Date   

Re: April 2022 SIKM Call: Patricia Eng - To ISO or not to ISO? #monthly-call #standards

Stan Garfield
 

Today we held our 200th monthly call. Thanks to Patricia for presenting, to those who spoke up and posted in the chat, and to all those who attended. Please continue the discussion here by replying to this thread. Here are the details of the call:
  • April 19, 2022 SIKM Call: Patricia Eng - To ISO or not to ISO? ISO 30401: Knowledge Management Systems From an Auditor’s Perspective
  • Slides
  • Recording
Group Chat
  • Stan: Nick Milton's talk: ISO 30401:2018 - The Management System Standard for KM and what it might do for you https://groups.io/g/SIKM/message/6687
  • Stan: Chris Collison's talk: Chefs’ Stories from the KM Cookbook https://groups.io/g/SIKM/message/7414
  • Brett Patron: I love the KM cookbook concept
  • Patrick Lambe: It is an excellent book, with great illustrative examples of meeting requirements
  • Tim Powell: This is excellent stuff! 30401 seems like a major leap forward for KM as a management discipline.
  • Marcie Zaharee: very interesting, thank you
  • Eve Porter-Zuckerman: I agree, very interesting information! Thank you!
  • Nate Sampson: Your comments on explaining what KM is and is not to your organization rings true to me as a relatively new corporate knowledge manager. Glad to hear those struggles are shared across organizations and maybe we're still on track to advance KM practices and standards.
  • Tim Powell: If there are few certified auditors, this seems like a major drawback.  Is there any systematic plan to address this?
  • Curtis Conley: Very informative - thank you so much!
  • Bart Verheijen: Thanks for your presentation and explanation Patricia!
  • Tim Powell: Thank you for the helpful presentation!
  • Brett Patron: Excellent presentation, thank you!
  • David Frank: Thanks Patricia for the interesting presentation. You really simplified it in a good way.
  • Patrick Lambe: Thanks Patricia!
  • Grazyna Wykowska: Thank you very much! Very interesting!


Re: Lessons Learned - Metadata #lessons-learned #metadata

Stan Garfield
 

Reply from Peter Reynolds in LinkedIn: Consider also ontologies and automation particularly for the provisioning of metadata and forming of connections to improve search/discovery and awareness of those lessons. Also consider Lessons Identified vs Learned, latter being all too often assumed rather than the reality!😝 Suggestion also to support “core” metadata (e.g. DCMI) and federate extensions to it as needed, owned by those relevant communities of practice/legal entities (e.g. confidentiality, integrity and availability labels)


April 2022 SIKM Call: Patricia Eng - To ISO or not to ISO? #monthly-call #standards

Stan Garfield
 

This is a reminder of tomorrow's monthly call from 11 am to 12 noon EDT. Note: The U.S. is now on Daylight Savings Time, so adjust accordingly in other countries.

  • April 19, 2022 SIKM Call: Patricia Eng - To ISO or not to ISO? ISO 30401: Knowledge Management Systems From an Auditor’s Perspective
  • Slides
  • For online chat, use the group chat in FreeConferenceCall.com.

SIKM Leaders Community Monthly Call

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Re: Lessons Learned - Building skills to recognize and describe them #lessons-learned

Endro Catur
 

Stephen,

These are a list of reflective questions that would be useful in collective settings such as teams and organizations. I have used some questions that were similar to those in this list when discussing post-knowledge mapping, especially when the mapping purpose is unfortunately limited to knowledge sharing.

My understanding is, that to create value, knowledge sharing is a SUPPLY that needs someone and some process to DEMAND it. Having this economical mindset, it may be limiting in itself but, helps people to share and seek what matters, esp. in the business context.
 
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On Mon, Apr 18, 2022 at 11:38 AM Stephen Bounds <km@...> wrote:

Hi Eve,

Ordinarily I hate the "C" word (culture) because it is so often misused, but I think it has relevance here.

There is a natural tension between hoarding knowledge for individual success, and sharing knowledge to maximise success of the group. Overcoming this requires a group acceptance that individual and joint success are linked. In addition, the specific acts of knowledge sharing have to be actually evaluated by individuals and groups as successful.

What you are seeking is a positive reinforcement cycle that draws a direct link between knowledge sharing and valuable outcomes.

I know this all sounds self-evident but you would be amazed how many times people aim to establish knowledge sharing and then say "job done". The problem is when you stop your thinking here, you're creating a cycle that is only sustained through continuous injections of incentives. What you are seeking is a system of activities that people intrinsically find valuable.

Back to culture! Culture is about how people discuss and adapt their approach to:

  • principles - consensus on value (how)
  • objectives - consensus on outcomes (why)
  • norms - consensus on behaviours (what)

Importantly, not discussing how these consensus positions are reached is is itself a form of organisational culture. One important step you can take is to start explicitly evaluating these often unstated assumptions:

  • Do you value when other people share their own experiences and knowledge? Why? How? Could it be improved? When does it come in handy? Why? Do others feel the same way? Do people ever share too often or too much? Are there people who tend not to share? Do you know why they don't share? If they should share more, how could this be supported?
  • When is the right time to share? Are there wrong times to share? Is it good to record things even if no immediate reuse is apparent? Are there kind of things to capture which are more likely to be reusable than others?
  • When have lessons learned and knowledge sharing been useful to you? What changed about your situation? Why? What would have happened if you didn't hear it from them? Did they benefit from sharing? Were you grateful? Should sharing be a thing we also "just do" intrinsically as a member of the organisation, or are extrinsic (tangible) rewards appropriate? Would people who intrinsically like to share resent extrinsic rewards being given to others, even if that was the only thing that would trigger them to share?
  • What are the individual benefits of sharing? Does everyone agree? Would it be a net positive or negative to your work if you were expected to share? Would you consider leaving if your performance was evaluated on how much you shared? Would other people you know of join or leave an organisation where sharing was a basic expectation of being an employee?
  • Would people feel more enthusiastic about sharing if it could be shown that an important metric improved? Are there key challenges your organisation is currently facing? Is there a measurable metric that represents this challenge?
  • What behaviours are expected of people who work for your organisation? What behaviours are actively disapproved of or discouraged? Are these expectations implicit or explicit? If implicit, do people feel these behavioural expectation should be stated explicitly? Do you have cultural leaders (not necessarily the formal leaders) who are influential in behaviours?
  • Do you trust your leaders? Your peers? The overall functioning of your organisation? Could your organisation be heavily impacted by external factors beyond your control (eg funding cuts) and would your organisation handle major impacts well or with difficulty?
  • Do you work outside of their normal professional responsibilities as needed to support overall outcomes? Or is "your job", your job? What happens when people either offer or are asked to go outside their ordinary responsibilities?
  • Could you ever see a situation where sharing knowledge might disadvantage you personally? Why / why not?
  • Have you ever started or stopped a behaviour because of an individual consequence you faced, or may have faced? Have you ever stopped a behaviour, even if it was encouraged, because it either had an organisational outcome you disapproved of, or failed to have a measurable impact? Why?
  • Are people rewarded for taking risks, and/or punished for failure? Does it matter who was at fault when things go wrong? How do you personally feel about taking risks in your work?
  • Do you think everyone has the skills to share effectively? Why / why not? How does this change your expectations around lessons learned and knowledge sharing? Would you be comfortable making knowledge sharing a highly encouraged norm, even if led to people who preferred not to share to leave? Why / why not?

Understanding the answers to these questions will help you to craft more effective knowledge-building practices, both tactically and strategically.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 14/04/2022 6:01 am, Eve Porter-Zuckerman wrote:

Hello everyone,

 

Inspired by TJ Hsu’s question about metadata and lessons learned, I’m looking for prompts, questions, pictures, and other guidance to help people recognize lessons learned and describe them in a way that others might benefit. 

 

I’m working with a growing organization that’s gradually, intentionally, distributing responsibility and moving to a learning culture as it transitions from founder-led. The appetite is there. The leadership is behind it and happy to model behavior and do what they can to encourage and celebrate. Members of the organization come from different cultures, educational backgrounds, and levels of professional experience. They are very hands-on. I’m helping them weave learning and sharing into their work, focusing on active learning and collaboration. 

 

I’d appreciate your thoughts on how to help people build skills to see and share lessons learned. We’re starting with (existing) meetings, and thinking about how to transition them from information exchanges to knowledge-building opportunities. Currently, at one of these meetings, someone sharing a great report might simply read out its title, and stop there. They won’t know how to highlight its value.

 

I have had a wonderful, productive time sifting through the trove of advice and thoughtful references here in the SIKM group, reading through and gathering excellent ideas from threads on #lessons-learned, #knowledge-sharing, #learning and other topics. I'm keeping my eye on the other thread with great interest and appreciation, too.

 

Thank you for what has been shared, and I look forward to your thoughts.

 

Eve

Eve Porter-Zuckerman
eporterzuckerman@...


Re: Lessons Learned - Building skills to recognize and describe them #lessons-learned

Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Eve,

Ordinarily I hate the "C" word (culture) because it is so often misused, but I think it has relevance here.

There is a natural tension between hoarding knowledge for individual success, and sharing knowledge to maximise success of the group. Overcoming this requires a group acceptance that individual and joint success are linked. In addition, the specific acts of knowledge sharing have to be actually evaluated by individuals and groups as successful.

What you are seeking is a positive reinforcement cycle that draws a direct link between knowledge sharing and valuable outcomes.

I know this all sounds self-evident but you would be amazed how many times people aim to establish knowledge sharing and then say "job done". The problem is when you stop your thinking here, you're creating a cycle that is only sustained through continuous injections of incentives. What you are seeking is a system of activities that people intrinsically find valuable.

Back to culture! Culture is about how people discuss and adapt their approach to:

  • principles - consensus on value (how)
  • objectives - consensus on outcomes (why)
  • norms - consensus on behaviours (what)

Importantly, not discussing how these consensus positions are reached is is itself a form of organisational culture. One important step you can take is to start explicitly evaluating these often unstated assumptions:

  • Do you value when other people share their own experiences and knowledge? Why? How? Could it be improved? When does it come in handy? Why? Do others feel the same way? Do people ever share too often or too much? Are there people who tend not to share? Do you know why they don't share? If they should share more, how could this be supported?
  • When is the right time to share? Are there wrong times to share? Is it good to record things even if no immediate reuse is apparent? Are there kind of things to capture which are more likely to be reusable than others?
  • When have lessons learned and knowledge sharing been useful to you? What changed about your situation? Why? What would have happened if you didn't hear it from them? Did they benefit from sharing? Were you grateful? Should sharing be a thing we also "just do" intrinsically as a member of the organisation, or are extrinsic (tangible) rewards appropriate? Would people who intrinsically like to share resent extrinsic rewards being given to others, even if that was the only thing that would trigger them to share?
  • What are the individual benefits of sharing? Does everyone agree? Would it be a net positive or negative to your work if you were expected to share? Would you consider leaving if your performance was evaluated on how much you shared? Would other people you know of join or leave an organisation where sharing was a basic expectation of being an employee?
  • Would people feel more enthusiastic about sharing if it could be shown that an important metric improved? Are there key challenges your organisation is currently facing? Is there a measurable metric that represents this challenge?
  • What behaviours are expected of people who work for your organisation? What behaviours are actively disapproved of or discouraged? Are these expectations implicit or explicit? If implicit, do people feel these behavioural expectation should be stated explicitly? Do you have cultural leaders (not necessarily the formal leaders) who are influential in behaviours?
  • Do you trust your leaders? Your peers? The overall functioning of your organisation? Could your organisation be heavily impacted by external factors beyond your control (eg funding cuts) and would your organisation handle major impacts well or with difficulty?
  • Do you work outside of their normal professional responsibilities as needed to support overall outcomes? Or is "your job", your job? What happens when people either offer or are asked to go outside their ordinary responsibilities?
  • Could you ever see a situation where sharing knowledge might disadvantage you personally? Why / why not?
  • Have you ever started or stopped a behaviour because of an individual consequence you faced, or may have faced? Have you ever stopped a behaviour, even if it was encouraged, because it either had an organisational outcome you disapproved of, or failed to have a measurable impact? Why?
  • Are people rewarded for taking risks, and/or punished for failure? Does it matter who was at fault when things go wrong? How do you personally feel about taking risks in your work?
  • Do you think everyone has the skills to share effectively? Why / why not? How does this change your expectations around lessons learned and knowledge sharing? Would you be comfortable making knowledge sharing a highly encouraged norm, even if led to people who preferred not to share to leave? Why / why not?

Understanding the answers to these questions will help you to craft more effective knowledge-building practices, both tactically and strategically.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 14/04/2022 6:01 am, Eve Porter-Zuckerman wrote:

Hello everyone,

 

Inspired by TJ Hsu’s question about metadata and lessons learned, I’m looking for prompts, questions, pictures, and other guidance to help people recognize lessons learned and describe them in a way that others might benefit. 

 

I’m working with a growing organization that’s gradually, intentionally, distributing responsibility and moving to a learning culture as it transitions from founder-led. The appetite is there. The leadership is behind it and happy to model behavior and do what they can to encourage and celebrate. Members of the organization come from different cultures, educational backgrounds, and levels of professional experience. They are very hands-on. I’m helping them weave learning and sharing into their work, focusing on active learning and collaboration. 

 

I’d appreciate your thoughts on how to help people build skills to see and share lessons learned. We’re starting with (existing) meetings, and thinking about how to transition them from information exchanges to knowledge-building opportunities. Currently, at one of these meetings, someone sharing a great report might simply read out its title, and stop there. They won’t know how to highlight its value.

 

I have had a wonderful, productive time sifting through the trove of advice and thoughtful references here in the SIKM group, reading through and gathering excellent ideas from threads on #lessons-learned, #knowledge-sharing, #learning and other topics. I'm keeping my eye on the other thread with great interest and appreciation, too.

 

Thank you for what has been shared, and I look forward to your thoughts.

 

Eve

Eve Porter-Zuckerman
eporterzuckerman@...


Understanding the NFT Community'​ dynamics: Insights from 30 days of immersion. #CoP

 

Hi, 

i'm sharing my insights and analysis of the NFT community' dynamics and configuration following 30 days of immersion.

I'm interested to get your thoughts and/ or comments :) 

Link to article

Thank you
Rachad 


Re: Lessons Learned - Metadata #lessons-learned #metadata

Stan Garfield
 

Reply from Ian Fry in LinkedIn: Agree with most of the comments in the SIKM group. One important thing; always select "All that apply" - note the recommendation that 3 is a realistic maximum. There are facets which will apply, but never be the main facet.


Re: Flipping the Script on Content Retention #content-management

Robert M. Taylor
 

It's a nice point. Everyone sees that nobody feels any need to hold back creating documents and copies, nor any need to delete anything. So raw content is produced and held in mass and grows phenomenally. It creates a very hard job around reducing it.
What I have very frequently heard is:
"Data is free or nearly free so it doesn't matter how many copies of fundamentally rubbish I keep" (wrong and wrong - data costs a lot once you look at all the processes and people around it)
"It does no harm to keep everything" (wrong everything you keep makes it harder to find what you need and contains latent risk)
"We might need it one day" (or you might not - and you'll probably never find it anyway)

I spent 5 years trying to get a major UK business to accept automated deletion. It was all agreed - probably after three years - but still not yet implemented when I left. Fundamentally, everyone prefers to accept the everyday real life issue (actual issue not risk, mark you) of degraded performance over the small potential risk associated with having deleted something. Well, we know that human psychology makes wrong risk judgements and this is one clear case.

It's actually very difficult to really delete anything beyond recovery anyway....


Lessons Learned - Building skills to recognize and describe them #lessons-learned

Eve Porter-Zuckerman
 

Hello everyone,

 

Inspired by TJ Hsu’s question about metadata and lessons learned, I’m looking for prompts, questions, pictures, and other guidance to help people recognize lessons learned and describe them in a way that others might benefit. 

 

I’m working with a growing organization that’s gradually, intentionally, distributing responsibility and moving to a learning culture as it transitions from founder-led. The appetite is there. The leadership is behind it and happy to model behavior and do what they can to encourage and celebrate. Members of the organization come from different cultures, educational backgrounds, and levels of professional experience. They are very hands-on. I’m helping them weave learning and sharing into their work, focusing on active learning and collaboration. 

 

I’d appreciate your thoughts on how to help people build skills to see and share lessons learned. We’re starting with (existing) meetings, and thinking about how to transition them from information exchanges to knowledge-building opportunities. Currently, at one of these meetings, someone sharing a great report might simply read out its title, and stop there. They won’t know how to highlight its value.

 

I have had a wonderful, productive time sifting through the trove of advice and thoughtful references here in the SIKM group, reading through and gathering excellent ideas from threads on #lessons-learned, #knowledge-sharing, #learning and other topics. I'm keeping my eye on the other thread with great interest and appreciation, too.

 

Thank you for what has been shared, and I look forward to your thoughts.

 

Eve

Eve Porter-Zuckerman
eporterzuckerman@...


Re: Lessons Learned - Metadata #lessons-learned #metadata

Robert M. Taylor
 

Love this topic and love the replies.
But my take is don't let the lessons sit still long enough to be tagged!
Embed them so they are actioned - that's the learning.
I can think of no case of anyone ever thinking "oh, let's go search the lessons learned"
No, we just expect the most current, up-to-date services, content, processes, products, quality, assistance - and we only get that by continuously embedding the lessons.
That improvement is the learning.
But I loved reading all of this!


International Joint Conference Radio 2022 #conferences

Ricardo Augusto da Silva Alfenas
 

Dear colleagues,

I disclose an international event that will be held here in Brazil and there is a thematic area in Knowledge Management in the Nuclear field. Article submissions are open.



Best regards,

Ricardo Alfenas
LAPOC/CNEN, Brazil.


Re: Lessons Learned - Metadata #lessons-learned #metadata

Simon Denton
 

We have data from tagging exercises that reinforces the comments as well.

#1 We find 'doing the minimum' is the norm. If only one tag is required but you offer the ability to apply multiple, then one tag is what you'll get. Don't expect more than 3 fields to be completed...

#2 'virtual Darwinism' applies to tags - you'll find a small number will be popular and usually the ones at the start of pick lists are the ones that are used. Tags have to resonate with the actual language being used by staff. For example, we asked 60 KM Managers to define 10 tags for their area of industry. The objective was to get no more than 600 tags that matched the key themes, terms etc. in that industry vertical. Apart from the fact we received over 1000 tags in response and had to deduplicate etc., we found that in practice many of the tags they thought would be common were not as common as they thought... We've been able to use Microsoft Viva Topics to prove that point. 

#3 Use automation to apply organisational tags e.g. project number, division etc. You just want people to provide the unique human classification that rules or automation cannot provide


Re: Lessons Learned - Metadata #lessons-learned #metadata

TJ Hsu
 

Thank you so much for your responses. Great insights!

Stephen - while generic, your points are definitely good to keep in mind. Keep it simple, knowing that every additional field comes with a cost (to the user, the solution, etc). Ensure there is a management process to look at the lessons captured. Think about common taxonomy.

Rachad - thanks for these examples, which make a lot of sense - and your note on aligning language.

Nick - agree, we are planning to conduct some design thinking workshops to understand this from the end user's perspectives.


Re: Calling all Chief Knowledge Officers & KM Leaders in technology & other sectors #call-for

Stan Garfield
 


Re: Flipping the Script on Content Retention #content-management

Stan Garfield
 

Reply from Ian Fry in LinkedIn: If so, ARCHIVE not DELETE. I have painful examples where cases become rarer, content gets deleted; and then it happens again!


Calling all Chief Knowledge Officers & KM Leaders in technology & other sectors #call-for

 

Hello SIKM leaders!

I will be conducting a series of informational interviews with KM leaders/CKOs across industries, but specifically in the technology sector (if CKOs exist here), to listen and understand what a real-world career path looks like and what's unique about it in this setting. If you have this background or know someone who does, please reach out. I'm looking forward to talking with you!

Much appreciated!

Rosanna Stephens
Manager for Insight & Discovery Experiences @ Adobe


Re: Lessons Learned - Metadata #lessons-learned #metadata

Nick Milton
 

A couple of things to consider TJ –

 

Firstly, speak to your users to understand the sorts of terms they would be searching or browsing for, and make sure the metadata fits their search patterns and needs.

Secondly, the ultimate destination for a lesson is to become embedded within updated processes and procedures, or product design components. Therefore the metadata applied to the lessons must match your existing process/procedure taxonomy and/or product and component taxonomy.  

 

Nick Milton

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of TJ Hsu
Sent: 08 April 2022 21:28
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] Lessons Learned - Metadata

 

Hi everyone,
Looking for anyone who might be able to share examples or insights for metadata (tagging / classification) for Lessons Learned - to make it easy to find/browse/filter for them. Examples specific to project delivery in pharma would be great.

Thank you,
TJ


Re: Lessons Learned - Metadata #lessons-learned #metadata

 

Hi TJ, 

LL metadata for classification can best be defined when:

1- They reproduce the context in which the LL has happened, and describe the situation conditions. For example: project type, customer region, risk severity…

2- They act as search criteria and filters for later findability. For example, product type, assembly part, function, process…

3- They refer to expertise and areas of knowledge within their communities. For example: LL validator, engineering expert, quality owner, related competency …

If the LL platform & process are cross-functional and covering the different business disciplines, every team will try to describe the LL using their own vocabularies. You might consider maintaining the cohesiveness of the metadata set and moderating their number. 

Thank you 
Rachad


Re: Lessons Learned - Metadata #lessons-learned #metadata

Stephen Bounds
 

Hi TJ,

You've asked a pretty generic question, so my insights are also necessarily pretty generic:

  1. You are likely to need less classification than you think.

  2. If you increase your costs of capture, make sure you can clearly describe the increased value you will get during later discovery and reuse.

  3. Metadata works best when it reflects and reinforces a common language already in use. If you don't have a common language, spend some effort establishing it in your relevant community first.

  4. Don't discount the effort required to manage your lessons already captured. Continuing to refer people to bad information is the quickest way for people to stop using a system.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 9/04/2022 6:27 am, TJ Hsu wrote:

Hi everyone,
Looking for anyone who might be able to share examples or insights for metadata (tagging / classification) for Lessons Learned - to make it easy to find/browse/filter for them. Examples specific to project delivery in pharma would be great.

Thank you,
TJ


Lessons Learned - Metadata #lessons-learned #metadata

TJ Hsu
 

Hi everyone,
Looking for anyone who might be able to share examples or insights for metadata (tagging / classification) for Lessons Learned - to make it easy to find/browse/filter for them. Examples specific to project delivery in pharma would be great.

Thank you,
TJ

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