Knowledge sharing incentives #motivation #knowledge-sharing


Marcie Zaharee
 

I would like to know what incentives are in place for knowledge sharing within your organization. I have a few questions and would appreciate your feedback.

• How does your organization encourage knowledge sharing and is it a component of your culture?
• Do you have an incentive program in place that recognizes outstanding examples of employees who have captured and shared knowledge?
• If so, are rewards referred to as "Knowledge Management" or are they a part of a larger corporate award program?


Don Kildebeck
 

Any reward structure you employ needs to focus on the importance - and modern day dominance- of intrinsic rewards. Extrinsic rewards simply do not work in the long run, and often not even in the short term. They can in fact do more harm than good. Give people rewards such as the opportunity to become "known", do a good deed, become an internal champion, play a role in a higher cause, etc etc and you will more than likely achieve what your goal.


----- Original Message -----
From: "mzaharee"
To: sikmleaders@...
Sent: Thursday, February 11, 2010 9:34:44 AM GMT -08:00 US/Canada Pacific
Subject: [sikmleaders] Knowledge sharing  incentives

 

I would like to know what incentives are in place for knowledge sharing within your organization. I have a few questions and would appreciate your feedback.

• How does your organization encourage knowledge sharing and is it a component of your culture?
• Do you have an incentive program in place that recognizes outstanding examples of employees who have captured and shared knowledge?
• If so, are rewards referred to as "Knowledge Management" or are they a part of a larger corporate award program?


Steve Kaukonen
 

We do have a number of 'incentives' in place for knowledge sharing and collaboration at Accenture - both built into our existing standard processes (such as Performance Management) as well as individual programs (Our 'Addo Agnitio Award' program) focused on recognizing our 'top knowledge sharers/collaborators'. We do not use the term 'Knowledge Management' related to the recognition/reward, but rather 'knowledge sharing and collaboration'. I would say that it is a component of our culture given one of our core values of 'One Global Network' is 'founded' on sharing and collaborating.

Steve

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, "mzaharee" <mzaharee@...> wrote:

I would like to know what incentives are in place for knowledge sharing within your organization. I have a few questions and would appreciate your feedback.

• How does your organization encourage knowledge sharing and is it a component of your culture?
• Do you have an incentive program in place that recognizes outstanding examples of employees who have captured and shared knowledge?
• If so, are rewards referred to as "Knowledge Management" or are they a part of a larger corporate award program?


Arthur Shelley
 

When I was at Cadbury Schweppes (just acquired by Kraft) we sent out a monthly Newsletter with knowledge sharing success stories.  It was widely read and appreciated.  We know this as we only told the “headline and summary” in the Newsletter (distributed email) and this was linked to the body of the story back on the portal.  We could track the hits the stories got across the recipients.  There was a lot of kudos associated with having your story selected and published as the KM’ers knew the leaders read the newsletter as well ( we made a point of profiling a senior manager in each issue with strategic updates and the sponsor for the newsletter was on the global board).  Each story was linked to how sharing generated both tangible and intangible business benefits.

Regards,
Arthur Shelley
Founder: Intelligent Answers & Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
Author:
The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
Twitter:
Metaphorage
Blog: http//organizationalzoo.blogspot.com 
Ph +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley 
Free Zoo Behavioural Profiles:
www.organizationalzoo.com


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of mzaharee
Sent: Friday, 12 February 2010 4:35 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Knowledge sharing incentives

 

 

I would like to know what incentives are in place for knowledge sharing within your organization. I have a few questions and would appreciate your feedback.

• How does your organization encourage knowledge sharing and is it a component of your culture?
• Do you have an incentive program in place that recognizes outstanding examples of employees who have captured and shared knowledge?
• If so, are rewards referred to as "Knowledge Management" or are they a part of a larger corporate award program?


Raj Datta <raj_datta@...>
 

For any discussion on incentives, do look at Alfie Kohn’s work “Punished by Rewards” - http://www.amazon.com/Punished-Rewards-Trouble-Incentive-Praise/dp/0618001816

 

It certainly challenges the way we have traditionally thought about rewards and incentives and their role in motivation and performance

 

Regards,

Raj

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of skaukonen
Sent: Friday, February 12, 2010 3:16 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Knowledge sharing incentives

 

 


We do have a number of 'incentives' in place for knowledge sharing and collaboration at Accenture - both built into our existing standard processes (such as Performance Management) as well as individual programs (Our 'Addo Agnitio Award' program) focused on recognizing our 'top knowledge sharers/collaborators'. We do not use the term 'Knowledge Management' related to the recognition/reward, but rather 'knowledge sharing and collaboration'. I would say that it is a component of our culture given one of our core values of 'One Global Network' is 'founded' on sharing and collaborating.

Steve

--- In sikmleaders@..., "mzaharee" wrote:
>
> I would like to know what incentives are in place for knowledge sharing within your organization. I have a few questions and would appreciate your feedback.
>
> • How does your organization encourage knowledge sharing and is it a component of your culture?
> • Do you have an incentive program in place that recognizes outstanding examples of employees who have captured and shared knowledge?
> • If so, are rewards referred to as "Knowledge Management" or are they a part of a larger corporate award program?
>



http://www.mindtree.com/email/disclaimer.html


Arthur Shelley
 

Good insights Raj, a good read for sure.

The issue with rewards is people value them differently.  Those who willingly share for “the common good” find them somewhat offensive and those that only share because of rewards will argue about the value attached to them.  Public recognition is a valuable mechanism, but needs to be well managed.  Some people are true quiet achievers and may be missed or worse taken advantage of and this erodes morale.

 

I demonstrate this in my student classes in a simple fun way.  With no prior notice or explanation, I randomly start handing chocolates to students who answer a question or participate in dialogue.  This soon generates an awareness of the need to participate to be rewarded, so input suddenly goes up and then fades.  At this point I ask them what they learnt, especially the ones who did not partake. Usually stimulates a good quality conversation about the value of Rewards and whether they are any different to a bribe.  I do not tell, I ask, they learn more from this than lecturing from a table of pros and cons. Of course at the end I offer product to everyone including a range of non chocolate confectionery, but even this is limited as some would not want to consume confectionery through choice, culture or dietary requirements.  There is a lesson in that as well, does not matter what you offer, there will always be some who are disappointed.

 

Regards,
Arthur Shelley
Founder: Intelligent Answers & Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
Author:
The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
Twitter:
Metaphorage
Blog: http//organizationalzoo.blogspot.com 
Ph +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley 
Free Zoo Behavioural Profiles:
www.organizationalzoo.com


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Raj Datta
Sent: Friday, 12 February 2010 4:24 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Re: Knowledge sharing incentives

 

 

For any discussion on incentives, do look at Alfie Kohn’s work “Punished by Rewards” - http://www.amazon.com/Punished-Rewards-Trouble-Incentive-Praise/dp/0618001816

 

It certainly challenges the way we have traditionally thought about rewards and incentives and their role in motivation and performance

 

Regards,

Raj

 

From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of skaukonen
Sent: Friday, February 12, 2010 3:16 AM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Knowledge sharing incentives

 

 


We do have a number of 'incentives' in place for knowledge sharing and collaboration at Accenture - both built into our existing standard processes (such as Performance Management) as well as individual programs (Our 'Addo Agnitio Award' program) focused on recognizing our 'top knowledge sharers/collaborators'. We do not use the term 'Knowledge Management' related to the recognition/reward, but rather 'knowledge sharing and collaboration'. I would say that it is a component of our culture given one of our core values of 'One Global Network' is 'founded' on sharing and collaborating.

Steve

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, "mzaharee" wrote:
>
> I would like to know what incentives are in place for knowledge sharing within your organization. I have a few questions and would appreciate your feedback.
>
> • How does your organization encourage knowledge sharing and is it a component of your culture?
> • Do you have an incentive program in place that recognizes outstanding examples of employees who have captured and shared knowledge?
> • If so, are rewards referred to as "Knowledge Management" or are they a part of a larger corporate award program?
>

 


http://www.mindtree.com/email/disclaimer.html


Elizabeth Meadows <emeadows317@...>
 

I've been a lurker until now (sorry), mainly due to my status as a wannabe KMer.  This particular subject, however, I think I can add to a bit.
 
I find Alfie Kohn's work insightful and intelligent.  Some personality types (based on Carl Jung's theory of cognitive functions) are 'people pleasers' by nature.  It will be particularly important to them to know how what they do affects others, not through praise or rewards, but through acknowledgment ("I noticed how you followed through with that project"), feedback ("It made my job a lot easier"), and seeing the fruits of their labor ("We finished ahead of schedule"). It's a fine line, but an important one.
 
Thanks for allowing me to lurk and learn.
 
Cheers,
Liz

On Fri, Feb 12, 2010 at 1:24 AM, Arthur Shelley <arthur@...> wrote:
 

Good insights Raj, a good read for sure.

The issue with rewards is people value them differently.  Those who willingly share for “the common good” find them somewhat offensive and those that only share because of rewards will argue about the value attached to them.  Public recognition is a valuable mechanism, but needs to be well managed.  Some people are true quiet achievers and may be missed or worse taken advantage of and this erodes morale.

 

I demonstrate this in my student classes in a simple fun way.  With no prior notice or explanation, I randomly start handing chocolates to students who answer a question or participate in dialogue.  This soon generates an awareness of the need to participate to be rewarded, so input suddenly goes up and then fades.  At this point I ask them what they learnt, especially the ones who did not partake. Usually stimulates a good quality conversation about the value of Rewards and whether they are any different to a bribe.  I do not tell, I ask, they learn more from this than lecturing from a table of pros and cons. Of course at the end I offer product to everyone including a range of non chocolate confectionery, but even this is limited as some would not want to consume confectionery through choice, culture or dietary requirements.  There is a lesson in that as well, does not matter what you offer, there will always be some who are disappointed.

 

Regards,
Arthur Shelley
Founder: Intelligent Answers & Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
Author:
The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
Twitter:
Metaphorage
Blog: http//organizationalzoo.blogspot.com 
Ph +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley 
Free Zoo Behavioural Profiles:
www.organizationalzoo.com


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Raj Datta
Sent: Friday, 12 February 2010 4:24 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Re: Knowledge sharing incentives

 

 

For any discussion on incentives, do look at Alfie Kohn’s work “Punished by Rewards” - http://www.amazon.com/Punished-Rewards-Trouble-Incentive-Praise/dp/0618001816

 

It certainly challenges the way we have traditionally thought about rewards and incentives and their role in motivation and performance

 

Regards,

Raj

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of skaukonen
Sent: Friday, February 12, 2010 3:16 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Knowledge sharing incentives
 


We do have a number of 'incentives' in place for knowledge sharing and collaboration at Accenture - both built into our existing standard processes (such as Performance Management) as well as individual programs (Our 'Addo Agnitio Award' program) focused on recognizing our 'top knowledge sharers/collaborators'. We do not use the term 'Knowledge Management' related to the recognition/reward, but rather 'knowledge sharing and collaboration'. I would say that it is a component of our culture given one of our core values of 'One Global Network' is 'founded' on sharing and collaborating.

Steve

--- In sikmleaders@..., "mzaharee" wrote:
>
> I would like to know what incentives are in place for knowledge sharing within your organization. I have a few questions and would appreciate your feedback.
>
> • How does your organization encourage knowledge sharing and is it a component of your culture?
> • Do you have an incentive program in place that recognizes outstanding examples of employees who have captured and shared knowledge?
> • If so, are rewards referred to as "Knowledge Management" or are they a part of a larger corporate award program?


Douglas Weidner
 

Arthur,

Excellent strategy (storytelling), especially tangible business benefits, often overlooked.

 

Douglas Weidner, eCKM Mentor

Chairman, International Knowledge Management Institute

Best in KM Training & Certification

Home of the KM Body of Knowledge (KMBOK)

www.kminstitute.org

703-757-1395

 

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Arthur Shelley
Sent: Thursday, February 11, 2010 7:25 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Knowledge sharing incentives

 

 

When I was at Cadbury Schweppes (just acquired by Kraft) we sent out a monthly Newsletter with knowledge sharing success stories.  It was widely read and appreciated.  We know this as we only told the “headline and summary” in the Newsletter (distributed email) and this was linked to the body of the story back on the portal.  We could track the hits the stories got across the recipients.  There was a lot of kudos associated with having your story selected and published as the KM’ers knew the leaders read the newsletter as well ( we made a point of profiling a senior manager in each issue with strategic updates and the sponsor for the newsletter was on the global board).  Each story was linked to how sharing generated both tangible and intangible business benefits.

Regards,
Arthur Shelley
Founder: Intelligent Answers & Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
Author:
The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
Twitter:
Metaphorage
Blog: http//organizationalzoo.blogspot.com 
Ph +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley 
Free Zoo Behavioural Profiles:
www.organizationalzoo.com


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of mzaharee
Sent: Friday, 12 February 2010 4:35 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Knowledge sharing incentives

 

 

I would like to know what incentives are in place for knowledge sharing within your organization. I have a few questions and would appreciate your feedback.

• How does your organization encourage knowledge sharing and is it a component of your culture?
• Do you have an incentive program in place that recognizes outstanding examples of employees who have captured and shared knowledge?
• If so, are rewards referred to as "Knowledge Management" or are they a part of a larger corporate award program?


Arthur Shelley
 

Douglas,

 

Yes it continued to work for a long time and in fact still is, more than two years after my departure and being handed over to my successor and then her successor.

We had a very deliberate succession plan to ensure it continued as we knew it was central to the success of the overall KM strategy.

It survived the split of the company into two and now the Cadbury part has been bought by Kraft (last week ) we continue to watch with held breath to see is to will survive this as well.

 

Regards,
Arthur Shelley
Founder: Intelligent Answers & Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
Author:
The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
Twitter:
Metaphorage
Blog: http//organizationalzoo.blogspot.com 
Ph +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley 
Free Zoo Behavioural Profiles:
www.organizationalzoo.com


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Weidner, Douglas
Sent: Saturday, 13 February 2010 3:23 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Knowledge sharing incentives

 

 

Arthur,

Excellent strategy (storytelling), especially tangible business benefits, often overlooked.

 

Douglas Weidner, eCKM Mentor

Chairman, International Knowledge Management Institute

Best in KM Training & Certification

Home of the KM Body of Knowledge (KMBOK)

www.kminstitute.org

703-757-1395

 

 

 

From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Arthur Shelley
Sent: Thursday, February 11, 2010 7:25 PM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Knowledge sharing incentives

 

 

When I was at Cadbury Schweppes (just acquired by Kraft) we sent out a monthly Newsletter with knowledge sharing success stories.  It was widely read and appreciated.  We know this as we only told the “headline and summary” in the Newsletter (distributed email) and this was linked to the body of the story back on the portal.  We could track the hits the stories got across the recipients.  There was a lot of kudos associated with having your story selected and published as the KM’ers knew the leaders read the newsletter as well ( we made a point of profiling a senior manager in each issue with strategic updates and the sponsor for the newsletter was on the global board).  Each story was linked to how sharing generated both tangible and intangible business benefits.

Regards,
Arthur Shelley
Founder: Intelligent Answers & Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
Author:
The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
Twitter:
Metaphorage
Blog: http//organizationalzoo.blogspot.com 
Ph +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley 
Free Zoo Behavioural Profiles:
www.organizationalzoo.com


From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of mzaharee
Sent: Friday, 12 February 2010 4:35 AM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [sikmleaders] Knowledge sharing incentives

 

 

I would like to know what incentives are in place for knowledge sharing within your organization. I have a few questions and would appreciate your feedback.

• How does your organization encourage knowledge sharing and is it a component of your culture?
• Do you have an incentive program in place that recognizes outstanding examples of employees who have captured and shared knowledge?
• If so, are rewards referred to as "Knowledge Management" or are they a part of a larger corporate award program?


Douglas Weidner
 

Arthur,

 

Excellent testimonial. Thanks.

 

Douglas Weidner, eCKM Mentor

Chairman, International Knowledge Management Institute

Best in KM Training & Certification

Home of the KM Body of Knowledge (KMBOK)

www.kminstitute.org

703-757-1395

 

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Arthur Shelley
Sent: Sunday, February 14, 2010 4:12 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Knowledge sharing incentives

 

 

Douglas,

 

Yes it continued to work for a long time and in fact still is, more than two years after my departure and being handed over to my successor and then her successor.

We had a very deliberate succession plan to ensure it continued as we knew it was central to the success of the overall KM strategy.

It survived the split of the company into two and now the Cadbury part has been bought by Kraft (last week ) we continue to watch with held breath to see is to will survive this as well.

 

Regards,
Arthur Shelley
Founder: Intelligent Answers & Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
Author:
The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
Twitter:
Metaphorage
Blog: http//organizationalzoo.blogspot.com 
Ph +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley 
Free Zoo Behavioural Profiles:
www.organizationalzoo.com


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Weidner, Douglas
Sent: Saturday, 13 February 2010 3:23 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Knowledge sharing incentives

 

 

Arthur,

Excellent strategy (storytelling), especially tangible business benefits, often overlooked.

 

Douglas Weidner, eCKM Mentor

Chairman, International Knowledge Management Institute

Best in KM Training & Certification

Home of the KM Body of Knowledge (KMBOK)

www.kminstitute.org

703-757-1395

 

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Arthur Shelley
Sent: Thursday, February 11, 2010 7:25 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Knowledge sharing incentives

 

 

When I was at Cadbury Schweppes (just acquired by Kraft) we sent out a monthly Newsletter with knowledge sharing success stories.  It was widely read and appreciated.  We know this as we only told the “headline and summary” in the Newsletter (distributed email) and this was linked to the body of the story back on the portal.  We could track the hits the stories got across the recipients.  There was a lot of kudos associated with having your story selected and published as the KM’ers knew the leaders read the newsletter as well ( we made a point of profiling a senior manager in each issue with strategic updates and the sponsor for the newsletter was on the global board).  Each story was linked to how sharing generated both tangible and intangible business benefits.

Regards,
Arthur Shelley
Founder: Intelligent Answers & Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
Author:
The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
Twitter:
Metaphorage
Blog: http//organizationalzoo.blogspot.com 
Ph +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley 
Free Zoo Behavioural Profiles:
www.organizationalzoo.com


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of mzaharee
Sent: Friday, 12 February 2010 4:35 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Knowledge sharing incentives

 

 

I would like to know what incentives are in place for knowledge sharing within your organization. I have a few questions and would appreciate your feedback.

• How does your organization encourage knowledge sharing and is it a component of your culture?
• Do you have an incentive program in place that recognizes outstanding examples of employees who have captured and shared knowledge?
• If so, are rewards referred to as "Knowledge Management" or are they a part of a larger corporate award program?


Nancy Dixon
 

Arthur,
What a very clever way to help students understand the concepts of rewards. And what I like is that the reward was not about points toward a grade that could be earned. I can just imagine the conversation about it afterward.

It reminded me of a project on patient safety that I was involved.  This project was an effort to get nurses to report  "near misses"  - things like, almost gave the wrong medication, or got Mr. Smith and Mr. Smythe mixed up and started wheeling Smythe to the operating room.  The idea was that near misses are a good indicator for a problems the system could address e.g. not putting people with similar sounding names in the same room.  

We created colorful forms on which to report near misses and  made a big box, like a valentine box, to slide the reports into.  There was a large box of chocolates by the box and every time someone put a slip in the box they were offered a chocolate. Now no one imagined that nurses would fill out the forms just to get the chocolates - but it sent a great message to the nursing staff that 1) reports on near misses were valued, 2) you even get rewarded for it, 3) and the playfullness of it indicated that there is no shame in a near miss.
 It worked! Nurses started reporting near misses.  Some took a chocolate and some did not. But the practice of reporting near misses continued - especially after we could detect a pattern,  find a way to fix it and then publicize the fix

Nancy

Nancy M, Dixon
Common Knowledge Associates
 512 912 6100

now blogging at www.nancydixonblog.com







Cory Banks
 

In our organisation we do not have separate incentives for knowledge sharing. We have intentionally tried to have these embedded in the recognised/existing programs in the business (rather than running something separate).

Example is our quarterly company values awards we have successfully lobbied for the award related to the value of "Sharing knowledge with our colleagues to achieve professional excellence" to be promoted as a 'Sharing Knowledge' award as opposed to 'Professional Excellence' as it had been.

Another example is having knowledge sharing and 'knowledge leadership' criteria as part of the advancement and associate programs in the business (Things like mentoring, participating in the technical excellence program, writing papers, presenting at conferences, running internal training, leading communities of practice etc..)

Thanks

Cory Banks

Profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/corza/
Blog: http://corzandeffect.wordpress.com/


On 12 February 2010 03:34, mzaharee <mzaharee@...> wrote:
 

I would like to know what incentives are in place for knowledge sharing within your organization. I have a few questions and would appreciate your feedback.

• How does your organization encourage knowledge sharing and is it a component of your culture?
• Do you have an incentive program in place that recognizes outstanding examples of employees who have captured and shared knowledge?
• If so, are rewards referred to as "Knowledge Management" or are they a part of a larger corporate award program?



Arthur Shelley
 

Great initiatives Cory.  I agree with the approach.  The more you can embed the principles of KM into the strategic initiatives the more effective they are.  They then become the accepted norm rather than something extra that you do if you get time.  At Cadbury we had “Collaborative” and “Adaptable” as two of the ten “leadership Imperatives” (behavioural expectations of managers and leaders that were assessed (more like discussed privately with your manager as a reminder of their importance – but it was documented and on file) twice per year and formed part of the basis of review with a link to bonus payments ( as part of the overall performance assessment).

Regards,
Arthur Shelley
Founder: Intelligent Answers & Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
Author:
The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
Twitter:
Metaphorage
Blog: http//organizationalzoo.blogspot.com 
Ph +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley 
Free Zoo Behavioural Profiles:
www.organizationalzoo.com


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Cory Banks
Sent: Wednesday, 17 February 2010 11:30 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge sharing incentives

 

 

In our organisation we do not have separate incentives for knowledge sharing. We have intentionally tried to have these embedded in the recognised/existing programs in the business (rather than running something separate).

 

Example is our quarterly company values awards we have successfully lobbied for the award related to the value of "Sharing knowledge with our colleagues to achieve professional excellence" to be promoted as a 'Sharing Knowledge' award as opposed to 'Professional Excellence' as it had been.

 

Another example is having knowledge sharing and 'knowledge leadership' criteria as part of the advancement and associate programs in the business (Things like mentoring, participating in the technical excellence program, writing papers, presenting at conferences, running internal training, leading communities of practice etc..)


Thanks

Cory Banks

Profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/corza/
Blog: http://corzandeffect.wordpress.com/

On 12 February 2010 03:34, mzaharee <mzaharee@mitre.org> wrote:

 

I would like to know what incentives are in place for knowledge sharing within your organization. I have a few questions and would appreciate your feedback.

• How does your organization encourage knowledge sharing and is it a component of your culture?
• Do you have an incentive program in place that recognizes outstanding examples of employees who have captured and shared knowledge?
• If so, are rewards referred to as "Knowledge Management" or are they a part of a larger corporate award program?

 


 

Cory

 

This is simple and practical…and a great practice..thanks

 

Bill

 

Bill Kaplan CPCM

571.934.7408 (o)

703.401.4198 (c)

 

 www.workingknowledge-csp.com

 http://www.linkedin.com/in/ckobillkaplan

 

 

___________________________________________

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Cory Banks
Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 2010 07:30
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge sharing incentives

 

 

In our organisation we do not have separate incentives for knowledge sharing. We have intentionally tried to have these embedded in the recognised/existing programs in the business (rather than running something separate).

 

Example is our quarterly company values awards we have successfully lobbied for the award related to the value of "Sharing knowledge with our colleagues to achieve professional excellence" to be promoted as a 'Sharing Knowledge' award as opposed to 'Professional Excellence' as it had been.

 

Another example is having knowledge sharing and 'knowledge leadership' criteria as part of the advancement and associate programs in the business (Things like mentoring, participating in the technical excellence program, writing papers, presenting at conferences, running internal training, leading communities of practice etc..)


Thanks

Cory Banks

Profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/corza/
Blog: http://corzandeffect.wordpress.com/

On 12 February 2010 03:34, mzaharee <mzaharee@...> wrote:

 

I would like to know what incentives are in place for knowledge sharing within your organization. I have a few questions and would appreciate your feedback.

• How does your organization encourage knowledge sharing and is it a component of your culture?
• Do you have an incentive program in place that recognizes outstanding examples of employees who have captured and shared knowledge?
• If so, are rewards referred to as "Knowledge Management" or are they a part of a larger corporate award program?

 


Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

There is a difference between a short-term rewards programme to publicize a new initiative and longer-term recognition

People in organizations really only want 2 things (yes, I am grossly over-simplifying here). Some want to have careers & progress upward to more responsibility & money. Some just want to get by - their personal fulfilment lies mostly outside their work.

So the KM pitch for the first group is that knowledge participation will help you advance your career. Now that claim has to be true. If managers who collaborate & mentor others get ahead then juniors will see that imitate it. If only territorial game-players (hey, they made their numbers, we don't care how) get promoted then likewise that behaviour will be be imitated. It doesn't really matter what appears in the performance review forms (organizations vary greatly in the extent to which this process is taken seriously or ).

For the second group, KM has to make their lives clearly easier - that's the incentive. Otherwise it's dead in the water.

I don't think you can talk about incentives without talking about role-modelling (or leadership, if you will).

[I'm glad Alfie Kohn got a mention & I also like one chapter of Dan Ariely's book that talks about the potentially destructive relationship between social obligation & financial rewards]


From: "bill@..." <bill@...>
To: "sikmleaders@..."
Sent: Thu, February 18, 2010 1:01:19 AM
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Knowledge sharing incentives

 

Cory

 

This is simple and practical…and a great practice..thanks

 

Bill

 

Bill Kaplan CPCM

571.934.7408 (o)

703.401.4198 (c)

 

 www.workingknowledg e-csp.com

 http://www.linkedin .com/in/ckobillkaplan

 

 

____________ _________ _________ _________ ____

 

WKELogo001.jpg

 

From: sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:sikmleaders @yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Cory Banks
Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 2010 07:30
To: sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge sharing incentives

 

 

In our organisation we do not have separate incentives for knowledge sharing. We have intentionally tried to have these embedded in the recognised/existing programs in the business (rather than running something separate).

 

Example is our quarterly company values awards we have successfully lobbied for the award related to the value of "Sharing knowledge with our colleagues to achieve professional excellence" to be promoted as a 'Sharing Knowledge' award as opposed to 'Professional Excellence' as it had been.

 

Another example is having knowledge sharing and 'knowledge leadership' criteria as part of the advancement and associate programs in the business (Things like mentoring, participating in the technical excellence program, writing papers, presenting at conferences, running internal training, leading communities of practice etc..)


Thanks

Cory Banks

Profile: http://www.linkedin .com/in/corza/
Blog: http://corzandeffec t.wordpress. com/

On 12 February 2010 03:34, mzaharee <mzaharee@mitre. org> wrote:

 

I would like to know what incentives are in place for knowledge sharing within your organization. I have a few questions and would appreciate your feedback.

• How does your organization encourage knowledge sharing and is it a component of your culture?
• Do you have an incentive program in place that recognizes outstanding examples of employees who have captured and shared knowledge?
• If so, are rewards referred to as "Knowledge Management" or are they a part of a larger corporate award program?

 



Atul Rai <raiatul2004@...>
 

Quite agree with the thoughts Matt has posted here. Basically, people need to see some form of value. Incentives i think are nice to get something started, but manyatimes a the thing that comes up is that KM happens for the incentives rather than for the value inherent. Somewhere, knowledge managers need to figure out how to manage this difference.


From: Matt Moore
To: sikmleaders@...
Sent: Thu, February 18, 2010 6:25:12 AM
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge sharing incentives

 

There is a difference between a short-term rewards programme to publicize a new initiative and longer-term recognition

People in organizations really only want 2 things (yes, I am grossly over-simplifying here). Some want to have careers & progress upward to more responsibility & money. Some just want to get by - their personal fulfilment lies mostly outside their work.

So the KM pitch for the first group is that knowledge participation will help you advance your career. Now that claim has to be true. If managers who collaborate & mentor others get ahead then juniors will see that imitate it. If only territorial game-players (hey, they made their numbers, we don't care how) get promoted then likewise that behaviour will be be imitated. It doesn't really matter what appears in the performance review forms (organizations vary greatly in the extent to which this process is taken seriously or ).

For the second group, KM has to make their lives clearly easier - that's the incentive. Otherwise it's dead in the water.

I don't think you can talk about incentives without talking about role-modelling (or leadership, if you will).

[I'm glad Alfie Kohn got a mention & I also like one chapter of Dan Ariely's book that talks about the potentially destructive relationship between social obligation & financial rewards]


From: "bill@workingknowle dge-csp.com"
To: "sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com"
Sent: Thu, February 18, 2010 1:01:19 AM
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Knowledge sharing incentives

 

Cory

 

This is simple and practical…and a great practice..thanks

 

Bill

 

Bill Kaplan CPCM

571.934.7408 (o)

703.401.4198 (c)

 

 www.workingknowledg e-csp.com

 http://www.linkedin .com/in/ckobillkaplan

 

 

____________ _________ _________ _________ ____

 

WKELogo001.jpg

 

From: sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:sikmleaders @yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Cory Banks
Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 2010 07:30
To: sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge sharing incentives

 

 

In our organisation we do not have separate incentives for knowledge sharing. We have intentionally tried to have these embedded in the recognised/existing programs in the business (rather than running something separate).

 

Example is our quarterly company values awards we have successfully lobbied for the award related to the value of "Sharing knowledge with our colleagues to achieve professional excellence" to be promoted as a 'Sharing Knowledge' award as opposed to 'Professional Excellence' as it had been.

 

Another example is having knowledge sharing and 'knowledge leadership' criteria as part of the advancement and associate programs in the business (Things like mentoring, participating in the technical excellence program, writing papers, presenting at conferences, running internal training, leading communities of practice etc..)


Thanks

Cory Banks

Profile: http://www.linkedin .com/in/corza/
Blog: http://corzandeffec t.wordpress. com/

On 12 February 2010 03:34, mzaharee <mzaharee@mitre. org> wrote:

 

I would like to know what incentives are in place for knowledge sharing within your organization. I have a few questions and would appreciate your feedback.

• How does your organization encourage knowledge sharing and is it a component of your culture?
• Do you have an incentive program in place that recognizes outstanding examples of employees who have captured and shared knowledge?
• If so, are rewards referred to as "Knowledge Management" or are they a part of a larger corporate award program?