Date   

Re: What would you do as Knowledge Manager in your first 90 days? A case study #assessment #books #question #strategy #case-studies

Ginetta Gueli
 

Dear SIKM Leaders,
I am impressed of how many advices, food for thoughts and support I got from you. I read all of them with lot of interest & curiosity and definitively they will help me during my next KM journey.

Thank you very much folks and of couse keep you posted!
All the best and ad maiora,
Ginetta
--
Ginetta Gueli
Information & Knowledge Manager | Project Manager


Re: CoPs vs Enterprise-wide Repository #CoP #knowledge-capture #knowledge-sharing #lessons-learned

Stan Garfield
 

Sandra, thanks for your initial post and subsequent responses.  You have already received some excellent advice.

>Community of Practice (for each group in an organization) vs. Enterprise-wide repository (or maybe both or neither).

My view is that communities and repositories are both useful and often complement each other.  I recommend collecting content and connecting people.

From 5 Modes of Knowledge Flow:

There is value in capturing some information in easily-retrievable repositories. For example, before beginning a new project, it is useful to ask the question "has anyone ever done anything like this before?" If information on all prior projects has been collected in a searchable repository, then this question can be answered. Not all of the documents created by previous projects may have been captured, but if the names of the project team members are available, then it is possible to contact them to find out more and to request any relevant documents. This is an example of how collection and connection can work together to deliver important knowledge at the time of need.

Another example of how collection and connection complement one another is asking a community for help. In responding to a request from one community member, another member can point to a previously-stored document which meets the needs of the first member.


Re: CoPs vs Enterprise-wide Repository #CoP #knowledge-capture #knowledge-sharing #lessons-learned

Sandra Willis
 

Hi Douglas,

 

Agree on the critical K part for Knowledge Transfer for core and deep expertise in the business when one retires requires its own lane.

 

I just finished a Knowledge Book (Kadrant) to capture the 20-30 year announced retirement from not only an internal expert, but a world expert in the industry for process technology.

 

It’s a bit more of a challenge for other ‘expert’ K that one can’t spend the same level of resources to capture in a book on a topic.

 

Best,

Sandra

 

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Douglas Weidner via groups.io
Sent: Friday, September 2, 2022 2:10 PM
To: main@sikm.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] CoPs vs Enterprise-wide Repository #CoP #lessons-learned #knowledge-capture

 

WARNING: Email originated outside of PepsiCo.

Hi Sandra,

 

I fundamentally agree with Nick's tacit/explicit and static/mature vs evolving scenario as a guideline..

 

However, I think the situation can be decomposed even further, especially for CRITICAL K.

 

Some critical K may be mature, some not, but it is often in the heads of very experienced senior folks who may soon retire.  

I don't mean next week, but someday soon.

 

There are some K Transfer & Retention (KT&R) techniques that have evolved, which are much improved over exit interviews, mentoring, or CoPs.

 

CoPs are great if properly implemented, but they are not typically optimum for narrowly focused, intensive K, especially critical K that may soon 'retire',  Also, high turnover can be analogous.v-v loss of critical K.

 

Finally, a new generation of mobile technology/Applications also exceeds the more traditional K Transfer approaches.

Such apps could be used in a CoP, but for maximum benefit, there are proven approaches, much more than a traditional FAQ.

 

Douglas Weidner

Chief CKM Instructor, KM Institute 

Editor-in-Chief, KMI Press

 

On Fri, Sep 2, 2022 at 9:31 AM Nick Milton <nick.milton@...> wrote:

It depends on 2 things Sandra -  the size of the practitioner base and the rate of change of the knowledge.

 

Knowledge that is fully mature (so is not constantly changing) but has a large practitioner base is best written down. Multiple requests to a CoP for this type of knowledge tend to lead to the development of an FAQ, or exhortation to “read the manual”.

 

Knowledge that is still evolving is best left with the community of practice, as by the time it is documented for a wide audience, it is out of date. If the community of practice is large, they may want to keep an evolving wiki, or a blog for discussion. If its small, then maybe the cost of documenting exceeds the value, and a small group of practitioners can keep the knowledge live through discussion and review.

 

 

Nick Milton
Knoco Ltd
www.knoco.com

www.facebook.com/knoco.ltd

www.linkedin.com/company/knoco-ltd
mobile +44 (0)7803 592947

email nick.milton@...

blog  www.nickmilton.com

twitter @nickknoco

Author of the recent book - "The Knowledge Manager’s Handbook"

"Ambition without knowledge is like a boat on dry land." 
--Mark Lee

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sandra Willis
Sent: 30 August 2022 23:34
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] CoPs vs Enterprise-wide Repository #CoP #lessons-learned #knowledge-capture

 

Hello all,

I was wondering about other opinions on the approach to knowledge capture for sharing purposes (technical, R&D, manufacturing, consumer goods project/product lessons learned) in terms of ease of access for the user.

Community of Practice (for each group in an organization) VS Enterprise-wide repository (or maybe both or neither).

Much of my recent reading appears to indicate for maybe scientific, technical or related types of content it may be best set up as CoPS (or focus libraries/repositories) instead of feeding all final lessons learned, project summaries, etc into one location and then trying to tag everything extensively to ensure accurate and relevant search results.  Or am I reading the wrong materials, books, websites (ha, ha).

I bought The Smart Mission so I will see what that covers as a technical information organization (NASA) about that approach to creating maybe segregated content (via wiki, knowledge portal, COP) vs single library/repository.

Thanks so much,
Sandra 


Re: CoPs vs Enterprise-wide Repository #CoP #knowledge-capture #knowledge-sharing #lessons-learned

Sandra Willis
 

Thank you Nick as I really appreciate what appears to be a subtle difference on content type/practice areas (mature steady vs evolving), but its transformative actually when you use it as a decision criteria.

 

I also just bought your Knowledge Manager’s Handbook. I am only on Chapter One and then skipped to the Use Cases as the Mars and NASA one’s were every relevant for me. Look forward to reading the rest.

 

Thanks!

Sandra

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nick Milton via groups.io
Sent: Friday, September 2, 2022 9:31 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] CoPs vs Enterprise-wide Repository #CoP #lessons-learned #knowledge-capture

 

WARNING: Email originated outside of PepsiCo.

It depends on 2 things Sandra -  the size of the practitioner base and the rate of change of the knowledge.

 

Knowledge that is fully mature (so is not constantly changing) but has a large practitioner base is best written down. Multiple requests to a CoP for this type of knowledge tend to lead to the development of an FAQ, or exhortation to “read the manual”.

 

Knowledge that is still evolving is best left with the community of practice, as by the time it is documented for a wide audience, it is out of date. If the community of practice is large, they may want to keep an evolving wiki, or a blog for discussion. If its small, then maybe the cost of documenting exceeds the value, and a small group of practitioners can keep the knowledge live through discussion and review.

 

 

Nick Milton
Knoco Ltd
www.knoco.com

www.facebook.com/knoco.ltd

www.linkedin.com/company/knoco-ltd
mobile +44 (0)7803 592947

email nick.milton@...

blog  www.nickmilton.com

twitter @nickknoco

Author of the recent book - "The Knowledge Manager’s Handbook"

"Ambition without knowledge is like a boat on dry land." 
--Mark Lee

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sandra Willis
Sent: 30 August 2022 23:34
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] CoPs vs Enterprise-wide Repository #CoP #lessons-learned #knowledge-capture

 

Hello all,

I was wondering about other opinions on the approach to knowledge capture for sharing purposes (technical, R&D, manufacturing, consumer goods project/product lessons learned) in terms of ease of access for the user.

Community of Practice (for each group in an organization) VS Enterprise-wide repository (or maybe both or neither).

Much of my recent reading appears to indicate for maybe scientific, technical or related types of content it may be best set up as CoPS (or focus libraries/repositories) instead of feeding all final lessons learned, project summaries, etc into one location and then trying to tag everything extensively to ensure accurate and relevant search results.  Or am I reading the wrong materials, books, websites (ha, ha).

I bought The Smart Mission so I will see what that covers as a technical information organization (NASA) about that approach to creating maybe segregated content (via wiki, knowledge portal, COP) vs single library/repository.

Thanks so much,
Sandra 


Re: CoPs vs Enterprise-wide Repository #CoP #knowledge-capture #knowledge-sharing #lessons-learned

Tim Powell
 

Dear Sandra,

 

TLDR:  I’d urge you to think of codification and personalization as a continuum, rather than as an either-or dichotomy.  Seek to develop a hybrid approach that captures and integrates the best of both approaches.

 

Codification “versus” personalization is one of the oldest debates in modern knowledge strategy.  It goes back at least to 1999, when Morten Hansen and others published their HBR article “What’s Your Strategy for Managing Knowledge?”  The answer is, as you might expect, “it depends” — on the organization’s overall competitive strategy, its customer value and economic models, and how its people deliver that value.  I would add, as Nick mentioned, the rate and nature of change in any of those variables.

 

Neither approach alone is nearly as useful or durable as a hybrid or blended approach, in my experience.  We may find useful precedents in other knowledge-based fields — for example, in the legal system here in the USA (and probably elsewhere.)  The law (a massive body of knowledge) consists of two major parts — STATUTES, which are codified at the federal, regional (state), and local levels, as well as through agency regulations — and CASE LAW, comprising decisions from judges at three main tiers of courts at each of those jurisdictional levels.  Codified law is relatively static, though of course subject to change by legislatures.  Case law is relatively dynamic, with new cases being decided continually — each of which becomes part of “the law” going forward.

 

I’m not a lawyer, so someone who is may chime in with corrections to what I’ve said.  But I do admire the law as a robust system of applied knowledge.  Of course, the legal system isn’t perfect — but it has lasted for centuries and works pretty well much of the time for most people.

 

How does this approach apply to knowledge work as we more often define it?  One example I work with turns this hybrid approach on its head, and leads with personalization (rather than with codification, as the legal system does.)  In addition to my “day job” as a consultant, I run a small enterprise (a media studio) in which there is a continual need for information about new products, technologies, and work methods. The several “bulletin boards” I consult on a daily basis consist of threaded discussions, many of which are useful and informed.  (The groups have human moderators to edit, or even delete, those that are not.) 

 

All comments are personalized (by name or pseudonym) and time-stamped.  Frequent visitors quickly learn whose information is reliable, its timeliness and context, and on what it was based.  When something is especially relevant or interesting, one can make “direct message” contact with the human source of the information to gain further depth.

 

When any discussion thread gets long and complex enough, some kind person (these are all run by volunteers) periodically takes on the job of compiling an FAQ or BKM (Best Known Methods) document.  This contains nuggets from the thread, validated where possible, and organized into user/problem-oriented categories.  If the BKM is especially valuable to other community members, and the discussion and/or topic is dynamic, the document may be issued in dated revisions that supplant the old ones.  When I’m making key decisions on workflow and capital outlays, this is like a living encyclopedia.

 

One other thing to remember is, with either strategy, it’s most useful to think of the “cognitive perimeter” of the organization as being potentially much broader than the organization itself.  Personalization, for example, may extend beyond current personnel to include both external experts and former internal experts (i.e, the organization’s alumni.)

 

Fascinating topic, thanks Sandra for your question, and I hope this at least gives you some ideas.  FYI I’m leading a workshop on the related topic “Knowledge Dynamics:  Strategies to Prevent Enterprise Knowledge From Turning Zombie” on Monday afternoon at KM World in November.

 

Kind regards,

 

Tim

 

TIM WOOD POWELL | President, The Knowledge Agency® | Author, The Value of Knowledge |

New York City, USA  |  TEL +1.212.243.1200 | 

SITE KnowledgeAgency.com | BLOG TimWoodPowell.com |

 

 

From: <main@SIKM.groups.io> on behalf of Sandra Willis <Sandra.Willis@...>
Reply-To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, August 30, 2022 at 6:34 PM
To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Subject: [SIKM] CoPs vs Enterprise-wide Repository #CoP #lessons-learned #knowledge-capture

 

Hello all,

I was wondering about other opinions on the approach to knowledge capture for sharing purposes (technical, R&D, manufacturing, consumer goods project/product lessons learned) in terms of ease of access for the user.

Community of Practice (for each group in an organization) VS Enterprise-wide repository (or maybe both or neither).

Much of my recent reading appears to indicate for maybe scientific, technical or related types of content it may be best set up as CoPS (or focus libraries/repositories) instead of feeding all final lessons learned, project summaries, etc into one location and then trying to tag everything extensively to ensure accurate and relevant search results.  Or am I reading the wrong materials, books, websites (ha, ha).

I bought The Smart Mission so I will see what that covers as a technical information organization (NASA) about that approach to creating maybe segregated content (via wiki, knowledge portal, COP) vs single library/repository.

Thanks so much,
Sandra 


Re: CoPs vs Enterprise-wide Repository #CoP #knowledge-capture #knowledge-sharing #lessons-learned

Douglas Weidner
 

Hi Sandra,

I fundamentally agree with Nick's tacit/explicit and static/mature vs evolving scenario as a guideline..

However, I think the situation can be decomposed even further, especially for CRITICAL K.

Some critical K may be mature, some not, but it is often in the heads of very experienced senior folks who may soon retire.  
I don't mean next week, but someday soon.

There are some K Transfer & Retention (KT&R) techniques that have evolved, which are much improved over exit interviews, mentoring, or CoPs.

CoPs are great if properly implemented, but they are not typically optimum for narrowly focused, intensive K, especially critical K that may soon 'retire',  Also, high turnover can be analogous.v-v loss of critical K.

Finally, a new generation of mobile technology/Applications also exceeds the more traditional K Transfer approaches.
Such apps could be used in a CoP, but for maximum benefit, there are proven approaches, much more than a traditional FAQ.

Douglas Weidner
Chief CKM Instructor, KM Institute 
Editor-in-Chief, KMI Press

On Fri, Sep 2, 2022 at 9:31 AM Nick Milton <nick.milton@...> wrote:

It depends on 2 things Sandra -  the size of the practitioner base and the rate of change of the knowledge.

 

Knowledge that is fully mature (so is not constantly changing) but has a large practitioner base is best written down. Multiple requests to a CoP for this type of knowledge tend to lead to the development of an FAQ, or exhortation to “read the manual”.

 

Knowledge that is still evolving is best left with the community of practice, as by the time it is documented for a wide audience, it is out of date. If the community of practice is large, they may want to keep an evolving wiki, or a blog for discussion. If its small, then maybe the cost of documenting exceeds the value, and a small group of practitioners can keep the knowledge live through discussion and review.

 

 

Nick Milton
Knoco Ltd
www.knoco.com

www.facebook.com/knoco.ltd

www.linkedin.com/company/knoco-ltd
mobile +44 (0)7803 592947

email nick.milton@...

blog  www.nickmilton.com

twitter @nickknoco

Author of the recent book - "The Knowledge Manager’s Handbook"

"Ambition without knowledge is like a boat on dry land." 
--Mark Lee

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sandra Willis
Sent: 30 August 2022 23:34
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] CoPs vs Enterprise-wide Repository #CoP #lessons-learned #knowledge-capture

 

Hello all,

I was wondering about other opinions on the approach to knowledge capture for sharing purposes (technical, R&D, manufacturing, consumer goods project/product lessons learned) in terms of ease of access for the user.

Community of Practice (for each group in an organization) VS Enterprise-wide repository (or maybe both or neither).

Much of my recent reading appears to indicate for maybe scientific, technical or related types of content it may be best set up as CoPS (or focus libraries/repositories) instead of feeding all final lessons learned, project summaries, etc into one location and then trying to tag everything extensively to ensure accurate and relevant search results.  Or am I reading the wrong materials, books, websites (ha, ha).

I bought The Smart Mission so I will see what that covers as a technical information organization (NASA) about that approach to creating maybe segregated content (via wiki, knowledge portal, COP) vs single library/repository.

Thanks so much,
Sandra 


Re: CoPs vs Enterprise-wide Repository #CoP #knowledge-capture #knowledge-sharing #lessons-learned

Nick Milton
 

It depends on 2 things Sandra -  the size of the practitioner base and the rate of change of the knowledge.

 

Knowledge that is fully mature (so is not constantly changing) but has a large practitioner base is best written down. Multiple requests to a CoP for this type of knowledge tend to lead to the development of an FAQ, or exhortation to “read the manual”.

 

Knowledge that is still evolving is best left with the community of practice, as by the time it is documented for a wide audience, it is out of date. If the community of practice is large, they may want to keep an evolving wiki, or a blog for discussion. If its small, then maybe the cost of documenting exceeds the value, and a small group of practitioners can keep the knowledge live through discussion and review.

 

 

Nick Milton
Knoco Ltd
www.knoco.com

www.facebook.com/knoco.ltd

www.linkedin.com/company/knoco-ltd
mobile +44 (0)7803 592947

email nick.milton@...

blog  www.nickmilton.com

twitter @nickknoco

Author of the recent book - "The Knowledge Manager’s Handbook"

"Ambition without knowledge is like a boat on dry land." 
--Mark Lee

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sandra Willis
Sent: 30 August 2022 23:34
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] CoPs vs Enterprise-wide Repository #CoP #lessons-learned #knowledge-capture

 

Hello all,

I was wondering about other opinions on the approach to knowledge capture for sharing purposes (technical, R&D, manufacturing, consumer goods project/product lessons learned) in terms of ease of access for the user.

Community of Practice (for each group in an organization) VS Enterprise-wide repository (or maybe both or neither).

Much of my recent reading appears to indicate for maybe scientific, technical or related types of content it may be best set up as CoPS (or focus libraries/repositories) instead of feeding all final lessons learned, project summaries, etc into one location and then trying to tag everything extensively to ensure accurate and relevant search results.  Or am I reading the wrong materials, books, websites (ha, ha).

I bought The Smart Mission so I will see what that covers as a technical information organization (NASA) about that approach to creating maybe segregated content (via wiki, knowledge portal, COP) vs single library/repository.

Thanks so much,
Sandra 


Re: Book Idea: A Day in the Life of a Knowledge Manager #books

Douglas Weidner
 

Hi Patrick, et al

Yes, some curation is highly recommended, so that the results can be cross-tabbed, more focused and instructional, hence beneficial.
 
The KMI Press intends to organize around a number of vectors, e.g., timeframes, specialty areas, etc..

For instance, in the earliest stages, first 90 Days and more, one must 'Create the Knowledge Imperative', by whatever label one prefers.
During that time, the organization must decide whether KM is just another discipline with a few KM-focused, IT systems (applications) or more aligned with the ISO definition of an effective management system for KM. In other words, whether effective KM requires a transformation, or not.

The difficulties will be that any case study will no doubt cover a number of specific actions.  Such activities will need to be labeled and cross-tabbed to gain maximum advantage of these ad hoc, anecdotal experiences.  Finally, the emerging body of evidence-based research needs to be cross-tabbed as well, to create an encyclopedia (a book or set of books giving information on many subjects or on many aspects of one subject) which could be called a methodology, or what we call the KM Body of Knowledge (KMBOK).

This will be a major effort, though certainly worthwhile.  It will be funded by KMI book revenues.

Cheers,
Douglas 
 ..

 

 

On Fri, Sep 2, 2022 at 12:35 AM Patrick Lambe <plambe@...> wrote:
Thanks Ari, Stan. I would regard the 30 September date as a soft deadline for those who want to schedule some time - ideally this will be a living, growing resource, and once there’s a good body of material perhaps we can do something interesting together like looking for themes around which we do more reflection.

P

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com


On 1 Sep 2022, at 9:52 PM, Ari Kramer via groups.io <akramer@...> wrote:

Hi Stan – Many thanks for the quick reply. I just uploaded the file, and will give some thought to a short chapter after the others start coming in. Again, really appreciate all the sharing that goes on here and the opportunity to contribute. It’s very helpful.
 
…….
 
Ari Kramer
Knowledge Management Officer
 
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Route 1 and College Road East  P.O. Box 2316
Princeton, NJ 08543-2316
Tel. 609-627-5969 
 
Please note: Based on the guidance of the CDC and public health agencies, all Robert Wood Johnson Foundation facilities are currently closed in response to COVID-19. All RWJF employees are working remotely, and all in-person meetings are postponed or canceled, or will be conducted virtually. Thank you for your patience.
 
For the most up-to-date information regarding COVID-19, please see resources on the CDC and NIH websites.
 
From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf OfStan Garfield via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, September 1, 2022 9:58 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Book Idea: A Day in the Life of a Knowledge Manager #books
 
Ari, thanks for your reply.  I appreciate your offer to share with this community.

You are welcome to submit your chapter whenever it is ready, even after September 30.  Keep in mind that it doesn't have to be very long or an epic.  A concise journal entry is fine.

Please share a copy of the case study you recently completed.  You can link to it or post it as an attachment.



Re: Book Idea: A Day in the Life of a Knowledge Manager #books

Patrick Lambe
 

Thanks Ari, Stan. I would regard the 30 September date as a soft deadline for those who want to schedule some time - ideally this will be a living, growing resource, and once there’s a good body of material perhaps we can do something interesting together like looking for themes around which we do more reflection.

P

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com


On 1 Sep 2022, at 9:52 PM, Ari Kramer via groups.io <akramer@...> wrote:

Hi Stan – Many thanks for the quick reply. I just uploaded the file, and will give some thought to a short chapter after the others start coming in. Again, really appreciate all the sharing that goes on here and the opportunity to contribute. It’s very helpful.
 
…….
 
Ari Kramer
Knowledge Management Officer
 
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Route 1 and College Road East  P.O. Box 2316
Princeton, NJ 08543-2316
Tel. 609-627-5969 
 
Please note: Based on the guidance of the CDC and public health agencies, all Robert Wood Johnson Foundation facilities are currently closed in response to COVID-19. All RWJF employees are working remotely, and all in-person meetings are postponed or canceled, or will be conducted virtually. Thank you for your patience.
 
For the most up-to-date information regarding COVID-19, please see resources on the CDC and NIH websites.
 
From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf OfStan Garfield via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, September 1, 2022 9:58 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Book Idea: A Day in the Life of a Knowledge Manager #books
 
Ari, thanks for your reply.  I appreciate your offer to share with this community.

You are welcome to submit your chapter whenever it is ready, even after September 30.  Keep in mind that it doesn't have to be very long or an epic.  A concise journal entry is fine.

Please share a copy of the case study you recently completed.  You can link to it or post it as an attachment.



Re: Book Idea: A Day in the Life of a Knowledge Manager #books

Ari Kramer
 
Edited

Hi Stan – Many thanks for the quick reply. I just uploaded the file, and will give some thought to a short chapter after the others start coming in. Again, really appreciate all the sharing that goes on here and the opportunity to contribute. It’s very helpful.

 

…….

 

Ari Kramer

Knowledge Management Officer

 

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Route 1 and College Road East  P.O. Box 2316

Princeton, NJ 08543-2316

Tel. 609-627-5969 

akramer@...

 

Please note: Based on the guidance of the CDC and public health agencies, all Robert Wood Johnson Foundation facilities are currently closed in response to COVID-19. All RWJF employees are working remotely, and all in-person meetings are postponed or canceled, or will be conducted virtually. Thank you for your patience.

 

For the most up-to-date information regarding COVID-19, please see resources on the CDC and NIH websites.

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Stan Garfield via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, September 1, 2022 9:58 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Book Idea: A Day in the Life of a Knowledge Manager #books

 

Ari, thanks for your reply.  I appreciate your offer to share with this community.

You are welcome to submit your chapter whenever it is ready, even after September 30.  Keep in mind that it doesn't have to be very long or an epic.  A concise journal entry is fine.

Please share a copy of the case study you recently completed.  You can link to it or post it as an attachment.

 


Knowledge Management at Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.pdf uploaded #case-studies

Group Notification <noreply@...>
 

The following files and folders have been uploaded to the Files area of the main@SIKM.groups.io group.

By: Ari Kramer <akramer@...>

Description:
APQC Case Study: Knowledge Management at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (2022)


Re: Book Idea: A Day in the Life of a Knowledge Manager #books

Douglas Weidner
 

Ari,

There have been a number of complementary discussions about Case Studies and book publishing.

I think the specific SIKM approach (Stan can correct if I'm wrong), was to collect such member cases submitted this month for online access to them by all members.

In addition, also mentioned - the KM Institute will be commencing the KMI Press by Jan 2023. It will include many approaches v-v Case Studies including at least these three and many non-case study themes:
  1. Peer-reviewed Case Studies derived from our new Master CKM Program just commencing, which will be one venue for creating and vetting certified practitioner experiences.
  2. Individually solicited Case Studies other than the MCKM Program, such as yours, to be compiled and published by the KMI Press .
  3. Other Specialty Topics by KM experts, typically those who want to teach that specialty in our Certified K Specialist Series.  However, teaching is not a requirement since some topics may not have enough demand for a viable workshop schedule.
You can contact me at:

On Thu, Sep 1, 2022 at 8:36 AM Ari Kramer via groups.io <akramer=rwjf.org@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Stan and other SIKM members - I just joined this community a few months ago and have really appreciated it. I would love to contribute to this new book, but unfortunately I don't think I would be able to do so by a 9/30 deadline. If I recall correctly , as part of this thread or another one not too long ago, there was also some dialogue around interest in seeing more KM case studies. I just completed one with APQC around our emerging function at my organization (the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation) which hits of a lot of major themes I've heard from others - e.g., the importance of key departmental relationships, leadership and cross-functional support, getting anchored in the most appropriate place. If it would be of interest, I'm happy to share a copy here and also to talk about our story within the community at some point. 


Re: Book Idea: A Day in the Life of a Knowledge Manager #books

Stan Garfield
 

Ari, thanks for your reply.  I appreciate your offer to share with this community.

You are welcome to submit your chapter whenever it is ready, even after September 30.  Keep in mind that it doesn't have to be very long or an epic.  A concise journal entry is fine.

Please share a copy of the case study you recently completed.  You can link to it or post it as an attachment.


Re: Book Idea: A Day in the Life of a Knowledge Manager #books

Ari Kramer
 

Hi Stan and other SIKM members - I just joined this community a few months ago and have really appreciated it. I would love to contribute to this new book, but unfortunately I don't think I would be able to do so by a 9/30 deadline. If I recall correctly , as part of this thread or another one not too long ago, there was also some dialogue around interest in seeing more KM case studies. I just completed one with APQC around our emerging function at my organization (the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation) which hits of a lot of major themes I've heard from others - e.g., the importance of key departmental relationships, leadership and cross-functional support, getting anchored in the most appropriate place. If it would be of interest, I'm happy to share a copy here and also to talk about our story within the community at some point. 


CoPs vs Enterprise-wide Repository #CoP #knowledge-capture #knowledge-sharing #lessons-learned

Sandra Willis
 

Hello all,

I was wondering about other opinions on the approach to knowledge capture for sharing purposes (technical, R&D, manufacturing, consumer goods project/product lessons learned) in terms of ease of access for the user.

Community of Practice (for each group in an organization) VS Enterprise-wide repository (or maybe both or neither).

Much of my recent reading appears to indicate for maybe scientific, technical or related types of content it may be best set up as CoPS (or focus libraries/repositories) instead of feeding all final lessons learned, project summaries, etc into one location and then trying to tag everything extensively to ensure accurate and relevant search results.  Or am I reading the wrong materials, books, websites (ha, ha).

I bought The Smart Mission so I will see what that covers as a technical information organization (NASA) about that approach to creating maybe segregated content (via wiki, knowledge portal, COP) vs single library/repository.

Thanks so much,
Sandra 


Re: Mind Mapping software? #tools

Joel Muzard
 
Edited

You may have a look at webideapro.net to see if that fit your needs

Joel mobile  
-----------------
Joel Muzard, Ph.D.
 www.a-i-a.com
 

Le 29 août 2022 à 09:53, Francois du Plessis <francoisdp@...> a écrit :

 

On 29 Aug 2022, 5:47:04 PM, Sean Fox via groups.io <sfoxca=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hello
 
Posting on behalf of a friend. If anyone has insights, I'd appreciate it!
 
"I'm scouring the web to find a 3D Mind Mapping tool and have found virtually nothing that looks useful. Essentially, I'm looking for something that goes beyond the X and Y axes of 2D and incorporates a Z axis as well. So the UX would allow me to rotate the map like a Rubik's Cube to view the info structure from multiple perspectives.
 
Also, it doesn't have to be a mind map-specific app--basically anything that would approximate what I'm looking for. I've used autocad for my inventions, so I don't understand why it's so difficult to find what I'm looking for."
Sean Fox 
 


Re: Enterprise/Federated Search #search

Yehuda Vansover
 

Thank you Stan!
I will check it :)

Yehuda Vansover

‫בתאריך יום א׳, 21 באוג׳ 2022 ב-17:06 מאת ‪Stan Garfield‬‏ <‪stangarfield@...‬‏>:‬

Yehuda, thanks for posting your query here.

See these previous threads:
Listen to the recordings of these previous monthly calls:
Check out these articles:
  • Andrew Gent implemented Searchable, an integrated search tool that emulated federated search at HP.
  • Lee Romero has written and presented frequently about enterprise search. See the section about him in Deloitte: Profiles in Knowledge.
  • My article on Enterprise Search includes links many resources that may be useful to you.


Re: Mind Mapping software? #tools

Francois du Plessis
 



On 29 Aug 2022, 5:47:04 PM, Sean Fox via groups.io <sfoxca=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hello

Posting on behalf of a friend. If anyone has insights, I'd appreciate it!

"I'm scouring the web to find a 3D Mind Mapping tool and have found virtually nothing that looks useful. Essentially, I'm looking for something that goes beyond the X and Y axes of 2D and incorporates a Z axis as well. So the UX would allow me to rotate the map like a Rubik's Cube to view the info structure from multiple perspectives.

Also, it doesn't have to be a mind map-specific app--basically anything that would approximate what I'm looking for. I've used autocad for my inventions, so I don't understand why it's so difficult to find what I'm looking for."

Sean Fox 


Re: Mind Mapping software? #tools

Francois du Plessis
 

Hallo Sean

You literally thinking outside the box here.  It is an amazing idea and I guess nobody has though about this before.

I think along the same lines.  I will have a look and respond if I find something.

Regards
Francois

On 29 Aug 2022, 5:47:04 PM, Sean Fox via groups.io <sfoxca=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hello

Posting on behalf of a friend. If anyone has insights, I'd appreciate it!

"I'm scouring the web to find a 3D Mind Mapping tool and have found virtually nothing that looks useful. Essentially, I'm looking for something that goes beyond the X and Y axes of 2D and incorporates a Z axis as well. So the UX would allow me to rotate the map like a Rubik's Cube to view the info structure from multiple perspectives.

Also, it doesn't have to be a mind map-specific app--basically anything that would approximate what I'm looking for. I've used autocad for my inventions, so I don't understand why it's so difficult to find what I'm looking for."

Sean Fox 


Mind Mapping software? #tools

Sean Fox
 

Hello

Posting on behalf of a friend. If anyone has insights, I'd appreciate it!

"I'm scouring the web to find a 3D Mind Mapping tool and have found virtually nothing that looks useful. Essentially, I'm looking for something that goes beyond the X and Y axes of 2D and incorporates a Z axis as well. So the UX would allow me to rotate the map like a Rubik's Cube to view the info structure from multiple perspectives.

Also, it doesn't have to be a mind map-specific app--basically anything that would approximate what I'm looking for. I've used autocad for my inventions, so I don't understand why it's so difficult to find what I'm looking for."

Sean Fox