Dissertation Study on KMS - Survey Response Questions Advice #survey


msulliv@att.net <msulliv@...>
 

Hello SIKMLeaders Group Members,

In the next few days, I plan to submit an e-mail to group members, requesting assistance with my dissertation study that will determine which personality types, if any, relate to the acceptance of technical knowledge management systems (also known as knowledge bases). The results of the study will be posted to the SIKMLeaders group for review.

Before I do that, I'd like your advice on the following questions:


1. What factors would increase the likelihood of members responding to your survey?

2. What factors would decrease the likelihood or make them abandon the survey if they started it?

3. What information should you provide back to the community after the survey is complete?

Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks.

--------------------------------------------
Maureen Sullivan
Capella University
Doctoral Student - School of Business & Technology
-------------------------------------------------


Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Hello Maureen,
 
You might want to check out the KM Researcher wiki that another KM email group created to deal with research surveys: http://kmresearcher.wikispaces.com/ (bit out of date now)
 
I also recently sent these notes to another PhD student with a web survey:
 
- Surveys sent out to email lists tend to get low response rates (we're
talking single % points or less). I have found that partnering with
organisations and getting an "official" stamp of approval for your
research garners you more responses.
- Have you identified other email lists or groups that might have your
target audience (e.g. com-prac, e-mint, LinkedIn discussion forums)? A low
response rate for unsolicited email means that you have to hit a lot of
people.
I'd also note that bribing people to participate can work. My single biggest gripe with research surveys is that they tend to be "fishing expeditions" and thus ask every single question that the researcher and their supervisor can think of. And in my experience, there is an inverse correlation between survey length & completion rate.
 
Cheers,
 
Matt


Maureen Sullivan <msulliv@...>
 

Hello Matt,
 
These are all great points. The SIKMLeaders is one group that I will be submitting the survey link to. I will also be submitting it to IEEE Professional Group and 30 related LinkedIn Groups. I have received permission (group managers and directors) from all of these groups to post the link to my survey. I'm hoping that the response rate will be what I need.  Unfortunately, the school requirements don't allow us to bribe participants (give gifts) for responding.  Thanks.
 
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"All you need is 20 seconds of insane courage and I promise you something great will come of it!" Matt Damon
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Maureen

From: Matt Moore
To: "sikmleaders@..."
Sent: Thursday, January 19, 2012 11:03 PM
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Dissertation Study on KMS - Survey Response Questions Advice

 
Hello Maureen,
 
You might want to check out the KM Researcher wiki that another KM email group created to deal with research surveys: http://kmresearcher.wikispaces.com/ (bit out of date now)
 
I also recently sent these notes to another PhD student with a web survey:
 
> - Surveys sent out to email lists tend to get low response rates (we're
> talking single % points or less). I have found that partnering with
> organisations and getting an "official" stamp of approval for your
> research garners you more responses.
> - Have you identified other email lists or groups that might have your
> target audience (e.g. com-prac, e-mint, LinkedIn discussion forums)? A low
> response rate for unsolicited email means that you have to hit a lot of
> people.

I'd also note that bribing people to participate can work. My single biggest gripe with research surveys is that they tend to be "fishing expeditions" and thus ask every single question that the researcher and their supervisor can think of. And in my experience, there is an inverse correlation between survey length & completion rate.
 
Cheers,
 
Matt



Patrick Lambe
 

"Bribery" can include making the findings available to contributors in the research

P

Patrick Lambe

Have you seen our new KM Planning Toolkit?   






On Jan 20, 2012, at 12:09 PM, Maureen Sullivan wrote:

 

Hello Matt,
 
These are all great points. The SIKMLeaders is one group that I will be submitting the survey link to. I will also be submitting it to IEEE Professional Group and 30 related LinkedIn Groups. I have received permission (group managers and directors) from all of these groups to post the link to my survey. I'm hoping that the response rate will be what I need.  Unfortunately, the school requirements don't allow us to bribe participants (give gifts) for responding.  Thanks.
 
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"All you need is 20 seconds of insane courage and I promise you something great will come of it!" Matt Damon
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Maureen

From: Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
To: "sikmleaders@..." <sikmleaders@...>
Sent: Thursday, January 19, 2012 11:03 PM
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Dissertation Study on KMS - Survey Response Questions Advice

 
Hello Maureen,
 
You might want to check out the KM Researcher wiki that another KM email group created to deal with research surveys: http://kmresearcher.wikispaces.com/ (bit out of date now)
 
I also recently sent these notes to another PhD student with a web survey:
 
> - Surveys sent out to email lists tend to get low response rates (we're
> talking single % points or less). I have found that partnering with
> organisations and getting an "official" stamp of approval for your
> research garners you more responses.
> - Have you identified other email lists or groups that might have your
> target audience (e.g. com-prac, e-mint, LinkedIn discussion forums)? A low
> response rate for unsolicited email means that you have to hit a lot of
> people.

I'd also note that bribing people to participate can work. My single biggest gripe with research surveys is that they tend to be "fishing expeditions" and thus ask every single question that the researcher and their supervisor can think of. And in my experience, there is an inverse correlation between survey length & completion rate.
 
Cheers,
 
Matt





Mark C Harris
 

Matt,

Thanks for the link and recommendations for researchers. I, also, will be conducting survey based research online and have read several books and articles about how difficult it can be and how to improve the odds of adequate responses. While internet-based research is rapidly expanding for many reasons, in cases like my own it is necessary due to having no relevant captive population to study. Also, people engaged in KM are nearly guaranteed to be web users. Still, as you say, we should expect difficulty obtaining meaningful response rates. I will check out the act KM kmresearcher wiki.

Mark Harris - researching success factors for public sector KM
Nova Southeastern University Grad. School of Computer and Information Sciences


msulliv@att.net <msulliv@...>
 

January 29, 2012

Dear Systems Integration KM Leaders Community Members,

** Thanks to all of you that have participated already. If you have participated already, please pass this onto people you know that may qualify for this study. **

You are invited to participate in a research project entitled `A Study of the Relationship Between Personality Types and The Acceptance of Technical Knowledge Management Systems (TKMS)', via a web-based survey. Maureen Sullivan, is conducting this study and will be using this information as the basis for her doctoral dissertation. You were chosen because of your experience with Knowledge Management. Additionally, please pass this survey request onto potential participants that have experience with the use of technical knowledge management systems (TKMS) within the past one year and are at least 18 years of age. TKMS is a knowledge management system, created by hardware and software vendors, containing technical knowledge on how to perform certain technical operations and resolve technical software or hardware problems. The TKMS could be ANY technical knowledge management system that you have used in the past 1 year (e.g., Microsoft knowledge base).

This survey will take approximately 15 minutes to complete and will answer questions concerning how you would describe yourselves, your usage of technical knowledge management systems, and your demographic information. The surveys are not coded in any way, thus the replies will be confidential. A link to this web-based survey is below.

Information on where to obtain a copy of the summarized results will be displayed in the `informed consent' area of the survey. Additionally, you can e-mail me directly at MSullivan9@... for a copy of the results.

Thank you in advance for your assistance. Your help is greatly appreciated. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact me at MSullivan9@.... You may also contact my dissertation mentor, Dr. Ronald Benson at Capella University at Ronald.Benson@....

To begin the survey, please click on the survey link:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/MT7ZB69


Sincerely,

Maureen Sullivan
Doctoral Student
Capella University