Tool to validate expertise #expertise-location #expertise


Hoelting, Emily <emily.hoelting@...>
 

Good Morning Everyone,

 

Does anyone know of a tool (checklist, assessment list, etc.) that facilitates the validation of a particular expertise or capability.   Case in point, my group claims to be SME's for performance measurement.  Is there an evaluation tool that we can undergo to prove our level of capability and/or expertise?

 

Please advise.

 

Thanks.

 

 

 

Emily Hoelting

Boeing C3N - Business Excellence - Certified in Knowledge Management - (714) 372 0170 - Cell: (714) 866 1529 

"Tell me and I'll forget; Show me and I may remember; Involve me and I'll understand"

 


William Ives <iveswilliam@...>
 

This is not exactly answering your question but there is a tool that combines social bookmarking and social networking that is great for expertise location based on output. It is Connectbeam - http://www.connectbeam.com/

Bill Ives

On Apr 29, 2008, at 10:32 AM, Hoelting, Emily wrote:


Good Morning Everyone,

 

Does anyone know of a tool (checklist, assessment list, etc.) that facilitates the validation of a particular expertise or capability.   Case in point, my group claims to be SME's for performance measurement.  Is there an evaluation tool that we can undergo to prove our level of capability and/or expertise?

 

Please advise.

 

Thanks.

 

 

 

Emily Hoelting

Boeing C3N - Business Excellence - Certified in Knowledge Management - (714) 372 0170 - Cell: (714) 866 1529 

"Tell me and I'll forget; Show me and I may remember; Involve me and I'll understand"

 




Gardner, Mike <Micheal.Gardner@...>
 

I am not really sure how you could ever have a generic tool to validate expertise. Each expertise is different and may need validating differently. Performance measurement could be very different for each company, some may be focussed on selling, some focussed on new ideas, etc. Depending on the tools you have, you may be able to measure some standard things (e.g documents shared, documents read) but the key will often be measurement of business benefit which differs.
 
You might argue tools like CMMI provide this, but this is too complex for your requirements. 
 

Mike Gardner
EDS CIO EKM Team - EDS Taxonomist & Content Rationalization Leader
Telephone: +44 (0) 1332 227367 (Hudson House) - Mon
+44 (0)1332 663964 (Home Office) - Tue - Fri
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Hudson House, Derby, UK
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From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of William Ives
Sent: 29 April 2008 15:50
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Tool to validate expertise

This is not exactly answering your question but there is a tool that combines social bookmarking and social networking that is great for expertise location based on output. It is Connectbeam - http://www.connectbeam.com/


Bill Ives
On Apr 29, 2008, at 10:32 AM, Hoelting, Emily wrote:


Good Morning Everyone,

Does anyone know of a tool (checklist, assessment list, etc.) that facilitates the validation of a particular expertise or capability.   Case in point, my group claims to be SME's for performance measurement.  Is there an evaluation tool that we can undergo to prove our level of capability and/or expertise?

Please advise.

Thanks.

Emily Hoelting

Boeing C3N - Business Excellence - Certified in Knowledge Management - (714) 372 0170 - Cell: (714) 866 1529 

"Tell me and I'll forget; Show me and I may remember; Involve me and I'll understand"




Hoelting, Emily <emily.hoelting@...>
 

Thanks for the great feedback Mike. 

 

Someone sent me these models as a response to my question, What do you think about the value of using them to determine expertise level of a particular process or capability?

 

 

Emily Hoelting

Boeing C3N - Business Excellence - Certified in Knowledge Management - (714) 372 0170 - Cell: (714) 866 1529 

"Tell me and I'll forget; Show me and I may remember; Involve me and I'll understand"

 

From: Gardner, Mike [mailto:Micheal.Gardner@...]
Sent: Tuesday, April 29, 2008 8:25 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Tool to validate expertise

 

I am not really sure how you could ever have a generic tool to validate expertise. Each expertise is different and may need validating differently. Performance measurement could be very different for each company, some may be focussed on selling, some focussed on new ideas, etc. Depending on the tools you have, you may be able to measure some standard things (e.g documents shared, documents read) but the key will often be measurement of business benefit which differs.

 

You might argue tools like CMMI provide this, but this is too complex for your requirements. 

 

Mike Gardner
EDS CIO EKM Team - EDS Taxonomist & Content Rationalization Leader
Telephone: +44 (0) 1332 227367 (Hudson House) - Mon
+44 (0)1332 663964 (Home Office) - Tue - Fri
Mobile: +44 (0)7790 492991
Hudson House, Derby, UK
micheal.gardner@...

We deliver on our commitments so you can deliver on yours.

This email contains information which is confidential and may be privileged. Unless you are the intended addressee (or authorised to receive for the addressee) you may not use, forward, copy or disclose to anyone this email or any information contained in this email. If you have received this email in error, please advise the sender by reply email immediately and delete this email.

Electronic Data Systems Ltd
Registered Office:, Lansdowne House, Berkeley Square, London  W1J 6ER
Registered in England no: 53419
VAT number: 432 99 5915

 

 


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of William Ives
Sent: 29 April 2008 15:50
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Tool to validate expertise

This is not exactly answering your question but there is a tool that combines social bookmarking and social networking that is great for expertise location based on output. It is Connectbeam - http://www.connectbeam.com/

 

Bill Ives

On Apr 29, 2008, at 10:32 AM, Hoelting, Emily wrote:



 

Good Morning Everyone,

Does anyone know of a tool (checklist, assessment list, etc.) that facilitates the validation of a particular expertise or capability.   Case in point, my group claims to be SME's for performance measurement.  Is there an evaluation tool that we can undergo to prove our level of capability and/or expertise?

Please advise.

Thanks.

Emily Hoelting

Boeing C3N - Business Excellence - Certified in Knowledge Management - (714) 372 0170 - Cell: (714) 866 1529 

"Tell me and I'll forget; Show me and I may remember; Involve me and I'll understand"

 

 


Bernadette Boas <bernadette.boas@...>
 

Emily
there are standard, overall skills, leadership and value assessment tools - The 360, Birkman, DISC, etc.; but not sure that is what you are looking for
 
Due to the fact that per business the skills and performance measures that one wants to measure, could vary amongst different companies, I am not familiar with a standard tool. I have seen that those that want to look at a particular area or set of skills, and rate or measure a business' specific expertise level, have often been developed in-house through the HR, Organization Development, even Training departments. And they are usually self-assessments that are then validated by the manager. 
 
I would definitely be interested as well in any input received on this.

Bernadette Boas
678-438-1908
bernadette.boas@...
"Driving Change, Delivering Results"





To: sikmleaders@...
From: emily.hoelting@...
Date: Tue, 29 Apr 2008 07:32:28 -0700
Subject: [sikmleaders] Tool to validate expertise

Good Morning Everyone,

 

Does anyone know of a tool (checklist, assessment list, etc.) that facilitates the validation of a particular expertise or capability.   Case in point, my group claims to be SME's for performance measurement.  Is there an evaluation tool that we can undergo to prove our level of capability and/or expertise?

 

Please advise.

 

Thanks.

 

 

 

Emily Hoelting

Boeing C3N - Business Excellence - Certified in Knowledge Management - (714) 372 0170 - Cell: (714) 866 1529 

"Tell me and I'll forget; Show me and I may remember; Involve me and I'll understand"

 



Bhojaraju Gunjal
 

Hi

You may have a look at

Regards

Thanks & Regards

Bhojaraju Gunjal
2008 Endeavour Research Fellow | Victoria University | Melbourne, Australia.
KM Consultant | Bangalore, India.
*********************************************************************
KM-Forum: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/KM-Forum
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bhojarajug

--- In sikmleaders@..., "Hoelting, Emily" wrote:
>
> Good Morning Everyone,
>
>
>
> Does anyone know of a tool (checklist, assessment list, etc.) that
> facilitates the validation of a particular expertise or capability.
> Case in point, my group claims to be SME's for performance measurement.
> Is there an evaluation tool that we can undergo to prove our level of
> capability and/or expertise?
>
>
>
> Please advise.
>
>
>
> Thanks.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Emily Hoelting
>
> Boeing C3N - Business Excellence - Certified in Knowledge Management -
> (714) 372 0170 - Cell: (714) 866 1529
>
> "Tell me and I'll forget; Show me and I may remember; Involve me and
> I'll understand"
>


Matt Moore <laalgadger@...>
 


Matt Moore <laalgadger@...>
 

Emily,

The basic approach here would be: On what basis do
these people claim expertise in this domain? And would
this claim be supported by i. those inside the
organisation and ii. those outside?

With well-established domains you can refer to
professional qualifications. But with newer ones you
don't have that luxury...

Cheers,

Matt

--- "Hoelting, Emily" <emily.hoelting@boeing.com>
wrote:

Good Morning Everyone,



Does anyone know of a tool (checklist, assessment
list, etc.) that
facilitates the validation of a particular expertise
or capability.
Case in point, my group claims to be SME's for
performance measurement.
Is there an evaluation tool that we can undergo to
prove our level of
capability and/or expertise?



Please advise.



Thanks.







Emily Hoelting

Boeing C3N - Business Excellence - Certified in
Knowledge Management -
(714) 372 0170 - Cell: (714) 866 1529

"Tell me and I'll forget; Show me and I may
remember; Involve me and
I'll understand"





____________________________________________________________________________________
Be a better friend, newshound, and
know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now. http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ


Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

Looks like "validating expertise" and "sharing knowledge" are two complimentary topics of interest now.

We have looked at both, using social/organizational network analysis to find...

* emergent [i.e. actually utilized] experts
* isolated [i.e. un-utilized] expertise
* diffusion of specific knowledge
* patterns of knowledge sharing/transfer
* foci of knowledge hoarding
* patterns of "impending" knowledge loss
* critical knowledge sources/bridges
* how storytelling diffuses knowledge

Once we have a network map of the above activities we can apply various metrics to the map.

Stan has organized a "Midwest KM Community One-Day Meeting in Detroit" on May 22. For my short presentation at this meeting I was going to discuss "innovation at the intersections", but based on this group's interest in the above topics of "validating expertise" and "sharing knowledge" I will change my presentation to cover those. For those who can not attend I will make a PDF of my slides available after the 22nd.

Valdis Krebs
valdis@orgnet.com
http://www.orgnet.com


Hoelting, Emily <emily.hoelting@...>
 

I have a question- I know we have been discussing how one can go about validating the expertise of a person…but how would you go about validating the expertise needed for capabilities of an organization?

 

For example:

 

The expertise needed to be successful in Quality Records Management vs Process Management vs Raw material inspection vs Knowledge Management

 

Or to put it really bluntly…

a job where anyone who could read a text book or screen prompt could execute a success job well vs a job where experience, talent and individual judgment calls were needed. 

 

Is there a tool or any set of questions one could ask to validate this and give you values for each capability you evaluate?

 

 

Emily

 

 

From: Valdis Krebs [mailto:valdis@...]
Sent: Wednesday, April 30, 2008 7:58 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Validating Expertise + Sharing Knowledge

 

Looks like "validating expertise" and "sharing knowledge" are two
complimentary topics of interest now.

We have looked at both, using social/organizational network analysis
to find...

* emergent [i.e. actually utilized] experts
* isolated [i.e. un-utilized] expertise
* diffusion of specific knowledge
* patterns of knowledge sharing/transfer
* foci of knowledge hoarding
* patterns of "impending" knowledge loss
* critical knowledge sources/bridges
* how storytelling diffuses knowledge

Once we have a network map of the above activities we can apply
various metrics to the map.

Stan has organized a "Midwest KM Community One-Day Meeting in Detroit"
on May 22. For my short presentation at this meeting I was going to
discuss "innovation at the intersections", but based on this group's
interest in the above topics of "validating expertise" and "sharing
knowledge" I will change my presentation to cover those. For those
who can not attend I will make a PDF of my slides available after the
22nd.

Valdis Krebs
valdis@...
http://www.orgnet.com


Albert Simard <simarda@...>
 

Emily -
 
Sounds like you would like to automate something that requires professional judgement.  That is, use a method applicable to routine knowledge for a more complex process.  
 
As  a scientist, I was required to list and describe all my scientific accomplishments in a prescribed format.  This was then evaluated by a committee of my peers who rapidly sorted the wheat from the chaff and determined my appropriate level in the organizational science hierarchy.  
 
I also participated in many such review groups and was continuously surprised at the relative consistency of the individual reviews, despite broad ranges of scientific disciplines.
 
I don't know how how one could evaluate something like expertise other than with some sort of peer review.
 
Al Simard


Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

In general terms...

The text book jobs would have very few people seeking knowledge from
others, because most would look it up themselves... unless the
textbook jobs got more complex and started having "exceptions" or
"conditions", then an informal knowledge network would quickly emerge
and the workers would figure out who among them had expertise/
experience in what and who would be willing to share it. At this
point a network could be mapped and measured.

The wisdom jobs [experience, talent and judgement] would have very
strong sharing/exchange/mentoring networks along with holes where
hoarding was happening. You can only learn a wisdom job from those
wiser and more experienced -- it is not written down anywhere(because
it can't be)! In a wisdom job, "who you know" determines a lot of
"what you know" and how effective you are. Wisdom is only transferred
through repeated interaction. Nobody knows everything, but together
with key others, a sub-network can know quite a bit. Finding the
"wise ones" would be fairly straight forward via a proper network
analysis. The wise ones will probably NOT be those who are most
active in the network. Wise ones often[not always] have a firewall of
less-wise ones who handle many of the requests. Wise ones usually do
not want to talk to newbies but will talk to those with experience.

The key to the network analysis is that the key resources/experts do
not evaluate themselves... or answer questions from HR/KM. It is how
others "know of them" and "access them" that reveals the go-to
people. Google works the same way, but on a more basic level -- no
human dynamics.

This is a complex topic and not conducive to occasional emails. Call
me if you want to discuss further and in more detail.

Valdis Krebs
440 331 1222
valdis@orgnet.com
http://www.orgnet.com

On Apr 30, 2008, at 4:41 PM, Hoelting, Emily wrote:

Or to put it really bluntly…
a job where anyone who could read a text book or screen prompt could
execute a success job well vs a job where experience, talent and
individual judgment calls were needed.

Is there a tool or any set of questions one could ask to validate
this and give you values for each capability you evaluate?


Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

I fully agree Al! A properly done network analysis is a peer review of sorts -- except it goes further than just direct connections. It is a multi-level peer review. We ALWAYS have the client participate in review and sense-making of the network maps.

Valdis

On Apr 30, 2008, at 5:08 PM, Albert Simard wrote:

I don't know how how one could evaluate something like expertise other than with some sort of peer review.


thomas.m.barfield@...
 

Note from Tom – I had to make a correction below (underlined).  This may have posted twice to the system.

 

 

I have been thinking about social bookmarking recently (Ex. Del.icio.us – I can never remember where those dots go).  I have been wondering if there might be a social tagging approach to validate expertise.  I assume everyone is clear that social bookmarking is about people tagging web pages as favorites that are stored centrally.  We can pool together the tags of similar people (ex. Ability to see to most favorite tags and bookmarks that have been done by members of the SIKMLeader group has tagged).  BTW – I am skeptical we could get large percentages of people to tag but let’s suspend that issue for now.

 

Let’s apply social tagging thinking to expertise.  Let’s pretend that the SIKMLeaders group had a skill in KM (I know – real stretch here).  Let’s assume that somehow we defined three proficiency levels 1, 2,3 where a “3” is the uber-expert and there are only a couple of those.  There are probably more “2’s” and even more “1’s”. 

 

What if we had some sort of system where if I was a “1”  I could go in and see what activities that I might need to do to achieve a “2” status.  The folks who are already at the “2” or “3” status might be the ones responsible for defining/suggesting those activities – and they might do this thru some sort of wiki approach.  If I am a “1” I’d go in the system and see the recommendations – I might also be able to see a list of people who are at the “2” level.  Odds are I probably would invest time in finding ways to get to know and network with the “2’s”.

 

The “2’s” (who would be like the “1’s” and be working toward “3” status) would be able to see the list of “1’s” and might choose some to mentor/coach.  At any point a “2” could tag a “1” as ready for consideration for the elite “2” hood.  There might be some sort of rule in place that says that after a “1” collects a couple of those tags they are brought into a process to consider being a “2”.

 

I suppose if at some point in time if the performance of a “2” is evaluated as not meeting expectations the system might have a record of those “2’s” who tagged the “1” and some sort of changes could be made there.

 

Hopefully that is all understandable.  It is just some things that have been running thru my mind (actually I have probably spent more time writing this note tonight than I had in conjuring up the idea until know).

 

I am sure there are lots of gotchas and probably many examples of this being done using other approaches.

 

Thoughts?

 

Tom Barfield
Accenture - Integrated Markets - Knowledge Management
St. Charles, IL;  (312) 693-2662
MS IM: thomas.m.barfield@...

Learn more about me on My Page

 

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Albert Simard <simarda@...>
 

Tom -
 
Interesting thought, but I'm not sure what happens when we implant a proactive administrative template in a social process.  Just to spur the discussion...
  • I see similarities to people in bureaucracies.  There is a significant percentage who "play the system" simply to advance their careers, without much concern for the content that they impart along the way.  As long as the box is checked and there are some words in it, little else matters.
  • In science, we have the Science Citation Index, which uses the number of times that an authored publication is cited by others.  Despite the game of "I'll cite yours if you cite mine," and getting your name as a coauthor on as many papers as possible (scientists are people too!) the index has considerable validity in distinguishing between the real thought leaders and the rest of us. 
  • Then there's indices of links to one's pages as a Web-based indicator of popularity.  Although this is not the same as "expertise," it is an indicator.
  • Similarly, on Slideshare, there is a large range in the number of downloads of individual presentations.  Although I'm not sure what it measures (we need a bit of Web 2.0 social science here),  it may indicate good content, great graphics, a hot topic, the right buzzword, or, possibly "expertise."
Al Simard 


Dr. Nick Bontis <nbontis@...>
 

Consider checking out Knexa Solutions at:

http://www.Knexa.com

The world's first knowledge exchange auction is an example of a KM peer-
review system.

Cheers, Nick


Dr. Nick Bontis
DeGroote School of Business
McMaster University
http://www.NickBontis.com