KM & IP Creative Commons Licences; Do They work #question


Mel Corley <fsphinxrha@...>
 

All

Huge thanks for all the helpful posts to my my last post on the subject of "Looking for KM advice". By way of an update, i had a really useful discussion the other day with a KM guru, and the topic of IP was mentioned, to which the secondary subject of creative commons licences was mentioned

Whilst i understand what the CCC licences is, and the do and don'ts, but i was wondering if others on the board had any other additional thoughts on the subjects, such as are they good to use, what is good about them, and what is not so good

Looking forward to hearing your thoughts

Rgrds
Mel


Jack Vinson <jackvinson@...>
 

Mel- 

This is an interesting twist on the Intellectual Property connection to Knowledge Management.  Usually, IP is mentioned as an asset to be managed by the company.  IP is usually in the form of patents and copyrighted material (and brands and trademarks).  KM looks at this from managing the stuff and access to it - usually internal to the company.  KM sometimes also looks at the innovation process in creation of new IP. 

So, how does the type of license to the IP relate to this?  I don't know if there is a global answer. 

But I do have a related story.  I worked with a software company that sold sophisticated, expensive software.  Their developers from time to time would look for solutoins out on the web and they used GPL (gnu public license) software.  At some point the organization realized that the nature of the GPL could be construed to say that the weren't allowed to turn around and sell software that incorporates GPL software, so they went through a remediation effort to remove and rewrite code that used GPL materials.  I don't know if this is the _right_ interpretaion, but it was theirs. 

Does this relate to Creative Commons? 

Mel, can you tell us a little more about your concern with Creative Commons licensing?  Are you publishing in that mode?  Are you worried about consuming / using CC licensed works?

Jack Vinson


On Thu, Apr 5, 2012 at 10:39 AM, Mel Corley <fsphinxrha@...> wrote:
All

Huge thanks for all the helpful posts to my my last post on the subject of "Looking for KM advice". By way of an update, i had a really useful discussion the other day with a KM guru, and the topic of IP was mentioned, to which the secondary subject of creative commons licences was mentioned

Whilst i understand what the CCC licences is, and the do and don'ts, but i was wondering if others on the board had any other additional thoughts on the subjects, such as are they good to use, what is good about them, and what is not so good

Looking forward to hearing your thoughts

Rgrds
Mel



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Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Hi,

Understanding CC licensing is of great importance if you work in the arts, media or government. Those working with the linked data / semantic web view them as a critical piece of the legal infrastructure for their efforts. 

It is worth noting that the body of case law directly related to CC is tiny: http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Case_Law

One upshot of this is that the some of the implications of using a CC license have not really been tested. For example, what exactly does "non-commercial" mean? Not necessarily full agreement on that: http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Defining_Noncommercial

So Jack's experience GPL is probably relevant...

Matt


kimahmer <kahmer@...>
 

Hi Mel, I can't help you with the exact details, but can tell you that our legal department did an assessment of creative commons and opted to create our on IP waiver and volunteer participation forms. Our IP is developed through a network of volunteers and final ownership of the product needed to be clearly in the hands of our organization. If you would like, you can check out the documents here: http://www.isaca.org/About-ISACA/Volunteering/Pages/Join-A-Committee.aspx they located on the right side of the page in the box labled "volunteer information".

Hope this helps.

Kim

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, Jack Vinson <jackvinson@...> wrote:

Mel-

This is an interesting twist on the Intellectual Property connection to
Knowledge Management. Usually, IP is mentioned as an asset to be managed
by the company. IP is usually in the form of patents and copyrighted
material (and brands and trademarks). KM looks at this from managing the
stuff and access to it - usually internal to the company. KM sometimes
also looks at the innovation process in creation of new IP.

So, how does the type of license to the IP relate to this? I don't know if
there is a global answer.

But I do have a related story. I worked with a software company that sold
sophisticated, expensive software. Their developers from time to time
would look for solutoins out on the web and they used GPL (gnu public
license) software. At some point the organization realized that the nature
of the GPL could be construed to say that the weren't allowed to turn
around and sell software that incorporates GPL software, so they went
through a remediation effort to remove and rewrite code that used GPL
materials. I don't know if this is the _right_ interpretaion, but it was
theirs.

Does this relate to Creative Commons?

Mel, can you tell us a little more about your concern with Creative Commons
licensing? Are you publishing in that mode? Are you worried about
consuming / using CC licensed works?

Jack Vinson

On Thu, Apr 5, 2012 at 10:39 AM, Mel Corley <fsphinxrha@...>wrote:

All

Huge thanks for all the helpful posts to my my last post on the subject of
"Looking for KM advice". By way of an update, i had a really useful
discussion the other day with a KM guru, and the topic of IP was mentioned,
to which the secondary subject of creative commons licences was mentioned

Whilst i understand what the CCC licences is, and the do and don'ts, but i
was wondering if others on the board had any other additional thoughts on
the subjects, such as are they good to use, what is good about them, and
what is not so good

Looking forward to hearing your thoughts

Rgrds
Mel



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Mel Corley <fsphinxrha@...>
 

Kim

Thanks for the post, i certainly will check out the link

Thanks again

Regards
Mel

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, "kimahmer" <kahmer@...> wrote:

Hi Mel, I can't help you with the exact details, but can tell you that our legal department did an assessment of creative commons and opted to create our on IP waiver and volunteer participation forms. Our IP is developed through a network of volunteers and final ownership of the product needed to be clearly in the hands of our organization. If you would like, you can check out the documents here: http://www.isaca.org/About-ISACA/Volunteering/Pages/Join-A-Committee.aspx they located on the right side of the page in the box labled "volunteer information".

Hope this helps.

Kim

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, Jack Vinson <jackvinson@> wrote:

Mel-

This is an interesting twist on the Intellectual Property connection to
Knowledge Management. Usually, IP is mentioned as an asset to be managed
by the company. IP is usually in the form of patents and copyrighted
material (and brands and trademarks). KM looks at this from managing the
stuff and access to it - usually internal to the company. KM sometimes
also looks at the innovation process in creation of new IP.

So, how does the type of license to the IP relate to this? I don't know if
there is a global answer.

But I do have a related story. I worked with a software company that sold
sophisticated, expensive software. Their developers from time to time
would look for solutoins out on the web and they used GPL (gnu public
license) software. At some point the organization realized that the nature
of the GPL could be construed to say that the weren't allowed to turn
around and sell software that incorporates GPL software, so they went
through a remediation effort to remove and rewrite code that used GPL
materials. I don't know if this is the _right_ interpretaion, but it was
theirs.

Does this relate to Creative Commons?

Mel, can you tell us a little more about your concern with Creative Commons
licensing? Are you publishing in that mode? Are you worried about
consuming / using CC licensed works?

Jack Vinson

On Thu, Apr 5, 2012 at 10:39 AM, Mel Corley <fsphinxrha@>wrote:

All

Huge thanks for all the helpful posts to my my last post on the subject of
"Looking for KM advice". By way of an update, i had a really useful
discussion the other day with a KM guru, and the topic of IP was mentioned,
to which the secondary subject of creative commons licences was mentioned

Whilst i understand what the CCC licences is, and the do and don'ts, but i
was wondering if others on the board had any other additional thoughts on
the subjects, such as are they good to use, what is good about them, and
what is not so good

Looking forward to hearing your thoughts

Rgrds
Mel



------------------------------------

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