Critical Process #definition


Hoelting, Emily <emily.hoelting@...>
 

Good Morning Everyone,

Do any of you have a good set definition for ‘Critical Process’?  I’ve been researching for this term in my company,  and the results of a standard definition, let alone a definition at all, has been very hard to come across.   I listed what I found below, but was curious if anyone might have something better to offer up.  Thanks for your help,

Emily

 

 

Critical Process

A business process which is key to the functioning, products, or services of the work unit.

 

A business process that must be restored immediately after a disruption to ensure the affected firm's ability to protect its assets, meet its significant needs and satisfy mandatory regulations and requirements. 


EXAMPLES:

 

Computing & Network Operations defines a Critical Process as:

"any process that is used to produce the end product or service to your customer."
AND
"a repeatable process where it is important to complete it the same way each time."
AND
is enterprise-wide in use and adherence.

 

 


Peter Baloh
 


Pugh, Katrina <katrina.pugh@...>
 
Edited

Hello, KM’ers –

 

When I was with Intel, the Strategy Architecture and Innovation Group led an analysis and prioritization of business processes across the entire Intel Value Chain.

 

The framework is the “Enterprise Capabilities Framework”  (also called global capabilities framework).  This requires you to do a hard-nosed look at your value chain, and then prioritize your processes, applications, skills, etc.

 

I’ve uploaded it to our yahoo group store.  Special thanks to Jannine Setter (cc’d above), who presented this to an Enterprise Architecture conference in the fall.

EAC - EA shelfware or strategic planning tool.pdf

 

Cheers

Kate

 

Katrina Pugh
VP, Knowledge Management
IT Center of Excellence
Fidelity Investments, Personal and Workplace Investing
400 Puritan Way M3J
Marlborough, MA 01752
(O) 508 357 3236
(M) 781 258 0920


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of noisedata
Sent: Friday, January 25, 2008 1:48 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Critical Process

 

Hi Emily...

 

I would say that this depends on what is the standpoint or criteria for assessing the "critical" bit.

 

Because if looking at it from the business perspective, and if you need this for prioritizing processes you would like to change/renovate etc.., then you could go for various definitions... i.e.

"Critical processes are

1) the most important processes that influence the customer satisfaction and/or profit
2) Those which represent a risk or opportunity from the knowledge-perspective,

3) Those that are not in the way to support the organizational vision..."

 

So I guess before finding 'the best' definition I would say that it would be good if you elaborate a bit on what 'criticality' are you looking for. Or... for what purpose you need the 'definition' for...

Hope it makes some sense...

 

Best,

Peter

 

 

On Jan 25, 2008 2:48 AM, Hoelting, Emily <emily.hoelting@boeing.com> wrote:

Good Morning Everyone,

Do any of you have a good set definition for 'Critical Process'?  I've been researching for this term in my company,  and the results of a standard definition, let alone a definition at all, has been very hard to come across.   I listed what I found below, but was curious if anyone might have something better to offer up.  Thanks for your help,

Emily

 

 

Critical Process

A business process which is key to the functioning, products, or services of the work unit.

 

A business process that must be restored immediately after a disruption to ensure the affected firm's ability to protect its assets, meet its significant needs and satisfy mandatory regulations and requirements. 


EXAMPLES:

 

Computing & Network Operations defines a Critical Process as:

"any process that is used to produce the end product or service to your customer."
AND
"a repeatable process where it is important to complete it the same way each time."
AND
is enterprise-wide in use and adherence.

.