Topics

KM Maturity Model: Linking desired maturity level to business benefits #maturity


Jeevan Kamble
 

Dear All,

I do realize putting just a Maturity framework and assess the client and tell them where are they and where they should be would be easy but can we go step further and clearly articulate:

  1. The maturity dimensions and KM focus areas should be derived from client perceived challenges and try to define what maturity level from current to future desired state that client would need to overcome certain challenge. (Just the focus could be on Knowledge Management perspective and not the business specific issues)
  2. Even if i define all my parameters from level 0 to level 5 (highest level), Ultimately client might ask "You have defined the levels for me - So what". Can you tell me if i attain the highest level what benefits my business will get. Do i need to put heavy investments?
  3. Will it be good idea to show, dimensions derived from challenges (that client wanted to overcome and see KM as good opportunity to resolve the issue) and Business benefits derived from "highest level"parameter definitions. Instead putting just standard definitions around dimensions or focus area and submit the report of maturity levels and recommendations that would seem to be flat.

Sorry if i am putting very odd questions. Appreciate and looking forward for your valuable insight.

Warm Regards
Jeevan


Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Jeevan,

Forgive me, but if you are defining your maturity dimensions based specifically on client challenges and not broadly applicable measures ... well, aren't you just writing a KM strategy and cloaking it in a consultancy tool?

It sounds like you're worried that the client won't understand the links between your recommended actions and benefits that will flow from these actions. To avoid this you need to be clear in articulating a logical progression.

I have a 7 point checklist I always refer to when writing strategies like these:

1. Background (why is this important?)
2. Objectives (how will the strategy change the organisation?)
3. Benefits (what will happen as a result of the changes?)
4. Principles (how does it all fit together?)
5. Strategies (how do we make it work?)
6. Responsibilities (who is accountable and for what?)
7. Goals (what are the tangible things we need to do?)

Note that the entailment order is principles -> strategies -> goals -> objectives -> benefits.

However, gaining acceptance for the strategic endgame needs be achieved *before* going through nitty-gritty detail, hence why we talk about objectives and benefits first.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

On 19/08/2011 4:41 AM, jeevan kamble wrote:
Dear All,

I do realize putting just a Maturity framework and assess the client and
tell them where are they and where they should be would be easy but can
we go step further and clearly articulate:

1. The maturity dimensions and KM focus areas should be derived from
client perceived challenges and try to define what maturity level
from current to future desired state that client would need to
overcome certain challenge. (Just the focus could be on Knowledge
Management perspective and not the business specific issues)
2. Even if i define all my parameters from level 0 to level 5
(highest level), Ultimately client might ask "You have defined the
levels for me - So what". Can you tell me if i attain the highest
level what benefits my business will get. Do i need to put heavy
investments?
3. Will it be good idea to show, dimensions derived from challenges
(that client wanted to overcome and see KM as good opportunity to
resolve the issue) and Business benefits derived from "highest
level"parameter definitions. Instead putting just standard
definitions around dimensions or focus area and submit the report
of maturity levels and recommendations that would seem to be flat.


Sorry if i am putting very odd questions. Appreciate and looking forward
for your valuable insight.

Warm Regards
Jeevan


Jeevan Kamble
 

Thanks Stephan,

I do agree to your pointers. In fact the below questions came to my mind when client started asking what benefits they could achieve from KM or KM Maturity assessment which in the first meeting itself.

Warm Regards
Jeevan

"Know-l-Edge is power"


From: Stephen Bounds
To: sikmleaders@...
Sent: Friday, 19 August 2011 7:09 PM
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] KM Maturity Model: Linking desired maturity level to business benefits

 
Hi Jeevan,

Forgive me, but if you are defining your maturity dimensions based
specifically on client challenges and not broadly applicable measures
... well, aren't you just writing a KM strategy and cloaking it in a
consultancy tool?

It sounds like you're worried that the client won't understand the links
between your recommended actions and benefits that will flow from these
actions. To avoid this you need to be clear in articulating a logical
progression.

I have a 7 point checklist I always refer to when writing strategies
like these:

1. Background (why is this important?)
2. Objectives (how will the strategy change the organisation?)
3. Benefits (what will happen as a result of the changes?)
4. Principles (how does it all fit together?)
5. Strategies (how do we make it work?)
6. Responsibilities (who is accountable and for what?)
7. Goals (what are the tangible things we need to do?)

Note that the entailment order is principles -> strategies -> goals ->
objectives -> benefits.

However, gaining acceptance for the strategic endgame needs be achieved
*before* going through nitty-gritty detail, hence why we talk about
objectives and benefits first.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

On 19/08/2011 4:41 AM, jeevan kamble wrote:
> Dear All,
>
> I do realize putting just a Maturity framework and assess the client and
> tell them where are they and where they should be would be easy but can
> we go step further and clearly articulate:
>
> 1. The maturity dimensions and KM focus areas should be derived from
> client perceived challenges and try to define what maturity level
> from current to future desired state that client would need to
> overcome certain challenge. (Just the focus could be on Knowledge
> Management perspective and not the business specific issues)
> 2. Even if i define all my parameters from level 0 to level 5
> (highest level), Ultimately client might ask "You have defined the
> levels for me - So what". Can you tell me if i attain the highest
> level what benefits my business will get. Do i need to put heavy
> investments?
> 3. Will it be good idea to show, dimensions derived from challenges
> (that client wanted to overcome and see KM as good opportunity to
> resolve the issue) and Business benefits derived from "highest
> level"parameter definitions. Instead putting just standard
> definitions around dimensions or focus area and submit the report
> of maturity levels and recommendations that would seem to be flat.
>
>
> Sorry if i am putting very odd questions. Appreciate and looking forward
> for your valuable insight.
>
> Warm Regards
> Jeevan
>