KM assessment survey #survey #assessment


Sean Fox
 

Hi
 
I'm looking for additional questions to include in a KM assessment survey for my organization.  My audience is 2,000 tax professionals scattered across 70 plus offices in the U.S. 
 
We're addressing the usual challenges - too many places to look for content, lack of useful content, inadequate search capabilities, information overload from external information providers,  reliance on some technologies which aren't being fully leveraged, etc.
 
I'm using some questions to prove/disprove some of the myths floating around the organization.
 
I know this group is full of great ideas and practices, so thank you in advance.

Sean  


Peter Hobby
 

How about questions on how people connect and share? I'm guessing for taxes much is in the interpretation and internal conversations/referrals may play a big part in problem solving. Who do you consult for information? How do you locate expertise? What do you do with what you learn?

Questions like these may help add meat to the social network.

And back to information - questions on the access to library services may help with more explicit sources.

APQC and others have good information on assessments and audits and the like as well - if you want to dig into more formal approaches - http://www.apqc.org/

Hope this helps,

Peter Hobby

On Sep 6, 2011, at 3:47 PM, Sean Fox wrote:

 

Hi
 
I'm looking for additional questions to include in a KM assessment survey for my organization.  My audience is 2,000 tax professionals scattered across 70 plus offices in the U.S. 
 
We're addressing the usual challenges - too many places to look for content, lack of useful content, inadequate search capabilities, information overload from external information providers,  reliance on some technologies which aren't being fully leveraged, etc.
 
I'm using some questions to prove/disprove some of the myths floating around the organization.
 
I know this group is full of great ideas and practices, so thank you in advance.

Sean  



DeGard, Paulette H <Paulette.H.Degard@...>
 

If you have access to APQC they have wonderful materials about KM Assessments. I’ve participated in several of their research activities on behalf of Boeing.

 

I hope this helps.

 

Paulette

 

Dr. Paulette DeGard
Knowledge Strategist
BCA Engineering Airplane Systems
Everett Office: 425-717-9238 (voice)
Virtual on Fridays: (360) 550-4099
*New

inSite Profile

http://airplanesys.ca.boeing.com/kmgateway.asp


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Sean Fox
Sent: Tuesday, September 06, 2011 12:47 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] KM assessment survey

 

 

Hi

 

I'm looking for additional questions to include in a KM assessment survey for my organization.  My audience is 2,000 tax professionals scattered across 70 plus offices in the U.S. 

 

We're addressing the usual challenges - too many places to look for content, lack of useful content, inadequate search capabilities, information overload from external information providers,  reliance on some technologies which aren't being fully leveraged, etc.

 

I'm using some questions to prove/disprove some of the myths floating around the organization.

 

I know this group is full of great ideas and practices, so thank you in advance.

Sean  


Stan Garfield
 

Here are examples of three different types of surveys you can use.

 

Opportunities Survey

 

  1. Check all of the following challenges you are currently experiencing:

1.       It's difficult for my team to make decisions, and when we make them, they are bad.

2.       It's hard to find relevant information and resources at the time of need.

3.       We have to start from scratch each time we start a new project, and my team keeps reinventing the wheel.

4.       We repeat the same mistakes over and over.

5.       It's difficult to find out if anyone else has solved a similar problem before or already done similar work.

6.       Information is poorly communicated to me, and I am unaware of what has been done, what is happening, and where the organization is heading.

7.       I can't find standard processes, procedures, methods, tools, templates, techniques, and examples.

8.       I can't get experts to help me, because they are scarce, in great demand, and unavailable when needed.

9.       We are unable to respond to customers who ask for proof that we know how to help them and that we have done similar work before.

10.   It takes too long to invent, design, manufacture, sell, and deliver products and services to our customers.

  1. List any other challenges you regularly experience with learning, sharing, reusing, collaborating, innovating, and searching for knowledge.
  2. From the challenges which you checked and the ones you listed, please rank the three most important in decreasing order of importance:

1.      

2.      

3.      

  1. What examples can you provide where learning, sharing, reusing, collaborating, innovating, and searching for knowledge are working well today?
  2. What examples can you provide where learning, sharing, reusing, collaborating, innovating, and searching for knowledge worked well in the past?
  3. What examples can you provide where learning, sharing, reusing, collaborating, innovating, and searching for knowledge worked well in the past or are working well today in other organizations?
  4. What suggestions do you have for dealing with any of the challenges you identified?
  5. What other needs do you have for learning, sharing, reusing, collaborating, innovating, and searching for knowledge?
  6. What suggestions do you have for meeting the needs you identified?
  7. Describe how knowledge management would work ideally.

 

Resource Survey

 

Demographic Questions

 

  1. What is your e-mail address?
  2. What is your location?
  3. What is your organization, including group and sub-group?
  4. What is your job role?
  5. How many years have you worked in the organization?

Multiple Choice Questions: For each of the following knowledge resource web sites, please answer the first question.  If the answer is "Yes," please also answer the second question.

 

Provide a complete list of knowledge resources currently available in your organization.  Use the Top 50 Knowledge Management Components  to help identify and categorize the resources.

 

  1. In the last 30 days, have you used this web site? 
    1. Yes
    2. No
    3. Don't Know
  2. If you have used the site in the last 30 days, how useful is this web site to you in your work?
    1. Very useful
    2. Moderately useful
    3. Not useful
    4. Don't Know

Open-ended Questions

 

  1. Are there other valuable knowledge resources you use frequently? If so, what are they?
  2. When you need to find knowledge to help you learn, where do you go first?
  3. When you want to share your knowledge, where do you go first?
  4. When you need to find knowledge to reuse, where do you go first?
  5. When you want to collaborate with colleagues, where do you go first?
  6. When you need to find knowledge to help you innovate, where do you go first?
  7. Do you have comments about any of the knowledge resources mentioned in the survey?
  8. What knowledge resources would you like to see added or created?
  9. Are there knowledge resources you would like to see improved? If so, how?
  10. What knowledge resources do you need to access but don't know if or where they exist?

 

Employee Satisfaction Survey

 

  1. How satisfied are you with your manager's support for you spending time on knowledge sharing and reuse?
  2. How satisfied are you with your ability to access knowledge resources when you are not connected to the network?
  3. How satisfied are you with the ability of knowledge reuse activities to save time and/or effort in your work?
  4. How satisfied are you with your ability to find the information and knowledge you need to do your job?
  5. How satisfied are you with the system availability of the online knowledge resources you use most often?
  6. How satisfied are you with the experience of searching repositories to find reusable content?
  7. How satisfied are you with the experience of locating an expert?
  8. How satisfied are you with the ease of collaborating with internal colleagues?
  9. How satisfied are you with the ease of collaborating with customers, partners, and external colleagues?
  10. How satisfied are you with your ability to join, participate, and derive value from communities of practice?
  11. How satisfied are you with training and documentation for using knowledge resources?
  12. How satisfied are you with the services provided by the knowledge help desk?
  13. Do you have a success story you can share with using the knowledge resources?


Cory Banks
 

Sean,

There is something to be said for people to self assess their own KM capabilities (personal KM).

You can do a whole lot of stuff to deliver systems, programs and services but if the people themselves are not capable of sharing or open to other peoples experiences then it can all be for nought.

Perhaps get them to share a story about the last time they proactively shared something that was of value to someone else (outside their team, division, organisation) or received something form someone else.

Ask them to judge how frequently they leverage other peoples experience in planning their own actions and do they feel that is adequate.

This could allow you to set some benchmarks for individuals and aggregate across groups.

Thanks

Cory Banks



On 7 September 2011 05:47, Sean Fox <sfoxca@...> wrote:
 

Hi
 
I'm looking for additional questions to include in a KM assessment survey for my organization.  My audience is 2,000 tax professionals scattered across 70 plus offices in the U.S. 
 
We're addressing the usual challenges - too many places to look for content, lack of useful content, inadequate search capabilities, information overload from external information providers,  reliance on some technologies which aren't being fully leveraged, etc.
 
I'm using some questions to prove/disprove some of the myths floating around the organization.
 
I know this group is full of great ideas and practices, so thank you in advance.

Sean  



Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Sean,

I'm sorry to say that I look at your list of challenges and see a list of items relating to Information Management, not Knowledge Management.

To paraphrase Arthur Shelley's formulation, here are the three questions that need answering to determine if effective knowledge management exists in your organisation:

1. Are "conversations that matter" happening inside the organisation? [Or to state the inverse, are important points of view going unstated or unshared due to fear, politics, etc?]
2. Does the organisation allow experiential learning opportunities that build effective decision making capabilities throughout the organisation?
3. Are staff jointly working to enhance the performance of the organisation, filtered through a common awareness of desired future outcomes?

That's not to say that the things you are asking about don't matter, but they are only an initial enabler of KM. Establishing effective practices at the IM level will have little effect if the organisational is dysfunctional at the deeper levels of knowledge integration and distributed problem solving.

[I posted about this at http://bounds.net.au/node/37 a while ago if you want a more detailed explanation of these ideas.]

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

On 7/09/2011 5:47 AM, Sean Fox wrote:
Hi
I'm looking for additional questions to include in a KM assessment
survey for my organization. My audience is 2,000 tax professionals
scattered across 70 plus offices in the U.S.
We're addressing the usual challenges - too many places to look for
content, lack of useful content, inadequate search capabilities,
information overload from external information providers, reliance on
some technologies which aren't being fully leveraged, etc.
I'm using some questions to prove/disprove some of the myths floating
around the organization.
I know this group is full of great ideas and practices, so thank you in
advance.

Sean


Lee, Jim <jlee@...>
 

Peter & Paulette,

 

Many thanks for your kind words regarding APQC’s tools and assessments in particular. I’ve often been silent on questions like this since my responses may seem self-serving, but the fact that you’ve now mentioned it, I do feel obligated to provide a bit more information regarding our KM Levels of Maturity and KM Capability Assessment Tool. Both were developed in collaboration with a few selected organizations known to be high on the KM maturity curve, and also with the subject matter expertise of Dr. Bill Curtis (one of the SEI-CMMI originators). The KM Capability Assessment Tool consists of 150-items, and has been used by over 70 organizations to date. It forms the basis for the maturity level rating of the organization. Here is a brief overview and registration information http://www.apqc.org/km-capability-assessment-tool. For additional details, please feel free to contact me directly at jlee@....

 

Again, my sincere thanks to the colleagues here for your continuing collaboration and willingness to share.

 

jim