Value of Facebook friend about 37 cents: NYTimes Blog #social-media


Peter Dorfman <pdorfman@...>
 

I first got on Facebook about a year ago, and at that time I went looking for
groups in a couple of my key interest areas (knowledge management and IT service
management/ITIL). From those groups, I friended a number of people I didn't know,
but who simply shared these interests. Also, I've accepted friend requests from
an additional number of strangers, sometimes pretty indiscriminately. I know I
would not have any problem deleting 10 of these people.

Does that say something about me and my networking proclivities?

Then again...I wouldn't touch a Whopper with a 10-foot pole.

Peter Dorfman
KnowledgeFarm
http://pdorfman.wordpress.com

On Mon Jan 12 11:05 , 'Tom Short' <tman9999@sbcglobal.net> sent:











In this article in the NYTimes , Jenna Wortham discusses a Burger King promotion
offering Facbook users a free Whopper (value: about $3.70)  if they delete 1o of
their friends.  Interesting read in terms of the reactions of users who were
interviewed, and the reasons they gave as to why it would be difficult to weed
out 10 people from their lists of up to 600 (or more) "friends."  I particularly
liked the answer given by a gentleman who said he thought it would be easy, but
ended up getting stuck at seven because he grew concerned about what information
he might miss if he deleted people, even though he was no longer in constant
communication with them. 

Not being a Facebook user (I know - webcretin) this to me is an interesting
insight into the motivation for some people to use these types of sites - in
addition to being a popularity contest (who can accumulate the most friends),
also appears to be a way to build one's own custom set of narrowcasting info
channels, based on the vetted relationships one has developed.  Makes sense -
even if it's three relationships beyond some person you were once dating, it
doesn't mean that person's perspective and info flows may not still be of some
interest, in some particular areas.




Tom Short <tman9999@...>
 

In this article in the NYTimes , Jenna Wortham discusses a Burger King promotion offering Facbook users a free Whopper (value: about $3.70)  if they delete 1o of their friends.  Interesting read in terms of the reactions of users who were interviewed, and the reasons they gave as to why it would be difficult to weed out 10 people from their lists of up to 600 (or more) "friends."  I particularly liked the answer given by a gentleman who said he thought it would be easy, but ended up getting stuck at seven because he grew concerned about what information he might miss if he deleted people, even though he was no longer in constant communication with them. 

Not being a Facebook user (I know - webcretin) this to me is an interesting insight into the motivation for some people to use these types of sites - in addition to being a popularity contest (who can accumulate the most friends), also appears to be a way to build one's own custom set of narrowcasting info channels, based on the vetted relationships one has developed.  Makes sense - even if it's three relationships beyond some person you were once dating, it doesn't mean that person's perspective and info flows may not still be of some interest, in some particular areas.