Topics

Video capture of Lessons Learned #video #lessons-learned


Dean Testa
 

I am looking for #KMers that have some lessons learned to share about "video capture of Lessons Learned". We are planning a disciplined experiment to see if the video medium can be more effective and/or complimentary to an A3 written document approach. A key element for us is the use of Lessons Learned - a captured lesson is waste unless it is used.

Who has experiences to share???


Karla Phlypo
 

Hi Dean,
When video taping either an event make sure that you dont have people in the first two rows or make sure the camera can capture the face of the individual talking. So for larger groups I recommend at least 2 cameras. Also it would be worth your while to get proper lighting shadows sometimes obscure the persons if they are demonstrating some kind of technique. The lighting can be as simple as going to home depot and getting the clap on lights with some professional lighting umbrellas that will defuse the light. Sound is vital if you are in an area with too much ambient noise it may be hard to hear. So conference rooms are vital. Also make sure that the clips are short and consistent. What I mean is that have each person talk about their area of expertise using the same pattern it will help the viewer know what they will find out next. For instance an lesson what when wrong, next how it was fixed and if that fix can be implemented with other products then the conditions of the fix. (Im talking about product) but you can also have a similar cadence for processes. Why what how who etc.

Kind regards,
Karla Phlypo


Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Dean,

I have a general observation about the use of video in organisations: it's often a waste of money.

- Shooting video can be an expensive exercise (in terms of skilled staff costs & equipment).
- Editing video can be time-consuming.
- Video files can be big (esp. in the raw formats you need for editing) to store & move around.

From a user perspective, video can be difficult to search & browse. If you record a video and you want to the content to be as finadable as possible then you need to have a transcript made up as well.
 
In many cases, the effort put into video would be better invested in well-structured text and diagrams. I'd question the value of pointing a camera at someone talking.
 
That said, the case for using video when you have to physically demonstrate something tricky is a no-brainer (e.g. I wanted to see how to replace a kitchen tap, I went to YouTube).
 
Regards,
 
Matt


thomas.hsu@...
 

Microsoft’s Academy Mobile is a “corporate Youtube” platform built on SharePoint for their sales force. British Telecom launched its own version based on their program - both very successful. Lots of use cases – they bought a small amount of learning for consumption but tapped employees for the majority of content. I saw one 2 minute video of a field engineer demonstrating how to use a torque wrench – it probably would have taken him many hours to document that in text/diagram format, and it would’ve probably just stayed in his head. Another guy had a very popular “on the road” podcast series where he would record his client experiences literally as he was driving from client to client. Video doesn’t have to be studio quality – many laptops have web cams and recording devices, but those services can be offered centrally for those who want to put out something more polished…I think video can be a very effective knowledge sharing platform, if it’s done right and there’s the right support and change management program in place.



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marie.strah@yahoo.com <marie.strah@...>
 

Love this example – thank you for sharing!

 

Many years ago I was involved in a startup (Easy2Technologies) that did the same thing for clients – provided video repositories not only for internal staff but for customers/end users who wanted “how to” videos for home improvement/manufacturing products (I did one on torque wrenches actually!) In 2000 Flash was a new technology (shocker!) and using short video segments to communicate complex actions to non experts was taking off as viable alternative to difficult to understand diagrams/written instructions.

 

I’ve used videos on SharePoint platform for internal customers as part of KM strategy for same reason: much easier to demo/communicate difficult concepts (show me versus tell me).

 

Mobile technologies as your pointed out make this both cost effective and easy to implement (podcasts, video capture, recording) whereas in the past formal studio or editing time made this difficult or cost prohibitive. I’m expecting we’ll see an uptick in “alternative media” (user-generated media) as part of organizational KM – challenge will be in capturing and searching that metadata since many KM programs focus on document or text based content.

 

Thanks for great example!

 

Best, Michelle

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of thomas.hsu@...
Sent: Tuesday, July 17, 2012 11:11 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Video capture of Lessons Learned

 

 

Microsoft’s Academy Mobile is a “corporate Youtube” platform built on SharePoint for their sales force. British Telecom launched its own version based on their program - both very successful. Lots of use cases – they bought a small amount of learning for consumption but tapped employees for the majority of content. I saw one 2 minute video of a field engineer demonstrating how to use a torque wrench – it probably would have taken him many hours to document that in text/diagram format, and it would’ve probably just stayed in his head. Another guy had a very popular “on the road” podcast series where he would record his client experiences literally as he was driving from client to client. Video doesn’t have to be studio quality – many laptops have web cams and recording devices, but those services can be offered centrally for those who want to put out something more polished…I think video can be a very effective knowledge sharing platform, if it’s done right and there’s the right support and change management program in place.

 


Subject to local law, communications with Accenture and its affiliates including telephone calls and emails (including content), may be monitored by our systems for the purposes of security and the assessment of internal compliance with Accenture policy.
______________________________________________________________________________________

www.accenture.com


Nicky Hayward-Wright
 

Dean
I haven't used video for lessons learned, however have done one trial for capture of internal learn sessions. The one videoed was on use of Agile.

Some of the lessons and questions I offer are similar to Karla's and some points which Matt has raised are also worth considering

  • Preparation
    • Do you need to do a storyboard or have rough structure?
      • this depends on the purpose, audience and how the video will be used in future
    • Work out positions for participants who will be videoed
    • Do a a walk through with participants
      • be prepared that it's not going to go to plan even with walk through
    • Have appropriate lighting
    • Have good sound - if audience are participating you need a roving mike
    • Watch for background noise (air conditioning, people talking)
    • keep first two rows of seating clear or don't have seating within range of wide angle pan.
  • Other considerations
    • Do you want to just capture the event as is, or will the video need to be edited to provide a polished finish (which goes to what's the purpose and who's the audience)
    • Be aware of file size (one video may have multiple files)
    • What format will you be shooting in and does this need to be converted (do you have software?)
    • Do you have people who can edit (if this is your intention) - do they have the time?
    • How are you going to catalogue?
    • Do you need to provide a written version ?
    • Where are you going to store (consider file(s) size)?
    • How are you going to let people know that it's available?


Regards Nicky

Nicky Hayward-Wright
Advisor, Knowledge Management
GS1 Australia




Nancy Dixon
 

I find  short videos can be of great value,  but not as individual videos in a  repository. If the accumulated lessons about a topic from across many projects is synthesized into  actionable guidelines, then short videos can be used to illustrate that guidance and personalize it by interviewing  people who the reader can contact for greater information. 
Nancy M. Dixon
Common Knowledge Associates
 512 912 6100

now blogging at www.nancydixonblog.com