Knowledge capture and the retrieval of knowledge exchanged during conferences #conferences #tools #knowledge-capture


Marcie Zaharee
 

I'm conducting a quick look assessment to determine what collaborative tools can be used to improve both the knowledge capture and the retrieval of knowledge exchanged during conferences/meetings/corporate events, etc. Is anyone familiar with any recent studies on web 2.0 tool usage trends in these settings? Would you mind sharing what best practices exist in your own companies.


TRflanagan@...
 

I would remain a wee bit more optimistic.

In terms of retaining meaning from a meeting on a complex topic, I do believe that one can capture a list of decisions made by the group and an "image" of the relationships among the important concepts that lead up to that decision. 

The enduring take-away needs to be some narrative about "what have we decided and what were the key considerations that shaped that decision."  There is probably some real archival value in having access to a catalogue of warrants that were applied to group decisions which are made repeatedly by different groups in slightly different situations.

Of course, I am speaking about meetings that result in group decisions.  Presentations themselves are broadcasts, and I feel that they rarely tap the wisdom of the audience in real time.  In narrative form I enjoy brief presentations (usually), yet on their own merits they rarely prompt me into a new course of action.  In a complex situation, I rely on deliberation and collective decision.

Tom Flanagan
><((((º>·..¸¸·´¯`·.><(((º>`·.¸¸.·´¯`·..¸¸><((((º> .·´¯`·..><(((º>

In a message dated 7/15/2009 7:15:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time, tman9999@... writes:

Subj: [sikmleaders] Re: knowledge capture and the retrieval of knowledge exchanged during conferences
Date: 7/15/2009 7:15:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time
From: tman9999@...
Reply-to: sikmleaders@...
To: sikmleaders@...
Sent from the Internet

Apart from publishing a collection of the presentation decks that were presented, not sure what you had in mind.

Even then I have found very little residual value in the various binders full of powerpoint slides that I've collected - I have probably referred back to less than 1% of all slides amassed in binders over the years.

What knowledge are you thinking should be captured? Capture, imho, is for the most part a useless exercise. By analogy, have you ever tried to type up the notes that were put up on a whiteboard, along with any diagrams? How much residual use are those notes? How much use are they to someone who wasn't even in the room? Point is, any true "knowledge" that was generated during a conference was probably highly contextual, and sticky - the people who gave rise to it are probably the only ones who will have it a year from now, despite their efforts to capture or transmit it.

Just a thought.




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fmremski <fmremski@...>
 

This is a very interesting question and I am looking forward to reading others' feedback.

The challenges for knowledge capture in a meeting or event setting are somewhat unique. You need to avoid distracting speakers and participants with the task of facilitating the capture, but likely also need to keep the size of the capture small to minimize time spent on post-capture editing. It's not web 2.0, but I am a big fan of Camtasia Studio for rich, complex knowledge capture and would likely start with this tool. Capturing an interactive chat or blog session by several volunteers from the audiance might also be valuable.

Ultimately, stiching audio, video, screen shots, etc... back together into a "knowledge capsule" with metadate (bookmarks, keywords, references, et al) may be beyond current web 2.0 capabilities, but I reserve the right to be corrected! -Frank


Tom Short <tman9999@...>
 

Apart from publishing a collection of the presentation decks that were presented, not sure what you had in mind.

Even then I have found very little residual value in the various binders full of powerpoint slides that I've collected - I have probably referred back to less than 1% of all slides amassed in binders over the years.

What knowledge are you thinking should be captured? Capture, imho, is for the most part a useless exercise. By analogy, have you ever tried to type up the notes that were put up on a whiteboard, along with any diagrams? How much residual use are those notes? How much use are they to someone who wasn't even in the room? Point is, any true "knowledge" that was generated during a conference was probably highly contextual, and sticky - the people who gave rise to it are probably the only ones who will have it a year from now, despite their efforts to capture or transmit it.

Just a thought.


Matt Moore <laalgadger@...>
 

Hello,

I think there's a big design issue here. It's not just about using video or Twitter, it's about how we design our conferences as 1. learning & exchange spaces in their own right & 2. integrated into everything else that we do.

As Tom has put very well, simply "capturing" stuff as text or graphics or audio or video is all very well but will people go back and use it?

My experience has been decided mixed in this area. If the talks are on a topic that engages a large proportion of the audience and presented excellently then yes - just look at the TED site. But few events come close to the standards of TED.

When we recorded the monthly presentations to the national learning communities at gov agency and made them available on the intranet as streaming video we got a little take up but nowhere near as much as the live video conferenced events (I don't think it helped that the videos were 45 mins plus with poor browsing functionality).

The NSW KM Forum recently ran a session on the future of conferences: http://nswkmforum.wordpress.com/2009/05/04/future-of-conferences-redux/

And Australia's ABC Radio National did a programme on the same topic where I was a panellist: http://www.abc.net.au/rn/futuretense/stories/2009/2564798.htm

Cheers,

Matt


--- On Wed, 7/15/09, mzaharee wrote:

From: mzaharee
Subject: [sikmleaders] knowledge capture and the retrieval of knowledge exchanged during conferences
To: sikmleaders@...
Date: Wednesday, July 15, 2009, 3:55 PM

I'm conducting a quick look assessment to determine what collaborative tools can be used to improve both the knowledge capture and the retrieval of knowledge exchanged during conferences/ meetings/ corporate events, etc. Is anyone familiar with any recent studies on web 2.0 tool usage trends in these settings? Would you mind sharing what best practices exist in your own companies.



Nancy Dixon
 

Marcie,
I have used  Issue Mapping and Dialogue http://www.cognexus.org/issue_mapping_webinar_series.htm . It takes a skilled person to create the map, but it's a great way to see the relationship between issues and to be able to  attach documents and notes.  Jeff Conklin has some research - here is one http://www.cognexus.org/ConklinCaseStudyChapter.pdf  - but more on his site.  There is also a youtube video that explains Issue Mapping. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pxS5wUljfjE 

Nancy

Nancy M, Dixon
Common Knowledge Associates
202 277 5839   NEW PHONE NUMBER as of Aug 28,  512 694 6605

now blogging at www.nancydixonblog.com


On Jul 15, 2009, at 9:55 AM, mzaharee wrote:



I'm conducting a quick look assessment to determine what collaborative tools can be used to improve both the knowledge capture and the retrieval of knowledge exchanged during conferences/meetings/corporate events, etc. Is anyone familiar with any recent studies on web 2.0 tool usage trends in these settings? Would you mind sharing what best practices exist in your own companies.









Nancy Dixon
 

Matt, I agree with you. For large conferences, not just meetings - its a design issue.  In a recent blog  http://www.nancydixonblog.com/2009/07/a-km-strategy-built-on-the-collective-knowledge-of-ecopetrol.html  I describe a meeting at Ecopetrol that was designed for collective learning.  In this meeting both the big ideas and decisions were preserved. 

Nancy

Nancy M, Dixon
Common Knowledge Associates
202 277 5839   NEW PHONE NUMBER as of Aug 28,  512 694 6605

now blogging at www.nancydixonblog.com



On Jul 15, 2009, at 6:35 PM, Matt Moore wrote:


Hello,

I think there's a big design issue here. It's not just about using video or Twitter, it's about how we design our conferences as 1. learning & exchange spaces in their own right & 2. integrated into everything else that we do.

As Tom has put very well, simply "capturing" stuff as text or graphics or audio or video is all very well but will people go back and use it?

My experience has been decided mixed in this area. If the talks are on a topic that engages a large proportion of the audience and presented excellently then yes - just look at the TED site. But few events come close to the standards of TED.

When we recorded the monthly presentations to the national learning communities at gov agency and made them available on the intranet as streaming video we got a little take up but nowhere near as much as the live video conferenced events (I don't think it helped that the videos were 45 mins plus with poor browsing functionality).

The NSW KM Forum recently ran a session on the future of conferences:http://nswkmforum.wordpress.com/2009/05/04/future-of-conferences-redux/

And Australia's ABC Radio National did a programme on the same topic where I was a panellist: http://www.abc.net.au/rn/futuretense/stories/2009/2564798.htm

Cheers,

Matt

--- On Wed, 7/15/09, mzaharee org> wrote:

From: mzaharee org>
Subject: [sikmleaders] knowledge capture and the retrieval of knowledge exchanged during conferences
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, July 15, 2009, 3:55 PM

I'm conducting a quick look assessment to determine what collaborative tools can be used to improve both the knowledge capture and the retrieval of knowledge exchanged during conferences/ meetings/ corporate events, etc. Is anyone familiar with any recent studies on web 2.0 tool usage trends in these settings? Would you mind sharing what best practices exist in your own companies.











Larry Hawes
 

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, "mzaharee" <mzaharee@...> wrote:

I'm conducting a quick look assessment to determine what collaborative tools can be used to improve both the knowledge capture and the retrieval of knowledge exchanged during conferences/meetings/corporate events, etc. Is anyone familiar with any recent studies on web 2.0 tool usage trends in these settings? Would you mind sharing what best practices exist in your own companies.
At most technology-themed conferences, numerous attendees use Twitter to capture and immediately disseminate key points the speaker or panel is making. Nearly all conferences define and publicize hashtags (i.e. #e2conf at the Enterprise 2.0 Conference held last month in Boston) that attendees can include in their tweets, so they may be grouped into a common index for both realtime and post-event retrieval. Some conferences have gone so far as to assign a specific, distinct hashtag to each session.

The same method could be used for any private meeting as well. The largest challenge is that Twitter does not retain tweets containing hashtags for more than 3 months, and often less. Individuals seeking to mine older tweets would have to rely on a second service, such as FriendFeed, that aggregates information from multiple services and archives it indefinitely (making it available for query much later.)

I hope this helps!

Larry


Keith De La Rue
 

You asked about:

"… collaborative tools … to improve both the knowledge capture and the retrieval of knowledge exchanged during conferences / meetings / corporate events, etc."

There has been a fair bit written about the use of Twitter for this purpose recently.  I have blogged about this - including links to some fairly detailed blog posts elsewhere - here:

http://delarue.net/blog/2009/06/twitter-and-openness/

Regards,
 
 - Keith.
--------------------------------------------------------
Keith De La Rue
AcKnowledge Consulting
...acting on knowledge, communication and learning
email:
keith@...
phone: +61 418 51 7676

blog: http://acknowledgeconsulting.com/
--------------------------------------------------------



Randy Adkins
 

We have used Captivate software to capture both the presentation slides and audio including questions and answers at some of our conferences.  That content was then placed on the web on our CoP for access by members to listen to the audio along with the slides.  We found it very successful because the audio provides the rich discussion that takes place during the presentation.  We went back even a year later to harvest some of the content for other purposes and having the audio along with the slides was essential. 
 
Randy Adkins


From: mzaharee
To: sikmleaders@...
Sent: Wednesday, July 15, 2009 10:55:50 AM
Subject: [sikmleaders] knowledge capture and the retrieval of knowledge exchanged during conferences

I'm conducting a quick look assessment to determine what collaborative tools can be used to improve both the knowledge capture and the retrieval of knowledge exchanged during conferences/ meetings/ corporate events, etc. Is anyone familiar with any recent studies on web 2.0 tool usage trends in these settings? Would you mind sharing what best practices exist in your own companies.



John D. Smith <john.smith@...>
 

 
There is a cluster of practices being tagged as "socialreporting" that have a lot of potential for adding to and reshaping conferences.
 
 
An interesting story about the democratization of video.  I asked my friend Beverly Trayner what video camera I should buy.  She replied that instead of having a fancy one, she shows up with four cheap Flip cameras and lends them to people who then other people in a conference.  The trick for a big conference is to get the interviews posted really fast so that people can follow up face-to-face during the conference.
 
John
*
* John D. Smith ~ Voice: 503.963.8229 ~ Skype & Twitter: smithjd
* Portland, Oregon, USA  http://www.learningAlliances.net
* “Can't ask newspapers to invent craigslist...” Clay Shirky
 
 


Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

Flips are great!!! Costco has them at a really good price, normal or HD. Surprised at the excellent audio quality...

Valdis Krebs
http://orgnet.com
http://thenetworkthinker.com

On Jul 16, 2009, at 12:21 PM, John D. Smith wrote:

four cheap Flip cameras and lends them to people who then other people in a conference.