Topics

How to learn about KM #km101 #definition #certification #periodicals #learning


jean_graef <jean.graef@...>
 

One of our Canadian members is looking to educate herself about knowledge management and would like to know the following:

-- Is KM certification a practical way to learn about KM and a good career move? If so, what are the top-rated programs?

-- What KM conferences do you recommend?

This person is more interested in the collaboration as opposed to the repository side of KM.

This list is a great resource in itself, but I wanted to give her other, more formalized sources as well.


Simard, Albert <albert.simard@...>
 

Jean –

 

A few other thoughts –

  • Join the IKMF group.
  • If she works for the government, go to the KM site on GCPedia.gc.ca
  • Go to the KM group on Slide Share.
  • KMWorld and APQC could provide a fast learning experience.
  • Local conferences depending on the person’s location.
  • There’s always the Conference Board of Canada KM group (steep membership fee).

 

Al Simard

 


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of jean_graef
Sent: Monday, March 16, 2009 9:40 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] How to learn about KM

 

One of our Canadian members is looking to educate herself about knowledge management and would like to know the following:

-- Is KM certification a practical way to learn about KM and a good career move? If so, what are the top-rated programs?

-- What KM conferences do you recommend?

This person is more interested in the collaboration as opposed to the repository side of KM.

This list is a great resource in itself, but I wanted to give her other, more formalized sources as well.


Stan Garfield
 

--- Jean Graef wrote:
> Is KM certification a practical way to learn about KM and a good career move? If so, what are the top-rated programs?
> What KM conferences do you recommend?
> How to learn about KM?

See:

Regards,
Stan


Carl Frappaolo <cfraff@...>
 

have yet to see a job in Km that required certification.


On Mon, Mar 16, 2009 at 9:47 AM, Simard, Albert <albert.simard@...> wrote:

Jean –

 

A few other thoughts –

  • Join the IKMF group.
  • If she works for the government, go to the KM site on GCPedia.gc.ca
  • Go to the KM group on Slide Share.
  • KMWorld and APQC could provide a fast learning experience.
  • Local conferences depending on the person’s location.
  • There’s always the Conference Board of Canada KM group (steep membership fee).

 

Al Simard

 


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of jean_graef
Sent: Monday, March 16, 2009 9:40 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] How to learn about KM

 

One of our Canadian members is looking to educate herself about knowledge management and would like to know the following:

-- Is KM certification a practical way to learn about KM and a good career move? If so, what are the top-rated programs?

-- What KM conferences do you recommend?

This person is more interested in the collaboration as opposed to the repository side of KM.

This list is a great resource in itself, but I wanted to give her other, more formalized sources as well.




--
Carl Frappaolo
Co-founder and Principal
Information Architected, Inc.
Ten Post Office Square
Boston, MA 02109
617-933-2584
cf@...
blog:  www.takingaiim.com


Sathya Pandalai <spandalai@...>
 


There are many KM related graduate programs which would be useful

Kent State
CSU-Northridge
Canberra

This wiki site also have some good resources related to km education.

Sathya


--- On Mon, 3/16/09, jean_graef wrote:
From: jean_graef
Subject: [sikmleaders] How to learn about KM
To: sikmleaders@...
Date: Monday, March 16, 2009, 5:40 PM

One of our Canadian members is looking to educate herself about knowledge management and would like to know the following:

-- Is KM certification a practical way to learn about KM and a good career move? If so, what are the top-rated programs?

-- What KM conferences do you recommend?

This person is more interested in the collaboration as opposed to the repository side of KM.

This list is a great resource in itself, but I wanted to give her other, more formalized sources as well.



Paul McDowall
 

Certification may be a useful vehicle but my caution is that it does not replace experience. Unfortunately I have too often seen people use their certification credentials as a badge of expertise. If given the choice I would always chose a practitioner from the trenches who has tried and failed, over someone claiming expertise based on a formal curriculum.
Cheers
Paul


Kaplan, Bill <bill.kaplan@...>
 

Certification implies there is an accredited body of knowledge .. not sure there is one agreed upon..one would also need to know if the certification is accredited by a recognized accreditation authority…some things to consider

 

William S. Kaplan, CPCM

Chief Knowledge Officer

Acquisition Solutions, Inc.

 

(w) 703.253.6313

(c)  571.238.9878

 

"Knowledge at Work"

 

The information contained in this message may be privileged, confidential, and protected from disclosure. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, or copying of this communication is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us immediately by replying to this message, and then delete it from your computer.

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Carl Frappaolo
Sent: Monday, March 16, 2009 09:57
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] How to learn about KM

 

have yet to see a job in Km that required certification.

On Mon, Mar 16, 2009 at 9:47 AM, Simard, Albert <albert.simard@...> wrote:

Jean –

 

A few other thoughts –

  • Join the IKMF group.
  • If she works for the government, go to the KM site on GCPedia.gc.ca
  • Go to the KM group on Slide Share.
  • KMWorld and APQC could provide a fast learning experience.
  • Local conferences depending on the person’s location.
  • There’s always the Conference Board of Canada KM group (steep membership fee).

 

Al Simard

 


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of jean_graef
Sent: Monday, March 16, 2009 9:40 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] How to learn about KM

 

One of our Canadian members is looking to educate herself about knowledge management and would like to know the following:

-- Is KM certification a practical way to learn about KM and a good career move? If so, what are the top-rated programs?

-- What KM conferences do you recommend?

This person is more interested in the collaboration as opposed to the repository side of KM.

This list is a great resource in itself, but I wanted to give her other, more formalized sources as well.




--
Carl Frappaolo
Co-founder and Principal
Information Architected, Inc.
Ten Post Office Square
Boston, MA 02109
617-933-2584
cf@...
blog:  www.takingaiim.com


Lee, Jim <jlee@...>
 

Bill Kaplan’s observation that a single body of knowledge does not yet exist for KM is an important one. Certification would imply a level of competence in KM that is widely accepted. In fact, the mere existence of multiple KM certifications is likely more harmful than helpful to those interested in learning about the field and then desiring to apply that knowledge professionally.

 

 

Jim Lee, PMP

APQC

123 North Post Oak Lane

Houston, TX 77024

O: +1.713.893.7790   C: +1.216.338.3548

email: jlee@...

Yahoo, AOL, Skype IM: jimpmp2000

Windows Live Messenger: jimleesr@...

text messaging: 2163383548@...

 

 


Kaplan, Bill <bill.kaplan@...>
 

I would also suggest that it is important to distinguish between “certification for competence” and “certification to sell training”..they are different.  I have always believed that the best “certification” is from practicing KM in a business environment while delivering measurable value at the bottom line…

 

William S. Kaplan, CPCM

Chief Knowledge Officer

Acquisition Solutions, Inc.

 

(w) 703.253.6313

(c)  571.238.9878

 

"Knowledge at Work"

 

The information contained in this message may be privileged, confidential, and protected from disclosure. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, or copying of this communication is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us immediately by replying to this message, and then delete it from your computer.

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Lee, Jim
Sent: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 07:44
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: How to learn about KM

 

Bill Kaplan’s observation that a single body of knowledge does not yet exist for KM is an important one. Certification would imply a level of competence in KM that is widely accepted. In fact, the mere existence of multiple KM certifications is likely more harmful than helpful to those interested in learning about the field and then desiring to apply that knowledge professionally.

 

 

Jim Lee, PMP

APQC

123 North Post Oak Lane

Houston, TX 77024

O: +1.713.893.7790   C: +1.216.338.3548

email: jlee@...

Yahoo, AOL, Skype IM: jimpmp2000

Windows Live Messenger: jimleesr@...

text messaging: 2163383548@...

 

 


Arthur Shelley
 

Experiential learning is an essential part of being a successful knowledge
leader - preferably broad experiences across multiple disciplines (including
HR/capability development, project management, strategy, finance,
behavioural understanding/EQ, reflective practice and future focused
improvement). Theoretical/classroom can assist in broadening, but to make a
difference a knowledge practitioner has to ultimately apply these learnings
and their experiences in their own context.

I don't believe that we can certify a "Knowledge manager program" as the
basis of a competency, but we can observe who is effective at achieving
success in knowledge based programs. Many of these people have not arrived
at their success through KM education - most have come to KM leadership
positions through other disciplines and a particular style and passion for
creating the right behaviors and environment which fosters the application
of knowledge principles (like Bill has done at Acquisition Solutions, John
at Fluor, Raj at Mindtree and Amit at Tata).

Regards

Arthur Shelley
Author: The Organizational Zoo, A Survival Guide to Workplace Behavior and
Being a Successful Knowledge Leader, What knowledge practitioners need to
know to make a difference (March 2009)
www.organizationalzoo.com
Ph +61 413 047 408

-----Original Message-----
From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of Kaplan, Bill
Sent: Wednesday, 25 March 2009 10:49 PM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Re: How to learn about KM

I would also suggest that it is important to distinguish between
"certification for competence" and "certification to sell
training"..they are different. I have always believed that the best
"certification" is from practicing KM in a business environment while
delivering measurable value at the bottom line.



William S. Kaplan, CPCM

Chief Knowledge Officer

Acquisition Solutions, Inc.



(w) 703.253.6313

(c) 571.238.9878



"Knowledge at Work"



The information contained in this message may be privileged,
confidential, and protected from disclosure. If the reader of this
message is not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any
dissemination, distribution, or copying of this communication is
strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error,
please notify us immediately by replying to this message, and then
delete it from your computer.





From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com]
On Behalf Of Lee, Jim
Sent: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 07:44
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: How to learn about KM



Bill Kaplan's observation that a single body of knowledge does not yet
exist for KM is an important one. Certification would imply a level of
competence in KM that is widely accepted. In fact, the mere existence of
multiple KM certifications is likely more harmful than helpful to those
interested in learning about the field and then desiring to apply that
knowledge professionally.





Jim Lee, PMP

APQC

123 North Post Oak Lane

Houston, TX 77024

O: +1.713.893.7790 C: +1.216.338.3548

email: jlee@apqc.org

Yahoo, AOL, Skype IM: jimpmp2000

Windows Live Messenger: jimleesr@sbcglobal.net
<mailto:jimleesr@sbcglobal.net>

text messaging: 2163383548@messaging.sprintpcs.com







No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 8.0.238 / Virus Database: 270.11.25/2019 - Release Date: 03/25/09
07:16:00


Simard, Albert <albert.simard@...>
 

A couple of additional thoughts.  

 

A standard body of knowledge does not yet exist because KM is still in the process of becoming, of inventing itself.  We are still experimenting with what works and what doesn’t.  I expect that it will take an additional decade or two for KM settle down and define itself.  Looking to our predecessor field, it took 2-3 decades for IM to define itself.  We’re broader and more complex, so why should we expect things to go any quicker.

 

In addition, a philosophical question.  It is unlikely that a single one-size-fits-all definition of KM can be developed because any definition of KM has to be relevant to the context in which it is applied (e.g., business, academia, government, social networks) to be useful.  And knowledge is all about diversity; it is about stubbornly resisting classification (to the considerable consternation of bureaucracies that need to pigeon-hole all things within their purview.  In my opinion, it is still much too early to consider certification.

 

Al Simard

 


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Kaplan, Bill
Sent: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 7:49 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Re: How to learn about KM

 

I would also suggest that it is important to distinguish between “certification for competence” and “certification to sell training”..they are different.  I have always believed that the best “certification” is from practicing KM in a business environment while delivering measurable value at the bottom line…

 

William S. Kaplan, CPCM

Chief Knowledge Officer

Acquisition Solutions, Inc.

 

(w) 703.253.6313

(c)  571.238.9878

 

"Knowledge at Work"

 

The information contained in this message may be privileged, confidential, and protected from disclosure. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, or copying of this communication is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us immediately by replying to this message, and then delete it from your computer.

 

 

From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Lee, Jim
Sent: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 07:44
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: How to learn about KM

 

Bill Kaplan’s observation that a single body of knowledge does not yet exist for KM is an important one. Certification would imply a level of competence in KM that is widely accepted. In fact, the mere existence of multiple KM certifications is likely more harmful than helpful to those interested in learning about the field and then desiring to apply that knowledge professionally.

 

 

Jim Lee, PMP

APQC

123 North Post Oak Lane

Houston, TX 77024

O: +1.713.893.7790   C: +1.216.338.3548

email: jlee@...

Yahoo, AOL, Skype IM: jimpmp2000

Windows Live Messenger: jimleesr@sbcglobal.net

text messaging: 2163383548@messaging.sprintpcs.com

 

 


Murray Jennex
 

I admit I'm more of an academic member of this list but I have to disagree that KM does not have a body of knowledge.  I am the editor in chief of the International Journal of Knowledge Management and I co-lead a track focused on KM Systems at one of the top academic IS conferences, the Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences.  I see a lot of the KM research that is being done, and publish (enen write some) much of it.  One of the goals of my journal is to define and develop the KM discipline.
 
First, I do believe we are a discipline that is separate from Information Systems and other disciplines.  To be a discipline we need to have a body of knowledge, active research, journals, conferences, and interesting questions. 
 
I believe we have a small body of knowledge, but is growing.  We have this body of knowledge in areas like knowledge transfer, KM success, KM Systems, knowledge discovery, ontologies, communities of practice, what is knowledge, etc.  This body is growing and developing but we do have accepted theories from it, SECI, KM Success based off of DeLone and McLean's IS Success Model, Critical Success Factors, KM Acceptance, KM Readiness, etc.
 
I also think we have a good working definition of KM (I derived this from a panel of KM researchers):
 

KM is the practice of selectively applying knowledge from previous experiences of decision-making to current and future decision making activities with the express purpose of improving the organization’s effectiveness.  KM is really about two issues:

 

       Leveraging what the organization “knows” so that it can better utilize its knowledge assets, and

       Connecting knowledge generators, holders, and users to facilitate the flow of knowledge through the organization

 
This definition focuses on what we are trying to do, improve decision making, as well as what technologies we are looking at: those that help with capturing, storing, searching, retrieving, manipulating knowledge and those that help us network or connect knowledge workers.
 
This may not be all inclusive in what we do but I think almost everything (and I can't really think of something that doesn't fit in the definition, just allowing for it) fits in to achieving the above.
 
That said, perhaps the problem is that we aren't doing a good job of moving what the researchers are finding out to what the practitioners are doing and needing and of course getting the interaction necessary to refine it to where we all agree on it.
 
I don't like to make long posts so will stop, but I do intend to post a list of resources that we are using in research and teaching KM later.  Thanks...murray jennex
 
Murray E. Jennex, Ph.D., P.E., CISSP, CSSLP
San Diego State University
Editor in Chief International Journal of Knowledge Management
Co-editor in Chief International Journal of Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
President, Foundation for Knowledge Management


Great Deals on Dell 15" Laptops - Starting at $479


Kaplan, Bill <bill.kaplan@...>
 

yep

 

William S. Kaplan, CPCM

Chief Knowledge Officer

Acquisition Solutions, Inc.

 

(w) 703.253.6313

(c)  571.238.9878

 

"Knowledge at Work"

 

The information contained in this message may be privileged, confidential, and protected from disclosure. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, or copying of this communication is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us immediately by replying to this message, and then delete it from your computer.

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Simard, Albert
Sent: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 10:03
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Re: How to learn about KM

 

A couple of additional thoughts.  

 

A standard body of knowledge does not yet exist because KM is still in the process of becoming, of inventing itself.  We are still experimenting with what works and what doesn’t.  I expect that it will take an additional decade or two for KM settle down and define itself.  Looking to our predecessor field, it took 2-3 decades for IM to define itself.  We’re broader and more complex, so why should we expect things to go any quicker.

 

In addition, a philosophical question.  It is unlikely that a single one-size-fits-all definition of KM can be developed because any definition of KM has to be relevant to the context in which it is applied (e.g., business, academia, government, social networks) to be useful.  And knowledge is all about diversity; it is about stubbornly resisting classification (to the considerable consternation of bureaucracies that need to pigeon-hole all things within their purview.  In my opinion, it is still much too early to consider certification.

 

Al Simard

 


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Kaplan, Bill
Sent: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 7:49 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Re: How to learn about KM

 

I would also suggest that it is important to distinguish between “certification for competence” and “certification to sell training”..they are different.  I have always believed that the best “certification” is from practicing KM in a business environment while delivering measurable value at the bottom line…

 

William S. Kaplan, CPCM

Chief Knowledge Officer

Acquisition Solutions, Inc.

 

(w) 703.253.6313

(c)  571.238.9878

 

"Knowledge at Work"

 

The information contained in this message may be privileged, confidential, and protected from disclosure. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, or copying of this communication is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us immediately by replying to this message, and then delete it from your computer.

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Lee, Jim
Sent: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 07:44
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: How to learn about KM

 

Bill Kaplan’s observation that a single body of knowledge does not yet exist for KM is an important one. Certification would imply a level of competence in KM that is widely accepted. In fact, the mere existence of multiple KM certifications is likely more harmful than helpful to those interested in learning about the field and then desiring to apply that knowledge professionally.

 

 

Jim Lee, PMP

APQC

123 North Post Oak Lane

Houston, TX 77024

O: +1.713.893.7790   C: +1.216.338.3548

email: jlee@...

Yahoo, AOL, Skype IM: jimpmp2000

Windows Live Messenger: jimleesr@...

text messaging: 2163383548@...

 

 


Murray Jennex
 

Matt,
 
Thank you for the response, I suspect in some ways we are kindred spirits.
 
I'm attaching a keynote address I made at ACKMIDS, the Australian Conference on Knowledge Management and Intelligent Decision Support in December, 2006.  It specifically addresses the gap between academics and practitioners and suggests an approach to resolve it.
 
I will make this offer to all on this list: my journal, International Journal of Knowledge Management actually seeks out practitioner articles.  I look for experience reports, case studies, etc.  I don't expect these articles to fit the academic rigor presentation model, but do want them to be thorough.  Please feel free to send me articles and I will work with you to get them published.  I tend to do one maybe two an issue.
 
Also, thanks for mentioning Hawaii and HICSS.  While Keith may need to do more homework, my track features the following minitracks and I think it is striving to bridge the academic-practitioner gap.  This conference also includes practitioner papers and has very good discussion with the presentations
 
the link for this conference is www.hicss.org, the next conference is HICSS 43 next January.  Feel free to contact me if you have questions....murray
 
In a message dated 3/25/2009 3:10:38 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, laalgadger@... writes:
Murray,

Links between Academics & Practioners

We had a big debate about this on the actKM list a few months ago (with the most incisive comments made by a certain P Lambe).

I did a short presentation at the RAILS5 event at the end of Jan: http://www.hss.uts.edu.au/conferences/rails/

Here is the presso: http://www.slideshare.net/engineerswithoutfears/change-the-world-1198575

I was (in effect) arguing for an evidence-based approach to knowledge management that linked academia & practitioners. Everyone applauded and told me how great the presentation was but the truth was that I had failed miserably. No one wanted to do anything about it.

Hawaii

I have heard about Hawaii but I think that Keith Sawyer needs to do his homework first: http://keithsawyer.wordpress.com/2009/03/11/managing-knowledge-for-innovation/

Cheers,

Matt





Great Deals on Dell 15" Laptops - Starting at $479


Matt Moore <laalgadger@...>
 

Arthur & Bill's observations are well-taken.

Most professions do not just offer training (and in medicine & law it lasts for years rather than days) but mandate what are in effect apprenticeships at different institutions in different roles.

I would also like to see far greater transparency around those offering KM education & training - both in terms of openness about content & methods (show us your syllabus) and feedback from those who have taken it (and not just filtered testimonials from dazzled neophytes).

I think that's a role that is played informally by groups like this, actKM & KM4Dev. We don't offer training but we do have lots of collective experience and reasonable BS detectors.

Matt


Murray Jennex
 

I can do a special issue, or, start an ongoing conversation through many issues (probably my preference due to getting enough good articles at one time, but then, I'm easy and go either way).
 
I do have a question, what do you mean by evidence based KM?  I see this as KM research that is looking primarily at actual KM in use.  By this I mean action or case based KM research and I totally agree with that approach to discover what is working and what isn't.  Of course, the quantitative approach of using a survey over many subjects would be needed once we discover something that does work.  This is to make sure it is applicable over many different contexts, or, to discover the limits of the contexts it is applicable to.
 
Am I close to what you are thinking?  thanks...murray
 
In a message dated 3/25/2009 4:18:29 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, laalgadger@... writes:
Murray,

Thanks for the presentation - there's much that I agree with - and some that makes me uneasy.

The reflective integrator role tends to be occupied by either a particular kind of academic (often one with practitioner experience) or a particular kind of practitioner (often one with experience of multiple organisations/roles and possibly some acquaintance with academia)

The thing that's missing from the thinker-integrator-doer (and I think they are not necessarily different people so much as different roles - but we do tend to find the role we are most comfortable with) is the goal for these different activities. Ultimately the goal is improve the effectiveness of KM. Which is why an evidenced-based KM is so vital. Otherwise it's just all talk (again another P Lambe lift).

Would you devote an issue of IJKM to a discussion by practitioners & academics of what an Evidence-based Knowledge Management would mean?

Matt

P.S.I hear that ACKMIDS is good but I can only afford to go to conferences when someone is paying!

--- On Wed, 3/25/09, murphjen@... wrote:
From: murphjen@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: How to learn about KM
To: sikmleaders@...
Date: Wednesday, March 25, 2009, 10:38 PM

Matt,
 
Thank you for the response, I suspect in some ways we are kindred spirits.
 
I'm attaching a keynote address I made at ACKMIDS, the Australian Conference on Knowledge Management and Intelligent Decision Support in December, 2006.  It specifically addresses the gap between academics and practitioners and suggests an approach to resolve it.
 
I will make this offer to all on this list: my journal, International Journal of Knowledge Management actually seeks out practitioner articles.  I look for experience reports, case studies, etc.  I don't expect these articles to fit the academic rigor presentation model, but do want them to be thorough.  Please feel free to send me articles and I will work with you to get them published.  I tend to do one maybe two an issue.
 
Also, thanks for mentioning Hawaii and HICSS.  While Keith may need to do more homework, my track features the following minitracks and I think it is striving to bridge the academic-practition er gap.  This conference also includes practitioner papers and has very good discussion with the presentations
 
the link for this conference is www.hicss.org, the next conference is HICSS 43 next January.  Feel free to contact me if you have questions... .murray
 
In a message dated 3/25/2009 3:10:38 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, laalgadger@yahoo. co.uk writes:
Murray,

Links between Academics & Practioners

We had a big debate about this on the actKM list a few months ago (with the most incisive comments made by a certain P Lambe).

I did a short presentation at the RAILS5 event at the end of Jan: http://www.hss. uts.edu.au/ conferences/ rails/

Here is the presso: http://www.slidesha re.net/engineers withoutfears/ change-the- world-1198575

I was (in effect) arguing for an evidence-based approach to knowledge management that linked academia & practitioners. Everyone applauded and told me how great the presentation was but the truth was that I had failed miserably. No one wanted to do anything about it.

Hawaii

I have heard about Hawaii but I think that Keith Sawyer needs to do his homework first: http://keithsawyer. wordpress. com/2009/ 03/11/managing- knowledge- for-innovation/

Cheers,

Matt





Great Deals on Dell 15" Laptops - Starting at $479




Great Deals on Dell 15" Laptops - Starting at $479


Matt Moore <laalgadger@...>
 

Murray,

Links between Academics & Practioners

We had a big debate about this on the actKM list a few months ago (with the most incisive comments made by a certain P Lambe).

I did a short presentation at the RAILS5 event at the end of Jan: http://www.hss.uts.edu.au/conferences/rails/

Here is the presso: http://www.slideshare.net/engineerswithoutfears/change-the-world-1198575

I was (in effect) arguing for an evidence-based approach to knowledge management that linked academia & practitioners. Everyone applauded and told me how great the presentation was but the truth was that I had failed miserably. No one wanted to do anything about it.

Hawaii

I have heard about Hawaii but I think that Keith Sawyer needs to do his homework first: http://keithsawyer.wordpress.com/2009/03/11/managing-knowledge-for-innovation/

Cheers,

Matt


Kaplan, Bill <bill.kaplan@...>
 

Murray

 

I would agree that we have an evolving body of knowledge..I would also suggest that involving practitioners in addition to researchers and academia is essential in developing any working definition of KM or in understanding how KM can be effectively applied in solving real world business problems..that’s the real vale in KM…for what stands out for me is  the actual application of KM in improving performance that drives the lasting meaning and value of the KM discipline…my thoughts

 

Thanks

 

Bill

 

William S. Kaplan, CPCM

Chief Knowledge Officer

Acquisition Solutions, Inc.

 

(w) 703.253.6313

(c)  571.238.9878

 

"Knowledge at Work"

 

The information contained in this message may be privileged, confidential, and protected from disclosure. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, or copying of this communication is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us immediately by replying to this message, and then delete it from your computer.

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of murphjen@...
Sent: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 16:40
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: How to learn about KM

 

I admit I'm more of an academic member of this list but I have to disagree that KM does not have a body of knowledge.  I am the editor in chief of the International Journal of Knowledge Management and I co-lead a track focused on KM Systems at one of the top academic IS conferences, the Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences.  I see a lot of the KM research that is being done, and publish (enen write some) much of it.  One of the goals of my journal is to define and develop the KM discipline.

 

First, I do believe we are a discipline that is separate from Information Systems and other disciplines.  To be a discipline we need to have a body of knowledge, active research, journals, conferences, and interesting questions. 

 

I believe we have a small body of knowledge, but is growing.  We have this body of knowledge in areas like knowledge transfer, KM success, KM Systems, knowledge discovery, ontologies, communities of practice, what is knowledge, etc.  This body is growing and developing but we do have accepted theories from it, SECI, KM Success based off of DeLone and McLean's IS Success Model, Critical Success Factors, KM Acceptance, KM Readiness, etc.

 

I also think we have a good working definition of KM (I derived this from a panel of KM researchers):

 

KM is the practice of selectively applying knowledge from previous experiences of decision-making to current and future decision making activities with the express purpose of improving the organization’s effectiveness.  KM is really about two issues:

 

•       Leveraging what the organization “knows” so that it can better utilize its knowledge assets, and

•       Connecting knowledge generators, holders, and users to facilitate the flow of knowledge through the organization

 

This definition focuses on what we are trying to do, improve decision making, as well as what technologies we are looking at: those that help with capturing, storing, searching, retrieving, manipulating knowledge and those that help us network or connect knowledge workers.

 

This may not be all inclusive in what we do but I think almost everything (and I can't really think of something that doesn't fit in the definition, just allowing for it) fits in to achieving the above.

 

That said, perhaps the problem is that we aren't doing a good job of moving what the researchers are finding out to what the practitioners are doing and needing and of course getting the interaction necessary to refine it to where we all agree on it.

 

I don't like to make long posts so will stop, but I do intend to post a list of resources that we are using in research and teaching KM later.  Thanks...murray jennex

 

Murray E. Jennex, Ph.D., P.E., CISSP, CSSLP

San Diego State University

Editor in Chief International Journal of Knowledge Management

Co-editor in Chief International Journal of Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management

President, Foundation for Knowledge Management

 


Great Deals on Dell 15" Laptops - Starting at $479


Matt Moore <laalgadger@...>
 

Murray,

Thanks for the presentation - there's much that I agree with - and some that makes me uneasy.

The reflective integrator role tends to be occupied by either a particular kind of academic (often one with practitioner experience) or a particular kind of practitioner (often one with experience of multiple organisations/roles and possibly some acquaintance with academia)

The thing that's missing from the thinker-integrator-doer (and I think they are not necessarily different people so much as different roles - but we do tend to find the role we are most comfortable with) is the goal for these different activities. Ultimately the goal is improve the effectiveness of KM. Which is why an evidenced-based KM is so vital. Otherwise it's just all talk (again another P Lambe lift).

Would you devote an issue of IJKM to a discussion by practitioners & academics of what an Evidence-based Knowledge Management would mean?

Matt

P.S.I hear that ACKMIDS is good but I can only afford to go to conferences when someone is paying!


--- On Wed, 3/25/09, murphjen@... wrote:
From: murphjen@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: How to learn about KM
To: sikmleaders@...
Date: Wednesday, March 25, 2009, 10:38 PM

Matt,
 
Thank you for the response, I suspect in some ways we are kindred spirits.
 
I'm attaching a keynote address I made at ACKMIDS, the Australian Conference on Knowledge Management and Intelligent Decision Support in December, 2006.  It specifically addresses the gap between academics and practitioners and suggests an approach to resolve it.
 
I will make this offer to all on this list: my journal, International Journal of Knowledge Management actually seeks out practitioner articles.  I look for experience reports, case studies, etc.  I don't expect these articles to fit the academic rigor presentation model, but do want them to be thorough.  Please feel free to send me articles and I will work with you to get them published.  I tend to do one maybe two an issue.
 
Also, thanks for mentioning Hawaii and HICSS.  While Keith may need to do more homework, my track features the following minitracks and I think it is striving to bridge the academic-practition er gap.  This conference also includes practitioner papers and has very good discussion with the presentations
 
the link for this conference is www.hicss.org, the next conference is HICSS 43 next January.  Feel free to contact me if you have questions... .murray
 
In a message dated 3/25/2009 3:10:38 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, laalgadger@yahoo. co.uk writes:
Murray,

Links between Academics & Practioners

We had a big debate about this on the actKM list a few months ago (with the most incisive comments made by a certain P Lambe).

I did a short presentation at the RAILS5 event at the end of Jan: http://www.hss. uts.edu.au/ conferences/ rails/

Here is the presso: http://www.slidesha re.net/engineers withoutfears/ change-the- world-1198575

I was (in effect) arguing for an evidence-based approach to knowledge management that linked academia & practitioners. Everyone applauded and told me how great the presentation was but the truth was that I had failed miserably. No one wanted to do anything about it.

Hawaii

I have heard about Hawaii but I think that Keith Sawyer needs to do his homework first: http://keithsawyer. wordpress. com/2009/ 03/11/managing- knowledge- for-innovation/

Cheers,

Matt





Great Deals on Dell 15" Laptops - Starting at $479



Matt Moore <laalgadger@...>
 

Murray,

You are thinking along the right lines. What's interesting about evidence-based medicine (for example) is that they have gone much further than just discussing cases. They have developed a framework for assessing different types of evidence that supports different kinds of decision-making.

EBKM would involve taking a systematic approach to revewing the literature and probably something like this: http://www.cochrane.org/ or this: http://www.cebc.bangor.ac.uk/

We cannot just "lift & shift" the framework of evidence-based medicine but we do need to be more systematic in weighing evidence. I think first of all we need to sketch out what EBKM is (and what it is not) and then do something about it.

Regards,

Matt


--- On Wed, 3/25/09, murphjen@... wrote:
From: murphjen@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: How to learn about KM
To: sikmleaders@...
Date: Wednesday, March 25, 2009, 11:27 PM

I can do a special issue, or, start an ongoing conversation through many issues (probably my preference due to getting enough good articles at one time, but then, I'm easy and go either way).
 
I do have a question, what do you mean by evidence based KM?  I see this as KM research that is looking primarily at actual KM in use.  By this I mean action or case based KM research and I totally agree with that approach to discover what is working and what isn't.  Of course, the quantitative approach of using a survey over many subjects would be needed once we discover something that does work.  This is to make sure it is applicable over many different contexts, or, to discover the limits of the contexts it is applicable to.
 
Am I close to what you are thinking?  thanks...murray
 
In a message dated 3/25/2009 4:18:29 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, laalgadger@yahoo. co.uk writes:
Murray,

Thanks for the presentation - there's much that I agree with - and some that makes me uneasy.

The reflective integrator role tends to be occupied by either a particular kind of academic (often one with practitioner experience) or a particular kind of practitioner (often one with experience of multiple organisations/ roles and possibly some acquaintance with academia)

The thing that's missing from the thinker-integrator- doer (and I think they are not necessarily different people so much as different roles - but we do tend to find the role we are most comfortable with) is the goal for these different activities. Ultimately the goal is improve the effectiveness of KM. Which is why an evidenced-based KM is so vital. Otherwise it's just all talk (again another P Lambe lift).

Would you devote an issue of IJKM to a discussion by practitioners & academics of what an Evidence-based Knowledge Management would mean?

Matt

P.S.I hear that ACKMIDS is good but I can only afford to go to conferences when someone is paying!

--- On Wed, 3/25/09, murphjen@aol. com wrote:
From: murphjen@aol. com
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: How to learn about KM
To: sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com
Date: Wednesday, March 25, 2009, 10:38 PM

Matt,
 
Thank you for the response, I suspect in some ways we are kindred spirits.
 
I'm attaching a keynote address I made at ACKMIDS, the Australian Conference on Knowledge Management and Intelligent Decision Support in December, 2006.  It specifically addresses the gap between academics and practitioners and suggests an approach to resolve it.
 
I will make this offer to all on this list: my journal, International Journal of Knowledge Management actually seeks out practitioner articles.  I look for experience reports, case studies, etc.  I don't expect these articles to fit the academic rigor presentation model, but do want them to be thorough.  Please feel free to send me articles and I will work with you to get them published.  I tend to do one maybe two an issue.
 
Also, thanks for mentioning Hawaii and HICSS.  While Keith may need to do more homework, my track features the following minitracks and I think it is striving to bridge the academic-practition er gap.  This conference also includes practitioner papers and has very good discussion with the presentations
 
the link for this conference is www.hicss.org, the next conference is HICSS 43 next January.  Feel free to contact me if you have questions... .murray
 
In a message dated 3/25/2009 3:10:38 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, laalgadger@yahoo. co.uk writes:
Murray,

Links between Academics & Practioners

We had a big debate about this on the actKM list a few months ago (with the most incisive comments made by a certain P Lambe).

I did a short presentation at the RAILS5 event at the end of Jan: http://www.hss. uts.edu.au/ conferences/ rails/

Here is the presso: http://www.slidesha re.net/engineers withoutfears/ change-the- world-1198575

I was (in effect) arguing for an evidence-based approach to knowledge management that linked academia & practitioners. Everyone applauded and told me how great the presentation was but the truth was that I had failed miserably. No one wanted to do anything about it.

Hawaii

I have heard about Hawaii but I think that Keith Sawyer needs to do his homework first: http://keithsawyer. wordpress. com/2009/ 03/11/managing- knowledge- for-innovation/

Cheers,

Matt





Great Deals on Dell 15" Laptops - Starting at $479




Great Deals on Dell 15" Laptops - Starting at $479