Knowledge Workers? #workplace


Fred Nickols
 
Edited

John Seely Brown is one of the authors of a very interesting piece at this link:

http://web.archive.org/web/20100510193057/https://www.bloomberg.com/apps/harvardbusiness?sid=H12a9b09b214df3fdba284650b69531c4
or
https://hbr.org/2010/04/are-all-employees-knowledge-wo.html

It calls into question the validity and utility of identifying people as knowledge workers.

Fred Nickols
fred@nickols.us


Murray Jennex
 

John has attended many of our KM sessions at HICSS and I've had the pleasure of conversing.  Our group at HICSS tends to agree with John only in a reverse way, we just consider everyone a knowledge worker to some degree.  A few months ago I mentioned my knowledge loss risk process and the funny thing when we piloted it was that the long term executive secretary scored very high on the potential to be a loss of knowledge should she leave, it kind of surprised the clients...murray
 
 

In a message dated 4/6/2010 12:34:43 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, fred@... writes:
John Seely Brown is one of the authors of a very interesting piece at this link:

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/harvardbusiness?sid=H12a9b09b214df3fdba284650b69531c4

It calls into question the validity and utility of identifying people as knowledge workers.

Fred Nickols
fred@...
 


Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Nice one, Fred. One comment that stood out for me was:

"We should aggressively create opportunities for people within our organization to work together with leading edge talent outside our organization so that both sides can develop their talent even more rapidly. In driving scalable learning, we must expand our horizons far beyond the boundaries of our own firm."



From: Fred
To: sikmleaders@...
Sent: Wed, April 7, 2010 5:24:28 AM
Subject: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Workers?

 

John Seely Brown is one of the authors of a very interesting piece at this link:

http://www.bloomber g.com/apps/ harvardbusiness? sid=H12a9b09b214 df3fdba284650b69 531c4

It calls into question the validity and utility of identifying people as knowledge workers.

Fred Nickols
fred@nickols. us



Arthur Shelley
 

Matt and Fred,

 

Certainly this strategy worked very well when we developed the global Chocolate Expert community at Cadbury.

We were specifically looking for collaborative opportunities using the strapline:  Connect, Collaborate, Capitalise.  We were able to collate many success stories with tangible benefits and I would still argue that the intangibles were still far more important to performance improvement in terms of engagement, participation, mentoring and development of new employees and increased leverage of collective capabilities.

 

After it was interacting for about 18 months we did a social network analysis which showed many new connections between people across the world. Although the numbers active in the teleconferences were relatively low (10-20 typically), the SNA showed a community of 247 people, 50 of which were outside the organisation (represented by past employees, suppliers, customers etc).  The reach of the informal network is important to knowledge flow and flow increases rapidly when people have specific requirements to collaborate around.

Regards,
Arthur Shelley
Founder: Intelligent Answers & Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
Author:
The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
Twitter:
Metaphorage
Blog: http//organizationalzoo.blogspot.com 
Ph +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley 
Free Zoo Behavioural Profiles:
www.organizationalzoo.com


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Matt Moore
Sent: Wednesday, 7 April 2010 10:25 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Workers?

 

 

Nice one, Fred. One comment that stood out for me was:

"We should aggressively create opportunities for people within our organization to work together with leading edge talent outside our organization so that both sides can develop their talent even more rapidly. In driving scalable learning, we must expand our horizons far beyond the boundaries of our own firm."

 

 


From: Fred us>
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wed, April 7, 2010 5:24:28 AM
Subject: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Workers?

 

John Seely Brown is one of the authors of a very interesting piece at this link:

http://www.bloomber g.com/apps/ harvardbusiness? sid=H12a9b09b214 df3fdba284650b69 531c4

It calls into question the validity and utility of identifying people as knowledge workers.

Fred Nickols
fred@nickols. us

 


Tiffany Tyler
 

In reference to the knowledge in a secretary or other support staff, I think that "surprise" is (should be) a big wakeup call to managers.  Support staff hold all kinds of tacit knowledge that keeps the enterprise running.  If you do an organizational network analysis as part of your loss risk, or any other KM project, you find those "hidden" critical points in EVERY organization.  My personal favorite was a mailroom supervisor.  I  have found many of my previous clients resistant to the idea of including support staff in KM exercises until I do a small test.

"What would happen to this department if (X) left for 60 days?"


Tiffany Tyler
Human Capital Specialist
Resources Global Professionals


On Tue, Apr 6, 2010 at 8:07 PM, <murphjen@...> wrote:
 

John has attended many of our KM sessions at HICSS and I've had the pleasure of conversing.  Our group at HICSS tends to agree with John only in a reverse way, we just consider everyone a knowledge worker to some degree.  A few months ago I mentioned my knowledge loss risk process and the funny thing when we piloted it was that the long term executive secretary scored very high on the potential to be a loss of knowledge should she leave, it kind of surprised the clients...murray
 
 
In a message dated 4/6/2010 12:34:43 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, fred@... writes:
John Seely Brown is one of the authors of a very interesting piece at this link:

It calls into question the validity and utility of identifying people as knowledge workers.

Fred Nickols
fred@...
 



 

Tiffany

 

You are so right!! 

 

So consider, “Knowledge is where you find it!”

 

Bill

 

Bill Kaplan CPCM | Great Falls, Virginia 22066 | 571.934.7408 | 703.401.4198 (direct) | Linked In: www.linkedin.com/in/ckobillkaplan

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Learn more about that value we provide at www.workingknowledge-csp.com

 

 

The information contained in this e-mail and any attachments is intended solely for the use of the individual or individuals to whom it is addressed and others who are authorized to receive it. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that unauthorized use, copying or disclosure is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. If you have received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately.  Since this communication may contain confidential or legally privileged information, please do not forward to any third party without written authorization from the sender or Working KnowledgeCSP.

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Tiffany Tyler
Sent: Wednesday, April 07, 2010 09:03
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Workers?

 

 

In reference to the knowledge in a secretary or other support staff, I think that "surprise" is (should be) a big wakeup call to managers.  Support staff hold all kinds of tacit knowledge that keeps the enterprise running.  If you do an organizational network analysis as part of your loss risk, or any other KM project, you find those "hidden" critical points in EVERY organization.  My personal favorite was a mailroom supervisor.  I  have found many of my previous clients resistant to the idea of including support staff in KM exercises until I do a small test.

"What would happen to this department if (X) left for 60 days?"


Tiffany Tyler
Human Capital Specialist
Resources Global Professionals

On Tue, Apr 6, 2010 at 8:07 PM, <murphjen@...> wrote:

 

John has attended many of our KM sessions at HICSS and I've had the pleasure of conversing.  Our group at HICSS tends to agree with John only in a reverse way, we just consider everyone a knowledge worker to some degree.  A few months ago I mentioned my knowledge loss risk process and the funny thing when we piloted it was that the long term executive secretary scored very high on the potential to be a loss of knowledge should she leave, it kind of surprised the clients...murray

 

 

In a message dated 4/6/2010 12:34:43 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, fred@... writes:

John Seely Brown is one of the authors of a very interesting piece at this link:

It calls into question the validity and utility of identifying people as knowledge workers.

Fred Nickols
fred@...

 

 


Simard, Albert <albert.simard@...>
 

Tiffany –

 

Actually, this is exactly why, in the Canadian Forest Service, we developed a Directory of Expertise and Skills” (DOES) to include the valuable knowledge held by those who are not classed as Subject Matter Experts.

 

 Al


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of bill@...
Sent: Wednesday, April 07, 2010 10:21 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Workers?

 

 

Tiffany

 

You are so right!! 

 

So consider, “Knowledge is where you find it!”

 

Bill

 

Bill Kaplan CPCM | Great Falls, Virginia 22066 | 571.934.7408 | 703.401.4198 (direct) | Linked In: www.linkedin.com/in/ckobillkaplan

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Learn more about that value we provide at www.workingknowledge-csp.com

 

 

The information contained in this e-mail and any attachments is intended solely for the use of the individual or individuals to whom it is addressed and others who are authorized to receive it. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that unauthorized use, copying or disclosure is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. If you have received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately.  Since this communication may contain confidential or legally privileged information, please do not forward to any third party without written authorization from the sender or Working KnowledgeCSP.

 

From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tiffany Tyler
Sent: Wednesday, April 07, 2010 09:03
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Workers?

 

 

In reference to the knowledge in a secretary or other support staff, I think that "surprise" is (should be) a big wakeup call to managers.  Support staff hold all kinds of tacit knowledge that keeps the enterprise running.  If you do an organizational network analysis as part of your loss risk, or any other KM project, you find those "hidden" critical points in EVERY organization.  My personal favorite was a mailroom supervisor.  I  have found many of my previous clients resistant to the idea of including support staff in KM exercises until I do a small test.

"What would happen to this department if (X) left for 60 days?"


Tiffany Tyler
Human Capital Specialist
Resources Global Professionals

On Tue, Apr 6, 2010 at 8:07 PM, <murphjen@aol.com> wrote:

 

John has attended many of our KM sessions at HICSS and I've had the pleasure of conversing.  Our group at HICSS tends to agree with John only in a reverse way, we just consider everyone a knowledge worker to some degree.  A few months ago I mentioned my knowledge loss risk process and the funny thing when we piloted it was that the long term executive secretary scored very high on the potential to be a loss of knowledge should she leave, it kind of surprised the clients...murray

 

 

In a message dated 4/6/2010 12:34:43 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, fred@nickols.us writes:

John Seely Brown is one of the authors of a very interesting piece at this link:

It calls into question the validity and utility of identifying people as knowledge workers.

Fred Nickols
fred@nickols.us

 

 


Murray Jennex
 

In the particular case I cited the client realized that there are two kinds of experience, the direct experience of leading/doing projects and then the observational experience of being there when projects and activities happen.  I had purposefully included both types of experience in the evaluation as both can tell the "story" of what happened.  This is something I think a lot of organizations don't realize.  Observational skill transforms into great knowledge capture/retention and many staff personnel have this skill....murray
 
Murray E. Jennex
San Diego State University
Editor in Chief International Journal of Knowledge Management
 

In a message dated 4/8/2010 11:01:40 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, tman9999@... writes:


Hello Tiffany - great points. The Greeks used the word metis to describe the kind of knowledge that one develops through experience over time. It is not easily describable, much less tranmittable, and therefore difficult for companies to focus on - yet it is precisely the kind of knowledge that makes them anxious when they consider losing someone like the mailroom supervisor you described. My friend and colleague, Larry Prusak, introduced me to this concept while we were at IBM, and he wrote a nice short piece about it here.

Cheers!

-Tom Short
Knowledge Transfer, Metrics
tom.short at sbcglobal.net
http://shortnames.wordpress.com/

--- In sikmleaders@..., Tiffany Tyler wrote:
>
> In reference to the knowledge in a secretary or other support staff, I think
> that "surprise" is (should be) a big wakeup call to managers.  Support staff
> hold all kinds of tacit knowledge that keeps the enterprise running.  If you
> do an organizational network analysis as part of your loss risk, or any
> other KM project, you find those "hidden" critical points in EVERY
> organization.  My personal favorite was a mailroom supervisor.  I  have
> found many of my previous clients resistant to the idea of including support
> staff in KM exercises until I do a small test.
>
> "What would happen to this department if (X) left for 60 days?"
>
>
> *Tiffany Tyler*
> Human Capital Specialist
> Resources Global Professionals


Murray Jennex
 

Good point Al, this was exactly why also the
 

In a message dated 4/8/2010 6:47:33 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, albert.simard@... writes:


Tiffany –

 

Actually, this is exactly why, in the Canadian Forest Service, we developed a Directory of Expertise and Skills” (DOES) to include the valuable knowledge held by those who are not classed as Subject Matter Experts.

 

 Al


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of bill@...
Sent: Wednesday, April 07, 2010 10:21 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Workers?

 

 

Tiffany

 

You are so right!! 

 

So consider, “Knowledge is where you find it!”

 

Bill

 

Bill Kaplan CPCM | Great Falls, Virginia 22066 | 571.934.7408 | 703.401.4198 (direct) | Linked In: www.linkedin.com/in/ckobillkaplan

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Learn more about that value we provide at www.workingknowledge-csp.com

 

 

The information contained in this e-mail and any attachments is intended solely for the use of the individual or individuals to whom it is addressed and others who are authorized to receive it. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that unauthorized use, copying or disclosure is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. If you have received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately.  Since this communication may contain confidential or legally privileged information, please do not forward to any third party without written authorization from the sender or Working KnowledgeCSP.

 

From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tiffany Tyler
Sent: Wednesday, April 07, 2010 09:03
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Workers?

 

 

In reference to the knowledge in a secretary or other support staff, I think that "surprise" is (should be) a big wakeup call to managers.  Support staff hold all kinds of tacit knowledge that keeps the enterprise running.  If you do an organizational network analysis as part of your loss risk, or any other KM project, you find those "hidden" critical points in EVERY organization.  My personal favorite was a mailroom supervisor.  I  have found many of my previous clients resistant to the idea of including support staff in KM exercises until I do a small test.

"What would happen to this department if (X) left for 60 days?"


Tiffany Tyler
Human Capital Specialist
Resources Global Professionals

On Tue, Apr 6, 2010 at 8:07 PM, <murphjen@aol.com> wrote:

 

John has attended many of our KM sessions at HICSS and I've had the pleasure of conversing.  Our group at HICSS tends to agree with John only in a reverse way, we just consider everyone a knowledge worker to some degree.  A few months ago I mentioned my knowledge loss risk process and the funny thing when we piloted it was that the long term executive secretary scored very high on the potential to be a loss of knowledge should she leave, it kind of surprised the clients...murray

 

 

In a message dated 4/6/2010 12:34:43 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, fred@nickols.us writes:

John Seely Brown is one of the authors of a very interesting piece at this link:

It calls into question the validity and utility of identifying people as knowledge workers.

Fred Nickols
fred@nickols.us

 

 


Murray Jennex
 

sorry all, fat fingers, what I was saying is that the key component of our process was a skills and capabilities catalog.  This also ties in well with the strategy discussion that's been going on as all our assessments were tied to identifying persons with key knowledge for the organization.  Thanks...murray
 

In a message dated 4/8/2010 6:47:33 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, albert.simard@... writes:


Tiffany –

 

Actually, this is exactly why, in the Canadian Forest Service, we developed a Directory of Expertise and Skills” (DOES) to include the valuable knowledge held by those who are not classed as Subject Matter Experts.

 

 Al


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of bill@...
Sent: Wednesday, April 07, 2010 10:21 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Workers?

 

 

Tiffany

 

You are so right!! 

 

So consider, “Knowledge is where you find it!”

 

Bill

 

Bill Kaplan CPCM | Great Falls, Virginia 22066 | 571.934.7408 | 703.401.4198 (direct) | Linked In: www.linkedin.com/in/ckobillkaplan

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Learn more about that value we provide at www.workingknowledge-csp.com

 

 

The information contained in this e-mail and any attachments is intended solely for the use of the individual or individuals to whom it is addressed and others who are authorized to receive it. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that unauthorized use, copying or disclosure is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. If you have received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately.  Since this communication may contain confidential or legally privileged information, please do not forward to any third party without written authorization from the sender or Working KnowledgeCSP.

 

From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tiffany Tyler
Sent: Wednesday, April 07, 2010 09:03
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Workers?

 

 

In reference to the knowledge in a secretary or other support staff, I think that "surprise" is (should be) a big wakeup call to managers.  Support staff hold all kinds of tacit knowledge that keeps the enterprise running.  If you do an organizational network analysis as part of your loss risk, or any other KM project, you find those "hidden" critical points in EVERY organization.  My personal favorite was a mailroom supervisor.  I  have found many of my previous clients resistant to the idea of including support staff in KM exercises until I do a small test.

"What would happen to this department if (X) left for 60 days?"


Tiffany Tyler
Human Capital Specialist
Resources Global Professionals

On Tue, Apr 6, 2010 at 8:07 PM, <murphjen@aol.com> wrote:

 

John has attended many of our KM sessions at HICSS and I've had the pleasure of conversing.  Our group at HICSS tends to agree with John only in a reverse way, we just consider everyone a knowledge worker to some degree.  A few months ago I mentioned my knowledge loss risk process and the funny thing when we piloted it was that the long term executive secretary scored very high on the potential to be a loss of knowledge should she leave, it kind of surprised the clients...murray

 

 

In a message dated 4/6/2010 12:34:43 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, fred@nickols.us writes:

John Seely Brown is one of the authors of a very interesting piece at this link:

It calls into question the validity and utility of identifying people as knowledge workers.

Fred Nickols
fred@nickols.us

 

 


Tom <tman9999@...>
 

Hello Tiffany - great points. The Greeks used the word metis to describe the kind of knowledge that one develops through experience over time. It is not easily describable, much less tranmittable, and therefore difficult for companies to focus on - yet it is precisely the kind of knowledge that makes them anxious when they consider losing someone like the mailroom supervisor you described. My friend and colleague, Larry Prusak, introduced me to this concept while we were at IBM, and he wrote a nice short piece about it here.

Cheers!

-Tom Short
Knowledge Transfer, Metrics
tom.short at sbcglobal.net
http://shortnames.wordpress.com/


--- In sikmleaders@..., Tiffany Tyler wrote:
>
> In reference to the knowledge in a secretary or other support staff, I think
> that "surprise" is (should be) a big wakeup call to managers.  Support staff
> hold all kinds of tacit knowledge that keeps the enterprise running.  If you
> do an organizational network analysis as part of your loss risk, or any
> other KM project, you find those "hidden" critical points in EVERY
> organization.  My personal favorite was a mailroom supervisor.  I  have
> found many of my previous clients resistant to the idea of including support
> staff in KM exercises until I do a small test.
>
> "What would happen to this department if (X) left for 60 days?"
>
>
> *Tiffany Tyler*
> Human Capital Specialist
> Resources Global Professionals