Expert Locator - lessons learned please #expertise-location


Linda Hummel
 

SIKM Leaders,
We are in the process of determining whether or not to make an
investment in an Expert Locator system. I know several of the great
minds here have implemented these types of applications - can you share
the lessons you learned? For example, if you had to do it all over
today, what technology would you choose. What are the top 3-5 most
important customer requirements/features? What worked/didn't work?
Thanks in advance for your input!

Linda Hummel
Knowledge Management Leader
GE Energy
T +1 937 510 4978
linda.hummel@ge.com
GE imagination at work


Carl Frappaolo <cfraff@...>
 

Linda;

Obviously the solution needs to be tailored to your environment - but that said, the solution needs to be as transparent as possible on both the front and back end.  Interfaces for finding an expert have to be "as easy as Google is for web content" - and even more integrated to your business applications.  On the back-end, the establishment and maintenance of expert profiles has to be automated, or they will never be maintained.

Look for tools that allow customization of the facets that are used to quantify and qualify experts, and the relevancy rankings of each.

I hope this helps.


On Fri, Mar 27, 2009 at 4:57 PM, lindamhummel <lindamhummel@...> wrote:

SIKM Leaders,
We are in the process of determining whether or not to make an
investment in an Expert Locator system. I know several of the great
minds here have implemented these types of applications - can you share
the lessons you learned? For example, if you had to do it all over
today, what technology would you choose. What are the top 3-5 most
important customer requirements/features? What worked/didn't work?
Thanks in advance for your input!

Linda Hummel
Knowledge Management Leader
GE Energy
T +1 937 510 4978
linda.hummel@...
GE imagination at work




--
Carl Frappaolo
Co-founder and Principal
Information Architected, Inc.
Ten Post Office Square
Boston, MA 02109
617-933-2584
cf@...
blog:  www.takingaiim.com


Matt Moore <laalgadger@...>
 

Linda,

A lot of it depends on the expertise you want to leverage - that impacts the technology you choose. I'm working on a paper with Patrick Lambe around this.

Would you like to see an early draft of it?

Cheers,

Matt


--- On Fri, 3/27/09, lindamhummel wrote:
From: lindamhummel
Subject: [sikmleaders] Expert Locator - lessons learned please
To: sikmleaders@...
Date: Friday, March 27, 2009, 8:57 PM

SIKM Leaders,
We are in the process of determining whether or not to make an
investment in an Expert Locator system. I know several of the great
minds here have implemented these types of applications - can you share
the lessons you learned? For example, if you had to do it all over
today, what technology would you choose. What are the top 3-5 most
important customer requirements/ features? What worked/didn' t work?
Thanks in advance for your input!

Linda Hummel
Knowledge Management Leader
GE Energy
T +1 937 510 4978
linda.hummel@ ge.com
GE imagination at work



DeGard, Paulette H <Paulette.H.Degard@...>
 

Hi Linda,

 

Although I am not responsible for deployment of our Expert Locator system, I have been involved with a couple of groups who are reviewing the deployment. The first lesson we have learned is that people don’t understand some of the basics, like you have to put in your expertise in order for people to find you. Simple concept but appears to be missed by people. Another lesson is that you have to set up alerts if you want to know when people are responding to discussions or questions. Again, simple concept but a little training goes a long ways.

 

We are using a tool called inSite at Boeing. It is being advocated by the top people in the company (CEO, CIO, etc), which is actually a good thing. Some people are using it exclusively to collaborate and to find deep technical experts. Others are using it to network with people of like mind and yet others are using it to help frame up projects. I personally have found it to be quite interesting and beneficial to have this social networking/expert locator as an open system compared to the previous system which only allowed to be populated by certain people. With inSite, you don’t have to be in a special group, just an employee at Boeing and the richness of knowledge and know-how that comes from many more people being in the system is wonderful. I can pretty much find anyone (who has signed up) that has an expertise I am looking for within seconds. We’ve even seen some huge efficiency gains because people start a discussion about an issue and within hours, not days, find solutions to their problems.

 

I hope this helps.

 

Paulette

 

Dr. Paulette DeGard

Knowledge Strategist

Lead, Process and Efficiency Team

Flight Deck

425-717-9238 (voice)

360-550-4099 (telecommute number on Fridays)


From: lindamhummel [mailto:lindamhummel@...]
Sent: Friday, March 27, 2009 1:57 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Expert Locator - lessons learned please

 

SIKM Leaders,
We are in the process of determining whether or not to make an
investment in an Expert Locator system. I know several of the great
minds here have implemented these types of applications - can you share
the lessons you learned? For example, if you had to do it all over
today, what technology would you choose. What are the top 3-5 most
important customer requirements/features? What worked/didn't work?
Thanks in advance for your input!

Linda Hummel
Knowledge Management Leader
GE Energy
T +1 937 510 4978
linda.hummel@ge.com
GE imagination at work


bkarney@...
 

If I were you I would suggest using LinkedIn as the Expert Locator System.  Unlike nearly any "internal only" system, LinkedIn provides at least two clear benefits for the experts in your organization.
 
1) Many people have already loaded their expertise into the tool.
2) Employees have personal motivation to keep LinkedIn up to date so that recruiters in other organizations may find them.
 
I also find that the "Recommendations" feature of LinkedIn adds a lot of value, in that it can tell you who SHARES their expertise with others.
 
By using LinkedIn as the Expertise Locator system, you can just as easily search for expertise outside your organization as inside it.
 
Cheers,
Bruce Karney
650 450-0332
bkarney@...
Solar Photovoltaic Marketing and Finance Expert
http://www.linkedin.com/in/brucekarney
blogging at http://mvsolar.blogspot.com


Feeling the pinch at the grocery store? Make dinner for $10 or less.


John D. Smith <john.smith@...>
 

I've been trying to capture some of the ideas in this thread on this wiki page:
 
 
I think that page has a long way to go, but it's a lot better than it was a couple days ago.  :-)
 
The context is a project that sprung from the Digital Habitats book that Etienne Wenger, Nancy White and I have been writing lo these many years.  We decided that there was a lot of useful, tool-specific information that either we knew or we thought our friends knew that should be captured on a wiki.  So here's the project description:
 
 
I think the general scheme describing a tool is pretty solid and will be useful in the long term.  There's another kind of page we want to have. Since one of the main points of this project is to talk about tools from a community perspective (as opposed to a tool designer's or vendor's perspective) one of the things we focused on was how certain tools seem to work well in combination.  For that we adapted some work from Kate Pugh and Nancy Dixon to come up with what amounts to a practice template: http://cpsquare.org/wiki/Use_in_Combination_Template (I just realized that the page didn't acknowledge that, so I just updated it; ain't wikis great?).  Here's an example of a page using the template that's coming along: http://cpsquare.org/wiki/Teleconferencing_and_Chat_practices  Love to have your heckles and comments on the template or one of the specific pages.
 
One of the uses that I see for these tool pages is to get participants in our "Connected Futures" workshop (which starts on April 20th, by the way) to use and leverage them on this wiki.  Doing it that way connects participants more closely to actual practice.  And hopefully we'll develop pages that make sense both to newbies and masters (the previous two offerings of this workshop had both, which was a real challenge and also really interesting).
 
You are invited to use (and contribute to)  this wiki which is sponsored by CPsquare and should eventually have a large collection of resources related to communities of practice.   Among other things you might know of useful tools directories:  http://cpsquare.org/wiki/Other_tools_directories
 
John
*
* John D. Smith ~ Voice: 503.963.8229 ~ Skype: smithjd
* Portland, Oregon, USA  http://www.learningAlliances.net
* CPsquare's 'Connected Futures' workshop starts April 20: http://cpsquare.org/edu/cp2tech
* “Your responsibility does not end with complaining. Suggest something better!” — Esther Dyson
 



From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of bkarney@...
Sent: Saturday, March 28, 2009 2:20 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re:Expert Locator - lessons learned please

If I were you I would suggest using LinkedIn as the Expert Locator System.  Unlike nearly any "internal only" system, LinkedIn provides at least two clear benefits for the experts in your organization.
 
1) Many people have already loaded their expertise into the tool.
2) Employees have personal motivation to keep LinkedIn up to date so that recruiters in other organizations may find them.
 
I also find that the "Recommendations" feature of LinkedIn adds a lot of value, in that it can tell you who SHARES their expertise with others.
 
By using LinkedIn as the Expertise Locator system, you can just as easily search for expertise outside your organization as inside it.
 
Cheers,
Bruce Karney
650 450-0332
bkarney@...
Solar Photovoltaic Marketing and Finance Expert
http://www.linkedin.com/in/brucekarney
blogging at http://mvsolar.blogspot.com


Feeling the pinch at the grocery store? Make dinner for $10 or less.


Seth Earley
 

Can I ask how many of discussions you typically have going and how they are organized? According to business units, disciplines, projects? 

 

Seth

 

Seth Earley
President
_____________________________

EARLEY & ASSOCIATES, Inc.
Cell: 781-820-8080

Office: 781-444-0287
Email: seth@...
Web:
www.earley.com

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of DeGard, Paulette H
Sent: Friday, March 27, 2009 7:31 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Expert Locator - lessons learned please

 

Hi Linda,

 

Although I am not responsible for deployment of our Expert Locator system, I have been involved with a couple of groups who are reviewing the deployment. The first lesson we have learned is that people don’t understand some of the basics, like you have to put in your expertise in order for people to find you. Simple concept but appears to be missed by people. Another lesson is that you have to set up alerts if you want to know when people are responding to discussions or questions. Again, simple concept but a little training goes a long ways.

 

We are using a tool called inSite at Boeing. It is being advocated by the top people in the company (CEO, CIO, etc), which is actually a good thing. Some people are using it exclusively to collaborate and to find deep technical experts. Others are using it to network with people of like mind and yet others are using it to help frame up projects. I personally have found it to be quite interesting and beneficial to have this social networking/expert locator as an open system compared to the previous system which only allowed to be populated by certain people. With inSite, you don’t have to be in a special group, just an employee at Boeing and the richness of knowledge and know-how that comes from many more people being in the system is wonderful. I can pretty much find anyone (who has signed up) that has an expertise I am looking for within seconds. We’ve even seen some huge efficiency gains because people start a discussion about an issue and within hours, not days, find solutions to their problems.

 

I hope this helps.

 

Paulette

 

Dr. Paulette DeGard

Knowledge Strategist

Lead, Process and Efficiency Team

Flight Deck

425-717-9238 (voice)

360-550-4099 (telecommute number on Fridays)


From: lindamhummel [mailto:lindamhummel@...]
Sent: Friday, March 27, 2009 1:57 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Expert Locator - lessons learned please

 

SIKM Leaders,
We are in the process of determining whether or not to make an
investment in an Expert Locator system. I know several of the great
minds here have implemented these types of applications - can you share
the lessons you learned? For example, if you had to do it all over
today, what technology would you choose. What are the top 3-5 most
important customer requirements/features? What worked/didn't work?
Thanks in advance for your input!

Linda Hummel
Knowledge Management Leader
GE Energy
T +1 937 510 4978
linda.hummel@...
GE imagination at work


DeGard, Paulette H <Paulette.H.Degard@...>
 

Hi Seth,

 

I usually have 4 or 5 discussions going on. However, what I’ve noticed is that there is a flurry of activity the first day or so and then it quiets down until someone, usually the originator, poses another question or idea and then you’ll see that flurry as well.

 

We are also using a tool called Idea Central, which allows a discussion to go on for a period of time and then the conversations are reviewed to create a solution to the question that was posed. We are getting ready to have a virtual KM forum and this is one of the tools we will use for generating ideas and real time solutions to KM issues at Boeing.

 

Regards,

 

Paulette

 

Dr. Paulette DeGard

Knowledge Strategist

Lead, Process and Efficiency Team

Flight Deck

425-717-9238 (voice)

360-550-4099 (telecommute number on Fridays)


From: Seth Earley [mailto:seth@...]
Sent: Sunday, March 29, 2009 6:43 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Expert Locator - lessons learned please

 

Can I ask how many of discussions you typically have going and how they are organized? According to business units, disciplines, projects? 

 

Seth

 

Seth Earley
President
_____________________________

EARLEY & ASSOCIATES, Inc.
Cell: 781-820-8080

Office: 781-444-0287
Email: seth@earley.com
Web:
www.earley.com

 

From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of DeGard, Paulette H
Sent: Friday, March 27, 2009 7:31 PM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Expert Locator - lessons learned please

 

Hi Linda,

 

Although I am not responsible for deployment of our Expert Locator system, I have been involved with a couple of groups who are reviewing the deployment. The first lesson we have learned is that people don’t understand some of the basics, like you have to put in your expertise in order for people to find you. Simple concept but appears to be missed by people. Another lesson is that you have to set up alerts if you want to know when people are responding to discussions or questions. Again, simple concept but a little training goes a long ways.

 

We are using a tool called inSite at Boeing. It is being advocated by the top people in the company (CEO, CIO, etc), which is actually a good thing. Some people are using it exclusively to collaborate and to find deep technical experts. Others are using it to network with people of like mind and yet others are using it to help frame up projects. I personally have found it to be quite interesting and beneficial to have this social networking/expert locator as an open system compared to the previous system which only allowed to be populated by certain people. With inSite, you don’t have to be in a special group, just an employee at Boeing and the richness of knowledge and know-how that comes from many more people being in the system is wonderful. I can pretty much find anyone (who has signed up) that has an expertise I am looking for within seconds. We’ve even seen some huge efficiency gains because people start a discussion about an issue and within hours, not days, find solutions to their problems.

 

I hope this helps.

 

Paulette

 

Dr. Paulette DeGard

Knowledge Strategist

Lead, Process and Efficiency Team

Flight Deck

425-717-9238 (voice)

360-550-4099 (telecommute number on Fridays)


From: lindamhummel [mailto:lindamhummel@...]
Sent: Friday, March 27, 2009 1:57 PM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [sikmleaders] Expert Locator - lessons learned please

 

SIKM Leaders,
We are in the process of determining whether or not to make an
investment in an Expert Locator system. I know several of the great
minds here have implemented these types of applications - can you share
the lessons you learned? For example, if you had to do it all over
today, what technology would you choose. What are the top 3-5 most
important customer requirements/features? What worked/didn't work?
Thanks in advance for your input!

Linda Hummel
Knowledge Management Leader
GE Energy
T +1 937 510 4978
linda.hummel@ge.com
GE imagination at work


Stan Garfield
 

Linda,

My preference is to use communities of practice as collections of expertise which can be tapped at the time of need, rather than trying to identify specific experts.  I also think that social networking profiles with self-tagged interests and expertise are more likely to be maintained than formal skills databases. 

Here are three blog posts which may be of interest.

Regards,
Stan


--- In sikmleaders@..., Linda Hummel wrote:
>
> SIKM Leaders,
> We are in the process of determining whether or not to make an
> investment in an Expert Locator system. I know several of the great
> minds here have implemented these types of applications - can you share
> the lessons you learned? For example, if you had to do it all over
> today, what technology would you choose.


Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

Agree with Stan on all of these. In addition a GoTo network map of key knowledge holders is useful. The person who you think you should contact actually points you to the right person AND makes the introduction! Based on my past experience as a consultant and, before that, an HR manager I would turn and sprint quickly away from anything that resembles a skills data base -- no matter who does the updating. Knowledge & skills are so contextual that it really requires a conversation with a knowing person to get you to the right spot.

Valdis Krebs
http://orgnet.com
http://thenetworkthinker.com

On Mar 30, 2009, at 11:05 AM, Stan Garfield wrote:

My preference is to use communities of practice as collections of expertise which can be tapped at the time of need, rather than trying to identify specific experts. I also think that social networking profiles with self-tagged interests and expertise are more likely to be maintained than formal skills databases.


Linda Hummel
 

Hi Valdis,
Thanks for your intriguing post, can you tell me more about a GoTo  network map? 
I agree with you, a skills db is not where I want to go with this.  It is more of identifying who is
an expert based on keywords.  that sounds like what the GoTo network concept is. The second facet is to have a system that is as easy to maintain as possible.
Best Regards,
Linda Hummel
937.602.3525



From: Valdis Krebs
To: sikmleaders@...
Sent: Monday, March 30, 2009 12:24:57 PM
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: Expert Locator - lessons learned please

Agree with Stan on all of these. In addition a GoTo network map of
key knowledge holders is useful. The person who you think you should
contact actually points you to the right person AND makes the
introduction! Based on my past experience as a consultant and, before
that, an HR manager I would turn and sprint quickly away from anything
that resembles a skills data base -- no matter who does the updating.
Knowledge & skills are so contextual that it really requires a
conversation with a knowing person to get you to the right spot.

Valdis Krebs
http://orgnet. com
http://thenetworkthinker.com

On Mar 30, 2009, at 11:05 AM, Stan Garfield wrote:

> My preference is to use communities of practice as collections of
> expertise which can be tapped at the time of need, rather than
> trying to identify specific experts. I also think that social
> networking profiles with self-tagged interests and expertise are
> more likely to be maintained than formal skills databases.



Simard, Albert <albert.simard@...>
 

Valdis –

 

I think that your comments have important implications and need to be considered by those of us who would develop directories of expertise.

 

Al

 


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Valdis Krebs
Sent: Monday, March 30, 2009 12:25 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: Expert Locator - lessons learned please

 

Agree with Stan on all of these. In addition a GoTo network map of
key knowledge holders is useful. The person who you think you should
contact actually points you to the right person AND makes the
introduction! Based on my past experience as a consultant and, before
that, an HR manager I would turn and sprint quickly away from anything
that resembles a skills data base -- no matter who does the updating.
Knowledge & skills are so contextual that it really requires a
conversation with a knowing person to get you to the right spot.

Valdis Krebs
http://orgnet.com
http://thenetworkthinker.com

On Mar 30, 2009, at 11:05 AM, Stan Garfield wrote:

> My preference is to use communities of practice as collections of
> expertise which can be tapped at the time of need, rather than
> trying to identify specific experts. I also think that social
> networking profiles with self-tagged interests and expertise are
> more likely to be maintained than formal skills databases.


Matt Moore <laalgadger@...>
 

Valdis,

There's 2 points I'd make here:

- The first kinda parrots what you said. We should be looking for Expertise Leverage systems rather than Expertise Locator systems identifying an expert is not the same as having them help you solve your problem (there was an interesting IBM paper about this - Rob Cross was involved - a few years back).
- The second is that for once, I disagree with you - but only partly. There are a small number of skills that skills databases work for (e.g. everyone with a CAPM qual). For these a skills database looks a lot like a competency framework. However, I suspect that the distribution of expertise within an organisation follows a power law or "long tail" distribution. We need different strategies for managing capability in the short head, broad shoulder & long tail of expertise. Our problems start when we use a technique that works well for one type of expertise for all them. BTW That is the content of a paper that I'm working on in a nutshell.

Regards,

Matt



--- On Mon, 3/30/09, Valdis Krebs wrote:
From: Valdis Krebs
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: Expert Locator - lessons learned please
To: sikmleaders@...
Date: Monday, March 30, 2009, 5:24 PM

Agree with Stan on all of these. In addition a GoTo network map of
key knowledge holders is useful. The person who you think you should
contact actually points you to the right person AND makes the
introduction! Based on my past experience as a consultant and, before
that, an HR manager I would turn and sprint quickly away from anything
that resembles a skills data base -- no matter who does the updating.
Knowledge & skills are so contextual that it really requires a
conversation with a knowing person to get you to the right spot.

Valdis Krebs
http://orgnet. com
http://thenetworkth inker.com

On Mar 30, 2009, at 11:05 AM, Stan Garfield wrote:

> My preference is to use communities of practice as collections of
> expertise which can be tapped at the time of need, rather than
> trying to identify specific experts. I also think that social
> networking profiles with self-tagged interests and expertise are
> more likely to be maintained than formal skills databases.



Stan Garfield
 

Linda,

This provides a good reason to launch communities of practice for your
key areas of expertise, a social networking initiative using an internal
tool (or LinkedIn as suggested by Bruce), or organizational network
analysis (or network map as suggested by Valdis). There will be other
benefits in addition to expertise leverage (as termed by Matt), but that
can be the catalyst.

Regards,
Stan


--- Linda Hummel wrote:
Thanks, Stan, this is great information. I have been pursuing several
levels of links from those you gave below. Re: your comments on
Communities, the situation here is that there are very few CoPs, how
would you see tapping into experts in this case?


Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

Matt,

Yes, even those with a license or accreditation are all different at their ability to share and explain their knowledge [Rob looked at this in that paper] -- so it still matters to find the right person for you and your context. GoTo maps can easily include attributes/fields that track any item you want like licenses, accreditation, degrees, etc. I think we are basically in agreement.

Valdis

On Mar 30, 2009, at 4:14 PM, Matt Moore wrote:

Valdis,

There's 2 points I'd make here:

- The first kinda parrots what you said. We should be looking for Expertise Leverage systems rather than Expertise Locator systems identifying an expert is not the same as having them help you solve your problem (there was an interesting IBM paper about this - Rob Cross was involved - a few years back).
- The second is that for once, I disagree with you - but only partly. There are a small number of skills that skills databases work for (e.g. everyone with a CAPM qual). For these a skills database looks a lot like a competency framework. However, I suspect that the distribution of expertise within an organisation follows a power law or "long tail" distribution. We need different strategies for managing capability in the short head, broad shoulder & long tail of expertise. Our problems start when we use a technique that works well for one type of expertise for all them. BTW That is the content of a paper that I'm working on in a nutshell.

Regards,

Matt



--- On Mon, 3/30/09, Valdis Krebs <valdis@orgnet.com> wrote:
From: Valdis Krebs <valdis@orgnet.com>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: Expert Locator - lessons learned please
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, March 30, 2009, 5:24 PM

Agree with Stan on all of these. In addition a GoTo network map of
key knowledge holders is useful. The person who you think you should
contact actually points you to the right person AND makes the
introduction! Based on my past experience as a consultant and, before
that, an HR manager I would turn and sprint quickly away from anything
that resembles a skills data base -- no matter who does the updating.
Knowledge & skills are so contextual that it really requires a
conversation with a knowing person to get you to the right spot.

Valdis Krebs
http://orgnet. com
http://thenetworkth inker.com

On Mar 30, 2009, at 11:05 AM, Stan Garfield wrote:

My preference is to use communities of practice as collections of
expertise which can be tapped at the time of need, rather than
trying to identify specific experts. I also think that social
networking profiles with self-tagged interests and expertise are
more likely to be maintained than formal skills databases.





Matt Moore <laalgadger@...>
 

Valdis,

Good point - will ponder.

Hmmm - example of a GoTo map please. There may be a few constraints around the applicability of GoTo maps but I'd like to see one first before I get stuck in.

Cheers,

Matt


--- On Mon, 3/30/09, Valdis Krebs wrote:
From: Valdis Krebs
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: Expert Locator - lessons learned please
To: sikmleaders@...
Date: Monday, March 30, 2009, 9:35 PM

Matt,

Yes, even those with a license or accreditation are all different at
their ability to share and explain their knowledge [Rob looked at this
in that paper] -- so it still matters to find the right person for you
and your context. GoTo maps can easily include attributes/fields that
track any item you want like licenses, accreditation, degrees, etc. I
think we are basically in agreement.

Valdis

On Mar 30, 2009, at 4:14 PM, Matt Moore wrote:

> Valdis,
>
> There's 2 points I'd make here:
>
> - The first kinda parrots what you said. We should be looking for
> Expertise Leverage systems rather than Expertise Locator systems
> identifying an expert is not the same as having them help you solve
> your problem (there was an interesting IBM paper about this - Rob
> Cross was involved - a few years back).
> - The second is that for once, I disagree with you - but only
> partly. There are a small number of skills that skills databases
> work for (e.g. everyone with a CAPM qual). For these a skills
> database looks a lot like a competency framework. However, I suspect
> that the distribution of expertise within an organisation follows a
> power law or "long tail" distribution. We need different strategies
> for managing capability in the short head, broad shoulder & long
> tail of expertise. Our problems start when we use a technique that
> works well for one type of expertise for all them. BTW That is the
> content of a paper that I'm working on in a nutshell.
>
> Regards,
>
> Matt
>
>
>
> --- On Mon, 3/30/09, Valdis Krebs <valdis@orgnet. com> wrote:
> From: Valdis Krebs <valdis@orgnet. com>
> Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: Expert Locator - lessons learned please
> To: sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com
> Date: Monday, March 30, 2009, 5:24 PM
>
> Agree with Stan on all of these. In addition a GoTo network map of
> key knowledge holders is useful. The person who you think you should
> contact actually points you to the right person AND makes the
> introduction! Based on my past experience as a consultant and, before
> that, an HR manager I would turn and sprint quickly away from anything
> that resembles a skills data base -- no matter who does the updating.
> Knowledge & skills are so contextual that it really requires a
> conversation with a knowing person to get you to the right spot.
>
> Valdis Krebs
> http://orgnet. com
> http://thenetworkth inker.com
>
> On Mar 30, 2009, at 11:05 AM, Stan Garfield wrote:
>
> > My preference is to use communities of practice as collections of
> > expertise which can be tapped at the time of need, rather than
> > trying to identify specific experts. I also think that social
> > networking profiles with self-tagged interests and expertise are
> > more likely to be maintained than formal skills databases.
>
>
>
>
>
>



Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

Many varieties for many clients, but a simple example is here...

http://orgnet.com/experts.html {names hidden for privacy}

Nodes/people can be colored according to clients wishes, here color indicates time from retirement. Usually have one map per topic/area of expertise. Can show multiple expert ties amongst same population or show multiple organizations. Maps are on-line, double-click will take you to person's home page/resume/blog/email/documents/etc. Can show just expert neighborhood around one person or one location or ... Maps can also show external experts & advisors and nodes can be organizations/data bases/groups/books/documents/systems, etc.

We normally do a custom version for each client.

Valdis

On Mar 30, 2009, at 4:48 PM, Matt Moore wrote:

Valdis,

Good point - will ponder.

Hmmm - example of a GoTo map please. There may be a few constraints around the applicability of GoTo maps but I'd like to see one first before I get stuck in.

Cheers,

Matt

--- On Mon, 3/30/09, Valdis Krebs <valdis@orgnet.com> wrote:
From: Valdis Krebs <valdis@orgnet.com>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: Expert Locator - lessons learned please
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, March 30, 2009, 9:35 PM

Matt,

Yes, even those with a license or accreditation are all different at
their ability to share and explain their knowledge [Rob looked at this
in that paper] -- so it still matters to find the right person for you
and your context. GoTo maps can easily include attributes/fields that
track any item you want like licenses, accreditation, degrees, etc. I
think we are basically in agreement.

Valdis

On Mar 30, 2009, at 4:14 PM, Matt Moore wrote:

Valdis,

There's 2 points I'd make here:

- The first kinda parrots what you said. We should be looking for
Expertise Leverage systems rather than Expertise Locator systems
identifying an expert is not the same as having them help you solve
your problem (there was an interesting IBM paper about this - Rob
Cross was involved - a few years back).
- The second is that for once, I disagree with you - but only
partly. There are a small number of skills that skills databases
work for (e.g. everyone with a CAPM qual). For these a skills
database looks a lot like a competency framework. However, I suspect
that the distribution of expertise within an organisation follows a
power law or "long tail" distribution. We need different strategies
for managing capability in the short head, broad shoulder & long
tail of expertise. Our problems start when we use a technique that
works well for one type of expertise for all them. BTW That is the
content of a paper that I'm working on in a nutshell.

Regards,

Matt



--- On Mon, 3/30/09, Valdis Krebs <valdis@orgnet. com> wrote:
From: Valdis Krebs <valdis@orgnet. com>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: Expert Locator - lessons learned
please
To: sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com
Date: Monday, March 30, 2009, 5:24 PM

Agree with Stan on all of these. In addition a GoTo network map of
key knowledge holders is useful. The person who you think you should
contact actually points you to the right person AND makes the
introduction! Based on my past experience as a consultant and,
before
that, an HR manager I would turn and sprint quickly away from
anything
that resembles a skills data base -- no matter who does the
updating.
Knowledge & skills are so contextual that it really requires a
conversation with a knowing person to get you to the right spot.

Valdis Krebs
http://orgnet. com
http://thenetworkth inker.com

On Mar 30, 2009, at 11:05 AM, Stan Garfield wrote:

My preference is to use communities of practice as collections of
expertise which can be tapped at the time of need, rather than
trying to identify specific experts. I also think that social
networking profiles with self-tagged interests and expertise are
more likely to be maintained than formal skills databases.









Tom Reamy <tomr@...>
 

Linda,

 

It’s interesting – another KM listserv was having this same expertise location discussion – must be something in the air.

 

I find myself agreeing with a lot of the comments in this group – but with the caveat that it really needs to be all of the above, not either/or.   As a number of people have said and my group’s experience with doing expertise location supports, how best to proceed will be largely driven by your current situation.  Which means that the starting point is really understanding the information/knowledge behaviors of your organization, what those behaviors imply for the design of your program, what business issues and problems the expertise location is designed to improve, etc.

 

Cultural issues are important and networks are a great tool, but don’t forget that a lot of expertise location is about search and categorization of expertise and supporting multiple search strategies.  Skills databases – no, categorization of a multi-faceted description of the areas of expertise – yes. 

 

What we found was that even the conventional wisdom of “you can’t get people to update profiles” has to be looked at more carefully.  It will, in part, depend on your employees (we did one project where they had a history of maintaining profiles since they engaged in a lot of internal selling) and the nature of the profiles.  There are ways to combine automated techniques with very simple user tagging profiles that make maintaining profiles very easy.  If, however, you discover that even that simple task is not being done, there are two answers – one is to completely automate the process.  We’ve done this with software that categorizes everything that people write and use that to update profiles.

 

And two, don’t forget, that whether you call it a profile or just a description or characterization of expertise areas, there will always be a “document” or description that is used to connect people to experts and that means you need a powerful, well designed search.  Two search related issues that I’ve found are critical are the need to monitor and refine the system based on the types of questions people are asking – from simple information requests that often can be answered by a document or a 5 minutes email to a request for in-depth knowledge that can only be answered by a significant session with the expert.  And the expertise location app needs to be designed to handle both.

 

The second search issue if more theoretical but enormously important- experts and non-experts think very differently and use different words to describe subject areas of expertise and specific issues within those subject areas.  How much of an issue this will be will depend on such factors as how large a population you are trying to serve, the types and depth of the kinds of questions your people typically ask, and so.  What we found is that since you can’t predict how people will use the system you need the right balance between simple high-level descriptions of expertise and something like a faceted navigation interface to support multiple perspectives.

 

Hope this helps and good luck with your project

 

 

Tom Reamy

Chief Knowledge Architect

KAPS Group, LLC

www.kapsgroup.com

510-530-8270 (O)

510-530-8272 (Fax)

510-333-2458 (M)

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of lindamhummel
Sent: Friday, March 27, 2009 1:57 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Expert Locator - lessons learned please

 

SIKM Leaders,
We are in the process of determining whether or not to make an
investment in an Expert Locator system. I know several of the great
minds here have implemented these types of applications - can you share
the lessons you learned? For example, if you had to do it all over
today, what technology would you choose. What are the top 3-5 most
important customer requirements/features? What worked/didn't work?
Thanks in advance for your input!

Linda Hummel
Knowledge Management Leader
GE Energy
T +1 937 510 4978
linda.hummel@...
GE imagination at work


carolcsanda <carol.csanda.ae03@...>
 

Hi Linda, I see you have a number of suggestions....several have recommended Social Networking software rather than the point solution of just expertise location. Here at State Farm, that's the approach we are taking too. We have Microsoft's SharePoint "MySites" in proof of concept and hope to pilot later in the year. Hoping that the profile space will allow people to declare expertise. Still a long way to go, but thinking that we can get the benefit of both expertise location as well as group and network building.

Carol Csanda
Director - Strategic Resources
State Farm Insurance

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, "lindamhummel" <lindamhummel@...> wrote:

SIKM Leaders,
We are in the process of determining whether or not to make an
investment in an Expert Locator system. I know several of the great
minds here have implemented these types of applications - can you share
the lessons you learned? For example, if you had to do it all over
today, what technology would you choose. What are the top 3-5 most
important customer requirements/features? What worked/didn't work?
Thanks in advance for your input!

Linda Hummel
Knowledge Management Leader
GE Energy
T +1 937 510 4978
linda.hummel@...
GE imagination at work


Linda Hummel
 

Hi Carol,
Thanks for you input.  There seems to be 3 paths one could take for an expert locator (based on the suggestions from this group and the additional info that several people pointed me to):
1) a profile-based system, like a skills-based tool, that relies on user to populate and update profile (like LinkedIn)
2) a social-networking, profile-based system that relies on user to populate and update profile and provides the additional benefit of network building (as you noted)
3) a passive expert determination system (like Tacit) that uses emails/documents to glean expertise of each person and allows each person to modify the system results.
 There are also hybrids, systems that do profile with portal features (Sharepoint mysites), and the possibility of integrating any expert locator with HR databases for populating profiles with info.
 
I am doing an informal count on which system (s) are recommended/used most.  Stay tuned, and to the broader list, thanks and please keep your input flowing.  This great knowledge sharing si what makes this community truly a treasure!
 
Best Regards,
Linda Hummel
937.602.3525



From: carolcsanda
To: sikmleaders@...
Sent: Thursday, April 2, 2009 10:00:08 AM
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Expert Locator - lessons learned please

Hi Linda, I see you have a number of suggestions. ...several have recommended Social Networking software rather than the point solution of just expertise location. Here at State Farm, that's the approach we are taking too. We have Microsoft's SharePoint "MySites" in proof of concept and hope to pilot later in the year. Hoping that the profile space will allow people to declare expertise. Still a long way to go, but thinking that we can get the benefit of both expertise location as well as group and network building.

Carol Csanda
Director - Strategic Resources
State Farm Insurance

--- In sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com, "lindamhummel" wrote:
>
> SIKM Leaders,
> We are in the process of determining whether or not to make an
> investment in an Expert Locator system. I know several of the great
> minds here have implemented these types of applications - can you share
> the lessons you learned? For example, if you had to do it all over
> today, what technology would you choose. What are the top 3-5 most
> important customer requirements/ features? What worked/didn' t work?
> Thanks in advance for your input!
>
> Linda Hummel
> Knowledge Management Leader
> GE Energy
> T +1 937 510 4978
> linda.hummel@ ...
> GE imagination at work
>