Examples of organizations taking a genuinely strategic approach to knowledge management #case-studies #call-for


Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Hello,

I'd like to know if anyone on this list has come across an organization that they think is using either knowledge management or organizational learning principles in a genuinely strategic way - i.e. it's actually influencing the strategic direction of the organization.

If you would like to put forward your own organization then that is fine (but I may be a little sceptical).

The reason for this request is there's a part of the book that I'm writing where I want to explore this situation (although anything you send to me publicly or privately will be not be published without your permission).

Regards,

Matt


Lee, Jim <jlee@...>
 

In a recent study of ours, I found that both Michelin and Rolls-Royce to have the strategic intent for knowledge that you’re interested in.

……………………………………....

Jim Lee, PMP

KM Senior Advisor, APQC

+1-713-893-7790 - Direct

+1-216-338-3548 - Mobile

jlee@...

www.apqc.org

 

APQC’s 15th Annual KM Conference and Training is back in Houston in April 2010. If YOU only ATTEND one conference in 2010, make it this ONE

 


Tom <tman9999@...>
 

Hello Matt-

Some of my favorite examples:

Wildland Fire Service 

US Army Center for Army Lessons 

David Garvin (Harvard) is one of the few people I have come across who has articulated a usable framework for learning organization theory and practice. Although he wrote this a decade ago, it is still relevant to this discussion, I believe (and includes his favorite enterprise examples): Learning in Action .

Great question. Will be curious to see what others have to offer on this.
Thanks.

-Tom

Tom Short Consulting
Specializing in Knowledge Transfer
+1 415 912 0927





--- In sikmleaders@..., Matt Moore wrote:
>
> Hello,
>
> I'd like to know if anyone on this list has come across an organization that they think is using either knowledge management or organizational learning principles in a genuinely strategic way - i.e. it's actually influencing the strategic direction of the organization.
>
> If you would like to put forward your own organization then that is fine (but I may be a little sceptical).
>
> The reason for this request is there's a part of the book that I'm writing where I want to explore this situation (although anything you send to me publicly or privately will be not be published without your permission).
>
> Regards,
>
> Matt
>


Allan Crawford
 

Matt,
 
I'd suggest looking at Fluor corporation as an example of a company that makes strategic use of KM.  I say this because it is my perception that they use "what they know" to help drive their business strategy.  They have also aligned their knowledge communities with their organizational structure (i.e., the heads of their functional organizations...are also the heads of the respective communities).  If you want more info on Fluor I'd take a look at John McQuary's March 13, 2008 SIKM presentation where he gives an overview of KM at Fluor.
 
As Tom suggested I'd also think about the work the Army is doing in KM.  As an example I'd look at the introduction to the US Army's counter insurgency manual, which outlines one of the best examples I know of...of using KM principles and processes to develop a strategy and tactics...in this case for fighting a counter insurgency war.
 
A third organization to look at is the World Health Organization.  I'm not familiar with anywhere close to all of the things that they do, but as far as I can tell from some reading and looking at their website, they have done a very nice job of applying KM principles (although I've not seen them referred to as KM) as part of a strategic effort to disseminate operating room practices, which have had a significant impact on reducing complications and deaths associated with surgery in countries around the world.  For more info on this effort you can look at their website titled "Safe Surgery Saves Lives".  I've also written a recent blog on the topic at www.kmisalive.com
 
 


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Tom
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2010 8:18 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Examples of organizations taking a genuinely strategic approach to knowledge management

 

Hello Matt-

Some of my favorite examples: n  

Wildland Fire Service 

US Army Center for Army Lessons 

David Garvin (Harvard) is one of the few people I have come across who has articulated a usable framework for learning organization theory and practice. Although he wrote this a decade ago, it is still relevant to this discussion, I believe (and includes his favorite enterprise examples): Learning in Action .

Great question. Will be curious to see what others have to offer on this.
Thanks.

-Tom

Tom Short Consulting
Specializing in Knowledge Transfer
+1 415 912 0927





--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, Matt Moore ...> wrote: e in 
>
> Hello,
>
> I'd like to know if anyone on this list has come across an organization that they think is using either knowledge management or organizational learning principles in a genuinely strategic way - i.e. it's actually influencing the strategic direction of the organization.
>
> If you would like to put forward your own organization then that is fine (but I may be a little sceptical).
>
> The reason for this request is there's a part of the book that I'm writing where I want to explore this situation (although anything you send to me publicly or privately will be not be published without your permission).
>
> Regards,
>
> Matt
>


Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Thanks Tom - After your recommendation last year, I bought Garvin's book and it does have some good stuff in it. I'll take a closer look at the woodland fire service....



From: Tom
To: sikmleaders@...
Sent: Tue, April 13, 2010 1:18:05 AM
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Examples of organizations taking a genuinely strategic approach to knowledge management

 

Hello Matt-

Some of my favorite examples:

Wildland Fire Service 

US Army Center for Army Lessons 

David Garvin (Harvard) is one of the few people I have come across who has articulated a usable framework for learning organization theory and practice. Although he wrote this a decade ago, it is still relevant to this discussion, I believe (and includes his favorite enterprise examples): Learning in Action .

Great question. Will be curious to see what others have to offer on this.
Thanks.

-Tom

Tom Short Consulting
Specializing in Knowledge Transfer
+1 415 912 0927





--- In sikmleaders@ yahoogroups. com, Matt Moore wrote:
>
> Hello,
>
> I'd like to know if anyone on this list has come across an organization that they think is using either knowledge management or organizational learning principles in a genuinely strategic way - i.e. it's actually influencing the strategic direction of the organization.
>
> If you would like to put forward your own organization then that is fine (but I may be a little sceptical).
>
> The reason for this request is there's a part of the book that I'm writing where I want to explore this situation (although anything you send to me publicly or privately will be not be published without your permission).
>
> Regards,
>
> Matt
>



Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Jim - Interesting. Can you say more? Cheers, Matt


From: "Lee, Jim" <jlee@...>
To: sikmleaders@...
Sent: Tue, April 13, 2010 12:49:11 AM
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re:Examples of organizations taking a genuinely strategic approach to k

 

In a recent study of ours, I found that both Michelin and Rolls-Royce to have the strategic intent for knowledge that you’re interested in.

……………………………………....

Jim Lee, PMP

KM Senior Advisor, APQC

+1-713-893-7790 - Direct

+1-216-338-3548 - Mobile

jlee@...

www.apqc.org

 

APQC’s 15th Annual KM Conference and Training is back in Houston in April 2010. If YOU only ATTEND one conference in 2010, make it this ONE

 



Lee, Jim <jlee@...>
 

Matt, thanks for your interest. Perhaps the easiest way for me to expand on this is to simply provide some excerpts from the extensive case studies we produced from the study on both Michelin and Rolls-Royce. I hope you find these useful.

At Michelin:

The nature of Michelin’s products is highly specialized and the skills necessary to design and produce these products are not generally available outside the organization, so knowledge retention is critical to success. In recognition of this, Michelin developed a formal KR&T strategy as part of the organization’s overall, systematic global knowledge strategy, which uses a variety of knowledge-sharing techniques.

Michelin’s knowledge retention and transfer strategy is also integrated with its work force planning strategy. The quality and organization service group oversees the knowledge-sharing initiative and is responsible for knowledge-sharing processes. This group provides employees with organizational models and continuous improvement methods in order to facilitate effective performance. The personnel service group leads the work force planning strategy and ensures that Michelin maintains an appropriate quantity and quality of trained employees to achieve its business goals.

Colleges Métiers

Understanding Michelin’s approach to managing knowledge requires a definition of “college métier.” Métier is a French word meaning job, trade, profession, skill, or area of expertise. Michelin’s organizational structure is based around colleges métiers; the organization has 22 métiers grouped into four expertise areas:

1. research and development;

2. industry;

3. commerce/marketing; and

4. support services (e.g., purchasing, audit, management control, finance, communications, legal, environment/prevention, personnel, quality, supply chain, and information systems).

 

Managers in each expertise area are responsible for carrying out activities to ensure proper staffing and training of employees in their respective métiers. The processes used in the expertise areas to define competency needs and carry out work force planning are developed by the personnel service group. Michelin considers employees to belong to the enterprise as a whole, rather than the individual business entities. However, each individual also “belongs” to a métier, and long-term career evolution is managed through these units. Each expertise area has an overall director of performance and a designated director of competencies.

The directors of performance are accountable for the execution of Michelin’s work force planning strategy in their domains through the directors of competencies. The directors of competencies are responsible for aligning the expertise areas’ activities with overall business needs, verifying that a sufficient number of competent employees are available in the expertise areas, and managing continuous improvement efforts within the expertise areas to ensure that Michelin meets its short- and long-term objectives.

 

 

For Rolls-Royce:

 

Because the majority of knowledge exchange at Rolls-Royce occurs between people, the knowledge transfer and capture strategy emphasizes increasing opportunities for collaboration via communities, processes, and social networks. Technology is an enabler of the strategy, but not a primary component. Although Rolls-Royce leverages modern tools and techniques to help people manage and share knowledge, much of its strategy focuses on people and processes.

Structure of Knowledge Management

The responsibilities for knowledge transfer and retention are embedded into the engineering and technology functions. A central team of knowledge management representatives works full time on knowledge retention and transfer efforts; this team is supported by local KM representatives working full and part time. The central team is responsible for R&D and implementation of all capability technology. KM representatives, who meet frequently, are managed by a KM leadership team that convenes every eight weeks to set strategy and review projects.

The KM team works closely with universities, academics, and leading organizations in order to leverage best practices and short-cycle its own efforts. Specifically, Rolls- Royce works with universities and engineering experts to develop semantic Web technology and sophisticated process modeling. These capabilities are transferred into the engineering and supply chain units.

Within the engineering function, KM representatives have bottom-line responsibility for knowledge management. Part of the KM representatives’ role is to provide awareness and training. KM representatives take techniques and tools and help implement them within the business units. In other functions, where specific KM representatives are not defined, the KM team works with system management teams (SMTs). SMTs are not full-time knowledge resources, but can be leveraged to implement a range of improvements within the organization. The Engineering Improvement Center is another resource that can provide support to areas of the organization that are not well resourced with KM representatives. The Engineering Improvement Center is a corporate group accountable for delivering a range of engineering improvement projects, including projects with a KM focus.

……………………………………....

Jim Lee, PMP

KM Senior Advisor, APQC

+1-713-893-7790 - Direct

+1-216-338-3548 - Mobile

jlee@...

www.apqc.org

 

APQC’s 15th Annual KM Conference and Training is back in Houston in April 2010. If YOU only ATTEND one conference in 2010, make it this ONE

 


Tom <tman9999@...>
 

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, Matt Moore <innotecture@...> wrote:

Thanks Tom - After your recommendation last year, I bought Garvin's
book and it does have some good stuff in it. I'll take a closer look at
the woodland fire service....

You're welcome, Matt. WFS had dvds about their program a couple years
ago that they sent to me for free (or maybe it was a couple bucks).
Anyway, lots of info there.

Another one that occurred to me is Intel. Intel had a program called
"copy exactly" - very interesting approach aimed at trying to ensure
high production yields from day 1 at their fabs. Google the term and you
should find info on it - or I think I may have some in my archives.

Cheers!
-Tom