Frameworks for Knowledge Sharing #culture #knowledge-sharing


Matthew Moore <matthew.moore@...>
 

Hi,
 
I have asked to come up with a position around "improving knowledge sharing" and "creating a knowledge sharing culture".
 
And yes, that is a very general request.
 
What are the best frameworks that you have encountered / used / created for explaining this area?
 
Some of the key challenges might be:
- Time: Focus on achieving short-term objectives rather than longer term goals around upskilling/learning.
- Space: People in different cities/countries/timezones.
- Compensation: Focused on individual performance.
- Technology: Lack of tools/infrastructure for collaboration.
- Silo Structures: Organisational groups that do not communicate/collaborate.
- Lack of Trust: Other internal groups/individuals perceived as untrustworthy or competitive
- Power: Particular information or skills perceived as a personal differentiator. Sharing dilutes this power.
- Lack of Availability/Awareness: People are not aware that particular knowledge that is useful to them exists elsewhere in the organisation.
- Pride: "Not invented here" syndrome.
 
N.B. These are not mutually exclusive but are often related to each other.
 
In my experience the following factors are key:
 
- Focus on specific areas of collaboration & improvement with identified groups rather than generalised "sharing".
- Demonstrate the individual & collective value of these sharing efforts.
- Publically reward examples of sharing (rewards not necessarily financial).
- Ritualising the sharing of experience/lessons/knowledge in dedicated sessions .
- Role-models. Senior people have to share their experience.
 
So what have others found?
 
Cheers,
 
Matt


nirmala.palaniappan@...
 

Matt! J

 

Wonderfully summarized!

I don’t think I have much to add but you may find a few minor but additional points in this post.

As for the framework, maybe, we ought to create one based on the points you’ve identified and collated. I am inspired to give it a shot sometime.

 

Thanks and Regards

Nirmala

http://nirmala-km.blogspot.com

****************************************

Anthony De Mello: "Problems exist only in the human mind" 

 


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Matthew Moore
Sent: Tuesday, February 20, 2007 8:24 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Frameworks for Knowledge Sharing

 

Hi,

 

I have asked to come up with a position around "improving knowledge sharing" and "creating a knowledge sharing culture".

 

And yes, that is a very general request.

 

What are the best frameworks that you have encountered / used / created for explaining this area?

 

Some of the key challenges might be:

- Time: Focus on achieving short-term objectives rather than longer term goals around upskilling/learning.

- Space: People in different cities/countries/timezones.

- Compensation: Focused on individual performance.

- Technology: Lack of tools/infrastructure for collaboration.

- Silo Structures: Organisational groups that do not communicate/collaborate.

- Lack of Trust: Other internal groups/individuals perceived as untrustworthy or competitive

- Power: Particular information or skills perceived as a personal differentiator. Sharing dilutes this power.

- Lack of Availability/Awareness: People are not aware that particular knowledge that is useful to them exists elsewhere in the organisation.

- Pride: "Not invented here" syndrome.

 

N.B. These are not mutually exclusive but are often related to each other.

 

In my experience the following factors are key:

 

- Focus on specific areas of collaboration & improvement with identified groups rather than generalised "sharing".

- Demonstrate the individual & collective value of these sharing efforts.

- Publically reward examples of sharing (rewards not necessarily financial).

- Ritualising the sharing of experience/lessons/knowledge in dedicated sessions .

- Role-models. Senior people have to share their experience.

 

So what have others found?

 

Cheers,

 

Matt


Peter-Anthony Glick
 

Hi Matt
yes, I have just joined this group and was pleased to find you here
too.
You had posted this question on ActKm as well and (as you probably
know) it inspired me to list these challenges for knowledge sharing
in the form of 10 syndromes
(http://leveragingknowledge.blogspot.com/2007/03/organizational-
cultures-not-conducive.html)
This list has sparked a lot of interest with suggestions of
additional syndromes and lot's of hits on my site.

However, my real interest is the same as yours: what do we do when
faced with most or all of these cultural traits?
I like your list of factors of success and I have to some extent
respected these. I have another question: does these factors assume
a willingness from the top-executive crowd to change the culture?
Isn't this the biggest challenge of all: having the Board on your
side? Or, are there known case studies where a K-sharing culture
was achieved without top-management involvement until late in the
process?

Peter


--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, "Matthew Moore"
<matthew.moore@...> wrote:

Hi,

I have asked to come up with a position around "improving
knowledge sharing" and "creating a knowledge sharing culture".

And yes, that is a very general request.

What are the best frameworks that you have encountered / used /
created for explaining this area?

Some of the key challenges might be:
- Time: Focus on achieving short-term objectives rather than
longer term goals around upskilling/learning.
- Space: People in different cities/countries/timezones.
- Compensation: Focused on individual performance.
- Technology: Lack of tools/infrastructure for collaboration.
- Silo Structures: Organisational groups that do not
communicate/collaborate.
- Lack of Trust: Other internal groups/individuals perceived as
untrustworthy or competitive
- Power: Particular information or skills perceived as a personal
differentiator. Sharing dilutes this power.
- Lack of Availability/Awareness: People are not aware that
particular knowledge that is useful to them exists elsewhere in the
organisation.
- Pride: "Not invented here" syndrome.

N.B. These are not mutually exclusive but are often related to
each other.

In my experience the following factors are key:

- Focus on specific areas of collaboration & improvement with
identified groups rather than generalised "sharing".
- Demonstrate the individual & collective value of these sharing
efforts.
- Publically reward examples of sharing (rewards not necessarily
financial).
- Ritualising the sharing of experience/lessons/knowledge in
dedicated sessions .
- Role-models. Senior people have to share their experience.

So what have others found?

Cheers,

Matt


Matthew Moore <matthew.moore@...>
 

Peter,
 
Thanks for this list. I agree with you. It was actually put together to show to senior management so I had to be somewhat diplomatic about their role.
 
I would take this a step further - it's not just buy-in of executives to the idea of "knowledge sharing" - they have to understand what that means.
 
The current challenge I have is: "This knowledge sharing sounds great! Can you order everyone to do it tomorrow please?"
 
Regards,
 
Matt
 

-----Original Message-----
From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]On Behalf Of peteranthonyglick
Sent: Friday, 16 March 2007 4:05 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Frameworks for Knowledge Sharing

Hi Matt
yes, I have just joined this group and was pleased to find you here
too.
You had posted this question on ActKm as well and (as you probably
know) it inspired me to list these challenges for knowledge sharing
in the form of 10 syndromes
(http://leveragingknowledge.blogspot.com/2007/03/organizational-
cultures-not-conducive.html)
This list has sparked a lot of interest with suggestions of
additional syndromes and lot's of hits on my site.

However, my real interest is the same as yours: what do we do when
faced with most or all of these cultural traits?
I like your list of factors of success and I have to some extent
respected these. I have another question: does these factors assume
a willingness from the top-executive crowd to change the culture?
Isn't this the biggest challenge of all: having the Board on your
side? Or, are there known case studies where a K-sharing culture
was achieved without top-management involvement until late in the
process?

Peter

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, "Matthew Moore"
...> wrote:
>
> Hi,
>
> I have asked to come up with a position around "improving
knowledge sharing" and "creating a knowledge sharing culture".
>
> And yes, that is a very general request.
>
> What are the best frameworks that you have encountered / used /
created for explaining this area?
>
> Some of the key challenges might be:
> - Time: Focus on achieving short-term objectives rather than
longer term goals around upskilling/learning.
> - Space: People in different cities/countries/timezones.
> - Compensation: Focused on individual performance.
> - Technology: Lack of tools/infrastructure for collaboration.
> - Silo Structures: Organisational groups that do not
communicate/collaborate.
> - Lack of Trust: Other internal groups/individuals perceived as
untrustworthy or competitive
> - Power: Particular information or skills perceived as a personal
differentiator. Sharing dilutes this power.
> - Lack of Availability/Awareness: People are not aware that
particular knowledge that is useful to them exists elsewhere in the
organisation.
> - Pride: "Not invented here" syndrome.
>
> N.B. These are not mutually exclusive but are often related to
each other.
>
> In my experience the following factors are key:
>
> - Focus on specific areas of collaboration & improvement with
identified groups rather than generalised "sharing".
> - Demonstrate the individual & collective value of these sharing
efforts.
> - Publically reward examples of sharing (rewards not necessarily
financial).
> - Ritualising the sharing of experience/lessons/knowledge in
dedicated sessions .
> - Role-models. Senior people have to share their experience.
>
> So what have others found?
>
> Cheers,
>
> Matt
>


Peter-Anthony Glick
 

Matt,

I always enjoy your sense your humour!

Perfect, I didn't know how to word this challenge in my "syndrome"
form.
So if you let me, I will now add this to our list (and I'll quote you
for it):

Top-executives misundertanding of KM challenges: The "this knowledge
sharing sounds great! Can you order everyone to do it tomorrow
please?" syndrome !!!

Peter

http://leveragingknowledge.blogspot.com

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, "Matthew Moore"
<matthew.moore@...> wrote:

Peter,

Thanks for this list. I agree with you. It was actually put
together to show to senior management so I had to be somewhat
diplomatic about their role.

I would take this a step further - it's not just buy-in of
executives to the idea of "knowledge sharing" - they have to
understand what that means.

The current challenge I have is: "This knowledge sharing sounds
great! Can you order everyone to do it tomorrow please?"

Regards,

Matt

-----Original Message-----
From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of peteranthonyglick
Sent: Friday, 16 March 2007 4:05 AM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Frameworks for Knowledge Sharing


Hi Matt
yes, I have just joined this group and was pleased to find you
here
too.
You had posted this question on ActKm as well and (as you
probably
know) it inspired me to list these challenges for knowledge
sharing
in the form of 10 syndromes
(http://leveragingknowledge.blogspot.com/2007/03/organizational-
cultures-not-conducive.html)
This list has sparked a lot of interest with suggestions of
additional syndromes and lot's of hits on my site.

However, my real interest is the same as yours: what do we do
when
faced with most or all of these cultural traits?
I like your list of factors of success and I have to some extent
respected these. I have another question: does these factors
assume
a willingness from the top-executive crowd to change the culture?
Isn't this the biggest challenge of all: having the Board on your
side? Or, are there known case studies where a K-sharing culture
was achieved without top-management involvement until late in the
process?

Peter

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, "Matthew Moore"
<matthew.moore@> wrote:
>
> Hi,
>
> I have asked to come up with a position around "improving
knowledge sharing" and "creating a knowledge sharing culture".
>
> And yes, that is a very general request.
>
> What are the best frameworks that you have encountered / used /
created for explaining this area?
>
> Some of the key challenges might be:
> - Time: Focus on achieving short-term objectives rather than
longer term goals around upskilling/learning.
> - Space: People in different cities/countries/timezones.
> - Compensation: Focused on individual performance.
> - Technology: Lack of tools/infrastructure for collaboration.
> - Silo Structures: Organisational groups that do not
communicate/collaborate.
> - Lack of Trust: Other internal groups/individuals perceived as
untrustworthy or competitive
> - Power: Particular information or skills perceived as a
personal
differentiator. Sharing dilutes this power.
> - Lack of Availability/Awareness: People are not aware that
particular knowledge that is useful to them exists elsewhere in
the
organisation.
> - Pride: "Not invented here" syndrome.
>
> N.B. These are not mutually exclusive but are often related to
each other.
>
> In my experience the following factors are key:
>
> - Focus on specific areas of collaboration & improvement with
identified groups rather than generalised "sharing".
> - Demonstrate the individual & collective value of these
sharing
efforts.
> - Publically reward examples of sharing (rewards not
necessarily
financial).
> - Ritualising the sharing of experience/lessons/knowledge in
dedicated sessions .
> - Role-models. Senior people have to share their experience.
>
> So what have others found?
>
> Cheers,
>
> Matt
>