (after a year and a half) learning new ways to do so online. Certainly some advantages to meeting online, but I do no think that will totally replace in person events, enhance them maybe, but not replace.
My opinion & I looks forward to your thoughts!
Thanks
Jane
 
Jane Dysart, Program Director
KMWorld 2021
Nov 15-18
 
KMworld Connect 2020
 
<image001.jpg>
Curator of Curiosity
Twitter & Skype: jdysart
 
 
 
 
From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Matt Moore
Sent: April 26, 2021 4:59 AM
To: main@sikm.groups.io
Cc: km4dev@...
Subject: Re: [SIKM] How will conferences change post-COVID?
 
Patrick,
 
As Peter Drucker so memorably opined: With the lights out, It’s less dangerous, Here we are now, Entertain us.
 
I suspect that post-COVID, trad conferences will return. I rarely go to those kinds of events but people seem to like them.
 
I hope that we get more purposeful and we think about what we are trying to achieve and what that means for format. 
 
While I love facilitatory formats, I’m also interested in borrowing from the performing arts. Marcus JH Brown’s work is wonderfully uncomfortable: https://www.marcusjohnhenrybrown.com/
 
Regards,
 
Matt Moore
+61 423 784 504


On Apr 26, 2021, at 1:16 PM, Patrick Lambe <plambe@...> wrote:

I’m posting the question in the subject line to both SIKM forum and KM4Dev, so apologies if you see it twice.
 
There was a question on KM4Dev about speakers for a conference. Bev Wenger-Traynor morphed it into a question about people with something to offer. Arthur Shelley distinguished between speaking and facilitating. Nancy Dixon has been speaking for a while about the importance of dialogue.
 
I am wondering how our conception of conferences (and other convening events where large audiences are expected to listen to/follow small elite cadres) will change post-COVID? I am wondering how the economics of such events might change. 
 
Let me give an example of post-COVID shifts in how we at ISKO Singapore are experiencing new ways of interacting. We are the Singapore chapter of an international organisation. Each country chapter runs its own programmes.
 
We used to have monthly in-person events. We would book a venue and refreshments, and get a speaker or a panel. We always tried to have networking and discussion, it wasn’t just listening. We got on the zoom wagon early, because we had attracted a couple of members from outside Singapore, so we would do live streaming for our overseas attendees, with them whatsapping questions or comments to be interposed. We started bringing in speakers/panellists by zoom as well to interact with the local panel. Our horizons broadened.
 
Since COVID all our events have gone online. We have become completely “leaky”. Our last event attracted folks from 12 countries. We have barely no costs. Our society’s members are essentially patrons, providing the volunteers and minimal funding to offer events to anyone who cares to attend (or see the materials afterwards) - very much on the SIKM Leader’s Forum model, but with a core group that has a shared Singapore identity and agenda. We are now starting to wonder what it means to be a country chapter. Old conceptions are starting to break down. 
 
Mainstream conferences, to survive, have started to experiment with new formats in a digital environment. I am wondering if we do have an in-person event this year or next year, how could it be different? How could we make better use of folks’ time being in the same space? Will conferences become “leaky” too, distributed over time, and with digital and physical components? How will the economics work? Or will (sponsoring) employer expectations force us back into our old passive habits?
 
I do think it’s worth bringing folks physically into a shared space in order to interact, ask questions, inquire, and share. I’m not convinced of the egocentric personality model where the “names” are the principal actors. Yes, names are good, as seeds for convening or to share experience or insight or to spark discussion (as Bev says, folks with some experience/skills to offer, and enough confidence to share). I would not even go so far as to recommend the use of the word “facilitator” because I think that has become contaminated with the notion of a special person (s/he who tells us - sorry suggests to us - what to do next). 
 
I prefer the terms convenors (to frame the invitation) and brokers (to help folks make connections with each other or in dialogue). The more convenors and brokers the better. In fact, we should all be convenors and brokers. We should all be pointing up other people’s good work so that they get curated into events.
 
So how will conferences change? Or will we slip back into dark-panelled ballrooms with no natural daylight watching large screens flicker expecting to be entertained and fed, and shuffling from session to session?
 
Bev, I would be fascinated to learn what your experiences with BEtreat might suggest.
 
By the way, if anyone is curious about our upcoming ISKO events check out www.iskosg.org - all welcome.
 
P
 
Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:                                             +65 98528511

web:                                                www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:                                       www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:      www.aithinsoftware.com


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: How will conferences change post-COVID? #conferences #COVID-19

Jane Dysart
 

Thanks for this timely thread, Patrick!  I am the program director for KMWorld and our call for speakers for 2021 is now live and we hope to host the event once again in DC – but who knows?

https://www.kmworld.com/Conference/2021/CallForSpeakers.aspx

the theme, Impacting The Future: New Models & Tech For Knowledge Sharing

Our 2020 event was the first virtual experience for the KMWorld community, was definitely a success in the producers eyes, and I believe in the attendees as well. It did allow for speakers who were in different countries to share more easily and if allowed for a larger universe of speakers!

 

I have always thought of KMWorld as a meeting place for the sharing ideas, insights, experiences, processes, tools and technologies for knowledge sharing in communities, governments and organizations, etc. That includes speakers who make us think in different ways, diversity of thinking; speakers who have tried a technique or tool and were successful or not & want to share their lessons learned – one of the best ways IMHO to learn; speakers who have engaged their communities to participate in building knowledge sharing intranets, or other platforms, especially on a global or remote basis; basically the building of learning environments/ecologies that can problem-solve, crunch data & analyze it for good decision making (perhaps using AI & machine learning), organize & find information, experts & knowledge (taxonomies, etc)

 

I believe in practical experiences that can be shared, or ideas that spark innovation/change, and lots more…. But you get the idea.  I want conferences that make me think, try something new, connect me with others who are doing similar things or trying something different that I can learn more about.  Not every session is going to be appropriate for everyone but if you can learn a few new things, make some new connections, find sone new avenues to pursue, I think that’s a win.

 

Interaction is so much easier and wonderfully serendipitous in person, but we are (after a year and a half) learning new ways to do so online. Certainly some advantages to meeting online, but I do no think that will totally replace in person events, enhance them maybe, but not replace.

My opinion & I looks forward to your thoughts!

Thanks

Jane

 

Jane Dysart, Program Director

KMWorld 2021

Nov 15-18

Call for Speakers: https://speakers.infotoday.com/kmw-speakers/

 

KMworld Connect 2020

https://pheedloop.com/kmwconnect/site/

Promo video: https://vimeo.com/467988679/b55014d4f7

 

Curator of Curiosity

jane@...

Twitter & Skype: jdysart

 

 

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Matt Moore
Sent: April 26, 2021 4:59 AM
To: main@sikm.groups.io
Cc: km4dev@...
Subject: Re: [SIKM] How will conferences change post-COVID?

 

Patrick,

 

As Peter Drucker so memorably opined: With the lights out, It’s less dangerous, Here we are now, Entertain us.

 

I suspect that post-COVID, trad conferences will return. I rarely go to those kinds of events but people seem to like them.

 

I hope that we get more purposeful and we think about what we are trying to achieve and what that means for format. 

 

While I love facilitatory formats, I’m also interested in borrowing from the performing arts. Marcus JH Brown’s work is wonderfully uncomfortable: https://www.marcusjohnhenrybrown.com/

 

Regards,

 

Matt Moore

+61 423 784 504



On Apr 26, 2021, at 1:16 PM, Patrick Lambe <plambe@...> wrote:

I’m posting the question in the subject line to both SIKM forum and KM4Dev, so apologies if you see it twice.

 

There was a question on KM4Dev about speakers for a conference. Bev Wenger-Traynor morphed it into a question about people with something to offer. Arthur Shelley distinguished between speaking and facilitating. Nancy Dixon has been speaking for a while about the importance of dialogue.

 

I am wondering how our conception of conferences (and other convening events where large audiences are expected to listen to/follow small elite cadres) will change post-COVID? I am wondering how the economics of such events might change. 

 

Let me give an example of post-COVID shifts in how we at ISKO Singapore are experiencing new ways of interacting. We are the Singapore chapter of an international organisation. Each country chapter runs its own programmes.

 

We used to have monthly in-person events. We would book a venue and refreshments, and get a speaker or a panel. We always tried to have networking and discussion, it wasn’t just listening. We got on the zoom wagon early, because we had attracted a couple of members from outside Singapore, so we would do live streaming for our overseas attendees, with them whatsapping questions or comments to be interposed. We started bringing in speakers/panellists by zoom as well to interact with the local panel. Our horizons broadened.

 

Since COVID all our events have gone online. We have become completely “leaky”. Our last event attracted folks from 12 countries. We have barely no costs. Our society’s members are essentially patrons, providing the volunteers and minimal funding to offer events to anyone who cares to attend (or see the materials afterwards) - very much on the SIKM Leader’s Forum model, but with a core group that has a shared Singapore identity and agenda. We are now starting to wonder what it means to be a country chapter. Old conceptions are starting to break down. 

 

Mainstream conferences, to survive, have started to experiment with new formats in a digital environment. I am wondering if we do have an in-person event this year or next year, how could it be different? How could we make better use of folks’ time being in the same space? Will conferences become “leaky” too, distributed over time, and with digital and physical components? How will the economics work? Or will (sponsoring) employer expectations force us back into our old passive habits?

 

I do think it’s worth bringing folks physically into a shared space in order to interact, ask questions, inquire, and share. I’m not convinced of the egocentric personality model where the “names” are the principal actors. Yes, names are good, as seeds for convening or to share experience or insight or to spark discussion (as Bev says, folks with some experience/skills to offer, and enough confidence to share). I would not even go so far as to recommend the use of the word “facilitator” because I think that has become contaminated with the notion of a special person (s/he who tells us - sorry suggests to us - what to do next). 

 

I prefer the terms convenors (to frame the invitation) and brokers (to help folks make connections with each other or in dialogue). The more convenors and brokers the better. In fact, we should all be convenors and brokers. We should all be pointing up other people’s good work so that they get curated into events.

 

So how will conferences change? Or will we slip back into dark-panelled ballrooms with no natural daylight watching large screens flicker expecting to be entertained and fed, and shuffling from session to session?

 

Bev, I would be fascinated to learn what your experiences with BEtreat might suggest.

 

By the way, if anyone is curious about our upcoming ISKO events check out www.iskosg.org - all welcome.

 

P

 

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:                                             +65 98528511

web:                                                www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:                                       www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:      www.aithinsoftware.com


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Network Mapping - Good practice & lessons learnt #mapping

Priyadarshini Banati
 

Hi everyone,
I hope you are all doing well today. 

I work for Q, a community of 4000+ members who come together to improve health & care across the UK and Ireland. We're piloting the use of Kumu for network mapping.  I am reaching out to the experts in this group to understand how you have approached network mapping with your communities.  What have you learnt from doing this?  Are there examples of your work where you used network mapping to actively shape / recalibrate your community's strategy and/or the support provided to that community?  What are the 2-3 things that we need to avoid or be wary of as we start down this path?

I will be happy to gather what is shared in this group and share it back with the group... and if there's sufficient interest, can volunteer to organise a peer assist to discuss what we've learnt across the group.

Looking forward to your help,
warmly,
Priya Banati


Re: Working Out Loud Discussion / Peer Assist #peer-assist #webinar #WOL

Ginetta Gueli
 

Happy to be onboard!
Ginetta
--
Ginetta Gueli
Information & Knowledge Manager | Project Manager


Working Out Loud Discussion / Peer Assist #peer-assist #webinar #WOL

Dennis Pearce
 

Earlier there was a request for a meet-up to discuss Working Out Loud, so we've scheduled one:

Date: Friday, May 7
Time: 10:00 am EDT

Below is the Zoom information.  If you would like a calendar invitation, let me know and I'll send you one.

Join Zoom Meeting

One tap mobile:

US: +16513728299,,97491258650# or +17866351003,,97491258650#

Meeting URL:

https://zoom.us/j/97491258650?from=addon

Meeting ID:

974 9125 8650

Join by Telephone

For higher quality, dial a number based on your current location.

Dial:


US: +1 651 372 8299 or +1 786 635 1003 or +1 267 831 0333 or +1 301 715 8592 or +1 312 626 6799 or +1 470 250 9358 or +1 470 381 2552 or +1 646 518 9805 or +1 646 558 8656 or +1 720 928 9299 or +1 971 247 1195 or +1 206 337 9723 or +1 213 338 8477 or +1 253 215 8782 or +1 346 248 7799 or +1 602 753 0140 or +1 669 219 2599 or +1 669 900 9128

Meeting ID:

974 9125 8650

International numbers


Help out a Masters student? (my wife, actually) -- Applied Industrial & Org Psych survey #survey

Aaron Buchsbaum
 

Hi fellow KM-ers. Could you find 5 minutes in your day to complete a (relevant) survey or an Applied Industrial and Organizational Psychology capstone project? The survey is here: https://gmuchss.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bHjciYgOqvd3j9Q

The purpose of the study is to explore job satisfaction among full time employees and/or those with managers. The survey does not apply to those working in a consulting capacity only.  

A huge thanks to anyone who takes the time. 
Stay safe & healthy.

Aaron


Re: Define an engagement goal and success for a Knowledge Base #metrics #engagement

Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Vandana,

What kind of work does the team do (broadly described if you can't be specific)? Customer service work will have quite different engagement frequencies and metrics from an engineering team, for example.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 27/04/2021 2:41 pm, Vandana Wadhawan via groups.io wrote:

Hi Stephen,

Thank you, you understood the challenge and limitations of the KB. The idea behind this exercise is to aspire towards a goal (Engagement specific), and then re-look at this change and see what else can be done to ensure the change (which is adapting this KB) is internalized in day-to-day behaviors of the team members. 

Is there a standard bench-mark i should measure engagement against? i mean the percentage of adoption that is defined and generally observed by KM practitioners during such projects.
--
Vandana W


Re: Define an engagement goal and success for a Knowledge Base #metrics #engagement

Vandana Wadhawan
 
Edited

Hi Stephen,

You are spot on in understanding the challenge and limitations of the KB. Thank you for sharing approaches that i can consider.
The idea behind this exercise is to aspire towards a goal (Engagement specific), and then re-look at this change (KB) and see what else can be done to ensure the change (which is adapting this KB) is internalized in day-to-day behaviors of the team members. 

Is there a standard bench-mark i should measure engagement against? I mean the percentage of adoption that is defined and generally observed by KM practitioners during such projects.
--
Vandana W


Re: How will conferences change post-COVID? #conferences #COVID-19

Joel Muzard
 

Hello Patrick and all,


Your post resonate a lot whit what we are doing in Montreal, with the Cafe-LABs and Knowledge-LABs.
We started meetings  a long time ago on the <Catacombes> of Montreal, public spaces we could share, Such as Public Cafes. And we are evolving to the internet realm using a 3 step event. A.- All the participants introduce themselves. B.- Silent Co-construction in a Shared WhiteBoard on WebIDEApro.net. Then participants work out loud their posts. C.- Final Retrospective and Engagements. So all the participants participate actively to the very inclusive conversation. And knowledge emerges and circulate.
The videos are published and a short report after the event.
Some of you have already participated on some events. You are all welcome. We are in the Time zone of New York.

Le 25 avr. 2021 à 23:08, Patrick Lambe <plambe@...> a écrit :

I’m posting the question in the subject line to both SIKM forum and KM4Dev, so apologies if you see it twice.

There was a question on KM4Dev about speakers for a conference. Bev Wenger-Traynor morphed it into a question about people with something to offer. Arthur Shelley distinguished between speaking and facilitating. Nancy Dixon has been speaking for a while about the importance of dialogue.

I am wondering how our conception of conferences (and other convening events where large audiences are expected to listen to/follow small elite cadres) will change post-COVID? I am wondering how the economics of such events might change. 

Let me give an example of post-COVID shifts in how we at ISKO Singapore are experiencing new ways of interacting. We are the Singapore chapter of an international organisation. Each country chapter runs its own programmes.

We used to have monthly in-person events. We would book a venue and refreshments, and get a speaker or a panel. We always tried to have networking and discussion, it wasn’t just listening. We got on the zoom wagon early, because we had attracted a couple of members from outside Singapore, so we would do live streaming for our overseas attendees, with them whatsapping questions or comments to be interposed. We started bringing in speakers/panellists by zoom as well to interact with the local panel. Our horizons broadened.

Since COVID all our events have gone online. We have become completely “leaky”. Our last event attracted folks from 12 countries. We have barely no costs. Our society’s members are essentially patrons, providing the volunteers and minimal funding to offer events to anyone who cares to attend (or see the materials afterwards) - very much on the SIKM Leader’s Forum model, but with a core group that has a shared Singapore identity and agenda. We are now starting to wonder what it means to be a country chapter. Old conceptions are starting to break down. 

Mainstream conferences, to survive, have started to experiment with new formats in a digital environment. I am wondering if we do have an in-person event this year or next year, how could it be different? How could we make better use of folks’ time being in the same space? Will conferences become “leaky” too, distributed over time, and with digital and physical components? How will the economics work? Or will (sponsoring) employer expectations force us back into our old passive habits?

I do think it’s worth bringing folks physically into a shared space in order to interact, ask questions, inquire, and share. I’m not convinced of the egocentric personality model where the “names” are the principal actors. Yes, names are good, as seeds for convening or to share experience or insight or to spark discussion (as Bev says, folks with some experience/skills to offer, and enough confidence to share). I would not even go so far as to recommend the use of the word “facilitator” because I think that has become contaminated with the notion of a special person (s/he who tells us - sorry suggests to us - what to do next). 

I prefer the terms convenors (to frame the invitation) and brokers (to help folks make connections with each other or in dialogue). The more convenors and brokers the better. In fact, we should all be convenors and brokers. We should all be pointing up other people’s good work so that they get curated into events.

So how will conferences change? Or will we slip back into dark-panelled ballrooms with no natural daylight watching large screens flicker expecting to be entertained and fed, and shuffling from session to session?

Bev, I would be fascinated to learn what your experiences with BEtreat might suggest.

By the way, if anyone is curious about our upcoming ISKO events check out www.iskosg.org - all welcome.

P

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com




201 - 220 of 9148