A KM-Focused Search Tool... #search


Chris Riemer
 

Greetings, all…

I mentioned this idea to Stan while it was in development, and he
thought it was worth posting here. (By way of introduction, I'm a
former corporate KM type who co-founded a company called Knowledge
Street in late 2002. Since then, we've run a generalized kind of
management consulting business, with KM flavors.)

Earlier this month we were doing a makeover on our own website, and
decided to switch to Google as a search tool. As we worked through
that process, we also decided to put up a second engine, directed
beyond our own site but restricted to a set of URLs that we thought
were particularly good from a KM and/or Communications perspective.
And then, we thought it would be interesting to solicit website
recommendations from other like-minded folks, and that's the purpose
of this note.

You can take a look at the results at http://tinyurl.com/2gpg9w. If
you'd like to recommend a URL for the search set, just let me know.
Any other comments would also be welcome.

Regards,

Chris


Chris Riemer
 

Ok... So TinyURL failed me! That's a first.

The actual URL is
http://www.knowledgestreet.com/What_We_Do/K_Street_Central/k_street_central.html

Chris


Lucas McDonnell
 


Chris Riemer
 

Thanks, Lucas...
 
Right now we have only four sites in there, in addition to knowledgestreet.com. It's searching Stan's blog-like resources:
 
 
And it's also searching David Gurteen's massive collection at http://www.gurteen.com. In fact, David has been experimenting with the same thing, and I don't think he'd mind me pointing that out since it's come up in the conversation. You can see it at http://www.gurteen.com/gurteen/gurteen.nsf/id/google-cse
 
We started down this road before reading that David Weinberger article that's referenced on our search page, but I think it's quite insightful. As the web expands, there's more and more worthwhile stuff, and it helps to have some sort of human filtering involved in selecting things that a given community finds valuable.

At some point, I imagine we'll add the list of sites, once we see the results of this "call for recommendations." David has one associated with his Google Custom Search, too.
 
Chris
 



From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Lucas McDonnell
Sent: Tuesday, March 27, 2007 10:17 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: A KM-Focused Search Tool...

Very interesting stuff Chris. I've created a similar Google Custom Seach engine that can be found on the right-hand column of my site (http://www.lucasmcdonnell.com). The list of sites that are searched by the engine are also listed at http://www.lucasmcdonnell.com/google-custom-search-is-back/.

Would it be possible for you to provide a list of the sites that your search engine is searching (perhaps I missed that on your site). I'd be very interested to see what sites are there.

Thanks for sharing this.

Lucas

--
http://www.lucasmcdonnell.com

Sharing knowledge through technology.

On 3/27/07, jcriemer <jcr@knowledgestreet.com> wrote:

Ok... So TinyURL failed me! That's a first.

The actual URL is
http://www.knowledgestreet.com/What_We_Do/K_Street_Central/k_street_central.html

Chris




Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

Hmmm... if there is "more and more worthwhile stuff" why not use it, take advantage of it???

Is this the beginning of the "Fox News channel of KM"? Fox claims they are "fair and balanced" but everyone[supporters and detractors] know they are far right. Go to any political blog and you will see these limited/filtered views in action... blue blogs only list news and news sources favorable to them, as do the red blogs. Of course they claim they are doing their readers a service by providing only what is valuable.

And remember, innovation happens at the intersections, by limiting/ filtering our search space we may be missing out on many opportunities and ah-has.

No thanks, I don't want my KM and related knowledge/news pre- filtered... I'll do it myself according to need and context.

Valdis Krebs
http://www.orgnet.com
http://www.networkweaving.com/blog

On Mar 27, 2007, at 10:46 AM, Chris Riemer wrote:

As the web expands, there's more and more worthwhile stuff, and it helps to have some sort of human filtering involved in selecting things that a given community finds valuable.


Boris Jaeger
 

To all,

I am maintaining this one:

Knowledge management Meta-Search
http://www.short-link.de/5006
Currently searching 144 sites

Pls. feel free to contribute! Just provide your e-mail address, and
I will send you an invitation. ... collaborating to create a real
meta-search engine.


Valdis,

you can choose how to search included sites:
- Search only included sites.
- Search the entire web but emphasize included sites.

Regards,
Boris

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, Valdis Krebs <valdis@...> wrote:

Hmmm... if there is "more and more worthwhile stuff" why not use
it,
take advantage of it???

Is this the beginning of the "Fox News channel of KM"? Fox
claims
they are "fair and balanced" but everyone[supporters and
detractors]
know they are far right. Go to any political blog and you will
see
these limited/filtered views in action... blue blogs only list
news
and news sources favorable to them, as do the red blogs. Of
course
they claim they are doing their readers a service by providing
only
what is valuable.

And remember, innovation happens at the intersections, by
limiting/
filtering our search space we may be missing out on many
opportunities and ah-has.

No thanks, I don't want my KM and related knowledge/news pre-
filtered... I'll do it myself according to need and context.

Valdis Krebs
http://www.orgnet.com
http://www.networkweaving.com/blog

On Mar 27, 2007, at 10:46 AM, Chris Riemer wrote:

As the web expands, there's more and more worthwhile stuff, and
it
helps to have some sort of human filtering involved in
selecting
things that a given community finds valuable.


Chris Riemer
 

Greetings, Valdis...
 
Well, I don't think the idea is about limiting access, it's about providing an additional vector for evaluation. That David Weinberger article I've alluded to is available at http://tinyurl.com/23fqnv . Perhaps you'd find his thinking more persuasive?
 
It seems to me that a lot of what happens on the Web is essentially about pointing people to the good stuff. That might involve publishing links to recommended resources or hyperlinking interesting articles into a blog. It's what's happening when people share URLs with del.icio.us.
 
The only difference here is that we're directing a search engine across a recommended collection of sites, instead of just providing them as individual URLs. I felt the members of this group might know about good resources that wouldn't appear in the first few pages of a Google search, and this would be a way to shine a light on them.
 
Thanks for your comments, though. I don't believe we've corresponded before, but I always enjoy reading what you have to say, both here and in the AOK Discussion Group.

Regards,
 
Chris
 


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Valdis Krebs
Sent: Tuesday, March 27, 2007 1:08 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: A KM-Focused Search Tool...

Hmmm... if there is "more and more worthwhile stuff" why not use it,
take advantage of it???

Is this the beginning of the "Fox News channel of KM"? Fox claims
they are "fair and balanced" but everyone[supporters and detractors]
know they are far right. Go to any political blog and you will see
these limited/filtered views in action... blue blogs only list news
and news sources favorable to them, as do the red blogs. Of course
they claim they are doing their readers a service by providing only
what is valuable.

And remember, innovation happens at the intersections, by limiting/
filtering our search space we may be missing out on many
opportunities and ah-has.

No thanks, I don't want my KM and related knowledge/news pre-
filtered... I'll do it myself according to need and context.

Valdis Krebs
http://www.orgnet.com
http://www.networkweaving.com/blog

On Mar 27, 2007, at 10:46 AM, Chris Riemer wrote:

> As the web expands, there's more and more worthwhile stuff, and it
> helps to have some sort of human filtering involved in selecting
> things that a given community finds valuable.


Chris Riemer
 

Greetings, Boris...
 
Interesting. Based on some test searches, I assume you're using the "emphasize selected sites" option. It's a good example of the concept in action.
 
If I search "Snowden" directly in Google, the first few entries have to do with the band and the mountain, whereas in your engine, the first entry belongs to Dave Snowden, fellow member of this august community. (The band comes in second.)
 
So it appears that having a kind of context-setting assumption within the engine does save some time.
 
Chris


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Boris Jäger
Sent: Tuesday, March 27, 2007 2:17 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: A KM-Focused Search Tool...

To all,

I am maintaining this one:

Knowledge management Meta-Search
http://www.short-link.de/5006
Currently searching 144 sites

Pls. feel free to contribute! Just provide your e-mail address, and
I will send you an invitation. ... collaborating to create a real
meta-search engine.

Valdis,

you can choose how to search included sites:
- Search only included sites.
- Search the entire web but emphasize included sites.

Regards,
Boris

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, Valdis Krebs wrote:
>
> Hmmm... if there is "more and more worthwhile stuff" why not use
it,
> take advantage of it???
>
> Is this the beginning of the "Fox News channel of KM"? Fox
claims
> they are "fair and balanced" but everyone[supporters and
detractors]
> know they are far right. Go to any political blog and you will
see
> these limited/filtered views in action... blue blogs only list
news
> and news sources favorable to them, as do the red blogs. Of
course
> they claim they are doing their readers a service by providing
only
> what is valuable.
>
> And remember, innovation happens at the intersections, by
limiting/
> filtering our search space we may be missing out on many
> opportunities and ah-has.
>
> No thanks, I don't want my KM and related knowledge/news pre-
> filtered... I'll do it myself according to need and context.
>
> Valdis Krebs
> http://www.orgnet.com
> http://www.networkweaving.com/blog
>
> On Mar 27, 2007, at 10:46 AM, Chris Riemer wrote:
>
> > As the web expands, there's more and more worthwhile stuff, and
it
> > helps to have some sort of human filtering involved in
selecting
> > things that a given community finds valuable.
>


Gorman, Brian A <brian.a.gorman@...>
 

I agree strongly with Chris…this is one of the key value propositions of Web 2.0-type social media, and more generally of reputation systems and the like.  As long as the agenda of the recommender is reasonably transparent, I don’t see much harm in this, and I see a whole lot of good.  It’s not as if a “this is good” recommendation precludes anyone from doing their own surfing.

Personally, I can’t imagine “finding it all myself” as an efficient or effective way to learn.

FWIW,

Brian

 

Brian Gorman

Intel Information Technology

Advanced Collaboration and Innovation

(916) 356-1398


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Chris Riemer
Sent: Tuesday, March 27, 2007 11:36 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Re: A KM-Focused Search Tool...

 

Greetings, Valdis...

 

Well, I don't think the idea is about limiting access, it's about providing an additional vector for evaluation. That David Weinberger article I've alluded to is available at http://tinyurl.com/23fqnv . Perhaps you'd find his thinking more persuasive?

 

It seems to me that a lot of what happens on the Web is essentially about pointing people to the good stuff. That might involve publishing links to recommended resources or hyperlinking interesting articles into a blog. It's what's happening when people share URLs with del.icio.us.

 

The only difference here is that we're directing a search engine across a recommended collection of sites, instead of just providing them as individual URLs. I felt the members of this group might know about good resources that wouldn't appear in the first few pages of a Google search, and this would be a way to shine a light on them.

 

Thanks for your comments, though. I don't believe we've corresponded before, but I always enjoy reading what you have to say, both here and in the AOK Discussion Group.


Regards,

 

Chris

 

 


From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Valdis Krebs
Sent: Tuesday, March 27, 2007 1:08 PM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: A KM-Focused Search Tool...

Hmmm... if there is "more and more worthwhile stuff" why not use it,
take advantage of it???

Is this the beginning of the "Fox News channel of KM"? Fox claims
they are "fair and balanced" but everyone[supporters and detractors]
know they are far right. Go to any political blog and you will see
these limited/filtered views in action... blue blogs only list news
and news sources favorable to them, as do the red blogs. Of course
they claim they are doing their readers a service by providing only
what is valuable.

And remember, innovation happens at the intersections, by limiting/
filtering our search space we may be missing out on many
opportunities and ah-has.

No thanks, I don't want my KM and related knowledge/news pre-
filtered... I'll do it myself according to need and context.

Valdis Krebs
http://www.orgnet.com
http://www.networkweaving.com/blog

On Mar 27, 2007, at 10:46 AM, Chris Riemer wrote:

> As the web expands, there's more and more worthwhile stuff, and it
> helps to have some sort of human filtering involved in selecting
> things that a given community finds valuable.


Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

Recommended by who? We are still filtering here... AND filtering is useful at times, but I would rather filter at the moment I need it...

Filtered sites can be useful... as long as you know they are filtered and from which angle/spin.

Valdis

On Mar 27, 2007, at 2:36 PM, Chris Riemer wrote:

The only difference here is that we're directing a search engine across a recommended collection of sites,


Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

I can't either... we agree.

Google's PageRank and other social-network-like algorithms/metrics
already float the good stuff to the top... they kind of execute
"Wisdom of the Crowd".

Valdis

On Mar 27, 2007, at 3:29 PM, Gorman, Brian A wrote:

Personally, I can’t imagine “finding it all myself” as an efficient
or effective way to learn


Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

And to really learn [something more than just facts or data]... I
would not go to Google or any data base[except for background
info]... I would seek out a person or two or three... and interact
with them in light of my current, and their previous, context. If I
had no idea who to turn to, and neither did any of my network, then I
would use the people that hit high on Google as a starting point.

Valdis

On Mar 27, 2007, at 3:50 PM, Valdis Krebs wrote:

I can't either... we agree.

Google's PageRank and other social-network-like algorithms/metrics
already float the good stuff to the top... they kind of execute
"Wisdom of the Crowd".

Valdis


On Mar 27, 2007, at 3:29 PM, Gorman, Brian A wrote:

Personally, I can’t imagine “finding it all myself” as an efficient
or effective way to learn


Peter Marshall <peter.marshall@...>
 


Chris Riemer
 

Valdis...
 
Just to answer the "recommended-by-who" question, if you look at the actual search page --  http://tinyurl.com/2gpg9w -- you can see our intent is to list the names of the contributors, along with links to on-line bio type information to the degree that it's available. So far, they include only Stan Garfield and David Gurteen.
 
But we'd be delighted to include any URLs you'd care to send our way... ;-)
 
Chris


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Valdis Krebs
Sent: Tuesday, March 27, 2007 3:40 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: A KM-Focused Search Tool...

Recommended by who? We are still filtering here... AND filtering
is useful at times, but I would rather filter at the moment I need it...

Filtered sites can be useful... as long as you know they are filtered
and from which angle/spin.

Valdis

On Mar 27, 2007, at 2:36 PM, Chris Riemer wrote:

> The only difference here is that we're directing a search engine
> across a recommended collection of sites,


Peter Marshall <peter.marshall@...>
 


Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

Yeah, that's what i was trying to say...

Valdis

On Mar 27, 2007, at 4:07 PM, Peter Marshall wrote:

To me, this is a case of having your cake and eating it too.

It's a bit like the problem of whether to read the newspaper or a specialist trade paper. One misses a lot if one JUST reads the trade rag, but there are certainly times when that's a better source.

This filtering issue is a bit more subtle... it's more like reading the whole paper vs. a "portalized" version of it that selects based on "what you've read in the past (a la Findory) or what your role is (typical corp portals) or your predefined orientation (Daily Kos / NRA.org) or what someone else recommends (every blog on earth).

I like having them all! as long as I'm not restricted to any of them.

That said -- there is a danger in relying too heavily on ANY source that has a self-selection bias / attractor phenomenon. Read all the recommended stuff you want, but go back to Google to keep one's eyes open.

Peter


On 3/27/07, Valdis Krebs <valdis@orgnet.com> wrote: I can't either... we agree.

Google's PageRank and other social-network-like algorithms/metrics
already float the good stuff to the top... they kind of execute
"Wisdom of the Crowd".

Valdis


ronald.lamb@...
 

I’m with Chris Riemer on this one. At least in a corp environment. 

e.g. > As the web expands, there's more and more worthwhile stuff, and it
> helps to have some sort of human filtering involved in selecting
> things that a given community finds valuable.

 

There is great value in having a coordinator who on behalf of any cross-functional group, take a point of view on what information is valuable and to make it readily available through one form or another.  The balance to this is the value in ensuring that there is also available equally readily available information that poses alternate points of view. 

 

I am working with a client focused on cutting edge research that is also the subject of much political discussion in the news.  Their executives need to understand their own firm’s point of view, as well as the alternatives points of view.  As such we’re having on-going discussions about the best process and technologies to  support information sharing when breaking discoveries can change their firm’s current position.  Their executives also need to know about and be able to respond to alternative points of view when challenged.

 

I’d be interested to hear from anyone who has experience in the KM world specific to cutting edge R&D organizations.   This is an R&D group within a very large corporation where information changes much more slowly. 

Best regards,

Ron Lamb

www.strategy2execution.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Valdis Krebs
Sent: Tuesday, March 27, 2007 10:08 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: A KM-Focused Search Tool...

 

Hmmm... if there is "more and more worthwhile stuff" why not use it,
take advantage of it???

Is this the beginning of the "Fox News channel of KM"? Fox claims
they are "fair and balanced" but everyone[supporters and detractors]
know they are far right. Go to any political blog and you will see
these limited/filtered views in action... blue blogs only list news
and news sources favorable to them, as do the red blogs. Of course
they claim they are doing their readers a service by providing only
what is valuable.

And remember, innovation happens at the intersections, by limiting/
filtering our search space we may be missing out on many
opportunities and ah-has.

No thanks, I don't want my KM and related knowledge/news pre-
filtered... I'll do it myself according to need and context.

Valdis Krebs
http://www.orgnet.com
http://www.networkweaving.com/blog

On Mar 27, 2007, at 10:46 AM, Chris Riemer wrote:

> As the web expands, there's more and more worthwhile stuff, and it
> helps to have some sort of human filtering involved in selecting
> things that a given community finds valuable.


Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

So, it appears that filtering, based on what they know today, is just
what this group does NOT want. They want diverse sources on info
that can also reveal faint signals that may disagree with prevailing
thought. And if they are "in the news" they definitely want to track
all sorts of emergent, and diverse, sources to follow the buzz. How
can they possibly know what they will need ahead of time if WoM/buzz
is so emergent and unknowable?

Valdis


On Mar 27, 2007, at 5:12 PM, <ronald.lamb@strategy2execution.com>
<ronald.lamb@strategy2execution.com> wrote:

Their executives need to understand their own firm’s point of view,
as well as the alternatives points of view. As such we’re having
on-going discussions about the best process and technologies to
support information sharing when breaking discoveries can change
their firm’s current position. Their executives also need to know
about and be able to respond to alternative points of view when
challenged.


Ronald Lamb <ronald.lamb@...>
 

That was one of their questions. I use a methodology called the Language of
Strategy 2 Execution that focuses on a targeted outcome and all the interim
outcomes that are required and necessary to achieve it. By looking at each
interim outcome it is possible to take a point of view on what are the
likely questions/ challenges that may arise. You're right, that if you had
no structured approach you could not identify the WOM/ buzz questions.
Having a coordinator acting on behalf of the cross functional groups focused
on achieving each outcome allow the group to identify or quickly deal with
the questions.
Ron

-----Original Message-----
From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of Valdis Krebs
Sent: Tuesday, March 27, 2007 2:55 PM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: A KM-Focused Search Tool...with Human
Intervention

So, it appears that filtering, based on what they know today, is just
what this group does NOT want. They want diverse sources on info
that can also reveal faint signals that may disagree with prevailing
thought. And if they are "in the news" they definitely want to track
all sorts of emergent, and diverse, sources to follow the buzz. How
can they possibly know what they will need ahead of time if WoM/buzz
is so emergent and unknowable?

Valdis


On Mar 27, 2007, at 5:12 PM, <ronald.lamb@strategy2execution.com>
<ronald.lamb@strategy2execution.com> wrote:

Their executives need to understand their own firm's point of view,
as well as the alternatives points of view. As such we're having
on-going discussions about the best process and technologies to
support information sharing when breaking discoveries can change
their firm's current position. Their executives also need to know
about and be able to respond to alternative points of view when
challenged.



Yahoo! Groups Links


Chris Riemer
 

Thanks for your comments, Peter...
 
I first got involved with KM when I was working in a corporate competency center that supported a Y2K consulting business.
 
In that context, we developed something we called a Y2K "Starter Kit"  -- selected articles, emails, white papers and other stuff intended to be read in a particular sequence. Not really training, but something to provide a bit of orientation for people who were new to the practice.
 
The selection of things in the Starter Kit evolved as the practice did, and we accepted recommendations from anyone who was already in the group. That's sort of what we had in mind with this search tool: a collection of resources recommended by real KM practitioners.
 
Of course, any of the Y2K newbies would have been free to hop on the web and do their own research, but most people liked being able to follow the lead of those who'd already been there.
 
Chris


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Peter Marshall
Sent: Tuesday, March 27, 2007 4:08 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: A KM-Focused Search Tool...

To me, this is a case of having your cake and eating it too. 

It's a bit like the problem of whether to read the newspaper or a specialist trade paper.  One misses a lot if one JUST reads the trade rag, but there are certainly times when that's a better source.

This filtering issue is a bit more subtle... it's more like reading the whole paper vs. a "portalized" version of it that selects based on "what you've read in the past (a la Findory) or what your role is (typical corp portals) or your predefined orientation (Daily Kos / NRA.org) or what someone else recommends (every blog on earth). 

I like having them all!  as long as I'm not restricted to any of them.

That said -- there is a danger in relying too heavily on ANY source that has a self-selection bias / attractor phenomenon.  Read all the recommended stuff you want, but go back to Google to keep one's eyes open.

Peter


On 3/27/07, Valdis Krebs <valdis@orgnet.com> wrote:
I can't either... we agree.

Google's PageRank and other social-network-like algorithms/metrics
already float the good stuff to the top... they kind of execute
"Wisdom of the Crowd".

Valdis


On Mar 27, 2007, at 3:29 PM, Gorman, Brian A wrote:

> Personally, I can't imagine "finding it all myself" as an efficient
> or effective way to learn




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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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