Shameless Self Promotion #periodicals #consulting


Chris Riemer
 
Edited

Greetings, all -

Yes, that's what this is. I'm a long-time member of the SIKM list, although not a particularly active one. My partner and I have been trying to bring KM to small and medium-sized businesses since 2003, and it's been a struggle. It's hard to sell something when people aren't buying it. However, we've been pretty successful with other kinds of work, and also have a monthly newsletter that's absolutely free! Some of you are already subscribers. And we got so many positive comments on this month's issue I thought it was time to let everyone on the list know it was out there.

We keep it short and focused, and try to keep it interesting. You can read the current issue by visiting http://www.knowledgestreet.com/ , scrolling down to GET IN TOUCH, and clicking on "signing up for our monthly newsletter.: If you like it, feel free to subscribe, or pass it on. Naturally, comments are welcome.

Thanks,

Chris

Chris Riemer
Principal

Knowledge Street LLC
www.knowledgestreet.com
+1 973 292 2949

 


Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Chris,

Nothing wrong with a little shameless self promotion - and I do like the "we are here" picture on your "what we do page" page.

Taking the discussion broader, I have also done some work with small & medium-sized businesses. I think KM becomes relevant for most businesses somewhere around the 100 employee mark (earlier if the workforce is highly distributed) but most organizations don't have the resources to deal with it properly until they get much larger.

What have other people's experience been?

Regards,

Matt


From: Chris
To: sikmleaders@...
Sent: Fri, February 12, 2010 5:50:39 AM
Subject: [sikmleaders] Shameless Self Promotion

 

Greetings, all -

Yes, that's what this is. I'm a long-time member of the SIKM list, although not a particularly active one. My partner and I have been trying to bring KM to small and medium-sized businesses since 2003, and it's been a struggle. It's hard to sell something when people aren't buying it. However, we've been pretty successful with other kinds of work, and also have a monthly newsletter that's absolutely free! Some of you are already subscribers. And we got so many positive comments on this month's issue I thought it was time to let everyone on the list know it was out there.

We keep it short and focused, and try to keep it interesting. You can read the current issue at http://tinyurl. com/y9mrr9q. If you like it, feel free to subscribe, or pass it on. Naturally, comments are welcome.

Thanks,

Chris

Chris Riemer
Principal

Knowledge Street LLC
www.knowledgestreet .com
+1 973 292 2949


Stuart French <sjfrenc@...>
 

Hi Matt,

I have worked in, worked on and studied KM in SMEs and have seen a similar dynamic, although I might describe it a different way.

1) Organic Knowledge Sharing happens naturally in groups who's size is well below the Dunbar number (forgiving individual personalities), much of it face-to-face. The trick is to focus on the gaps that appear as they grow.  A specific focus on maintaining intimacy between sites (if and when you have more than one) can be beneficial.
2) Succession planning is a big focus in SMEs and usually left until the last minute. KM can highlight this and look for ways to overcome the issues around executive change-over and areas of higher staff turnover.
3) In SMEs a lot of stuff is either done spur-of-the-minute, or as part of a QA system. Anything in-between is generally not managed. Encouraging and enabling people to slow down just a little and document or share knowledge (maybe by a wiki or yammer system) can really help the 2nd & 3rd time something is done. This MUST be done as part of the process though, like leaving footprints. Any attempt to get people to document after the fact will fail the second you take your eyes off it.


Note, these three things are often addressed with technology in large corporations and thus your comment about being affordable.  In SMEs many KM solutions don't require big databases, but can be handled through things like regular get-togethers, staff indoctrination procedures, mentoring programs and intelligent use of business narrative, both to sense organisational weak signals and to communication corporate values that can act as guideposts for newcomers.

Many people see the dropping cost of web-based information solutions as a way that SME's can benefit from KM solutions only the big-buys got to play with.  Instead I see KM co-opting social media and other tools in an attempt to make knowledge sharing in big business run more like an SME.

Stuart French
www.DeltaKnowledge.net


On 12 February 2010 11:19, Matt Moore <innotecture@...> wrote:
 

Chris,

Nothing wrong with a little shameless self promotion - and I do like the "we are here" picture on your "what we do page" page.

Taking the discussion broader, I have also done some work with small & medium-sized businesses. I think KM becomes relevant for most businesses somewhere around the 100 employee mark (earlier if the workforce is highly distributed) but most organizations don't have the resources to deal with it properly until they get much larger.

What have other people's experience been?

Regards,

Matt


From: Chris <jcr@...>
To: sikmleaders@...
Sent: Fri, February 12, 2010 5:50:39 AM
Subject: [sikmleaders] Shameless Self Promotion

 

Greetings, all -

Yes, that's what this is. I'm a long-time member of the SIKM list, although not a particularly active one. My partner and I have been trying to bring KM to small and medium-sized businesses since 2003, and it's been a struggle. It's hard to sell something when people aren't buying it. However, we've been pretty successful with other kinds of work, and also have a monthly newsletter that's absolutely free! Some of you are already subscribers. And we got so many positive comments on this month's issue I thought it was time to let everyone on the list know it was out there.

We keep it short and focused, and try to keep it interesting. You can read the current issue at http://tinyurl. com/y9mrr9q. If you like it, feel free to subscribe, or pass it on. Naturally, comments are welcome.

Thanks,

Chris

Chris Riemer
Principal

Knowledge Street LLC
www.knowledgestreet .com
+1 973 292 2949





Chris Riemer
 

Greetings, Stuart
 
In our experience, most of the SMB KM work is operationally focused. It may be industry-specific, but most of our customers aren't interested in trying to become more innovative. However, they generally are interested in things that could make them more efficient, either to reduce costs or to increase agility.
 
So we've been able to sell consulting and development work around improving a particular business process (proposal generation, for example) with the idea that reusable artifacts and a well-defined approach will reduce the cost of doing bids while simultaneously improving their quality.
 
SMBs are also aware of their vulnerability to the loss of key personnel, from either the sales or delivery side. So they like the idea of doing something that would help them hang onto their assets, as a hedge against turnover.
 
Chris


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Stuart French
Sent: Thursday, February 11, 2010 8:15 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] SMBs (was: Shameless Self Promotion)

 

Hi Matt,

I have worked in, worked on and studied KM in SMEs and have seen a similar dynamic, although I might describe it a different way.

1) Organic Knowledge Sharing happens naturally in groups who's size is well below the Dunbar number (forgiving individual personalities), much of it face-to-face. The trick is to focus on the gaps that appear as they grow.  A specific focus on maintaining intimacy between sites (if and when you have more than one) can be beneficial.
2) Succession planning is a big focus in SMEs and usually left until the last minute. KM can highlight this and look for ways to overcome the issues around executive change-over and areas of higher staff turnover.
3) In SMEs a lot of stuff is either done spur-of-the-minute, or as part of a QA system. Anything in-between is generally not managed. Encouraging and enabling people to slow down just a little and document or share knowledge (maybe by a wiki or yammer system) can really help the 2nd & 3rd time something is done. This MUST be done as part of the process though, like leaving footprints. Any attempt to get people to document after the fact will fail the second you take your eyes off it.


Note, these three things are often addressed with technology in large corporations and thus your comment about being affordable.  In SMEs many KM solutions don't require big databases, but can be handled through things like regular get-togethers, staff indoctrination procedures, mentoring programs and intelligent use of business narrative, both to sense organisational weak signals and to communication corporate values that can act as guideposts for newcomers.

Many people see the dropping cost of web-based information solutions as a way that SME's can benefit from KM solutions only the big-buys got to play with.  Instead I see KM co-opting social media and other tools in an attempt to make knowledge sharing in big business run more like an SME.

Stuart French
www.DeltaKnowledge.net


On 12 February 2010 11:19, Matt Moore <innotecture@yahoo.com> wrote:
 

Chris,

Nothing wrong with a little shameless self promotion - and I do like the "we are here" picture on your "what we do page" page.

Taking the discussion broader, I have also done some work with small & medium-sized businesses. I think KM becomes relevant for most businesses somewhere around the 100 employee mark (earlier if the workforce is highly distributed) but most organizations don't have the resources to deal with it properly until they get much larger.

What have other people's experience been?

Regards,

Matt


From: Chris <jcr@knowledgestreet.com>
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Fri, February 12, 2010 5:50:39 AM
Subject: [sikmleaders] Shameless Self Promotion

 

Greetings, all -

Yes, that's what this is. I'm a long-time member of the SIKM list, although not a particularly active one. My partner and I have been trying to bring KM to small and medium-sized businesses since 2003, and it's been a struggle. It's hard to sell something when people aren't buying it. However, we've been pretty successful with other kinds of work, and also have a monthly newsletter that's absolutely free! Some of you are already subscribers. And we got so many positive comments on this month's issue I thought it was time to let everyone on the list know it was out there.

We keep it short and focused, and try to keep it interesting. You can read the current issue at http://tinyurl. com/y9mrr9q. If you like it, feel free to subscribe, or pass it on. Naturally, comments are welcome.

Thanks,

Chris

Chris Riemer
Principal

Knowledge Street LLC
www.knowledgestreet .com
+1 973 292 2949





Stuart French <sjfrenc@...>
 

Thanks Chris,

Sun State Cement in Queensland has had similar success in the area of succession planning and mentor-based retirement planning. A good case study to check out if you haven't seen it already.

Stuart.


On 16 February 2010 03:37, Chris Riemer <jcr@...> wrote:
 

Greetings, Stuart
 
In our experience, most of the SMB KM work is operationally focused. It may be industry-specific, but most of our customers aren't interested in trying to become more innovative. However, they generally are interested in things that could make them more efficient, either to reduce costs or to increase agility.
 
So we've been able to sell consulting and development work around improving a particular business process (proposal generation, for example) with the idea that reusable artifacts and a well-defined approach will reduce the cost of doing bids while simultaneously improving their quality.
 
SMBs are also aware of their vulnerability to the loss of key personnel, from either the sales or delivery side. So they like the idea of doing something that would help them hang onto their assets, as a hedge against turnover.
 
Chris


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Stuart French
Sent: Thursday, February 11, 2010 8:15 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] SMBs (was: Shameless Self Promotion)

 

Hi Matt,

I have worked in, worked on and studied KM in SMEs and have seen a similar dynamic, although I might describe it a different way.

1) Organic Knowledge Sharing happens naturally in groups who's size is well below the Dunbar number (forgiving individual personalities), much of it face-to-face. The trick is to focus on the gaps that appear as they grow.  A specific focus on maintaining intimacy between sites (if and when you have more than one) can be beneficial.
2) Succession planning is a big focus in SMEs and usually left until the last minute. KM can highlight this and look for ways to overcome the issues around executive change-over and areas of higher staff turnover.
3) In SMEs a lot of stuff is either done spur-of-the-minute, or as part of a QA system. Anything in-between is generally not managed. Encouraging and enabling people to slow down just a little and document or share knowledge (maybe by a wiki or yammer system) can really help the 2nd & 3rd time something is done. This MUST be done as part of the process though, like leaving footprints. Any attempt to get people to document after the fact will fail the second you take your eyes off it.


Note, these three things are often addressed with technology in large corporations and thus your comment about being affordable.  In SMEs many KM solutions don't require big databases, but can be handled through things like regular get-togethers, staff indoctrination procedures, mentoring programs and intelligent use of business narrative, both to sense organisational weak signals and to communication corporate values that can act as guideposts for newcomers.

Many people see the dropping cost of web-based information solutions as a way that SME's can benefit from KM solutions only the big-buys got to play with.  Instead I see KM co-opting social media and other tools in an attempt to make knowledge sharing in big business run more like an SME.

Stuart French
www.DeltaKnowledge.net


On 12 February 2010 11:19, Matt Moore <innotecture@...> wrote:
 

Chris,

Nothing wrong with a little shameless self promotion - and I do like the "we are here" picture on your "what we do page" page.

Taking the discussion broader, I have also done some work with small & medium-sized businesses. I think KM becomes relevant for most businesses somewhere around the 100 employee mark (earlier if the workforce is highly distributed) but most organizations don't have the resources to deal with it properly until they get much larger.

What have other people's experience been?

Regards,

Matt


From: Chris <jcr@...>
To: sikmleaders@...
Sent: Fri, February 12, 2010 5:50:39 AM
Subject: [sikmleaders] Shameless Self Promotion

 

Greetings, all -

Yes, that's what this is. I'm a long-time member of the SIKM list, although not a particularly active one. My partner and I have been trying to bring KM to small and medium-sized businesses since 2003, and it's been a struggle. It's hard to sell something when people aren't buying it. However, we've been pretty successful with other kinds of work, and also have a monthly newsletter that's absolutely free! Some of you are already subscribers. And we got so many positive comments on this month's issue I thought it was time to let everyone on the list know it was out there.

We keep it short and focused, and try to keep it interesting. You can read the current issue at http://tinyurl. com/y9mrr9q. If you like it, feel free to subscribe, or pass it on. Naturally, comments are welcome.

Thanks,

Chris

Chris Riemer
Principal

Knowledge Street LLC
www.knowledgestreet .com
+1 973 292 2949