Great article by McKinsey - Using Technology to Improve Workforce Collaboration #collaboration


nsettlemurphy <nancy@...>
 
Edited

This article, dated October 27, 2009, suggests segmenting knowledge workers by type of collaboration needed, assigning value to particular interactions, and identifying the greatest sources of "waste"---all with an eye toward developing a virtual collaboration strategy for knowledge workers, with quantifiable results.

https://www.conference-board.org/retrievefile.cfm?filename=McKinsey_%20What%20Matters_%20Using%20technology%20to%20improve%20workforce%20collaboration.pdf&type=subsite

As someone who works with IT groups in helping accelerate adoption of new IT initiatives---especially those that relate to virtual collaboration---I think this paper will be very helpful in encouraging clients to create a real collaboration strategy whose success can be measured in time and money, rather than throwing tools out there and hoping for the best.

Would be interested in hearing comments from anyone who reads this.

Nancy Settle-Murphy
www.guidedinsights.com


Simard, Albert <albert.simard@...>
 

Nancy

 

Thanks for posting a link to this article.  It really hit home.  I see the article as a key initial step in the transition from individual work to collaboration.

 

I am struggling with setting up SharePoint because the only way that we can get everything done is through collaboration, but everyone is too busy to learn and use the technology (no, it is not intuitive, especially for site managers).  But by segmenting collaboration and identifying underlying processes and participants for each segment, (as we did for knowledge services) we can begin to understand the true nature of collaboration and tailor the technology to specific needs.  

 

As everyone knows, if you can’t measure it, you can’t manage it (notwithstanding my long history in the world of science where the primary criteria is “you know it when you see it”).  But before you can measure something, you have to describe it (actually, defining it is better).  That’s what this article begins to do for collaboration.  What does collaboration actually do?  How does it work?  Who does it?  What are its outputs?  How does it increase productivity?  Can we measure these things?  

 

Personally, I intend to use this as a starting point for developing framework and strategy for implementing collaboration and social networking, one function at a time.

 

Al Simard

Knowledge Manager

DRDC-Centre for Security Science

 


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of nsettlemurphy
Sent: Thursday, November 05, 2009 9:57 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Great article by McKinsey - Using Technology to Improve Workforce Collaboration

 

 

This article, dated October 27, 2009, suggests segmenting knowledge workers by type of collaboration needed, assigning value to particular interactions, and identifying the greatest sources of "waste"---all with an eye toward developing a virtual collaboration strategy for knowledge workers, with quantifiable results.

http://whatmatters.mckinseydigital.com/internet/using-technology-to-improve-workforce-collaboration?commented=0#txpCommentInputForm

As someone who works with IT groups in helping accelerate adoption of new IT initiatives---especially those that relate to virtual collaboration---I think this paper will be very helpful in encouraging clients to create a real collaboration strategy whose success can be measured in time and money, rather than throwing tools out there and hoping for the best.

Would be interested in hearing comments from anyone who reads this.

Nancy Settle-Murphy
www.guidedinsights.com