Knowledge Culture Audit - How to? #culture #knowledge-sharing #audit


Hodgson, David <david.hodgson@...>
 

 

Do you know of anyone who could conduct an assessment of department to summarize how well its culture supports knowledge sharing?

 

As many of us would agree, a culture that already rewards knowledge sharing and reuse has the best chances of reaping benefits from employing knowledge management methods and technology. Without an explicit system of such rewards, where people have implicit incentives for hoarding, it is extremely difficult to get any kind on KM program going.

 

I have an internal department that would like an independent assessment, conducted by in person interviews and/or survey, to report on its current culture. And so I’m looking for a consultant or such to help.

 

Thanks in advance for any leads.

 

Sincerely,

 

 

Dave.

 

--

Dave Hodgson

Site Head, Group Research Information &

Global Head, Group Knowledge Exchange
Roche Pharmaceuticals

david.hodgson@...

 


Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

Dave,

Employees are often surveyed about their opinions re: culture/work/ learning, but it is often better to see the actual behavior/
relationships that make it happen.

Sounds like an organizational network analysis would give you some of
this insight. ONA/SNA would allow you to see where sharing and
learning are actually taking place, and where they are not.

This screen shot [URL below], was actually taken from a project where
the consultant was looking at informal/emergent learning in a large
Fortune 50 firm. This network map shows many learning links within
each region, but very little across regions. Metrics to right of map
show E/I Ratio which reveals how open/closed a group is to others --
i.e. it is a "silo-ness" measure. A value near -1.0 shows a very self-
focused group [highly silo-ed].

You can map the knowledge exchange relationships [what is shown on map
below] -- a non-directional link is drawn if both people agree they exchange knowledge. You can also map the Go-To people for any
particular knowledge/expertise. That map would show directional
links: A-->B A seeks out B for knowledge/feedback/opinion/expertise
on X. There we run a different metric to find the key nodes in the
network.

As a result the client, realizing that the regions had much in common,
decided to improve the information flow across silos.
http://orgnet.com/inflow3.html

Valdis

On Oct 15, 2008, at 2:25 PM, Hodgson, David wrote:


Do you know of anyone who could conduct an assessment of department
to summarize how well its culture supports knowledge sharing?

As many of us would agree, a culture that already rewards knowledge
sharing and reuse has the best chances of reaping benefits from
employing knowledge management methods and technology. Without an
explicit system of such rewards, where people have implicit
incentives for hoarding, it is extremely difficult to get any kind
on KM program going.

I have an internal department that would like an independent
assessment, conducted by in person interviews and/or survey, to
report on its current culture. And so I’m looking for a consultant
or such to help.

Thanks in advance for any leads.

Sincerely,


Dave.

--
Dave Hodgson
Site Head, Group Research Information &
Global Head, Group Knowledge Exchange
Roche Pharmaceuticals
david.hodgson@roche.com


Tom Reamy <tomr@...>
 

David,

 

My company takes a slightly different approach than the one outlined by Valdis Krebs although we have used SNA techniques.  We look at the question of openness to knowledge sharing as one theme that is best understood within a larger context of a knowledge architecture audit (full description on our web site: http://www.kapsgroup.com/productsservices.shtml)

 

We use 2 levels of interviews, ethnographic studies if needed, and a survey.  The audit can be limited to only look at knowledge sharing behaviors but it usually works better if we also look at other information and knowledge behaviors.  I’d be happy to talk further about your needs.

 

Thanks,

 

Tom

 

 

Tom Reamy

Chief Knowledge Architect

KAPS Group, LLC

www.kapsgroup.com

510-530-8270 (O)

510-530-8272 (Fax)

510-333-2458 (M)

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Hodgson, David
Sent: Wednesday, October 15, 2008 11:25 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Culture Audit - How to?

 

 

Do you know of anyone who could conduct an assessment of department to summarize how well its culture supports knowledge sharing?

 

As many of us would agree, a culture that already rewards knowledge sharing and reuse has the best chances of reaping benefits from employing knowledge management methods and technology. Without an explicit system of such rewards, where people have implicit incentives for hoarding, it is extremely difficult to get any kind on KM program going.

 

I have an internal department that would like an independent assessment, conducted by in person interviews and/or survey, to report on its current culture. And so I’m looking for a consultant or such to help.

 

Thanks in advance for any leads.

 

Sincerely,

 

 

Dave.

 

--

Dave Hodgson

Site Head, Group Research Information &

Global Head, Group Knowledge Exchange
Roche Pharmaceuticals

david.hodgson@...

 


Dave Snowden <snowded@...>
 

You're going to regret asking that question in a forum with so many consultants!

We use an approach originally developed under DARPA funding to gather hundreds of stories from employees and then present the results in quantitative terms. That includes providing a three D representation over the overall culture of an organisation which includes the ability to drill down from the representation to the raw stories. Recently described by a UK Government Anthropologist as the "first ever field ethnographic tool" it provides richer material than a survey, but without the costs and inevitable bias that goes with field interviews. The DARPA interest was in the field of understanding the root causes of terrorism, weak signal detection and pre-emptive action. However it used now in industry and government alike to map cultures, identify the ways in which culture can be evolved (rather than changed top down). Once installed it can provide continuous monitoring of change without the need to redo a survey, or re-employ consultants. If you
are interested please contact my colleague Michael (michael.cheveldave@cognitive-edge.com)

Oh, and we have talked with Valdis about using the quantitative output to feed into his tools.

--- On Thu, 16/10/08, Tom Reamy <tomr@kapsgroup.com> wrote:
From: Tom Reamy <tomr@kapsgroup.com>
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Culture Audit - How to?
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, 16 October, 2008, 12:18 AM
David,



My company takes a slightly different approach than the one
outlined by
Valdis Krebs although we have used SNA techniques. We look
at the question
of openness to knowledge sharing as one theme that is best
understood within
a larger context of a knowledge architecture audit (full
description on our
web site: http://www.kapsgroup.com/productsservices.shtml)



We use 2 levels of interviews, ethnographic studies if
needed, and a survey.
The audit can be limited to only look at knowledge sharing
behaviors but it
usually works better if we also look at other information
and knowledge
behaviors. I'd be happy to talk further about your
needs.



Thanks,



Tom





Tom Reamy

Chief Knowledge Architect

KAPS Group, LLC

www.kapsgroup.com

510-530-8270 (O)

510-530-8272 (Fax)

510-333-2458 (M)



From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of Hodgson, David
Sent: Wednesday, October 15, 2008 11:25 AM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Culture Audit - How to?





Do you know of anyone who could conduct an assessment of
department to
summarize how well its culture supports knowledge sharing?



As many of us would agree, a culture that already rewards
knowledge sharing
and reuse has the best chances of reaping benefits from
employing knowledge
management methods and technology. Without an explicit
system of such
rewards, where people have implicit incentives for
hoarding, it is extremely
difficult to get any kind on KM program going.



I have an internal department that would like an
independent assessment,
conducted by in person interviews and/or survey, to report
on its current
culture. And so I'm looking for a consultant or such to
help.



Thanks in advance for any leads.



Sincerely,





Dave.



--

Dave Hodgson

Site Head, Group Research Information &

Global Head, Group Knowledge Exchange
Roche Pharmaceuticals

david.hodgson@roche.com


Jim <jlee@...>
 

David,

As Dave Snowden points out, you will not experience a dearth of
responses to your question. I suspect that given the membership here,
you will also receive many quality responses.

So rather than to bore everyone with a commercial, I will simply
mention that APQC conducts this type of assessment on a routine basis.
Please feel free to contact me directly if you have an interest in
learning more at jlee@apqc.org. In any event, I'm sure you'll be able
to triangulate on a good solution based upon your colleagues here. Good
luck!

jim lee

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, "Hodgson, David"
<david.hodgson@...> wrote:



Do you know of anyone who could conduct an assessment of department to
summarize how well its culture supports knowledge sharing?


steven.wieneke@...
 


 
David,
 

I recommend first determining the human information processing preferences of each individual in your department. This can be accomplished through a short individual survey. When analyzed your department will quantitatively know the relative ease each individual will likely experience when working together, including the vulnerabilities and misunderstandings inherent in human relationships.

 

The analyses will determine each individual preferred decision strategy to include...

 

        the amount of input information each requires,

        the kind of input information each prefers,

        the method they use to process information, and

        the action each will typically take (like sharing, hording, early adoption, hands-on action, etc.).

 

One of the advantages of this process is that team effectiveness is immediate because people do not have to change, just understand and appreciate each others differences. The theory behind the survey and analyses is a sociological phenomenon, not the psychology of understanding, measuring and predicting human behavior.

  

The second phase would be to look at existing structure, processes and reward mechanisms. I would be happy to review this technique in more detail at your convenience.

 

Best Regards,

 

Steven Wieneke

President

elka enterprise learning and knowledge awareness

a branch of Wieneke & Wieneke, Inc.

steven.wieneke@...

248.535.0427

 

"Hodgson, David"
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10/15/2008 02:25 PM

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[sikmleaders] Knowledge Culture Audit - How to?





 

Do you know of anyone who could conduct an assessment of department to summarize how well its culture supports knowledge sharing?

As many of us would agree, a culture that already rewards knowledge sharing and reuse has the best chances of reaping benefits from employing knowledge management methods and technology. Without an explicit system of such rewards, where people have implicit incentives for hoarding, it is extremely difficult to get any kind on KM program going.

I have an internal department that would like an independent assessment, conducted by in person interviews and/or survey, to report on its current culture. And so Im looking for a consultant or such to help.

Thanks in advance for any leads.

Sincerely,

Dave.

--

Dave Hodgson

Site Head, Group Research Information &

Global Head, Group Knowledge Exchange
Roche Pharmaceuticals

david.hodgson@...