Topics

Microblogging in the Enterprise? #Yammer #ESN


Bill Dixon
 

Does anyone have any direct experience with Microblogging (Twitter, Yammer, etc) in a large enterprise?  Internally at EY, we are exploring the implementation of the corporate equivalent of Twitter.  Any success stories or lessons learned would be greatly appreciated.

 

Regards,

 

Bill Dixon


John Hovell <jhovell@...>
 

Hi Bill -

We're using Yammer and an internal version of A-Space at ManTech International.  We also have a page on ManTechpedia that maintains a list of all the employees using Twitter (and their screen name, of course).  It has taken quite some time (from my early adopter perspective :)  ) to reach a tipping point, but we're getting to a point where the number of anecdotal successes seems to be growing.  As an recent example, we just had a new President/COO come on board and after his first 'all hands' (that physically happened at Corporate HQ) there was a flurry of conversation (on Yammer) around his vision, strategic direction(s), and the tactical approach - using Yammer was a great, informal way to quickly spread the message around the globe.

Thanks, hope that helps,
John

Director, Knowledge Management
ManTech International Corporation
Twitter/Delicious: klowey22


At 12:35 AM 7/25/2009, Bill Dixon wrote:
 

Does anyone have any direct experience with Microblogging (Twitter, Yammer, etc) in a large enterprise?  Internally at EY, we are exploring the implementation of the corporate equivalent of Twitter.  Any success stories or lessons learned would be greatly appreciated.

 

Regards,

 

Bill Dixon


Michael Fulton <cincibuckeyenut@...>
 

We have some folks that have used yammer and some using twitter but no formal efforts.  Yammer really went over well for a while, but I truly believe that to be successful in the enterprise, integrating microblogging with an enterprise 2.0 platform (like Facebook status feed externally) works much better.  Internally, we use Telligent Enterprise and the latest version of that (we aren't on it yet as it just came out a month ago), has that sort of integrated status feed.  I think we will get tremendous uptake in that once we migrate. 

Mike


--- On Sat, 7/25/09, John Hovell wrote:

From: John Hovell
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Microblogging in the Enterprise?
To: sikmleaders@...
Date: Saturday, July 25, 2009, 10:02 AM

 

Hi Bill -

We're using Yammer and an internal version of A-Space at ManTech International.  We also have a page on ManTechpedia that maintains a list of all the employees using Twitter (and their screen name, of course).  It has taken quite some time (from my early adopter perspective :)  ) to reach a tipping point, but we're getting to a point where the number of anecdotal successes seems to be growing.  As an recent example, we just had a new President/COO come on board and after his first 'all hands' (that physically happened at Corporate HQ) there was a flurry of conversation (on Yammer) around his vision, strategic direction(s) , and the tactical approach - using Yammer was a great, informal way to quickly spread the message around the globe.

Thanks, hope that helps,
John

Director, Knowledge Management
ManTech International Corporation
Twitter/Delicious: klowey22

At 12:35 AM 7/25/2009, Bill Dixon wrote:

 

Does anyone have any direct experience with Microblogging (Twitter, Yammer, etc) in a large enterprise?  Internally at EY, we are exploring the implementation of the corporate equivalent of Twitter.  Any success stories or lessons learned would be greatly appreciated.

 

Regards,

 

Bill Dixon



Carol H. Tucker
 

We use YAK and have found it a real time-saver when dealing with remote locations


On Sat, Jul 25, 2009 at 10:02 AM, John Hovell <jhovell@...> wrote:
 

Hi Bill -

We're using Yammer and an internal version of A-Space at ManTech International.  We also have a page on ManTechpedia that maintains a list of all the employees using Twitter (and their screen name, of course).  It has taken quite some time (from my early adopter perspective :)  ) to reach a tipping point, but we're getting to a point where the number of anecdotal successes seems to be growing.  As an recent example, we just had a new President/COO come on board and after his first 'all hands' (that physically happened at Corporate HQ) there was a flurry of conversation (on Yammer) around his vision, strategic direction(s), and the tactical approach - using Yammer was a great, informal way to quickly spread the message around the globe.

Thanks, hope that helps,
John

Director, Knowledge Management
ManTech International Corporation
Twitter/Delicious: klowey22

At 12:35 AM 7/25/2009, Bill Dixon wrote:
 

Does anyone have any direct experience with Microblogging (Twitter, Yammer, etc) in a large enterprise?  Internally at EY, we are exploring the implementation of the corporate equivalent of Twitter.  Any success stories or lessons learned would be greatly appreciated.

 

Regards,

 

Bill Dixon




--
Carol H. Tucker

"I believe that every human has a finite number of heart-beats. I don't intend to waste any of mine running around doing exercises."
 - Buzz Aldrin


Arthur Shelley
 

Bill,

 

Stuart French here in Melbourne has done some great work with this as part of his Masters of Knowledge research.

You can find Stuart at his excellent blog http://www.deltaknowledge.net/  

Keith Delarue and Andrew Mitchell have also done a lot in this area, find them through the Melbourne KM Leadership Forum and their respective on-line presence.  I think Keith may have also answered this as well directly.

Regards

Arthur Shelley
Author: The Organizational Zoo A Survival Guide to Workplace Behavior and
Being a Successful Knowledge Leader  What knowledge practitioners need to know to make a difference.
www.organizationalzoo.com
Ph +61 413 047 408


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Bill Dixon
Sent: Saturday, 25 July 2009 2:36 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Microblogging in the Enterprise?

 

 

Does anyone have any direct experience with Microblogging (Twitter, Yammer, etc) in a large enterprise?  Internally at EY, we are exploring the implementation of the corporate equivalent of Twitter.  Any success stories or lessons learned would be greatly appreciated.

 

Regards,

 

Bill Dixon

No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 8.5.392 / Virus Database: 270.13.30/2263 - Release Date: 07/26/09 06:33:00


Lee Romero
 

We have experimented with Yammer and also SocialCast. So far, no
formal support, but they have both seen quite a bit of use.

A recent blog post of interest on this topic (from Ray Sims):
http://raymondsims.com/?p=114

Regards
Lee Romero


Bruce Richard
 

A friend of mine recently left a company and found a new job (imagine in this economy!) where his coworkers actually expect him to Twitter...especially his direct reports.

Unfortunately he is on a 4 week vacation (imagine that in this economy!) so it may awhile before I get any more specifics.

bruce richard

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, "Arthur Shelley" <arthur@...> wrote:

Bill,



Stuart French here in Melbourne has done some great work with this as part
of his Masters of Knowledge research.

You can find Stuart at his excellent blog http://www.deltaknowledge.net/

Keith Delarue and Andrew Mitchell have also done a lot in this area, find
them through the Melbourne KM Leadership Forum and their respective on-line
presence. I think Keith may have also answered this as well directly.

Regards

Arthur Shelley
Author: The Organizational Zoo A Survival Guide to Workplace Behavior and
Being a Successful Knowledge Leader What knowledge practitioners need to
know to make a difference.
<http://www.organizationalzoo.com> www.organizationalzoo.com
Ph +61 413 047 408

_____

From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of Bill Dixon
Sent: Saturday, 25 July 2009 2:36 PM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [sikmleaders] Microblogging in the Enterprise?





Does anyone have any direct experience with Microblogging (Twitter, Yammer,
etc) in a large enterprise? Internally at EY, we are exploring the
implementation of the corporate equivalent of Twitter. Any success stories
or lessons learned would be greatly appreciated.



Regards,



Bill Dixon



No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 8.5.392 / Virus Database: 270.13.30/2263 - Release Date: 07/26/09
06:33:00


Hodgson, David <david.hodgson@...>
 

 

We’re really interested in using Yammer and have a few people on it already.

 

BUT, it’s yet another user interface, another site, another URL for people to remember and interact with!

 

It’d be great if someone would reverse-engineer the core functionality into SharePoint so we can have micro-blogging functionality in the same collaboration system…

 

Cheers,

 

Dave.

 

 

--

Dave Hodgson

Global Head, Scientific Knowledge Exchange
Roche Palo Alto LLC

david.hodgson@...

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Lee Romero
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2009 5:13 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Microblogging in the Enterprise?

 

 

We have experimented with Yammer and also SocialCast. So far, no
formal support, but they have both seen quite a bit of use.

A recent blog post of interest on this topic (from Ray Sims):
http://raymondsims.com/?p=114

Regards
Lee Romero


Bill Ives <iveswilliam@...>
 

Dave

Many of the vendors have recognized this and are incorporating Twitter like functionality into their collaboration platforms. Some, such as Newsgator integrate with Sharepoint, other such as Manymoon, integrate with Google Apps. 

see  Rise of Micro-messaging in Enterprise Collaboration Platforms


On Jul 28, 2009, at 11:33 AM, Hodgson, David wrote:


 

We’re really interested in using Yammer and have a few people on it already.

 

BUT, it’s yet another user interface, another site, another URL for people to remember and interact with!

 

It’d be great if someone would reverse-engineer the core functionality into SharePoint so we can have micro-blogging functionality in the same collaboration system…

 

Cheers,

 

Dave.

 

 

--

Dave Hodgson

Global Head, Scientific Knowledge Exchange
Roche Palo Alto LLC

david.hodgson@roche.com

 

 

From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Lee Romero
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2009 5:13 AM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Microblogging in the Enterprise?

 

 

We have experimented with Yammer and also SocialCast. So far, no
formal support, but they have both seen quite a bit of use.

A recent blog post of interest on this topic (from Ray Sims):
http://raymondsims.com/?p=114

Regards
Lee Romero




sswarup44 <sswarup44@...>
 

Yup, I agree with Dave - Yammer for all its touted benefits it is after all YET ANOTHER user interface, YET ANOTHER site, YET ANOTHER URL for people to remember and interact, and let me add YET ANOTHER site that we need to carve out time for in the already busy workday.

Sanjay

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, "Hodgson, David" <david.hodgson@...> wrote:



We're really interested in using Yammer and have a few people on it
already.



BUT, it's yet another user interface, another site, another URL for
people to remember and interact with!



It'd be great if someone would reverse-engineer the core functionality
into SharePoint so we can have micro-blogging functionality in the same
collaboration system...



Cheers,



Dave.





--

Dave Hodgson

Global Head, Scientific Knowledge Exchange
Roche Palo Alto LLC

david.hodgson@...





From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com]
On Behalf Of Lee Romero
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2009 5:13 AM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Microblogging in the Enterprise?





We have experimented with Yammer and also SocialCast. So far, no
formal support, but they have both seen quite a bit of use.

A recent blog post of interest on this topic (from Ray Sims):
http://raymondsims.com/?p=114

Regards
Lee Romero


Bill Dixon
 

Thanks for your message.

 

I’ve heard the same comment from people internal and external to EY.  There is a population that sees integration of microblogging with other collaboration tools as necessary for far reaching adoption.

 

Bill Dixon

EY

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Hodgson, David
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2009 10:33 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Microblogging in the Enterprise?

 

 

 

We’re really interested in using Yammer and have a few people on it already.

 

BUT, it’s yet another user interface, another site, another URL for people to remember and interact with!

 

It’d be great if someone would reverse-engineer the core functionality into SharePoint so we can have micro-blogging functionality in the same collaboration system…

 

Cheers,

 

Dave.

 

 

--

Dave Hodgson

Global Head, Scientific Knowledge Exchange
Roche Palo Alto LLC

david.hodgson@...

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Lee Romero
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2009 5:13 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Microblogging in the Enterprise?

 

 

We have experimented with Yammer and also SocialCast. So far, no
formal support, but they have both seen quite a bit of use.

A recent blog post of interest on this topic (from Ray Sims):
http://raymondsims.com/?p=114

Regards
Lee Romero


Kirk Broaddus <kbhouston@...>
 

 

I think this is an adoption trajectory common to any application introduced into an enterprise – the early adoptees put up with the hassle of learning yet another interface, they push it to the IT departments, who push it to the companies, and then the major applications already in the enterprise for a particular space (say collaboration) either create that functionality to their feature set or simply buy up the company that has it, and then merge it into their application.  I suspect  Sharepoint, Documentum, etc. will have that feature in the future, as they see the customer demand for it.   Microsoft was famous for absorbing other companies features into their OS, until they got into anti-trust trouble with it.

 

Kirk Broaddus

 


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Bill Dixon
Sent: Wednesday, July 29, 2009 3:22 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Microblogging in the Enterprise?

 

 

Thanks for your message.

 

I’ve heard the same comment from people internal and external to EY.  There is a population that sees integration of microblogging with other collaboration tools as necessary for far reaching adoption.

 

Bill Dixon

EY

 

From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Hodgson, David
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2009 10:33 AM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Microblogging in the Enterprise?

 

 

 

We’re really interested in using Yammer and have a few people on it already.

 

BUT, it’s yet another user interface, another site, another URL for people to remember and interact with!

 

It’d be great if someone would reverse-engineer the core functionality into SharePoint so we can have micro-blogging functionality in the same collaboration system…

 

Cheers,

 

Dave.

 

 

--

Dave Hodgson

Global Head, Scientific Knowledge Exchange
Roche Palo Alto LLC

david.hodgson@roche.com

 

 

From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Lee Romero
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2009 5:13 AM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Microblogging in the Enterprise?

 

 

We have experimented with Yammer and also SocialCast. So far, no
formal support, but they have both seen quite a bit of use.

A recent blog post of interest on this topic (from Ray Sims):
http://raymondsims.com/?p=114

Regards
Lee Romero


Matt Moore <laalgadger@...>
 

There is a powerful analogy with Instant Messaging here. Most IM systems are no longer standalone but integrated with email and other communications systems. Microblogging is a technical functionality / human activity that's part of broader set of technical functions & human activities ratehr than a standalone "thing"


--- On Wed, 7/29/09, Bill Dixon wrote:

From: Bill Dixon
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Microblogging in the Enterprise?
To: sikmleaders@...
Date: Wednesday, July 29, 2009, 9:21 PM

 

Thanks for your message.

 

I’ve heard the same comment from people internal and external to EY.  There is a population that sees integration of microblogging with other collaboration tools as necessary for far reaching adoption.

 

Bill Dixon

EY

 

From: sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:sikmleaders @yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Hodgson, David
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2009 10:33 AM
To: sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Microblogging in the Enterprise?

 

 

 

We’re really interested in using Yammer and have a few people on it already.

 

BUT, it’s yet another user interface, another site, another URL for people to remember and interact with!

 

It’d be great if someone would reverse-engineer the core functionality into SharePoint so we can have micro-blogging functionality in the same collaboration system…

 

Cheers,

 

Dave.

 

 

--

Dave Hodgson

Global Head, Scientific Knowledge Exchange
Roche Palo Alto LLC

david.hodgson@ roche.com

 

 

From: sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:sikmleaders @yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Lee Romero
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2009 5:13 AM
To: sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Microblogging in the Enterprise?

 

 

We have experimented with Yammer and also SocialCast. So far, no
formal support, but they have both seen quite a bit of use.

A recent blog post of interest on this topic (from Ray Sims):
http://raymondsims. com/?p=114

Regards
Lee Romero



Andrew Gent
 

[previous comments]


...Many of the vendors have recognized this and are incorporating Twitter like functionality into their collaboration platforms. Some, such as Newsgator integrate with Sharepoint, other such as Manymoon, integrate with Google Apps.


...It'd be great if someone would reverse-engineer the core functionality into SharePoint so we can have micro-blogging functionality in the same collaboration system...


...There is a powerful analogy with Instant Messaging here. Most IM systems are no longer standalone but integrated with email and other communications systems. Microblogging is a technical functionality / human activity that's part of broader set of technical functions & human activities rather than a standalone "thing"


I guess I am the dissenting vote here. Not that I don't think this is the direction the vendors are going -- I agree they are -- but I don't believe that is a good thing. There are two reasons that this is bad for users, both related to the intrinsic value of social software: the "social" component.

There is a strong analogy with IM -- I spend an ungodly amount of time negotiating with people over what IM client to use. (I just went through this again yesterday, by the way, and had to change IM clients once again.) As more and more vendors start implementing "Twitter-like" functionality, the more segmented and Tower of Babel-like the social landscape becomes. This is not so much of a problem with features that are bounded by the corporate firewall (such as office suites are and collaboration may be) or where interoperation standards have been accepted (such as email).

But it is a serious problem when you are talking about lightweight, highly social activities. Although it seems like a good idea to integrate it with your other communication functions, what if it gets integrated differently with two existing functions? What if email and collaboration both integrate microblogging? Unless you have a single vendor for all your apps, you are going to have a conflict.

This problem is exacerbated by the expanding and fluid nature of people's social environment nowadays. (This is the second problem I mentioned.) business and social interactions are mixed and people communicate both socially and business-wise far beyond the corporate boundaries. (e.g. Many of my friends are information architects or writers or engineers as well. We discuss persoanl and business matters interchangeably and this happens outside or across corporate boundaries.) Unfortunately, corporate IT likes to ignore this fact and choose tools for "inside" the firewall as if they operated in a vacuum. As a result I have had to run at least two IM clients for the last 4-5 years so I can keep up with both co-workers and business associates. I currently use Twitter. But I can already see that I may need to do much the same to maintain my microblogging connections in the future...

I am not claiming to know the right answer here. I agree that yet-another-ui is one problem. But it is not solved by creating a situation where you are forced to use 3-4 almost-the-same products. Clearly, interoperability would be ideal. But unlike email, vendor behavior has made that impractical for IM as well as socisl networking and (most likely) wlll do the same for microblogging. And, yes, I know I can (sort of) solve the problem with yet-another-freeware-integrator (friendfeed, etc) or some other geek hackery, but that doesn't solve the problem for the average user.

Well, having said all that, I come off sounding far more negative that I intended. I guess my desire is that corporations (and the consultants that advise them) recognize both the needs for corporate privacy and the much more integrated nature of work/personal interaction in modern life.

Andrew Gent


Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

Excellent post Andrew! No, not negative at all -- you hit points most vendors and I/T folks would rather not address. The technology is easy, the sociology is hard! Properly supporting human behavior with technology is even harder.

Us independents have always mixed business/social comm via various SW/ HW. You point out how it is also very true of corporate folks. Tough to live with rigid boundaries in a boundaryless world. The trick is how do we do permeable/changing boundaries?

BTW, SocialText has a great Twitter-like client and excellent integration across their products.

Valdis Krebs
http://orgnet.com
http://thenetworkthinker.com

On Jul 30, 2009, at 9:19 AM, Andrew Gent wrote:

[snip]
This problem is exacerbated by the expanding and fluid nature of people's social environment nowadays. (This is the second problem I mentioned.) business and social interactions are mixed and people communicate both socially and business-wise far beyond the corporate boundaries. (e.g. Many of my friends are information architects or writers or engineers as well. We discuss persoanl and business matters interchangeably and this happens outside or across corporate boundaries.) Unfortunately, corporate IT likes to ignore this fact and choose tools for "inside" the firewall as if they operated in a vacuum. As a result I have had to run at least two IM clients for the last 4-5 years so I can keep up with both co-workers and business associates. I currently use Twitter. But I can already see that I may need to do much the same to maintain my microblogging connections in the future...

I am not claiming to know the right answer here. I agree that yet- another-ui is one problem. But it is not solved by creating a situation where you are forced to use 3-4 almost-the-same products. Clearly, interoperability would be ideal. But unlike email, vendor behavior has made that impractical for IM as well as socisl networking and (most likely) wlll do the same for microblogging. And, yes, I know I can (sort of) solve the problem with yet-another- freeware-integrator (friendfeed, etc) or some other geek hackery, but that doesn't solve the problem for the average user.

Well, having said all that, I come off sounding far more negative that I intended. I guess my desire is that corporations (and the consultants that advise them) recognize both the needs for corporate privacy and the much more integrated nature of work/personal interaction in modern life.

Andrew Gent


jumpemgun <rudy.c.redmond@...>
 

To the many concerns raised about adding yet another tool/site to be used as a part of the corporate social networking realm, I agree that this dilutes the user experience and requires not only the management of one's daily work activities but having a clear understanding of who utilizes which tool/site. At Accenture, we've started using Microsoft's Office Communicator and it effectively is a "one-stop shop" in which you can combine contacts from several IM tools (AIM, Windows Messenger, Yahoo,..). I've found it very convenient/useful.

I am personally not a fan of "Twittering" because I feel you need to retain some sense of "privacy" both personally and professionally. I challenge the fact that everyone in your network needs to know your every move/thought every minute. Clear boundaries must be set.

Rudy

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Gent <ajgent@...> wrote:

[previous comments]

...Many of the vendors have recognized this and are incorporating Twitter
like functionality into their collaboration platforms. Some, such as
Newsgator integrate with Sharepoint, other such as Manymoon, integrate
with Google Apps.


...It'd be great if someone would reverse-engineer the core functionality into SharePoint so we can have micro-blogging functionality in the same collaboration system...

...There is a powerful analogy with Instant Messaging here. Most IM
systems are no longer standalone but integrated with email and other
communications systems. Microblogging is a technical functionality /
human activity that's part of broader set of technical functions &
human activities rather than a standalone "thing"
I guess I am the dissenting vote here. Not that I don't think this is the direction the vendors are going -- I agree they are -- but I don't believe that is a good thing. There are two reasons that this is bad for users, both related to the intrinsic value of social software: the "social" component.

There is a strong analogy with IM -- I spend an ungodly amount of time negotiating with people over what IM client to use. (I just went through this again yesterday, by the way, and had to change IM clients once again.) As more and more vendors start implementing "Twitter-like" functionality, the more segmented and Tower of Babel-like the social landscape becomes. This is not so much of a problem with features that are bounded by the corporate firewall (such as office suites are and collaboration may be) or where interoperation standards have been accepted (such as email).

But it is a serious problem when you are talking about lightweight, highly social activities. Although it seems like a good idea to integrate it with your other communication functions, what if it gets integrated differently with two existing functions? What if email and collaboration both integrate microblogging? Unless you have a single vendor for all your apps, you are going to have a conflict.

This problem is exacerbated by the expanding and fluid nature of people's social environment nowadays. (This is the second problem I mentioned.) business and social interactions are mixed and people communicate both socially and business-wise far beyond the corporate boundaries. (e.g. Many of my friends are information architects or writers or engineers as well. We discuss persoanl and business matters interchangeably and this happens outside or across corporate boundaries.) Unfortunately, corporate IT likes to ignore this fact and choose tools for "inside" the firewall as if they operated in a vacuum. As a result I have had to run at least two IM clients for the last 4-5 years so I can keep up with both co-workers and business associates. I currently use Twitter. But I can already see that I may need to do much the same to maintain my microblogging connections in the future...

I am not claiming to know the right answer here. I agree that yet-another-ui is one problem. But it is not solved by creating a situation where you are forced to use 3-4 almost-the-same products. Clearly, interoperability would be ideal. But unlike email, vendor behavior has made that impractical for IM as well as socisl networking and (most likely) wlll do the same for microblogging. And, yes, I know I can (sort of) solve the problem with yet-another-freeware-integrator (friendfeed, etc) or some other geek hackery, but that doesn't solve the problem for the average user.

Well, having said all that, I come off sounding far more negative that I intended. I guess my desire is that corporations (and the consultants that advise them) recognize both the needs for corporate privacy and the much more integrated nature of work/personal interaction in modern life.

Andrew Gent


Bruce Karney <bkarney@...>
 

I've been doing KM work for 15 years, and the last thing I'd want to encourage in any enterprise I care about is microblogging.

Kurt Vonnegut wrote a wonderful short story (http://instruct.westvalley.edu/lafave/hb.html) called "Harrison Bergeron" that can be appreciated on many levels, but the thing that sticks in my mind 40 years after first reading it was this passage about how an oppressive government destroyed the ability of its citizens to think:

"And it was in [April] that the men [from the office of the US Handicapper General] took George and Hazel Bergeron's fourteen-year-old son, Harrison, away.

"It was tragic, all right, but George and Hazel couldn't think about it very hard. Hazel had a perfectly average intelligence, which meant she couldn't think about anything except in short bursts. And George, while his intelligence was way above normal, had a little mental handicap radio in his ear. He was required by law to wear it at all times. It was tuned to a government transmitter. Every twenty seconds or so, the transmitter would send out some sharp noise to keep people like George from taking unfair advantage of their brains.

"George and Hazel were watching television. There were tears on Hazel's cheeks, but she'd forgotten for the moment what they were about."

Thanks for your attention, everyone. Tweet, tweet. Is that a bird outside my window? Pretty bird! Tweet, tweet! I forgot what I was going to say next, so I guess I'll just click "Send."

Cheers,
Bruce Karney
Solar Photovoltaic Marketing and Finance Consultant


Arthur Shelley
 

Folks,

 

The microblogging conversation reminded me that I decided to blog every week two years ago, did it once and never did again - until today.  Friends have been nagging me to be on Twitter for some time, but I have not been able to for lack of time (or is that a subconscious priority outcome rather than a conscious decision).  I have RSS links to many blogs that I rarely get to and don’t post to this and other forums as much as I would like.

 

I think we are all the same – too busy being busy to truly interact as we would like to.  We know we will get some value from these things, but in “look up and shout down” ROI focused organizations it is difficult to find the time to do what we really want.  Our behaviors drive what actions we take.  On that point, I invite you to have a closer look at yourself.  Invest 10 minutes of your time on my website to reflecting what animal you are… that is use my free animal profiler to discover your inner animal (behavioral assessment).  This is a lot of fun and quite reflective.  You can do one on your friends also.  Enjoy your weekends and by the way, my new blog will appear weekly at http://organizationalzoo.blogspot.com/

Kind Regards

Arthur Shelley
Author: The Organizational Zoo A Survival Guide to Workplace Behavior and
Being a Successful Knowledge Leader  What knowledge practitioners need to know to make a difference.
www.organizationalzoo.com
Ph +61 413 047 408


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of jumpemgun
Sent: Friday, 31 July 2009 1:01 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Microblogging in the Enterprise?

 

 

To the many concerns raised about adding yet another tool/site to be used as a part of the corporate social networking realm, I agree that this dilutes the user experience and requires not only the management of one's daily work activities but having a clear understanding of who utilizes which tool/site. At Accenture, we've started using Microsoft's Office Communicator and it effectively is a "one-stop shop" in which you can combine contacts from several IM tools (AIM, Windows Messenger, Yahoo,..). I've found it very convenient/useful.

I am personally not a fan of "Twittering" because I feel you need to retain some sense of "privacy" both personally and professionally. I challenge the fact that everyone in your network needs to know your every move/thought every minute. Clear boundaries must be set.

Rudy

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Gent wrote:
>
> [previous comments]
>
> ...Many of the vendors have recognized this and are incorporating Twitter
> like functionality into their collaboration platforms. Some, such as
> Newsgator integrate with Sharepoint, other such as Manymoon, integrate
> with Google Apps.
>
>
> ...It'd be great if someone would reverse-engineer the core functionality into SharePoint so we can have micro-blogging functionality in the same collaboration system...
>
> ...There is a powerful analogy with Instant Messaging here. Most IM
> systems are no longer standalone but integrated with email and other
> communications systems. Microblogging is a technical functionality /
> human activity that's part of broader set of technical functions &
> human activities rather than a standalone "thing"
> I guess I am the dissenting vote here. Not that I don't think this is the direction the vendors are going -- I agree they are -- but I don't believe that is a good thing. There are two reasons that this is bad for users, both related to the intrinsic value of social software: the "social" component.
>
> There is a strong analogy with IM -- I spend an ungodly amount of time negotiating with people over what IM client to use. (I just went through this again yesterday, by the way, and had to change IM clients once again.) As more and more vendors start implementing "Twitter-like" functionality, the more segmented and Tower of Babel-like the social landscape becomes. This is not so much of a problem with features that are bounded by the corporate firewall (such as office suites are and collaboration may be) or where interoperation standards have been accepted (such as email).
>
> But it is a serious problem when you are talking about lightweight, highly social activities. Although it seems like a good idea to integrate it with your other communication functions, what if it gets integrated differently with two existing functions? What if email and collaboration both integrate microblogging? Unless you have a single vendor for all your apps, you are going to have a conflict.
>
> This problem is exacerbated by the expanding and fluid nature of people's social environment nowadays. (This is the second problem I mentioned.) business and social interactions are mixed and people communicate both socially and business-wise far beyond the corporate boundaries. (e.g. Many of my friends are information architects or writers or engineers as well. We discuss persoanl and business matters interchangeably and this happens outside or across corporate boundaries.) Unfortunately, corporate IT likes to ignore this fact and choose tools for "inside" the firewall as if they operated in a vacuum. As a result I have had to run at least two IM clients for the last 4-5 years so I can keep up with both co-workers and business associates. I currently use Twitter. But I can already see that I may need to do much the same to maintain my microblogging connections in the future...
>
> I am not claiming to know the right answer here. I agree that yet-another-ui is one problem. But it is not solved by creating a situation where you are forced to use 3-4 almost-the-same products. Clearly, interoperability would be ideal. But unlike email, vendor behavior has made that impractical for IM as well as socisl networking and (most likely) wlll do the same for microblogging. And, yes, I know I can (sort of) solve the problem with yet-another-freeware-integrator (friendfeed, etc) or some other geek hackery, but that doesn't solve the problem for the average user.
>
> Well, having said all that, I come off sounding far more negative that I intended. I guess my desire is that corporations (and the consultants that advise them) recognize both the needs for corporate privacy and the much more integrated nature of work/personal interaction in modern life.
>
> Andrew Gent
>

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Michael Fulton <cincibuckeyenut@...>
 

Move to telligent enterprise instead of sharepoint as your collaboration platform and you will have it.  :)  Of course, that has much broader ramifications, but if TE is right for you, it does also offer sharepoint integration capability.  We use it and I absolutely love it. 

Mike


--- On Tue, 7/28/09, Hodgson, David wrote:

From: Hodgson, David
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Microblogging in the Enterprise?
To: sikmleaders@...
Date: Tuesday, July 28, 2009, 11:33 AM

 

 

We’re really interested in using Yammer and have a few people on it already.

 

BUT, it’s yet another user interface, another site, another URL for people to remember and interact with!

 

It’d be great if someone would reverse-engineer the core functionality into SharePoint so we can have micro-blogging functionality in the same collaboration system…

 

Cheers,

 

Dave.

 

 

--

Dave Hodgson

Global Head, Scientific Knowledge Exchange
Roche Palo Alto LLC

david.hodgson@ roche.com

 

 

From: sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:sikmleaders @yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Lee Romero
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2009 5:13 AM
To: sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Microblogging in the Enterprise?

 

 

We have experimented with Yammer and also SocialCast. So far, no
formal support, but they have both seen quite a bit of use.

A recent blog post of interest on this topic (from Ray Sims):
http://raymondsims. com/?p=114

Regards
Lee Romero



Suzy Tonini
 

RE: Sharepoint integration- Socialcast.com I believe offers that feature
Respectfully,

Suzy Tonini
stonini@...


On Wed, Jul 29, 2009 at 1:21 PM, Bill Dixon <wm_dixon@...> wrote:
 

Thanks for your message.

 

I’ve heard the same comment from people internal and external to EY.  There is a population that sees integration of microblogging with other collaboration tools as necessary for far reaching adoption.

 

Bill Dixon

EY

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Hodgson, David
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2009 10:33 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Microblogging in the Enterprise?

 

 

 

We’re really interested in using Yammer and have a few people on it already.

 

BUT, it’s yet another user interface, another site, another URL for people to remember and interact with!

 

It’d be great if someone would reverse-engineer the core functionality into SharePoint so we can have micro-blogging functionality in the same collaboration system…

 

Cheers,

 

Dave.

 

 

--

Dave Hodgson

Global Head, Scientific Knowledge Exchange
Roche Palo Alto LLC

david.hodgson@...

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Lee Romero
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2009 5:13 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Microblogging in the Enterprise?

 

 

We have experimented with Yammer and also SocialCast. So far, no
formal support, but they have both seen quite a bit of use.

A recent blog post of interest on this topic (from Ray Sims):
http://raymondsims.com/?p=114

Regards
Lee Romero