Topics

Capturing Significant Projects? #lessons-learned


ruby549 <Rebecca_A_Winter@...>
 

Hello

As many of you know, Whirlpool has just completed a significant
acquisition.

Our Project Management Office (group managing the acquisition) team
has done a tremendous amount of work and we'd like to capture it/the
learnings.

Does anyone have suggestions/best practices about how to go about
documenting a significant project such as this? As you can imagine,
there is sensitivity around some of the knowledge - and there is a
tremendous amount of information with 100's of different projects
spanning all functions of our two organizations.

Any suggestions/feedback that you can share is appreciated.

Cheers,
Rebecca

------------------------------------------------------------------
Rebecca Winter
Global Director
Knowledge Management
Whirlpool Corporation
269-923-7633


Chris Riemer
 

Greetings, Rebecca...
 
In my experience, the artifacts that would naturally be associated with such an effort (memos, presentations, spreadsheets, etc.) are of limited use with a narrative to thread them together. If you have the narrative clearly, whatever else you might collect can be slotted into some kind of useful context. Without that, it's very hard to make sense of the individual bits and pieces. I have a favorite David Weinberger essay on this topic, which you can read at http://www.hyperorg.com/backissues/joho-feb5-99.html#narratives.
 
As far as capturing the narrative, you need to find those people who were associated with the project who can tell the story as a story. If you can record them doing so -- telling the story to a small group -- you'll have a video or audio record that can be the backbone for whatever else you might do.
 
Just a thought,
 
Chris
 
Chris Riemer
Principal
Knowledge Street LLC
+1 973 292 2949
 



From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of ruby549
Sent: Monday, April 03, 2006 10:56 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Capturing Significant Projects?

Hello

As many of you know, Whirlpool has just completed a significant
acquisition.

Our Project Management Office (group managing the acquisition) team
has done a tremendous amount of work and we'd like to capture it/the
learnings. 

Does anyone have suggestions/best practices about how to go about
documenting a significant project such as this?  As you can imagine,
there is sensitivity around some of the knowledge - and there is a
tremendous amount of information with 100's of different projects
spanning all functions of our two organizations.

Any suggestions/feedback that you can share is appreciated.

Cheers,
Rebecca

------------------------------------------------------------------
Rebecca Winter
Global Director
Knowledge Management
Whirlpool Corporation
269-923-7633





Wallace, Richard <RICHARD.B.WALLACE@...>
 

Rebecca

 

The best approach that I have seen for a capture like this is a Retrospect that we use extensively within SAIC and Kent Greenes (who pioneered it) uses as well.  We have looked a disparate things such as Hurricane Katrina response for the GAO and the US Navy, ammunition operations after the Gulf War, and product development for Frito lay.  We capture the learnings and the context that they/it was learned in and the context for future reuse.  We also tie the artifacts to the relevant parts of the capture. Would be happy to walk you through the process if you want to see if it fits.  Cheers

 


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of ruby549
Sent: Monday, April 03, 2006 10:56 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Capturing Significant Projects?

 

Hello

As many of you know, Whirlpool has just completed a significant
acquisition.

Our Project Management Office (group managing the acquisition) team
has done a tremendous amount of work and we'd like to capture it/the
learnings. 

Does anyone have suggestions/best practices about how to go about
documenting a significant project such as this?  As you can imagine,
there is sensitivity around some of the knowledge - and there is a
tremendous amount of information with 100's of different projects
spanning all functions of our two organizations.

Any suggestions/feedback that you can share is appreciated.

Cheers,
Rebecca

------------------------------------------------------------------
Rebecca Winter
Global Director
Knowledge Management
Whirlpool Corporation
269-923-7633






David Snowden <snowded@...>
 

For projects mass narrative capture is one of the best ways
People encounter knowledge by asking many people questions and synthesising the resulting anecdotes in the context of their need to create new knowledge
This is more natural than case studies, or allowing experts to review stories and decide what is or is not appropriate

The other useful thing in M&A work is that you can extract from a body of stories (using the people themselves) under lying values, themes and archetypes than can account for and provide an intervention device to reduce the impact of different cultures coming together.  A purely explicit knowledge approach would miss this.

This is our core area of competence and we have supporting software (to declare an interest) but happy to talk you thought it if you want




Dave Snowden
Founder, The Cynefin Centre
www.cynefin.net


On 3 Apr 2006, at 15:55, ruby549 wrote:

Hello

As many of you know, Whirlpool has just completed a significant
acquisition.

Our Project Management Office (group managing the acquisition) team
has done a tremendous amount of work and we'd like to capture it/the
learnings. 

Does anyone have suggestions/best practices about how to go about
documenting a significant project such as this?  As you can imagine,
there is sensitivity around some of the knowledge - and there is a
tremendous amount of information with 100's of different projects
spanning all functions of our two organizations.

Any suggestions/feedback that you can share is appreciated.

Cheers,
Rebecca

------------------------------------------------------------------
Rebecca Winter
Global Director
Knowledge Management
Whirlpool Corporation
269-923-7633






YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS






Stan Garfield <stangarfield@...>
 

This reply is from Steven Wieneke of GM:

-----Original Message-----
From: Steven Wieneke
Sent: Monday, April 03, 2006 10:21 AM
To: Rebecca Winter

Rebecca,

Here is one of many websites focusing on After Action Reviews
http://www.nelh.nhs.uk/knowledge_management/km2/aar_toolkit.asp that
may prove helpful.

This pdf file
http://www.kminstitute.org/The_KM_Domain_October_2003.pdf contains
suggestions for documenting best practices (Section 6, pp. 13-15).
Section 6 describes types of best practices as well as sections
within a best practice. Suggest dropping the word "best' and using
product practices and process practices, or product knowledge and
process knowledge.

Getting started...

1. Suggest first splitting the knowledge topics into 2 categories -
process and product.

2. Creating a "domain view" of topics under processes and another
under product. The above pdf file contains an example of a domain
view for KM.

3. Comparing Whirlpool's taxonomy to Maytag's would be very useful in
this endeavor. The domain view can be used to create a taxonomy if
one does not already exist.

4. Once the topics are identified, need to identify who the subject
matter experts (SME) are for each topic. Publish a roster of SME by
topic. May wish to refer to them as "subject manner responsible
person/engineer" rather than "expert".

5. Now you need to decide how to best capture the knowledge, as well
as who will be capturing "them" or "your staff", suggest "them"
with "you coaching")-
a) peer assists,
b) action reviews,
c) retrospects,
d) interviews,
e) videos,
f) etc.

6. Other content categories:
a) rosters,
b) practices,
c) key learnings,
d)stories or vignettes,
e) checklists or guidelines,
f) procedures
g) etc.

7. Create a communication package, coaching material and schedule
100's of sessions.

Sounds like a great opportunity. Best of luck!


Tom Short <tom.short@...>
 

I would second Steve's thoughts regarding an AAR approach as well as
his step-by-step approach to establishing roles/ownership/
responsibilities. This highlights the notion that knowledge transfer
is an energy-intensive activity, and can incur substantial costs.

Regarding AAR's, I've recently become acquainted with the Wildland
Fire organization and their work (link to it may be found at the
bottom of the site Steve provided on AAR). I think AAR would be
worth investigating further, given your stated objective. It provides
a direct path to capturing lessons learned in a straightforward,
scalable fashion.

The Wildland Fire organization has done quite a lot of work rolling
out after action learning - one of the more developed efforts on
this front I've seen outside the military. Their lead has been
invited to join this group - so perhaps she will chime in.

Good luck,

-Tom Short

-----Original Message-----
From: Steven Wieneke
Sent: Monday, April 03, 2006 10:21 AM
To: Rebecca Winter

Rebecca,

Here is one of many websites focusing on After Action Reviews
http://www.nelh.nhs.uk/knowledge_management/km2/aar_toolkit.asp
that
may prove helpful.

This pdf file
http://www.kminstitute.org/The_KM_Domain_October_2003.pdf contains
suggestions for documenting best practices (Section 6, pp. 13-15).
Section 6 describes types of best practices as well as sections
within a best practice. Suggest dropping the word "best' and using
product practices and process practices, or product knowledge and
process knowledge.

Getting started...

1. Suggest first splitting the knowledge topics into 2 categories -
process and product.

2. Creating a "domain view" of topics under processes and another
under product. The above pdf file contains an example of a domain
view for KM.

3. Comparing Whirlpool's taxonomy to Maytag's would be very useful
in
this endeavor. The domain view can be used to create a taxonomy if
one does not already exist.

4. Once the topics are identified, need to identify who the subject
matter experts (SME) are for each topic. Publish a roster of SME by
topic. May wish to refer to them as "subject manner responsible
person/engineer" rather than "expert".

5. Now you need to decide how to best capture the knowledge, as
well
as who will be capturing "them" or "your staff", suggest "them"
with "you coaching")-
a) peer assists,
b) action reviews,
c) retrospects,
d) interviews,
e) videos,
f) etc.

6. Other content categories:
a) rosters,
b) practices,
c) key learnings,
d)stories or vignettes,
e) checklists or guidelines,
f) procedures
g) etc.

7. Create a communication package, coaching material and schedule
100's of sessions.

Sounds like a great opportunity. Best of luck!


Kaplan Bill <Bill.Kaplan@...>
 

If this is Pat Nasiatka, I spent much time with her a couple of years back discussing this model and we shared with each other the best ways to address the learning before, during, and after model to improve fire fighter performance.  They have a great program that also brings in training and simulation.  The fire fighters and their teams fully appreciate the value of getting the current experience from fire fighting to their team mates and into the training programs

 

Regards

 

--Bill Kaplan

 


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Tom Short
Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2006 14:30
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Capturing Significant Projects?

 

I would second Steve's thoughts regarding an AAR approach as well as
his step-by-step approach to establishing roles/ownership/
responsibilities.  This highlights the notion that knowledge transfer
is an energy-intensive activity, and can incur substantial costs.

Regarding AAR's, I've recently become acquainted with the Wildland
Fire organization and their work (link to it may be found at the
bottom of the site Steve provided on AAR).  I think AAR would be
worth investigating further, given your stated objective. It provides
a direct path to capturing lessons learned in a straightforward,
scalable fashion.

The Wildland Fire organization has done quite a lot of work rolling
out after action learning  - one of the more developed efforts on
this front I've seen outside the military.  Their lead has been
invited to join this group - so perhaps she will chime in.

Good luck,

-Tom Short

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Steven Wieneke
> Sent: Monday, April 03, 2006 10:21 AM
> To: Rebecca Winter

> Rebecca,
>
> Here is one of many websites focusing on After Action Reviews
> http://www.nelh.nhs.uk/knowledge_management/km2/aar_toolkit.asp
that
> may prove helpful.
>
> This pdf file
> http://www.kminstitute.org/The_KM_Domain_October_2003.pdf contains
> suggestions for documenting best practices (Section 6, pp. 13-15).
> Section 6 describes types of best practices as well as sections
> within a best practice. Suggest dropping the word "best' and using
> product practices and process practices, or product knowledge and
> process knowledge.
>
> Getting started...
>
> 1. Suggest first splitting the knowledge topics into 2 categories -
> process and product.
>
> 2. Creating a "domain view" of topics under processes and another
> under product. The above pdf file contains an example of a domain
> view for KM.
>
> 3. Comparing Whirlpool's taxonomy to Maytag's would be very useful
in
> this endeavor. The domain view can be used to create a taxonomy if
> one does not already exist.
>
> 4. Once the topics are identified, need to identify who the subject
> matter experts (SME) are for each topic. Publish a roster of SME by
> topic. May wish to refer to them as "subject manner responsible
> person/engineer" rather than "expert".
>
> 5. Now you need to decide how to best capture the knowledge, as
well
> as who will be capturing "them" or "your staff", suggest "them"
> with "you coaching")-
>         a) peer assists,
>         b) action reviews,
>         c) retrospects,
>         d) interviews,
>         e) videos,
>         f) etc.
>
> 6. Other content categories:
>         a) rosters,
>         b) practices,
>         c) key learnings,
>         d)stories or vignettes,
>         e) checklists or guidelines,
>         f) procedures
>         g) etc.
>
> 7. Create a communication package, coaching material and schedule
> 100's of sessions.
>
> Sounds like a great opportunity. Best of luck!
>