Knowledge Maps #mapping


Matt Moore <laalgadger@...>
 

Hello,

I am interested in knowledge mapping exercises that organisations have engaged in (& apologies to Stan for cross-posting, there is a reason tho).

The key things I am after are:
- What the purpose behind the exercise was.
- What techniques were used.
- What the outputs looked like (obviously there may be confidentiality issues here).
- What was then done with the outputs & what impact they had.

I'm currently doing some work with a client who have different groups all producing things they call "knowledge maps". Each group are doing this for different reasons & using techniques - and hence getting different outputs.

While I encourage then to focus on the "why", it's tweaked my curiosity & I'd like to see other examples of these things.

I may produce a "knowledge map gallery/atlas" if I get sufficient responses (& obviously confidential responses won't go in that).

Cheers,

Matt


Simard, Albert <albert.simard@...>
 

Matt –

 

I don’t have an answer for you; rather, I have the same question.  I’ll soon be engaged in a similar exercise for the Centre for Security Science and would be interested in the responses that you receive.

 

Al Simard

 


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Matt Moore
Sent: Monday, August 24, 2009 12:45 AM
To: sikmleaders@...; ActKM Discussion List; KM for Development
Subject: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Maps

 

 

Hello,

I am interested in knowledge mapping exercises that organisations have engaged in (& apologies to Stan for cross-posting, there is a reason tho).

The key things I am after are:
- What the purpose behind the exercise was.
- What techniques were used.
- What the outputs looked like (obviously there may be confidentiality issues here).
- What was then done with the outputs & what impact they had.

I'm currently doing some work with a client who have different groups all producing things they call "knowledge maps". Each group are doing this for different reasons & using techniques - and hence getting different outputs.

While I encourage then to focus on the "why", it's tweaked my curiosity & I'd like to see other examples of these things.

I may produce a "knowledge map gallery/atlas" if I get sufficient responses (& obviously confidential responses won't go in that).

Cheers,

Matt


 

Hi Matt,
I learned how to facilitate knowledge mapping in 2001 working at Unisys. We used K Mapping to support the rollout a corporate wide KM program and Enterprise Portal. We specifically used K Mapping to help develop the taxonomy for departmental and community of practice team sites. We used a technology called MindJet MindManager http://www.mindjet.com/

I love the tool and use it all the time to gather requirements for projects I work on. The visual aid the tool provides helps the process in so many ways.

Basically, you start the conversation with a core team of people who would represent the members. During a kick off session, you work through a series of questions. You want to ask about current content, future opportunities, business process improvements, and challenges that are important to the group.

The mind mapping software allows the facilitator to type as the group brainstorms on the content. Over a series of follow-up meetings the maps are further enhanced to support metadata and permissions requirements.

The result is mind map of the site, activities and process that define the group. The map is also the taxonomy specific to the organization.

I use the map to build wireframes that support the presentation and organization of the content.

You could standardize the questions and the facilitation method to help improve your output.

Feel free to reach out to me to talk specifically about the process.

Thanks,
Dee Anne

Dee Anne Kotzur
deeanne34@yahoo.com
610-659-7562
www.linkedin.com/in/deeannekotzur

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, Matt Moore <laalgadger@...> wrote:

Hello,

I am interested in knowledge mapping exercises that organisations have engaged in (& apologies to Stan for cross-posting, there is a reason tho).

The key things I am after are:
- What the purpose behind the exercise was.
- What techniques were used.
- What the outputs looked like (obviously there may be confidentiality issues here).
- What was then done with the outputs & what impact they had.

I'm currently doing some work with a client who have different groups all producing things they call "knowledge maps". Each group are doing this for different reasons & using techniques - and hence getting different outputs.

While I encourage then to focus on the "why", it's tweaked my curiosity & I'd like to see other examples of these things.

I may produce a "knowledge map gallery/atlas" if I get sufficient responses (& obviously confidential responses won't go in that).

Cheers,

Matt


Tom Eucker <tom@...>
 

Matt & Al,

I worked with Chuck Seeley at Intel some years ago and we used knowledge mapping as a form of organizational modeling which helped with understanding and identifying key leverage points where knowledge was most at risk or in need of enabling methods or technologies.  Using an interview approach modeled from the “one text” negotiation method (individual interviews), I would build an initial model with the first person and then take the evolving model to successive individuals and ask for “what’s missing?” or what modifications they would make to the model so that it accurately reflected how knowledge was used and transferred in the organization.  After a half dozen 30 minute interviews we would have a pretty helpful knowledge map.

Here is an example: [the labeled arrows represent the knowledge that comes from the group (boxes)]



They were not used to build taxonomies, but rather where the leverage would be in enabling or better managing the knowledge across the organizational system.  Let me know if you would like to follow up on the technique and how we used these knowledge maps.

Regards,
Tom

   
Training & Consulting
 tom@...
    503.439.6450


On 8/24/09 6:49 AM, "Simard, Albert" <albert.simard@...> wrote:


 
 

Matt –
 
I don’t have an answer for you; rather, I have the same question.  I’ll soon be engaged in a similar exercise for the Centre for Security Science and would be interested in the responses that you receive.
 
Al Simard
 


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Matt Moore
Sent: Monday, August 24, 2009 12:45 AM
To: sikmleaders@...; ActKM Discussion List; KM for Development
Subject: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Maps

  

Hello,

I am interested in knowledge mapping exercises that organisations have engaged in (& apologies to Stan for cross-posting, there is a reason tho).

The key things I am after are:
- What the purpose behind the exercise was.
- What techniques were used.
- What the outputs looked like (obviously there may be confidentiality issues here).
- What was then done with the outputs & what impact they had.

I'm currently doing some work with a client who have different groups all producing things they call "knowledge maps". Each group are doing this for different reasons & using techniques - and hence getting different outputs.

While I encourage then to focus on the "why", it's tweaked my curiosity & I'd like to see other examples of these things.

I may produce a "knowledge map gallery/atlas" if I get sufficient responses (& obviously confidential responses won't go in that).

Cheers,

Matt
 
    



Neil Olonoff
 

Hi Matt –

Several years ago I spent some time researching the concept of “knowledge maps,” and I reached the conclusion that there is no definitive definition of the term, nor is there any common understanding of what knowledge maps are intended to do.

The term sounds fascinating to me; I always felt that if a map portrays the terrain, then a knowledge map must portray, and point to, knowledge.  But it seems everyone has a different idea of what that might look like.  For example the people who equate knowledge map with mind maps or concept maps – I have trouble understanding that particular use.

I would invite comments from others – what do you think a knowledge map is, and does?

Regards,

Neil

Neil Olonoff   olonoff@...
Lead, Federal Knowledge Management Initiative,
Federal KM Working Group hosted at  http://KM.gov
Office:  703.614.5058 (US Army HQDA, G-4/Contracted by Innolog)
Mobile: 703.283.4157 (Disabled during working hours)
Personal profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/olonoff
Blogging at http://FedKM.org


On Mon, Aug 24, 2009 at 12:44 AM, Matt Moore <laalgadger@...> wrote:
Hello,

I am interested in knowledge mapping exercises that organisations have engaged in (& apologies to Stan for cross-posting, there is a reason tho).

The key things I am after are:
- What the purpose behind the exercise was.
- What techniques were used.
- What the outputs looked like (obviously there may be confidentiality issues here).
- What was then done with the outputs & what impact they had.

I'm currently doing some work with a client who have different groups all producing things they call "knowledge maps". Each group are doing this for different reasons & using techniques - and hence getting different outputs.

While I encourage then to focus on the "why", it's tweaked my curiosity & I'd like to see other examples of these things.

I may produce a "knowledge map gallery/atlas" if I get sufficient responses (& obviously confidential responses won't go in that).

Cheers,

Matt





_______________________________________________
Actkm mailing list
Actkm@...
http://actkm.org/mailman/listinfo/actkm_actkm.org


Simard, Albert <albert.simard@...>
 

I believe that the term “knowledge map” is like virtually every other term in the KM domain.  It is in the process of becoming.  

 

We all see what it looks like to each of us, but like the blind men and the elephant, none of us sees the whole image of what it really is.  We all perceive the idea flavored by our experiences and needs, but putting a universally acceptable explicit definition on paper is another matter.  I first ran into this when I worked on “knowledge services”  (whatever an organizations business was, spiffed up for marketing purposes!)  And, given the need to contextualize knowledge management terms, it may not be possible to develop a universal definition.  This is why dictionaries have several alternate definitions of most terms (try looking up information and knowledge, for example)

 

Personally, I simply acknowledge that there is considerable diversity and sidestep it by defining terms as I mean them in a particular context.  Although I sometimes use standard definitions, most of the time, I find that I have to adapt it to the particular context in which I use it.  My last glossary for a modeling framework in a KM context took no less than 710 definitions!   I even defined knowledge and knowledge management slightly differently in four separate papers to make them more relevant to the particular subject.

 

A personal description: I see knowledge maps as the routes or pathways taken by knowledge as it advances from its original source (changing form along the way) to its final use.  I see knowledge mapping as tracing the knowledge needed to accomplish an objective back to a source (demand) as well as tracing existing knowledge to a possible application (supply).

 

Definitions are in the mind of the user.  Perhaps that’s as it should be for something as ephemeral as knowledge.

 

Al Simard

 


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Neil Olonoff

Sent: Monday, August 24, 2009 12:22 PM
To: ActKM Discussion List
Cc: sikmleaders@...; KM for Development
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: [Actkm] Knowledge Maps

 

 

Hi Matt –

Several years ago I spent some time researching the concept of “knowledge maps,” and I reached the conclusion that there is no definitive definition of the term, nor is there any common understanding of what knowledge maps are intended to do.

The term sounds fascinating to me; I always felt that if a map portrays the terrain, then a knowledge map must portray, and point to, knowledge.  But it seems everyone has a different idea of what that might look like.  For example the people who equate knowledge map with mind maps or concept maps – I have trouble understanding that particular use.

I would invite comments from others – what do you think a knowledge map is, and does?

Regards,

Neil

Neil Olonoff   olonoff@gmail.com
Lead, Federal Knowledge Management Initiative,
Federal KM Working Group hosted at  http://KM.gov
Office:  703.614.5058 (US Army HQDA, G-4/Contracted by Innolog)
Mobile: 703.283.4157 (Disabled during working hours)
Personal profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/olonoff
Blogging at http://FedKM.org

On Mon, Aug 24, 2009 at 12:44 AM, Matt Moore <laalgadger@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:

Hello,

I am interested in knowledge mapping exercises that organisations have engaged in (& apologies to Stan for cross-posting, there is a reason tho).

The key things I am after are:
- What the purpose behind the exercise was.
- What techniques were used.
- What the outputs looked like (obviously there may be confidentiality issues here).
- What was then done with the outputs & what impact they had.

I'm currently doing some work with a client who have different groups all producing things they call "knowledge maps". Each group are doing this for different reasons & using techniques - and hence getting different outputs.

While I encourage then to focus on the "why", it's tweaked my curiosity & I'd like to see other examples of these things.

I may produce a "knowledge map gallery/atlas" if I get sufficient responses (& obviously confidential responses won't go in that).

Cheers,

Matt





_______________________________________________
Actkm mailing list
Actkm@actkm.org
http://actkm.org/mailman/listinfo/actkm_actkm.org

 


Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

Agree with Neil... so many definitions, so little agreement.

I have actually had my organizational/social network maps used as
knowledge maps -- when we map who goes to whom for expertise/
assistance/opinion on topic/domain X? We have done these maps by
product/service line and looked at various angles of knowledge
application: technical/installation/use -- who you go to for tech
assistance on product X may not be the same person who is
knowledgeable about the use of the product or it's installation process.

Also social network maps help define who *actually* shares their
knowledge... we find smart/experienced employees that do not allow
their knowledge to be "easily harvested" by management or colleagues.

Valdis Krebs
http://orgnet.com

On Aug 24, 2009, at 12:22 PM, Neil Olonoff wrote:



Hi Matt –

Several years ago I spent some time researching the concept of
“knowledge maps,” and I reached the conclusion that there is no
definitive definition of the term, nor is there any common
understanding of what knowledge maps are intended to do.

The term sounds fascinating to me; I always felt that if a map
portrays the terrain, then a knowledge map must portray, and point
to, knowledge. But it seems everyone has a different idea of what
that might look like. For example the people who equate knowledge
map with mind maps or concept maps – I have trouble understanding
that particular use.

I would invite comments from others – what do you think a knowledge
map is, and does?

Regards,

Neil

Neil Olonoff olonoff@gmail.com
Lead, Federal Knowledge Management Initiative,
Federal KM Working Group hosted at http://KM.gov
Office: 703.614.5058 (US Army HQDA, G-4/Contracted by Innolog)
Mobile: 703.283.4157 (Disabled during working hours)
Personal profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/olonoff
Blogging at http://FedKM.org


On Mon, Aug 24, 2009 at 12:44 AM, Matt Moore
<laalgadger@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
Hello,

I am interested in knowledge mapping exercises that organisations
have engaged in (& apologies to Stan for cross-posting, there is a
reason tho).

The key things I am after are:
- What the purpose behind the exercise was.
- What techniques were used.
- What the outputs looked like (obviously there may be
confidentiality issues here).
- What was then done with the outputs & what impact they had.

I'm currently doing some work with a client who have different
groups all producing things they call "knowledge maps". Each group
are doing this for different reasons & using techniques - and hence
getting different outputs.

While I encourage then to focus on the "why", it's tweaked my
curiosity & I'd like to see other examples of these things.

I may produce a "knowledge map gallery/atlas" if I get sufficient
responses (& obviously confidential responses won't go in that).

Cheers,

Matt





_______________________________________________
Actkm mailing list
Actkm@actkm.org
http://actkm.org/mailman/listinfo/actkm_actkm.org




TRflanagan@...
 

We harvest knowledge in response to specific issue-based trigger questions.  The knowledge is harvested in the form of decisions made during focused discussions among a set of stakeholders.  The harvested knowledge is presented in the form of a map which records significant influence identified by stakeholders in the form of a "tree stucture."  The map is constructed entirely by the stakeholders as they compare ideas in a pairwise process.

The use:  Human systems design
The software: Cognisystem   (DOWNLOAD FREE at http://blogora.wetpaint.com/page/Dialogue+Structuring+Software]
The design methodology:  Interactive Management / CogniScope / Structured Dialogic Design
The result:  Fourty years of successful application in broad range of user communities across the globe


Tom Flanagan
Director, SouthCoast Community Collaborative Design Studio
><((((º>·..¸¸·´¯`·.><(((º>`·.¸¸.·´¯`·..¸¸><((((º> .·´¯`·..><(((º>
"Risk Management Support for Multi Organization Initiatives"

SoCo Community Collaborative Design Studio is a project of the Community Foundation of Southeastern Massachusetts.  Our mission is to build community capacity through the use of advanced collaborative design practices.  SoCoDesign is a resource for multi-organization planning and not a direct source of funds.

VOICE: 508-264-0066
EMAIL: TRFlanagan@...
WEBSITE:  http://socodesign.wetpaint.com/

"All democracy is local."

COURSE: Storytelling by Design at UMass Dartmouth
http://www.umassd.edu/pce/brochure/undergradcourse.cfm#DES300


griffegg <ggg@...>
 

Purpose - capture subject matter expert knowledge to teach others on laser-focused topics

Technique - Concept Maps (Novak, 1998) (http://cmap.ihmc.us/conceptmap.html)

Outputs - see above

Outcome - to answer specific questions, the Cmap is very useful to convey complex information in a simple graphical format. We embed the Cmaps into slide presentations to deliver complex information in meetings. Effectiveness is pretty good compared to lots of bullets and words.

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, Matt Moore <laalgadger@...> wrote:

Hello,

I am interested in knowledge mapping exercises that organisations have engaged in (& apologies to Stan for cross-posting, there is a reason tho).

The key things I am after are:
- What the purpose behind the exercise was.
- What techniques were used.
- What the outputs looked like (obviously there may be confidentiality issues here).
- What was then done with the outputs & what impact they had.

I'm currently doing some work with a client who have different groups all producing things they call "knowledge maps". Each group are doing this for different reasons & using techniques - and hence getting different outputs.

While I encourage then to focus on the "why", it's tweaked my curiosity & I'd like to see other examples of these things.

I may produce a "knowledge map gallery/atlas" if I get sufficient responses (& obviously confidential responses won't go in that).

Cheers,

Matt


Arthur Shelley
 

A knowledge map for me is a visualization of the location of and
interdependance of the knowledge in the organisation. This is useful
to understand what knowledge is core to hold within the business and
what can be more transient (or even "outsourced").

Perhaps the most significant value comes from understanding which core
knowledge is at risk and understanding what can be done to minimise
impacts of losing it.

Arthur
Www.organizationalzoo.com

On 25/08/2009, at 5:35, Valdis Krebs <valdis@orgnet.com> wrote:

Agree with Neil... so many definitions, so little agreement.

I have actually had my organizational/social network maps used as
knowledge maps -- when we map who goes to whom for expertise/
assistance/opinion on topic/domain X? We have done these maps by
product/service line and looked at various angles of knowledge
application: technical/installation/use -- who you go to for tech
assistance on product X may not be the same person who is
knowledgeable about the use of the product or it's installation process.

Also social network maps help define who *actually* shares their
knowledge... we find smart/experienced employees that do not allow
their knowledge to be "easily harvested" by management or colleagues.

Valdis Krebs
http://orgnet.com



On Aug 24, 2009, at 12:22 PM, Neil Olonoff wrote:



Hi Matt –

Several years ago I spent some time researching the concept of
“knowledge maps,” and I reached the conclusion that there is no
definitive definition of the term, nor is there any common
understanding of what knowledge maps are intended to do.

The term sounds fascinating to me; I always felt that if a map
portrays the terrain, then a knowledge map must portray, and point
to, knowledge. But it seems everyone has a different idea of what
that might look like. For example the people who equate knowledge
map with mind maps or concept maps – I have trouble understanding
that particular use.

I would invite comments from others – what do you think a knowledge
map is, and does?

Regards,

Neil

Neil Olonoff olonoff@gmail.com
Lead, Federal Knowledge Management Initiative,
Federal KM Working Group hosted at http://KM.gov
Office: 703.614.5058 (US Army HQDA, G-4/Contracted by Innolog)
Mobile: 703.283.4157 (Disabled during working hours)
Personal profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/olonoff
Blogging at http://FedKM.org


On Mon, Aug 24, 2009 at 12:44 AM, Matt Moore
<laalgadger@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
Hello,

I am interested in knowledge mapping exercises that organisations
have engaged in (& apologies to Stan for cross-posting, there is a
reason tho).

The key things I am after are:
- What the purpose behind the exercise was.
- What techniques were used.
- What the outputs looked like (obviously there may be
confidentiality issues here).
- What was then done with the outputs & what impact they had.

I'm currently doing some work with a client who have different
groups all producing things they call "knowledge maps". Each group
are doing this for different reasons & using techniques - and hence
getting different outputs.

While I encourage then to focus on the "why", it's tweaked my
curiosity & I'd like to see other examples of these things.

I may produce a "knowledge map gallery/atlas" if I get sufficient
responses (& obviously confidential responses won't go in that).

Cheers,

Matt





_______________________________________________
Actkm mailing list
Actkm@actkm.org
http://actkm.org/mailman/listinfo/actkm_actkm.org





------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Lee, Jim <jlee@...>
 
Edited

A few years ago, I tried to sort out the various mapping tools that we use for this exact reason—to understand what to use when. Attached is a presentation on the topic. I hope you find it helpful.

KMWorld+2004+-+APQC+-+Mapping+Tools+-+Lee.pdf

 

Jim Lee, PMP

APQC

123 North Post Oak Lane

Houston, TX 77024

O: +1.713.893.7790   C: +1.216.338.3548

email: jlee@...

Yahoo, AOL, Skype IM: jimpmp2000

Windows Live Messenger: jimleesr@...

text messaging: 2163383548@...

 

 


Matt Moore <laalgadger@...>
 

Jim,

Many thanks! This is an excellent introductory presentation to the topic.

Cheers,

Matt


--- On Tue, 8/25/09, Lee, Jim wrote:

From: Lee, Jim
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: [Actkm] Knowledge Maps [1 Attachment]
To: sikmleaders@...
Date: Tuesday, August 25, 2009, 4:11 PM

 

A few years ago, I tried to sort out the various mapping tools that we use for this exact reason—to understand what to use when. Attached is a presentation on the topic. I hope you find it helpful.

 

 

Jim Lee, PMP

APQC

123 North Post Oak Lane

Houston, TX 77024

O: +1.713.893.7790   C: +1.216.338.3548

email: jlee@...

Yahoo, AOL, Skype IM: jimpmp2000

Windows Live Messenger: jimleesr@sbcglobal. net

text messaging: 2163383548@messagin g.sprintpcs. com

 

 



Patrick Lambe
 

Hi Matt

Just to recast your enquiry: maps of any kind are shaped by their purposes - to aid navigation, exploitation, demarcation and identity, power claims, memory, sensemaking, to name but a few. An inventory of purposes (if you manage to compile one) should help to clarify a typology of forms, and they should help identify useful processes and tools (to modify slightly the sequence of your question elements). In knowledge mapping I think we tend to get hung up on either on the form we are familiar with first, or on the process we use to develop a map, and think too little about the originating need or purpose. So as always you have engineered a fascinating quest!

In my experience maps of knowledge (whether intra-organisation, community-based or societal) tend to serve the following functions:

Locate knowledge resources and "owners"
Show relationships between any combination of knowledge resources, people, locations, activities/processes
Track flows of information and knowledge
Identify gaps (can exploit map forms produced for other purposes)
Track development of knowledge, trends in knowledge landscapes
Aid navigation of knowledge resources (eg taxonomies and site structures)
Find rationalisation/"tidying up"/efficiency opportunities
Assess value of resources (this could just as well be an inventory, but a map could help illustrate the multiplication potential from combining resources)
Improve the exploitation of knowledge resources

In terms of your example request, I have some short video clips explaining how we use knowledge maps as part of a knowledge audit activity at
http://www.greenchameleon.com/gc/blog_detail/conducting_a_knowledge_audit/

P

Patrick Lambe

weblog: www.greenchameleon.com
website: www.straitsknowledge.com
book: www.organisingknowledge.com


Have you seen our KM Method Cards or
Organisation Culture Cards?

http://www.straitsknowledge.com/store/

On Aug 24, 2009, at 12:44 PM, Matt Moore wrote:

Hello,

I am interested in knowledge mapping exercises that organisations have engaged in (& apologies to Stan for cross-posting, there is a reason tho).

The key things I am after are:
- What the purpose behind the exercise was.
- What techniques were used.
- What the outputs looked like (obviously there may be confidentiality issues here).
- What was then done with the outputs & what impact they had.

I'm currently doing some work with a client who have different groups all producing things they call "knowledge maps". Each group are doing this for different reasons & using techniques - and hence getting different outputs.

While I encourage then to focus on the "why", it's tweaked my curiosity & I'd like to see other examples of these things.

I may produce a "knowledge map gallery/atlas" if I get sufficient responses (& obviously confidential responses won't go in that).

Cheers,

Matt





_______________________________________________
Actkm mailing list
Actkm@actkm.org
http://actkm.org/mailman/listinfo/actkm_actkm.org


tom short <tman9999@...>
 
Edited

Matt - a few years back a colleague and I were working with a large industrial client on developing a knowledge strategy. During this work we "invented" an approach we called 'knowledge process mapping.'

Purpose: identify an appropriate focus for KM by isolating a work process and process step within it that would benefit the most from the application of KM principles.

Technique: knowledge process mapping (described in Lesson 1, attached book chapter)
TomShort-BookChapter-KM+Lessons+Learned.pdf

Outputs
: see (described in Lesson 1, attached book chapter)

What was done with the outputs: the K process mapping activity pointed us to the area within the client's work processes that had the greatest potential to benefit from application of KM. This formed the basis for creating a business architecture map and implementation plans, which included establishing the new role of knowledge broker and building a tool kit for that role to enable expertise tracking/location as well as content retrieval.

Impact: Client quote one year after implementation began: "I laminated the architecture map we created and I carry it around with me daily. This will keep us busy for the next two to three years."  (diagram shown in Lesson 2, attached book chapter).

Keep us posted on your work on this - would be interested in seeing any final collection/summary.

Thanks.

-Tom Short
Tom Short Consulting
San Francisco, CA
415-912-0927


--- In sikmleaders@..., Matt Moore wrote:

>
> The key things I am after are:
> - What the purpose behind the exercise was.
> - What techniques were used.
> - What the outputs looked like (obviously there may be confidentiality issues here).
> - What was then done with the outputs & what impact they had.
>


maria_de_cali <mtrujillo@...>
 


--- In sikmleaders@..., "Lee, Jim" wrote:
>
> A few years ago, I tried to sort out the various mapping tools that we
> use for this exact reason-to understand what to use when. Attached is a
> presentation on the topic. I hope you find it helpful.

Jim, very helpful ... your description of knowledge maps made me revise my own definition. What you have there looks more like a table than a map, why would you call them maps then?

Maria F. Trujillo, PhD
Knowledge Management Senior Associate
CAMRIS International


Lee, Jim <jlee@...>
 

Maria,

 

Thanks for your interest and question. It may be easier to think in terms of the action that we’re completing when referring to the table as a map. That is, by using that format, we’re “mapping” the knowledge—in terms of its use, its source, and its value. We create many of these in collaboration with our clients through workshop-type sessions of subject matter experts and process owners. For that reason, using the row/column metaphor for a map offers several practical advantages, including:

 

1.       Spreadsheet applications are ubiquitous—everyone has one on their computer, so there’s no learning curve with respect to the format.

2.       Completing the map in real-time with the input of the SMEs in the room means that the linear nature (going across the columns for each step of the process) makes it easy for people to follow the thinking and consequently, easier to facilitate. [Think in terms of a concept map and the variability in final appearance as a comparison.]

3.       A spreadsheet application also provide hotlink capability. That is, say you have a column, “Where is the knowledge located?”. You could simply insert the URL or hotlink directly into the cell for both ease of access as well as for version control.

4.       Perhaps the most important benefit of the format is that knowledge maps must be periodically updated! Any knowledge map created and simply left static will soon lose its own value as the first time something changes and everyone knows that the map is not updated, rendering it less than 100% reliable, the map will soon fall into disuse. Using a spreadsheet format removes one of the barriers to upkeep as again, anyone should have enough familiarity with the application to update.

 

I hope this answers your question.

 

 

Jim Lee, PMP

APQC

123 North Post Oak Lane

Houston, TX 77024

O: +1.713.893.7790   C: +1.216.338.3548

http://www.apqc.org

email: jlee@...

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