Thoughts on a library for a small enterprise #books #strategy


Arthur Shelley
 
Edited

I was asked by a colleague who works for a small(ish) enterprise (about 100 people across two key sites) what they should have as a library and what they should do about a Knowledge Strategy.  I have some options for them, but believe this makes an interesting question for this forum.

 

In times of ebooks and ejournals and a VAST number of new publications created every day, what should a small enterprise do to optimise its return on investment in content?

How would it best reap the rewards of any “content” it might choose to purchase?

Would that “content” be in the form of electronic subscriptions or physical material?

What would good KM look like in such an organisation?

 

It is my intention to provide these answers to the colleague at no charge with reference to the names of the people who provide them and the forum from which it comes (participating in forums is part of my suggestion on how to proceed).

Regards,
Arthur Shelley
Founder: Intelligent Answers & Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
Author:
The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
Twitter:
Metaphorage
Blog: http//organizationalzoo.blogspot.com 
Ph +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley 
Free Zoo Behavioural Profiles:
www.organizationalzoo.com_


Leanne <leanne.staples@...>
 

Hello Arthur,
I wonder what kind of enterprise it is. For myself, I have been a subscriber of Executive Book Summaries. They are excellent 8 page summaries of many popular business books. I often find enough information in a summary to get what I need or to determine if the book is worth buying.
Leanne

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, "Arthur Shelley" <arthur@...> wrote:

I was asked by a colleague who works for a small(ish) enterprise (about 100
people across two key sites) what they should have as a library and what
they should do about a Knowledge Strategy. I have some options for them,
but believe this makes an interesting question for this forum.



It times of ebooks and ejournals and a VAST number of new publications
created every day, what should a small enterprise do to optimise its return
on investment in content?

How would it best reap the rewards of any "content" it might choose to
purchase?

Would that "content" be in the form of electronic subscriptions or physical
material?

What would good KM look like in such an organisation?



It is my intention to provide these answers to the colleague at no charge
with reference to the names of the people who provide them and the forum
from which it comes (participating in forums is part of my suggestion on how
to proceed).

Regards,
Arthur Shelley
Founder: Intelligent Answers & Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
Twitter: Metaphorage
Blog: http//organizationalzoo.blogspot.com
Ph +61 413 047 408 Skype: Arthur.Shelley
Free Zoo Behavioural Profiles: <http://www.organizationalzoo.com/>
www.organizationalzoo.com_


Arthur Shelley
 

Leanne,

 

Yes great service.  I used to subscribe to these as well many years ago.  We also invested in the cassette recordings (I guess these days it would be a podcast service).

This is certainly something that is worth adding to the list of items to recommend.

Thanks for your suggestion. My colleague will appreciate it.

Regards,
Arthur Shelley
Founder: Intelligent Answers & Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
Author:
The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
Twitter:
Metaphorage
Blog: http//organizationalzoo.blogspot.com 
Ph +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley 
Free Zoo Behavioural Profiles:
www.organizationalzoo.com


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Leanne
Sent: Wednesday, 16 June 2010 9:32 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Thoughts on a library for a small enterprise

 

 

Hello Arthur,
I wonder what kind of enterprise it is. For myself, I have been a subscriber of Executive Book Summaries. They are excellent 8 page summaries of many popular business books. I often find enough information in a summary to get what I need or to determine if the book is worth buying.
Leanne

--- In sikmleaders@..., "Arthur Shelley" >
> I was asked by a colleague who works for a small(ish) enterprise (about 100
> people across two key sites) what they should have as a library and what
> they should do about a Knowledge Strategy. I have some options for them,
> but believe this makes an interesting question for this forum.
>
>
>
> It times of ebooks and ejournals and a VAST number of new publications
> created every day, what should a small enterprise do to optimise its return
> on investment in content?
>
> How would it best reap the rewards of any "content" it might choose to
> purchase?
>
> Would that "content" be in the form of electronic subscriptions or physical
> material?
>
> What would good KM look like in such an organisation?
>
>
>
> It is my intention to provide these answers to the colleague at no charge
> with reference to the names of the people who provide them and the forum
> from which it comes (participating in forums is part of my suggestion on how
> to proceed).
>
> Regards,
> Arthur Shelley
> Founder: Intelligent Answers & Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
> Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
> Twitter: Metaphorage
> Blog: http//organizationalzoo.blogspot.com
> Ph +61 413 047 408 Skype: Arthur.Shelley
> Free Zoo Behavioural Profiles: <http://www.organizationalzoo.com/>
> www.organizationalzoo.com_
>


Tom <tman9999@...>
 

Hello Arthur - interesting question, especially for those in the group who have a background in library science.

The first thing I would want to understand more about before attempting to supply an answer or strategy is how does this firm currently use their library? Is used routinely to support execution of core work tasks/processes? Or is it used sporadically to address unusual situations? Who are the users? A small group of specialists within the company? Or could be anyone?

Questions like these are important to understand prior to embarking on any type of solution path, in my opinion (and experience). To do otherwise is to risk implementing a solution that, while elegant, does not improve the usefullness of the library (a knowledge-based resource) to those who use it to do the firm's work.

-Tom

Tom Short Consulting
Knowledge Strategy
Knowledge Transfer
Metrics
415-912-0927

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, "Arthur Shelley" <arthur@...> wrote:

I was asked by a colleague who works for a small(ish) enterprise (about 100
people across two key sites) what they should have as a library and what
they should do about a Knowledge Strategy. I have some options for them,
but believe this makes an interesting question for this forum.



It times of ebooks and ejournals and a VAST number of new publications
created every day, what should a small enterprise do to optimise its return
on investment in content?

How would it best reap the rewards of any "content" it might choose to
purchase?

Would that "content" be in the form of electronic subscriptions or physical
material?

What would good KM look like in such an organisation?



It is my intention to provide these answers to the colleague at no charge
with reference to the names of the people who provide them and the forum
from which it comes (participating in forums is part of my suggestion on how
to proceed).

Regards,
Arthur Shelley
Founder: Intelligent Answers & Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
Twitter: Metaphorage
Blog: http//organizationalzoo.blogspot.com
Ph +61 413 047 408 Skype: Arthur.Shelley
Free Zoo Behavioural Profiles: <http://www.organizationalzoo.com/>
www.organizationalzoo.com_


Simard, Albert <albert.simard@...>
 

Arthur –

 

I have a presentation that links KM and libraries that may be of interest to your colleague.  Unfortunately, I can’t send it to you because we still can’t send e-mails with attachments (we’ve only been down for 2 months).  And I can’t send (or read) the URL because, of course, that’s active code.  

 

But it’s posted under my name on Slide Share (which I can’t access!).  It’s called the Knowledge Economy: Wherefore Libraries.

 

Sigh!

 

Albert J. Simard, Ph.D.

Knowledge Manager / Gestionnaire du savoir

 

Defence R&D Canada - / R&D pour la defense Canada

305 Rideau St., 9th floor - AH11 / 305 rue Rideau, 9 ieme etage -AH11

Ottawa, Ontatio K1A 0K2

Canada

Tel: 613-943-3501   Fax: 613-996-7063

e-mail: albert.simard@...

 


Nancy Dixon
 

In response to Arthur's question, I wanted to describe a practice we use in an organization I consult with, the Defense Intelligence Agency.  

The leader of the Knowledge Lab is a voracious reader and he writes reviews of many of the books he reads for the internal communication magazine - which is widely read.  At the end of each review he notes that copies of that books are available to anyone who wants to read them. The Knowledge Lab then buys 15-20 copies of each book.

The book program is a great success.  People come by and browse through the books and take a couple with them.  There is a check out sheet that people can sign as, but many of those "borrowed" books now live on the shelves of managers and executives - which is all to the good.  No one ever fusses because someone has permanently borrowed a book!  

So maybe the question is not so much what books to buy for this organization, but how to get people to read them!

Nancy

Nancy M. Dixon
Common Knowledge Associates
 512 912 6100

now blogging at www.nancydixonblog.com







Fingerman, Susan M. <susan.fingerman@...>
 

Hello,
An association called AIIP - Association of Independent Information Professionals - has people who will do an information assessment for your organization to analyze the pros and cons of having a library. I worked for several small organizations as a one person library which gave alot of value to the company. www.aiip.org<https://aplive.jhuapl.edu/,DanaInfo=.awxyCenowHx1r+>

Also, the Special Libraries Association still offers I believe a short free consulting period to help you analyze your requirements. They have local chapters who may have a "consulting" board position to do this for you. www.sla.org<https://aplive.jhuapl.edu/,DanaInfo=.awxyCwqgGw0q+>.

Our library group at APL is very involved in both KM/KS tools as well as managing external resources.

Susan Fingerman
Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

________________________________
From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tom [tman9999@sbcglobal.net]
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2010 11:25 AM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Thoughts on a library for a small enterprise



Hello Arthur - interesting question, especially for those in the group who have a background in library science.

The first thing I would want to understand more about before attempting to supply an answer or strategy is how does this firm currently use their library? Is used routinely to support execution of core work tasks/processes? Or is it used sporadically to address unusual situations? Who are the users? A small group of specialists within the company? Or could be anyone?

Questions like these are important to understand prior to embarking on any type of solution path, in my opinion (and experience). To do otherwise is to risk implementing a solution that, while elegant, does not improve the usefullness of the library (a knowledge-based resource) to those who use it to do the firm's work.

-Tom

Tom Short Consulting
Knowledge Strategy
Knowledge Transfer
Metrics
415-912-0927

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sikmleaders%40yahoogroups.com>, "Arthur Shelley" <arthur@...> wrote:

I was asked by a colleague who works for a small(ish) enterprise (about 100
people across two key sites) what they should have as a library and what
they should do about a Knowledge Strategy. I have some options for them,
but believe this makes an interesting question for this forum.



It times of ebooks and ejournals and a VAST number of new publications
created every day, what should a small enterprise do to optimise its return
on investment in content?

How would it best reap the rewards of any "content" it might choose to
purchase?

Would that "content" be in the form of electronic subscriptions or physical
material?

What would good KM look like in such an organisation?



It is my intention to provide these answers to the colleague at no charge
with reference to the names of the people who provide them and the forum
from which it comes (participating in forums is part of my suggestion on how
to proceed).

Regards,
Arthur Shelley
Founder: Intelligent Answers & Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
Twitter: Metaphorage
Blog: http//organizationalzoo.blogspot.com
Ph +61 413 047 408 Skype: Arthur.Shelley
Free Zoo Behavioural Profiles: <http://www.organizationalzoo.com/>
www.organizationalzoo.com_


John David Smith <john.smith@...>
 

“To read and discuss” I would say, Nancy.

 

At one point in my career I got very interested in “learning histories” and dug into all the methods of producing them (as developed by a group at SoL / Organizational Learning Center).  After writing one I came to the realization that the undeveloped practice was getting people to read and talk about them afterward.   Without that the whole effort was interesting but useless.

 

John

* John David Smith ~ Voice: 503.963.8229 ~ Skype & Twitter: smithjd

* Portland, Oregon, USA http://www.learningAlliances.net

* “The best way to predict the future is to invent it.” Alan Kay

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Nancy Dixon
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2010 8:45 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] what books to recommend

 



In response to Arthur's question, I wanted to describe a practice we use in an organization I consult with, the Defense Intelligence Agency.  

 

The leader of the Knowledge Lab is a voracious reader and he writes reviews of many of the books he reads for the internal communication magazine - which is widely read.  At the end of each review he notes that copies of that books are available to anyone who wants to read them. The Knowledge Lab then buys 15-20 copies of each book.

 

The book program is a great success.  People come by and browse through the books and take a couple with them.  There is a check out sheet that people can sign as, but many of those "borrowed" books now live on the shelves of managers and executives - which is all to the good.  No one ever fusses because someone has permanently borrowed a book!  

 

So maybe the question is not so much what books to buy for this organization, but how to get people to read them!

 

Nancy

 

Nancy M. Dixon

Common Knowledge Associates

 512 912 6100

 

now blogging at www.nancydixonblog.com