Date   

July 2008 SIKM Call: Steve Wieneke of GM - Replacing a Lessons Learned Database with a Visible Learning Process #lessons-learned #monthly-call

Stan Garfield
 
Edited

TO: SIKM Leaders Community

 

Today we held our 38th monthly call. Here is a summary.

 

Attendees

1.       Lynn Busby

2.       Barry Dayton

3.       Michael Dieterle

4.       Bill Dixon

5.       Marcus Funke

6.       Stan Garfield

7.       Yao Ge

8.       Andrew Gent

9.       Carol Gillis

10.   Nat Girish

11.   Sue Hanley

12.   Felix Harling

13.   John Hovell

14.   Linda Hummel

15.   Tara Keithley

16.   Dee Anne Kotzur

17.   Sanjay Swarup

18.   Erick Thompson

19.   Jack Vinson

20.   Peter West

21.   Steve Wieneke

22.   Kristin Zaccheo

 

The call featured Steve Wieneke of GM on "Replacing a Lessons Learned Database with a Visible Learning Process." Steve's presentation is available at  Replacing_a_Lessons_Learned_Database_SIKM_Wieneke.ppt. Thanks to Steve for presenting.

 

Here are some comments from the participants:

"Great session... Steve is a really bright guy."

"Good session!"

"Blog post already generated!"

"It was excellent."

 

You can continue the discussion by replying to this thread.

Future Calls

August 19, 2008: Marc Solomon - "Content supply? Meet Knowledge Demand - PRTM's KM experience"

September 16, 2008: Hubert Saint-Onge - "Collaboration and the New Enterprise"

October 21, 2008: Richard McDermott - "Developing, Deepening and Retaining Expertise"

November 18, 2008: John Hovell of ManTech - "KM at ManTech International"

December 16, 2008 Raj Datta of MindTree - "Building a knowledge ecosystem"

January 20, 2009 Bernadette Boas - "Day in the Life of Business Workflow"

February 17, 2009 Arthur Shelley - "Impacts of behavior on project outcomes (with an emphasis on knowledge transfer)"

March 17, 2009 Al Simard - "Knowledge services framework developed by Natural Resources Canada"


Making SIKM Presentations More Widely Available #APQC

Dale Arseneault <dalearseneault@...>
 

An interesting proposition (Thanks for tabling this Stan) ..

APQC has put a lot of thought into their www.kmedge.org web site,
and already have a KM Community of staff from APQC Corporate members
(I'm one and I value their organization, research and their staff
very highly.)

I wouldn't be surprised if appealing to this group is an
opportunistic strategy for improving contributions / readership /
membership. But, that's just conjecture.

It would be worth while asking APQC do disclose transparently the
purpose and objective behind their offer. It can't be 100%
altruistic, and that's not a bad thing. Just good to know what the
agenda is so we can make an informed decision.

I think overall community governance is the overarching question,
which of course includes IP.

Questions like "who decides in the new world?" "what decisions will
the community retain v.s. APQC?" "what happens to this community if
APQC gets involved.. will it continue to exist?" "What does
the "end-game" look like?" "how will APQC focus on achieving it's
business objectives (membership, revenue/ cost recovery) influence
the future community direction?"

I think it would be useful if these questions were explored.

Stan.. an idea.. how about asking someone from APQC who has the
right authority to join this community, post a formal proposal, so
all SIKMLeaders can discuss transparently and see where it goes...

think that might prove useful in debateing the idea?

.. and a follow on question.. how will THIS community decide "go/no-
go?" Autocratic? Democratic? Concensus? Is there a minimum amount
of input required before any decision is reached?

I personally suggest a democratic strategy - once we have the debate
on line with APQC and have a clearer vision of the end-game, we
start another voting thread, keep it going for 6-8 weeks, and at
that time, tally the yes and no votes and go with the majority.

Dale Arseneault


In sikmleaders@..., "Stan Garfield" <stangarfield@...>
wrote:


APQC has offered to play a larger role in supporting the SIKM
Leaders Community. This could include con call logistics, providing
wider access to presentations, and providing a blog platform.

Before agreeing to any of this, I wanted to ask the members for
their views. If you agree, disagree, or have other suggestions on
this topic, please reply to this thread. No decisions will be made
without first notifying the members.

Regards,
Stan


Grouply...

Christian DE NEEF <christian.deneef@...>
 

Hi everyone,

Hope this is ok to post this here... You can see a list of my groups on Grouply at the link below. Maybe you'll find some you want to join.

Christian

Here's the link:
http://www.grouply.com/register.php?tmg=371199&vt=1254622

====================
This message was posted by a fellow group member who uses Grouply instead of email to access this group. Grouply blocks additional invitations from being sent to this group by anyone for 30 days. Group owners can permanently block future invitations using Grouply Owner Controls: http://blog.grouply.com/protect#prevent_invites .


Online open house for Knowledge Management at Kent State, Wednesday, July 9 #learning

Thomas J. Froehlich
 

On Wednesday, July 9, 2008, from 6 PM to 7:30 PM, there will be an online, interactive session on the certificate program and Master of Science degree in Knowledge Management at Kent State University. For information about joining this online open house, go to: http://iakm.kent.edu/kmonline/ The session will also be recorded, so interested parties can access it immediately following the event.

Potential students are encouraged to make time for this informational meeting. They will be able to access the presentation as it occurs and will be able to ask questions through their computers online.

Dr. Thomas J. Froehlich, Director of the Masters Program in Information Architecture and Knowledge Management, will provide an overview of the program and its online options in the area of Knowledge Management.

Dr. Denise Bedford will speak about her background, experience and expertise in knowledge management and will provide an overview of the two courses she will be teaching for the IAKM program in the fall, Foundational Principles of Knowledge Management and the Economics of Information.

Dr. Bedford holds a Ph.D. in Information Science from the University of California, Berkeley. She has been the Senior Information Officer at the World Bank since 1997, where she is responsible for management of the World Bank’s core metadata strategy, including content type strategy and the various ontologies that support Bank metadata.

She has taught courses at the University of Tennessee, Georgetown University, Catholic University of America, University of Richmond, and George Mason University.


Accounts Payable Research

diannakelly04 <dianna.kelly@...>
 

I joined this group today at Stan Garfield's suggestion and have
really enjoyed reading through the messages.

I have been tasked to research Accounts Payable practices in
preparation for a major transformation we are planning in the Supply
Management group at Fidelity. We have posed questions to several
companies in which we have AP contacts however I have joined this
group and the KM Edge group on LinkedIn in the hopes of obtaining
broader knowledge.

Below are general questions we have been asking. If anyone has very
detailed AP knowledge I would also be interested in discussing how
companies have addressed specific issues.

Non-PO Invoices –
•What is your process?
•What have you done to reduce volume?
•What is the volume? % of total volume?


PO Invoices –
•Scan to match process – Do you index and review? Do you conduct
after that fact audits?
•Do you send out for approval?
•What have you done to minimize overbilling?


Electronic Invoicing –
•Do you have an electronic invoicing tool?
•What percentage is electronic ($ & volume)?


Pcards –
•How many Pcard? % to employees?
•Ghost cards or vendor cards? Volume? Types?


AP Cards –
•Are you using them?


ACH –
•What is the % of payments?
•How do you maintain vendor bank account information?
•What are the exceptions or issues with this process?


Customer Service –
•Do you have a dedicated line for vendors? Do you push them to a
portal?
•Internal customers for AP? What is the model?
•Internal customers for T&E? What is the model?


Sales/Use Tax –
•Is it in the Tax or Ops group?


Re: Generations #generations

jacobwatts <jacob.watts@...>
 

Funny - not long before I read your post I found this on the
del.icio.us hotlist: http://www.i-dose.us/. A few of these tracks
also use white noise in combination with other ambient sounds.
Maybe they can be useful in "focusing" on multi-tasking (in other
words, getting better at distributing focus) in addition to their
intended purpose.

-Jacob

--- In sikmleaders@..., Valdis Krebs <valdis@...> wrote:

We have been talking about multi-tasking and how it may be
distracting
from accomplishing things. Here is some "intentional
distraction"
that may actual help you concentrate, relax, sleep, create... I
always have ambient music on in the back ground to "even out the
daily
noises", but this is even more basic... tunable white noise via
your
browser...

http://www.simplynoise.com/

Enjoy!

Valdis


Making SIKM Presentations More Widely Available #APQC

Douglas Weidner
 

Stan,

I've been meaning to make a suggestion to the SIKM group for some
time, but just wasn't able to get around to it.

The APQC invite and our recent progress at the KM Institute has
caused me to step forward now to introduce the following way to
leverage the SIKM IP.

As many know, the KM Institute has developed a robust KM
Certification training program over many years and has recently
converted it to an interactive video, e-learning format as well.
(Samples can be seen on our site at www.kminstitute.org) The e-
learning has been so well received, we are now about to launch the
next phase of our KM Training strategy – a complete curriculum of KM
courses by actual KM practitioners such as the folks in this
community.

Some of the group, or the entirety, may want to consider an
alternative and/or complementary approach at this juncture.

The KM institute has the methods – rapid development methodology, the
technology – authoring programs, and the means – video studio, to
create some meaningful and relevant instructional content for the KM
profession.

There are many ways to pursue this, from an organized anthology of
past contributions (instead of a book or other collection of selected
writings by various authors, a collection of e-learning modules by
various authors"), to some individuals, or groups of individuals (Co-
Authors) stepping forward to handle some major domain such as CoPs,
KM Performance Metrics, SNA, KM Change Management, Content Mgmt,
Personal KM, etc., etc.

Let's chat. If anyone wants to do that offline, I can be reached at
douglas.weidner@....

Douglas Weidner, eCKM Mentor™
Chairman, International Knowledge Management Institute
Best in KM Training & Certification
Home of the KM Body of Knowledge™
www.kminstitute.org
703-757-1395


Generations #generations

Ken Martin <Ken.Martin@...>
 

Peter,

 

I agree, it seems that when trying to engage in complex process it is most effective to focus on the topic at hand.

 

The “lighter side” was an attempt to demonstrate the difficulty in finding meaningful and/or actionable knowledge from bulleted lists, abbreviations, ½ baked concepts, partial conversations, and a pre-occupation with having many things going in an attempt to be busy. Culturally programmed ADD is an excellent characterization. It is a behavior we must understand consequences of especially in the workplace. Cell phone, social-network, blogs, ear phone are standard equipment in college life now and are translating to the workplace. It’s the streaming-wobble-web-boggy-instant-chatter creating enormous amounts of intra-confusion. J

 

Yes, to still the chattering mind through diet, exercise, meditation and “other” means is a time honored discipline.

 

It is amazing that we have created the technology to increase the amount of chatter. I was talking with someone at a conference recently. They were amazed at the number of people using some type of device to “multi-task” during the work sessions. In other words, the companies sent the people to the conference to learn and interact socially. Instead, they conference attendees were participating in other activates with people not at the conference while setting in the work session. Who is benefiting from this type of multi-tasking?   (Wow!)

 

For today, it just seemed that a bit of humor in the face of some many ways to amplify the chatter might be appreciated.

 

Ken


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Peter Marshall
Sent: Saturday, July 05, 2008 10:25 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: Multitasking

 

Hi Martin! :-) Give hugs to the Toronto gang for me.

So I don't believe that multi-tasking (or the ability to use
chat-abbreviations) is generational.

But I have observed a general decline in the business world of the
tolerance or patience for reflective thought. A kind of culturally
programmed ADD that seems to have obliterated the capacity of most
people to follow complex thoughts, or develop a nuanced understanding.
And actually, I think this affects more senior execs from the old
generation more than younger folks.

Now it's always been true that as execs got older, they get to the
point more and more quickly, they avoid sophomoric theorizing and
over-analysis, they navigate their personal networks to find answers
rather than trying to understand everything themselves. All good.

But I'm talking about somethin different and new -- an inability to
think complex thoughts. And I trace this back to our over-stimulated,
snippet-based culture. News as sound bites. IM rather than letters.
Responses required at blackberry pace rather than thoughtful pace.
And I think this is not effective... I think those that fall into this
trap will end up getting out-competed by those that still can think.

I personally have always been struck by the beautiful, complex
thinking that even the commonest Civil War recruit could express in
letters back home, let alone the gorgeous thinking of folks like John
Adams or Beethoven, compared to the useless "hey u. wywh. twittering
away.." of our time. It's startling and obvious -- no way to avoid
seeing the obvious downside of our culture.

And I personally find that the capacity for reflective thought is
greatly enhanced by practice. For the last year, I have handwritten a
letter to a particular friend every morning, and I find it to be a
very useful way to get the mind humming. I also find that running
outdoors or similar meditative exercise every single day is enormously
helpful... the time spent is always paid back in spades.

Peter

On Fri, Jul 4, 2008 at 2:40 PM, Martin@Cleaver.org <martin@cleaver.org> wrote:
> There are somethings I can multitask well at, and others I fail dismally
> for.
>
> I can track my state in multiple tasks - e.g. configure software or servers,
> interject into conversations at the right time, no problem. These are all
> tactical, following existing grooves in my mind. Likewise I can brainstorm,
> do expansive tasks.
>
> When I am formulating something, a plan, or prose, something where I have a
> story to tell, be strategic, condensive, then I must concentrate.
>
> Words on the radio that get my evaluative mind going seem to block my
> ability to think strategically whilst doing something else.
>
> Having the TV on while I work is a killer for me. If my mind gets really
> pulled into a story, I'm toast.
>
> My wife, on the other hand, will ignore the TV if its on. Except that she
> WANTS it on because it helps her not get board with the task at hand.
>
> I bought her a pair of headphones :)
>
> On Fri, Jul 4, 2008 at 2:08 PM, Peter Marshall <peter.marshall@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>>
>> Vert interesting discussion.
>>
>> I agree that there are annoying (and counterproductive) current
>> cultural misconceptions with respect to age or generation and the
>> capability to multi-task. I see plenty of examples of old farts who
>> still can't tell the difference between their computer screen and
>> their browser and who think IM is the devil, but I see just as many
>> that can multi-task better than most teens, because they've learned
>> how their minds work. Having 6 chats going at once while doing
>> homework and watching TV is just a normal use of the brain's capacity,
>> if one wishes.
>>
>> Certainly there is a "personal style" element which is interesting
>> too. I find it fascinating that exactly half of my immediate family
>> -- one of my sisters, my mom, and I -- all feel most comfortable in a
>> "distracting" environment. I love to concentrate amidst noise; I
>> think best when 3 things are going on, I work best in cafes -- never
>> libraries -- never. Although I love the solitude and quiet of
>> running, kayaking, and biking too. Go figure. My dad and my other 2
>> sisters are the polar opposite. There is no correlation in this tiny
>> sample set between this preference for ferment and analytic ability,
>> but there is a noticeable correlation with creativity/artistic feel.
>>
>> Peter
>>
>> On Fri, Jul 4, 2008 at 9:16 AM, David Snowden <snowded@btinternet.com>
>> wrote:
>> > There are no universal rules here
>> >
>> > Some people can multitask and some tasks are compatable (watching
>> > star trek while doing your maths homework, listening to music while
>> > writing
>> > to take too personal examples). Its partly a matter of what the brain is
>> > used to. Listening to a conference call while using instant messaging
>> > can
>> > in my experience increase concentration overall.
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > Dave Snowden
>> > Founder & Chief Scientific Officer
>> > Cognitive Edge Pte Ltd
>> > Now blogging at www.cognitive-edge.com
>> >
>> > On 3 Jul 2008, at 09:12, Gardner, Mike wrote:
>> >
>> > I think it depends what you mean by multi-tasking.
>> >
>> > I absolutely agree that trying to do two things at once leads to neither
>> > being done correctly. You only have to look at the evidence for the use
>> > of
>> > hand held phones in cars whilst driving to show this is the case. Trying
>> > to
>> > do the two things together leads to accidents (and hence the ban on
>> > their
>> > use in the UK). And even the evidence for the use of hands free phones
>> > in
>> > cars and their relation to accidents is piling up (no metaphor
>> > intended).
>> >
>> > I have found that I sometimes will listen to a conference call, have an
>> > instant message conference going in the background with some attendees,
>> > and
>> > be reading my email at the same time. But if someone suddenly asks you a
>> > question in the meeting, how often do you find you have missed the last
>> > point and have to ask them to recap. There may be an appropriate level
>> > where
>> > you are only in a listening mode and can do some email processing while
>> > listening to a teleconference. I would be interested to know if this has
>> > ever been identified.
>> >
>> > However, the focus on a single task with no other focus for the full day
>> > can
>> > also detract from productivity. You sometimes need to step back and do
>> > something else, and then return to the task with a fresh impetus. I know
>> > I
>> > find that if I concentrate on one thing to the exclusion of all else I
>> > find
>> > my mind starts to wander on to other subjects.
>> >
>> >
>> > Mike Gardner
>> > EDS CIO EKM Team - EDS Taxonomist & Content Rationalization Leader
>> > Telephone: +44 (0)1332 663964 (Home Office)
>> > Mobile: +44 (0)7790 492991
>> > Work from home, Derby, UK
>> > micheal.gardner@eds.com
>> >
>> > We deliver on our commitments so you can deliver on yours.
>> >
>> > This email contains information which is confidential and may be
>> > privileged.
>> > Unless you are the intended addressee (or authorised to receive for the
>> > addressee) you may not use, forward, copy or disclose to anyone this
>> > email
>> > or any information contained in this email. If you have received this
>> > email
>> > in error, please advise the sender by reply email immediately and delete
>> > this email.
>> >
>> > Electronic Data Systems Ltd
>> > Registered Office:, Lansdowne House, Berkeley Square, London W1J 6ER
>> > Registered in England no: 53419
>> > VAT number: 432 99 5915
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > ________________________________
>> > From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com]
>> > On
>> > Behalf Of Bill Linn
>> > Sent: 03 July 2008 08:42
>> > To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
>> > Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Multitasking
>> >
>> > Here is another idea from Dr. Edward M. Hallowell, M.D. in his book
>> > Crazy Busy he has a chapter on the Myth and Reality of Multitasking.
>> > In it he says on page 19 that, "It is fine to believe that
>> > multitasking is a skill necessary in the modern world, but to believe
>> > it is an equivalent substitute for single-minded focus on one task is
>> > incorrect."
>> >
>> > I would agree with what Dr. Hallowell says on this. I personally
>> > perform better on a task when I am focused and devote my attention to
>> > it. I think you might find Crazy Busy and interesting book. It is a
>> > very affordable book, easy to read and I feel it is a great resource
>> > for my personal productivity study.
>> >
>> > --- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, dkkildebeck@... wrote:
>> >>
>> >> Great article on the Creative Passionate Users blog "Multitasking
>> > makes us stupid?"
>> >> Quote:
>> >> "Perhaps the biggest problem of all, though, is that the majority
>> > of people doing the most media multitasking have a big-ass blind spot
>> > on just how much they suck at it.
>> >> We believe we can e-mail and talk on the phone at the same time,
>> > with little or no degradation of either communication.
>> >> We believe we can do homework while watching a movie.
>> >> We believe we can surf the web while talking to our
>> > kids/spouse/lover/co-worker.
>> >> But we can't! (Not without a hit on every level--time, quality, and
>> > the ability to think deeply)".
>> >> Here's the full article:
>> >>
>> > http://headrush.typepad.com/creating_passionate_users/2006/03/multitas
>> > king_ma.html
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> -------------- Original message --------------
>> >> From: "allan crawford" ...>
>> >> And once you have wireless in your car will you be trying to drive
>> > at the same time?
>> >>
>> >> John Medina's new book Brain Rules has some interesting insights
>> > into the effectives (or lack of) for multitasking at any age….
>> >>
>> >> Allan Crawford
>> >> 310-994-1619
>> >> www.acrawfordphoto.com
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
>> > [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bill Ives
>> >> Sent: Wednesday, July 02, 2008 7:01 PM
>> >> To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
>> >> Subject: [sikmleaders] stop bashing the "older generations"
>> >>
>> >> Good for you Validis, as an already gone grey consultant, I am
>> > tired of all this old folks bashing around the use of social
>> > software. Here is a blog post on a recent Enterprise 2.0 conference
>> > where this came up and I objected. Us older people have actually
>> > seen multiple waves of new technologies and can perhaps have a bit
>> > more perspective here.
>> >>
>> >> http://www.fastforwardblog.com/2008/06/11/enterprise-20-conference-
>> > notes-reality-check-with-andrew-mcafee/
>> >>
>> >> Bill
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> On Jul 2, 2008, at 9:00 PM, Valdis Krebs wrote:
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> As a starting-to-gray consultant, I have had a half a several Skype
>> >> chat sessions going at once, while I listen in on a conference
>> > call,
>> >> while I read/answer simple emails.
>> >>
>> >> Not my typical day, but us old farts can multi-task too!
>> >>
>> >> Valdis
>> >>
>> >> On Jul 2, 2008, at 7:23 PM, Ge, Yao (Y.) wrote:
>> >>
>> >> > There is a huge generation gap on "braing thrashing threshold".
>> > Gen-
>> >> > Y seems to be able mutli-tasking much more effectively than older
>> >> > generations (like me).
>> >> > http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=91769862
>> >>
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>>
>> --
>> Peter Marshall
>> ----------------------------------------------------------
>> SVP, Platform Strategy & Chief Technology Officer
>> Peracon, Inc.
>> www.peracon.com
>> 1650 Tysons Blvd., Suite 950
>> McLean, VA 22102
>> Office: (703) 748-7517
>> Mobile: (949) 689-7000
>> Skype: ideasware
>
> PS. Hi Peter!
> --
> Martin Cleaver MSc MBA
> Cell: 416-786-6752
> Martin.Cleaver@BlendedPerspectives.com
> Principal, http://www.blendedperspectives.com/
> Founder, http://www.torontowikituesdays.com/
> Chair, http://www.wikisym.org/ws2008/
>

--
Peter Marshall
----------------------------------------------------------
SVP, Platform Strategy & Chief Technology Officer
Peracon, Inc.
www.peracon.com
1650 Tysons Blvd., Suite 950
McLean, VA 22102
Office: (703) 748-7517
Mobile: (949) 689-7000
Skype: ideasware


Re: Generations #generations

Peter Marshall <peter.marshall@...>
 

ekdsvbdskjnmldskv kladsbvlasbvklzdsbvkladsjbvlcfx dsvds,mcv dsknv
bcjbfjdsbvjkdbndgfn ccdlgbegf

Sorry... my head just hit my laptop keyboard...

I guess now that I've woken up my creativity should be enhanced, right?

:-)

Peter

On Sat, Jul 5, 2008 at 12:08 PM, Valdis Krebs <valdis@...> wrote:
We have been talking about multi-tasking and how it may be distracting
from accomplishing things. Here is some "intentional distraction"
that may actual help you concentrate, relax, sleep, create... I
always have ambient music on in the back ground to "even out the daily
noises", but this is even more basic... tunable white noise via your
browser...

http://www.simplynoise.com/

Enjoy!

Valdis

--
Peter Marshall
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
SVP, Platform Strategy & Chief Technology Officer
Peracon, Inc.
www.peracon.com
1650 Tysons Blvd., Suite 950
McLean, VA 22102
Office: (703) 748-7517
Mobile: (949) 689-7000
Skype: ideasware


Re: Generations #generations

Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

We have been talking about multi-tasking and how it may be distracting from accomplishing things. Here is some "intentional distraction" that may actual help you concentrate, relax, sleep, create... I always have ambient music on in the back ground to "even out the daily noises", but this is even more basic... tunable white noise via your browser...

http://www.simplynoise.com/

Enjoy!

Valdis


Re: Generations #generations

Peter Marshall <peter.marshall@...>
 

Hi Martin! :-) Give hugs to the Toronto gang for me.

So I don't believe that multi-tasking (or the ability to use
chat-abbreviations) is generational.

But I have observed a general decline in the business world of the
tolerance or patience for reflective thought. A kind of culturally
programmed ADD that seems to have obliterated the capacity of most
people to follow complex thoughts, or develop a nuanced understanding.
And actually, I think this affects more senior execs from the old
generation more than younger folks.

Now it's always been true that as execs got older, they get to the
point more and more quickly, they avoid sophomoric theorizing and
over-analysis, they navigate their personal networks to find answers
rather than trying to understand everything themselves. All good.

But I'm talking about somethin different and new -- an inability to
think complex thoughts. And I trace this back to our over-stimulated,
snippet-based culture. News as sound bites. IM rather than letters.
Responses required at blackberry pace rather than thoughtful pace.
And I think this is not effective... I think those that fall into this
trap will end up getting out-competed by those that still can think.

I personally have always been struck by the beautiful, complex
thinking that even the commonest Civil War recruit could express in
letters back home, let alone the gorgeous thinking of folks like John
Adams or Beethoven, compared to the useless "hey u. wywh. twittering
away.." of our time. It's startling and obvious -- no way to avoid
seeing the obvious downside of our culture.

And I personally find that the capacity for reflective thought is
greatly enhanced by practice. For the last year, I have handwritten a
letter to a particular friend every morning, and I find it to be a
very useful way to get the mind humming. I also find that running
outdoors or similar meditative exercise every single day is enormously
helpful... the time spent is always paid back in spades.

Peter

On Fri, Jul 4, 2008 at 2:40 PM, Martin@... <martin@...> wrote:
There are somethings I can multitask well at, and others I fail dismally
for.

I can track my state in multiple tasks - e.g. configure software or servers,
interject into conversations at the right time, no problem. These are all
tactical, following existing grooves in my mind. Likewise I can brainstorm,
do expansive tasks.

When I am formulating something, a plan, or prose, something where I have a
story to tell, be strategic, condensive, then I must concentrate.

Words on the radio that get my evaluative mind going seem to block my
ability to think strategically whilst doing something else.

Having the TV on while I work is a killer for me. If my mind gets really
pulled into a story, I'm toast.

My wife, on the other hand, will ignore the TV if its on. Except that she
WANTS it on because it helps her not get board with the task at hand.

I bought her a pair of headphones :)

On Fri, Jul 4, 2008 at 2:08 PM, Peter Marshall <peter.marshall@...>
wrote:

Vert interesting discussion.

I agree that there are annoying (and counterproductive) current
cultural misconceptions with respect to age or generation and the
capability to multi-task. I see plenty of examples of old farts who
still can't tell the difference between their computer screen and
their browser and who think IM is the devil, but I see just as many
that can multi-task better than most teens, because they've learned
how their minds work. Having 6 chats going at once while doing
homework and watching TV is just a normal use of the brain's capacity,
if one wishes.

Certainly there is a "personal style" element which is interesting
too. I find it fascinating that exactly half of my immediate family
-- one of my sisters, my mom, and I -- all feel most comfortable in a
"distracting" environment. I love to concentrate amidst noise; I
think best when 3 things are going on, I work best in cafes -- never
libraries -- never. Although I love the solitude and quiet of
running, kayaking, and biking too. Go figure. My dad and my other 2
sisters are the polar opposite. There is no correlation in this tiny
sample set between this preference for ferment and analytic ability,
but there is a noticeable correlation with creativity/artistic feel.

Peter

On Fri, Jul 4, 2008 at 9:16 AM, David Snowden <snowded@...>
wrote:
There are no universal rules here

Some people can multitask and some tasks are compatable (watching
star trek while doing your maths homework, listening to music while
writing
to take too personal examples). Its partly a matter of what the brain is
used to. Listening to a conference call while using instant messaging
can
in my experience increase concentration overall.



Dave Snowden
Founder & Chief Scientific Officer
Cognitive Edge Pte Ltd
Now blogging at www.cognitive-edge.com

On 3 Jul 2008, at 09:12, Gardner, Mike wrote:

I think it depends what you mean by multi-tasking.

I absolutely agree that trying to do two things at once leads to neither
being done correctly. You only have to look at the evidence for the use
of
hand held phones in cars whilst driving to show this is the case. Trying
to
do the two things together leads to accidents (and hence the ban on
their
use in the UK). And even the evidence for the use of hands free phones
in
cars and their relation to accidents is piling up (no metaphor
intended).

I have found that I sometimes will listen to a conference call, have an
instant message conference going in the background with some attendees,
and
be reading my email at the same time. But if someone suddenly asks you a
question in the meeting, how often do you find you have missed the last
point and have to ask them to recap. There may be an appropriate level
where
you are only in a listening mode and can do some email processing while
listening to a teleconference. I would be interested to know if this has
ever been identified.

However, the focus on a single task with no other focus for the full day
can
also detract from productivity. You sometimes need to step back and do
something else, and then return to the task with a fresh impetus. I know
I
find that if I concentrate on one thing to the exclusion of all else I
find
my mind starts to wander on to other subjects.


Mike Gardner
EDS CIO EKM Team - EDS Taxonomist & Content Rationalization Leader
Telephone: +44 (0)1332 663964 (Home Office)
Mobile: +44 (0)7790 492991
Work from home, Derby, UK
micheal.gardner@...

We deliver on our commitments so you can deliver on yours.

This email contains information which is confidential and may be
privileged.
Unless you are the intended addressee (or authorised to receive for the
addressee) you may not use, forward, copy or disclose to anyone this
email
or any information contained in this email. If you have received this
email
in error, please advise the sender by reply email immediately and delete
this email.

Electronic Data Systems Ltd
Registered Office:, Lansdowne House, Berkeley Square, London W1J 6ER
Registered in England no: 53419
VAT number: 432 99 5915



________________________________
From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
On
Behalf Of Bill Linn
Sent: 03 July 2008 08:42
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Multitasking

Here is another idea from Dr. Edward M. Hallowell, M.D. in his book
Crazy Busy he has a chapter on the Myth and Reality of Multitasking.
In it he says on page 19 that, "It is fine to believe that
multitasking is a skill necessary in the modern world, but to believe
it is an equivalent substitute for single-minded focus on one task is
incorrect."

I would agree with what Dr. Hallowell says on this. I personally
perform better on a task when I am focused and devote my attention to
it. I think you might find Crazy Busy and interesting book. It is a
very affordable book, easy to read and I feel it is a great resource
for my personal productivity study.

--- In sikmleaders@..., dkkildebeck@... wrote:

Great article on the Creative Passionate Users blog "Multitasking
makes us stupid?"
Quote:
"Perhaps the biggest problem of all, though, is that the majority
of people doing the most media multitasking have a big-ass blind spot
on just how much they suck at it.
We believe we can e-mail and talk on the phone at the same time,
with little or no degradation of either communication.
We believe we can do homework while watching a movie.
We believe we can surf the web while talking to our
kids/spouse/lover/co-worker.
But we can't! (Not without a hit on every level--time, quality, and
the ability to think deeply)".
Here's the full article:
http://headrush.typepad.com/creating_passionate_users/2006/03/multitas
king_ma.html



-------------- Original message --------------
From: "allan crawford" <allancrawford@...>
And once you have wireless in your car will you be trying to drive
at the same time?

John Medina's new book Brain Rules has some interesting insights
into the effectives (or lack of) for multitasking at any age….

Allan Crawford
310-994-1619
www.acrawfordphoto.com



From: sikmleaders@...
[mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Bill Ives
Sent: Wednesday, July 02, 2008 7:01 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] stop bashing the "older generations"

Good for you Validis, as an already gone grey consultant, I am
tired of all this old folks bashing around the use of social
software. Here is a blog post on a recent Enterprise 2.0 conference
where this came up and I objected. Us older people have actually
seen multiple waves of new technologies and can perhaps have a bit
more perspective here.

http://www.fastforwardblog.com/2008/06/11/enterprise-20-conference-
notes-reality-check-with-andrew-mcafee/

Bill


On Jul 2, 2008, at 9:00 PM, Valdis Krebs wrote:



As a starting-to-gray consultant, I have had a half a several Skype
chat sessions going at once, while I listen in on a conference
call,
while I read/answer simple emails.

Not my typical day, but us old farts can multi-task too!

Valdis

On Jul 2, 2008, at 7:23 PM, Ge, Yao (Y.) wrote:

There is a huge generation gap on "braing thrashing threshold".
Gen-
Y seems to be able mutli-tasking much more effectively than older
generations (like me).
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=91769862


--
Peter Marshall
----------------------------------------------------------
SVP, Platform Strategy & Chief Technology Officer
Peracon, Inc.
www.peracon.com
1650 Tysons Blvd., Suite 950
McLean, VA 22102
Office: (703) 748-7517
Mobile: (949) 689-7000
Skype: ideasware
PS. Hi Peter!
--
Martin Cleaver MSc MBA
Cell: 416-786-6752
Martin.Cleaver@...
Principal, http://www.blendedperspectives.com/
Founder, http://www.torontowikituesdays.com/
Chair, http://www.wikisym.org/ws2008/
--
Peter Marshall
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
SVP, Platform Strategy & Chief Technology Officer
Peracon, Inc.
www.peracon.com
1650 Tysons Blvd., Suite 950
McLean, VA 22102
Office: (703) 748-7517
Mobile: (949) 689-7000
Skype: ideasware


Generations #generations

Ken Martin <Ken.Martin@...>
 

On the lighter side of generation Alpha and Omega:

 

Architects, generals, sailors, pilots, operators of complex equipment, astronauts, engineers, soldiers, and many others have all been multi-tasking for generations.

 

One may even refer to cave people hunting while guarding against predators as the beginning of multi-tasking. Eat or be eaten is a takes multi-tasking to another level for anyone.

 

Today we associate ‘multi-chatter’ with multi-tasking.  Does getting 1/8 of 8 different conversations = a whole conversation?

 

 

Thumbs typing bullets

 

Bits of info spread across the group

 

Messages streaming

 

Leaves much to interpretation

 

Busy responding?

 

Must save time

 

Use symbols <(:>)

 

Abbrv.

 

2  fab cool & qik 4 me

 

Share KM @ any TM

 

U   2  can RSVP in multpl

 

 

Twiddle thumbs a twittering we will go

 

 

Now harvesting, understanding, sharing, and retaining knowledge in this environment is going to be very interesting.

 

Ken Martin

Tacilent Corporation

 

Office: (214) 257-7880

Fax:    (214) 821-4028


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Ge, Yao (Y.)
Sent: Wednesday, July 02, 2008 6:24 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Making SIKM Presentations More Widely Available

 

There is a huge generation gap on "braing thrashing threshold". Gen-Y seems to be able mutli-tasking much more effectively than older generations (like me).

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=91769862

 


From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of dkkildebeck@comcast.net
Sent: Wednesday, July 02, 2008 7:15 PM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Making SIKM Presentations More Widely Available

Oh yes, Twitter. Tried it.....here's my feelings about it:

 

 

-------------- Original message --------------
From: Peter Dorfman com>

I think the other members have put it pretty well. I'd say go for it. I might
even feel moved to blog.

Hey....how many of you Twitter? I've just tried it for the first time. I suppose
there might be lots of people who really need to tweet, have a practical reason
for it, but I don't, as a function of what I do, so it left me feeling just a
bit, how shall I put this...narcissistic? Have you ever had that feeling about
any of these Web 2 gimmicks?

Peter Dorfman

On Wed Jul 2 13:45 , 'Stan Garfield' <stangarfield@gmail.com> sent:

>
>APQC has offered to play a larger role in supporting the SIKM Leaders
>Community. This could include con call logistics, providing wider
>access to presentations, and providing a blog platform.
>
>Before agreeing to any of this, I wanted to ask the members for their
>views. If you agree, disagree, or have ! other s uggestions on this topic,
>please reply to this thread. No decisions will be made without first
>notifying the members.
>
>Regards,
>Stan
>
>
>--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, Bill Kaplan wrote:
>> I would suggest considering a multiple set of candidate sponsors if
>this
>> is the approach taken.
>
>
>--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, Mike Koffman wrote:
>> Stan, if you put all these presentations together you will have a nice
>> book of readings. Perhaps that is something to consider. Over time,
>> quite a bit of intellectual capital has passed through this community.
>> A volunteer committee might pick the "best" offerings and seek to get
>> release permission from the authors. Perhaps an APQC-sponsored
>> ! publica tion? The nice idea to me is the concept of a publication
>> emanating from a an on-line virtual community.
>
>
>
>
>------------------------------------
>
>Yahoo! Groups Links
>
> To visit your group on the web, go to:
> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/
>
> Your email settings:
> Individual Email | Traditional
>
> To change settings online go to:
> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/join
> (Yahoo! ID required)
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> sikmleaders-digest@yahoogroups.com
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& gt;
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>
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> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
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>


Re: Generations #generations

Martin@Cleaver.org <martin@...>
 


Re: Generations #generations

Peter Marshall <peter.marshall@...>
 

Vert interesting discussion.

I agree that there are annoying (and counterproductive) current
cultural misconceptions with respect to age or generation and the
capability to multi-task. I see plenty of examples of old farts who
still can't tell the difference between their computer screen and
their browser and who think IM is the devil, but I see just as many
that can multi-task better than most teens, because they've learned
how their minds work. Having 6 chats going at once while doing
homework and watching TV is just a normal use of the brain's capacity,
if one wishes.

Certainly there is a "personal style" element which is interesting
too. I find it fascinating that exactly half of my immediate family
-- one of my sisters, my mom, and I -- all feel most comfortable in a
"distracting" environment. I love to concentrate amidst noise; I
think best when 3 things are going on, I work best in cafes -- never
libraries -- never. Although I love the solitude and quiet of
running, kayaking, and biking too. Go figure. My dad and my other 2
sisters are the polar opposite. There is no correlation in this tiny
sample set between this preference for ferment and analytic ability,
but there is a noticeable correlation with creativity/artistic feel.

Peter

On Fri, Jul 4, 2008 at 9:16 AM, David Snowden <snowded@...> wrote:
There are no universal rules here

Some people can multitask and some tasks are compatable (watching
star trek while doing your maths homework, listening to music while writing
to take too personal examples). Its partly a matter of what the brain is
used to. Listening to a conference call while using instant messaging can
in my experience increase concentration overall.



Dave Snowden
Founder & Chief Scientific Officer
Cognitive Edge Pte Ltd
Now blogging at www.cognitive-edge.com

On 3 Jul 2008, at 09:12, Gardner, Mike wrote:

I think it depends what you mean by multi-tasking.

I absolutely agree that trying to do two things at once leads to neither
being done correctly. You only have to look at the evidence for the use of
hand held phones in cars whilst driving to show this is the case. Trying to
do the two things together leads to accidents (and hence the ban on their
use in the UK). And even the evidence for the use of hands free phones in
cars and their relation to accidents is piling up (no metaphor intended).

I have found that I sometimes will listen to a conference call, have an
instant message conference going in the background with some attendees, and
be reading my email at the same time. But if someone suddenly asks you a
question in the meeting, how often do you find you have missed the last
point and have to ask them to recap. There may be an appropriate level where
you are only in a listening mode and can do some email processing while
listening to a teleconference. I would be interested to know if this has
ever been identified.

However, the focus on a single task with no other focus for the full day can
also detract from productivity. You sometimes need to step back and do
something else, and then return to the task with a fresh impetus. I know I
find that if I concentrate on one thing to the exclusion of all else I find
my mind starts to wander on to other subjects.


Mike Gardner
EDS CIO EKM Team - EDS Taxonomist & Content Rationalization Leader
Telephone: +44 (0)1332 663964 (Home Office)
Mobile: +44 (0)7790 492991
Work from home, Derby, UK
micheal.gardner@...

We deliver on our commitments so you can deliver on yours.

This email contains information which is confidential and may be privileged.
Unless you are the intended addressee (or authorised to receive for the
addressee) you may not use, forward, copy or disclose to anyone this email
or any information contained in this email. If you have received this email
in error, please advise the sender by reply email immediately and delete
this email.

Electronic Data Systems Ltd
Registered Office:, Lansdowne House, Berkeley Square, London W1J 6ER
Registered in England no: 53419
VAT number: 432 99 5915



________________________________
From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On
Behalf Of Bill Linn
Sent: 03 July 2008 08:42
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Multitasking

Here is another idea from Dr. Edward M. Hallowell, M.D. in his book
Crazy Busy he has a chapter on the Myth and Reality of Multitasking.
In it he says on page 19 that, "It is fine to believe that
multitasking is a skill necessary in the modern world, but to believe
it is an equivalent substitute for single-minded focus on one task is
incorrect."

I would agree with what Dr. Hallowell says on this. I personally
perform better on a task when I am focused and devote my attention to
it. I think you might find Crazy Busy and interesting book. It is a
very affordable book, easy to read and I feel it is a great resource
for my personal productivity study.

--- In sikmleaders@..., dkkildebeck@... wrote:

Great article on the Creative Passionate Users blog "Multitasking
makes us stupid?"
Quote:
"Perhaps the biggest problem of all, though, is that the majority
of people doing the most media multitasking have a big-ass blind spot
on just how much they suck at it.
We believe we can e-mail and talk on the phone at the same time,
with little or no degradation of either communication.
We believe we can do homework while watching a movie.
We believe we can surf the web while talking to our
kids/spouse/lover/co-worker.
But we can't! (Not without a hit on every level--time, quality, and
the ability to think deeply)".
Here's the full article:
http://headrush.typepad.com/creating_passionate_users/2006/03/multitas
king_ma.html



-------------- Original message --------------
From: "allan crawford" <allancrawford@...>
And once you have wireless in your car will you be trying to drive
at the same time?

John Medina's new book Brain Rules has some interesting insights
into the effectives (or lack of) for multitasking at any age….

Allan Crawford
310-994-1619
www.acrawfordphoto.com



From: sikmleaders@...
[mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Bill Ives
Sent: Wednesday, July 02, 2008 7:01 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] stop bashing the "older generations"

Good for you Validis, as an already gone grey consultant, I am
tired of all this old folks bashing around the use of social
software. Here is a blog post on a recent Enterprise 2.0 conference
where this came up and I objected. Us older people have actually
seen multiple waves of new technologies and can perhaps have a bit
more perspective here.

http://www.fastforwardblog.com/2008/06/11/enterprise-20-conference-
notes-reality-check-with-andrew-mcafee/

Bill


On Jul 2, 2008, at 9:00 PM, Valdis Krebs wrote:



As a starting-to-gray consultant, I have had a half a several Skype
chat sessions going at once, while I listen in on a conference
call,
while I read/answer simple emails.

Not my typical day, but us old farts can multi-task too!

Valdis

On Jul 2, 2008, at 7:23 PM, Ge, Yao (Y.) wrote:

There is a huge generation gap on "braing thrashing threshold".
Gen-
Y seems to be able mutli-tasking much more effectively than older
generations (like me).
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=91769862


--
Peter Marshall
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
SVP, Platform Strategy & Chief Technology Officer
Peracon, Inc.
www.peracon.com
1650 Tysons Blvd., Suite 950
McLean, VA 22102
Office: (703) 748-7517
Mobile: (949) 689-7000
Skype: ideasware


Re: Generations #generations

David Snowden <snowded@...>
 

There are no universal rules here
Some people can multitask and some tasks are compatable (watching star trek while doing your maths homework, listening to music while writing to take too personal examples).  Its partly a matter of what the brain is used to.  Listening to a conference call while using instant messaging can in my experience increase concentration overall.



Dave Snowden
Founder & Chief Scientific Officer
Cognitive Edge Pte Ltd

Now blogging at www.cognitive-edge.com


On 3 Jul 2008, at 09:12, Gardner, Mike wrote:


I think it depends what you mean by multi-tasking.
 
I absolutely agree that trying to do two things at once leads to neither being done correctly. You only have to look at the evidence for the use of hand held phones in cars whilst driving to show this is the case. Trying to do the two things together leads to accidents (and hence the ban on their use in the UK). And even the evidence for the use of hands free phones in cars and their relation to accidents is piling up (no metaphor intended).
 
I have found that I sometimes will listen to a conference call, have an instant message conference going in the background with some attendees, and be reading my email at the same time. But if someone suddenly asks you a question in the meeting, how often do you find you have missed the last point and have to ask them to recap. There may be an appropriate level where you are only in a listening mode and can do some email processing while listening to a teleconference. I would be interested to know if this has ever been identified.
 
However, the focus on a single task with no other focus for the full day can also detract from productivity. You sometimes need to step back and do something else, and then return to the task with a fresh impetus. I know I find that if I concentrate on one thing to the exclusion of all else I find my mind starts to wander on to other subjects.
 

Mike Gardner 
EDS CIO EKM Team - EDS Taxonomist & Content Rationalization Leader 
Telephone: +44 (0)1332 663964 (Home Office) 
Mobile: +44 (0)7790 492991 
Work from home, Derby, UK 
micheal.gardner@eds.com

We deliver on our commitments so you can deliver on yours.

This email contains information which is confidential and may be privileged. Unless you are the intended addressee (or authorised to receive for the addressee) you may not use, forward, copy or disclose to anyone this email or any information contained in this email. If you have received this email in error, please advise the sender by reply email immediately and delete this email.

Electronic Data Systems Ltd 
Registered Office:, Lansdowne House, Berkeley Square, London  W1J 6ER 
Registered in England no: 53419 
VAT number: 432 99 5915

 


From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bill Linn
Sent: 03 July 2008 08:42
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Multitasking

Here is another idea from Dr. Edward M. Hallowell, M.D. in his book 
Crazy Busy he has a chapter on the Myth and Reality of Multitasking. 
In it he says on page 19 that, "It is fine to believe that 
multitasking is a skill necessary in the modern world, but to believe 
it is an equivalent substitute for single-minded focus on one task is 
incorrect."

I would agree with what Dr. Hallowell says on this. I personally 
perform better on a task when I am focused and devote my attention to 
it. I think you might find Crazy Busy and interesting book. It is a 
very affordable book, easy to read and I feel it is a great resource 
for my personal productivity study.

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, dkkildebeck@... wrote:
>
> Great article on the Creative Passionate Users blog "Multitasking 
makes us stupid?"
> Quote:
> "Perhaps the biggest problem of all, though, is that the majority 
of people doing the most media multitasking have a big-ass blind spot 
on just how much they suck at it.
> We believe we can e-mail and talk on the phone at the same time, 
with little or no degradation of either communication.
> We believe we can do homework while watching a movie.
> We believe we can surf the web while talking to our 
kids/spouse/lover/co-worker.
> But we can't! (Not without a hit on every level--time, quality, and 
the ability to think deeply)".
> Here's the full article:
> 
http://headrush.typepad.com/creating_passionate_users/2006/03/multitas
king_ma.html
> 
> 
> 
> -------------- Original message -------------- 
> From: "allan crawford" ...> 
> And once you have wireless in your car will you be trying to drive 
at the same time?
> 
> John Medina's new book Brain Rules has some interesting insights 
into the effectives (or lack of) for multitasking at any age….
> 
> Allan Crawford
> 310-994-1619
> www.acrawfordphoto.com
> 
> 
> 
> From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com 
[mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bill Ives
> Sent: Wednesday, July 02, 2008 7:01 PM
> To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
> Subject: [sikmleaders] stop bashing the "older generations"
> 
> Good for you Validis, as an already gone grey consultant, I am 
tired of all this old folks bashing around the use of social 
software. Here is a blog post on a recent Enterprise 2.0 conference 
where this came up and I objected. Us older people have actually 
seen multiple waves of new technologies and can perhaps have a bit 
more perspective here. 
> 
> http://www.fastforwardblog.com/2008/06/11/enterprise-20-conference-
notes-reality-check-with-andrew-mcafee/
> 
> Bill
> 
> 
> On Jul 2, 2008, at 9:00 PM, Valdis Krebs wrote:
> 
> 
> 
> As a starting-to-gray consultant, I have had a half a several Skype 
> chat sessions going at once, while I listen in on a conference 
call, 
> while I read/answer simple emails.
> 
> Not my typical day, but us old farts can multi-task too!
> 
> Valdis
> 
> On Jul 2, 2008, at 7:23 PM, Ge, Yao (Y.) wrote:
> 
> > There is a huge generation gap on "braing thrashing threshold". 
Gen- 
> > Y seems to be able mutli-tasking much more effectively than older 
> > generations (like me).
> > http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=91769862
>




Re: Making SIKM Presentations More Widely Available #APQC

sjagannath@...
 


Seem a like a good idea to join with APQC, although few concerns raised regarding flexibility, IP are worthwhile deliberating.

Thanks and Regards,
Srinivas Prasad J





"Stan Garfield"
Sent by: sikmleaders@...

07/02/2008 11:15 PM

Please respond to
sikmleaders@...

To
sikmleaders@...
cc
Subject
[sikmleaders] Making SIKM Presentations More Widely Available







APQC has offered to play a larger role in supporting the SIKM Leaders
Community. This could include con call logistics, providing wider
access to presentations, and providing a blog platform.

Before agreeing to any of this, I wanted to ask the members for their
views. If you agree, disagree, or have other suggestions on this topic,
please reply to this thread. No decisions will be made without first
notifying the members.

Regards,
Stan

--- In sikmleaders@..., Bill Kaplan wrote:
> I would suggest considering a multiple set of candidate sponsors if
this
> is the approach taken.

--- In sikmleaders@..., Mike Koffman wrote:
> Stan, if you put all these presentations together you will have a nice
> book of readings. Perhaps that is something to consider. Over time,
> quite a bit of intellectual capital has passed through this community.
> A volunteer committee might pick the "best" offerings and seek to get
> release permission from the authors. Perhaps an APQC-sponsored
> publication? The nice idea to me is the concept of a publication
> emanating from a an on-line virtual community.



Re: Generations #generations

Yao Ge
 

Don Burke (the 2nd guy from right in the panel) mentioned the 69 Yr-old guy with 30,000 edits was trying to do everything with wiki.
-Yao


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Steve Ardire
Sent: Thursday, July 03, 2008 1:53 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Twitter

Yao I attended E2.0 conf and this session. Did you know that the #1 contributor to Intellipedia is a 69 year old guy ;)

On Thu, Jul 3, 2008 at 6:58 AM, Ge, Yao (Y.) <yge@...> wrote:

Very insightful Mark. When I brought up the issue of generation gap, I mean to bring attention to gaps in habits and comfort levels to different types of media people leverage to stay connected to each other. It is not that much about multi-tasking vs. single tasking and shallow thinking vs. deep thinking. We need both skills preferably and someone would thrive in one vs. the other. One of the KM goal to bring all these type talents together via all available channels that they are on. There is no stereotyping on old generations. I do think the brains get wired differently in younger generation and workplace needs to be ready to leverage it.
 
Here is the video achieve for Enterprise 2.0 Conference
The Enterprise 2.0 Reality Check panel discussion is the 3rd from the top. The two guys sat at the right end of the panel are from CIA. They worked on Intellipedia project.
 
-Yao


From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mark D Neff
Sent: Thursday, July 03, 2008 8:39 AM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [sikmleaders] Twitter


Matt and Peter,

I agree about Twitter. I see a lot of people using it to chronicle their day, not so useful. Others use it to pose interesting questions or share what they are working on. Much more useful ... at least to me. Recently I attended a Twebinar (maybe the one you mentioned below) - webinar with hosted twitter session on the side. It was very fast paced but interesting. It took back channel to a whole new level. Lots of people commenting on what they heard, what they could apply, what they wanted more of, what they agreed with, what they didn't agree with, other topics they would like to see addressed in a similar manner. (There were close to 40 twitters a minute during some of the conference that had over 500 people in attendance.) Anything you can do to get real feedback from people other than a smiley sheet at the end is a step in the right direction for me. It also leads up to getting a discussion to last longer than just the event and building a support team for asking questions afterwards. As a result of attending the twebinar (www.twebinar.com), I added several people to follow and several people added me to the list of people they follow. Just because you have not found a use for it yet, does not mean one does not exist.

I have already had one colleague confess that Twitter is the only way she could get an answer to something from someone. They didn't respond to email, didn't respond to a phone call. They did however respond to her question on Twitter. Very interesting. Again, we just need to figure out what medium people respond to and be versatile enough to use what they prefer to use to get our answers and continue building the behaviors necessary to encourage collaboration - in all forms. I see potential value to it for a manager trying to keep in touch with their remote workers. If you see them pop up on twitter and share a little bit about what they are working on it helps to fill in the unknown during the week between staff meetings when you really don't know what they are doing and you want to know but don't want to appear too intrusive or as if you are micro-managing them. It also gives you a chance to share withthem what you are working on. A new communication medium and a way for you to bring them along by helping them understand some of the things you are trying to address or have interests in. A new way build or enhance current strategies for relationship building. A quick way to jot down thoughts that might lead to an intersting blog article but something that literally takes seconds and not minutes or hours. A quicker way to point people to interesting urls you run across without having to string them along into a newsletter or even a reply to a listserv. It also focuses you. Getting a message into 140 characters is not easy when you first get started.

If interested, I am mneff on twitter. I don't "tweet" all day but I do put out a question from time to time or comment on something I am looking into.

Mark Neff
706.447.8522



Matt Moore <laalgadger@yahoo.co.uk>
Sent by: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com

07/02/2008 07:01 PM


To
sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
cc
Subject
[sikmleaders] Twitter




Peter,

I have had a Twitter account for nearly a year but only got into it in the last 3 months. The observation I would make is: Like all social software, Twitter is not much fun if you are doing it by yourself. It becomes fun (& useful) when there is a group of you on there. I was at a conference a couple of weeks ago where half the audience (noo meeja) were Twittering & the other half (auld meeja) weren't. An eye-opener. And Twitter has actually demonstrated some ROI for me.

BTW My Twitter ID is innotecture if anyone wants to connect.

Cheers,

Matt

--- On Wed, 7/2/08, Peter Dorfman <pdorfman@knowfarm.com> wrote:
From: Peter Dorfman <pdorfman@knowfarm.com>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Making SIKM Presentations More Widely Available
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, July 2, 2008, 11:13 PM

I think the other members have put it pretty well. I'd say go for it. I might
even feel moved to blog.

Hey....how many of you Twitter? I've just tried it for the first time. I suppose
there might be lots of people who really need to tweet, have a practical reason
for it, but I don't, as a function of what I do, so it left me feeling just a
bit, how shall I put this...narcissistic ? Have you ever had that feeling about
any of these Web 2 gimmicks?

Peter Dorfman







Re: Generations #generations

Steve Ardire <sardire@...>
 


Re: Generations #generations

Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

But how do you know that is the real identity, Steve?

Maybe it is a 32 year old woman working for the CIA?

;-)

Valdis

On Jul 3, 2008, at 1:53 PM, Steve Ardire wrote:

Did you know that the #1 contributor to Intellipedia is a 69 year old guy ;)


Re: Generations #generations

Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

It all depends on the task, Bill. Not all tasks are equal, some should be multi-tasked, others should not.

It also depends on the person, people have different work styles and strengths.

A smart manager knows when to assign the right person to the right work.

I can do both, multi-task and focus, I hope I pick the right times/ situations to apply them!

Valdis

On Jul 3, 2008, at 3:41 AM, Bill Linn wrote:

Here is another idea from Dr. Edward M. Hallowell, M.D. in his book
Crazy Busy he has a chapter on the Myth and Reality of Multitasking.
In it he says on page 19 that, "It is fine to believe that
multitasking is a skill necessary in the modern world, but to believe
it is an equivalent substitute for single-minded focus on one task is
incorrect."

I would agree with what Dr. Hallowell says on this. I personally
perform better on a task when I am focused and devote my attention to
it. I think you might find Crazy Busy and interesting book. It is a
very affordable book, easy to read and I feel it is a great resource
for my personal productivity study.

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